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Leeds Catholic Post History

Newspaper for the Diocese of Leeds

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Feb 2013 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

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Feb 2013 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

CATHOLIC POST THE NEWSPAPER FOR THE DIOCESE OF LEEDS FEBRUARY 2013 www.dioceseofleeds.org.uk awww.catholicpost.org.uk FREE T his year`s Week of Prayer for Christian Unity got off to an international start at Leeds Minster. More than forty representatives of Christians from all corners of the world gathered to represent the diversity of the worldwide Christian community and to pray for the spread of Christ`s church and the unity of all Christians. Mgr. Michael McQuinn represented the local Catholic community and other members of the West Yorkshire Ecumenical Council (WYEC) also attended. Pastors of many Pentecostal churches were present and leaders of the Chinese Christian communities. The very large tapestry made up of the flags of the world, which is becoming a regular feature of ecumenical events, was spread across the steps of the Minster church and the prayer was followed by a fellowship meal. International start to Christian Unity Week Please join us to celebrate the launch of our 150th Anniversary Year PUBLIC MEETING &, LAUNCH OF 150TH ANNIVERSARY HISTORY BOOK 1863 –, 2013 Tuesday, 26th February 2013 at 2 p.m. at Little Sisters of the Poor Mount St. Joseph’,s, Shire Oak Road, Headingley, Leeds LS6 2DE RSVP: 11 North Grange Road, Headingley, Leeds LS6 2BR Tel: 0113 –, 3885400 Sunday 30th June

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Feb 2013 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 2 Leeds Catholic Post “,What happened tonight is just the beginning”, said the BBCʼ,s Nick Robinson, reporting on the gay marriage vote which produced the topsy-turvey situation where the opposition helped to carry the Prime Ministerʼ,s legislation after it had been rejected by his own party, by 136 conservative votes to 126. Mr Cameron did not attend. This means different things to different people.... Christians wonder what will happen next, in a state which has now dismantled the age-old components of marriage ... man, woman, children. Who now may marry whom? What other institutions will be brought up to date in Mr Cameron s new Britain? The problem is that we again may not know before we next vote ourselves, because this piece of legislation made no appearance in any manifesto. Could it be just the beginning of a culture of discrimination- not against the churches as such, but those who subscribe to their beliefs, but then as public employees may be obliged to teach or work against their consciences.”,Locks”, or no “,locks”,, you cannot legislate in isolation. Just the beginning …, as Nick Robinson really meant…,. of turmoil for Mr Cameron who has alienated many members of his Conservative party with his liberal legislation. The passion of opponents in his own party was clear to see and hear. On a more positive note, this may be just the beginning of the way that various Christians from different groupings in and out of the Commons were prepared to speak against the fundamental changes to our society outlined in this legislation. Christians urgently need to speak with one voice- not to restrict the freedom of others, but to protect our own. Finally, that Commons vote was a significant step, but still just the beginning: this Bill has still some way to go before it is law. The Post Says FROM JUST £,299 R.G.R. MEMORIALS COLOUR CATALOGUE QUALITY MEMORIALS AT AFFORDABLE PRICES IN GRANITE, MARBLE &, STONE ALL PRICES INCLUDE DELIVERY &, FIXING Ogee top memorial 2’,6”, high Fully polished Black Granite, Delivered and Fixed for £,399 inc VAT FREE Tel: 0113 282 3888 43 High Ridge Park, Rothwell, Leeds LS26 0NL ADVENT at Notre A s always at Notre Dame, Advent was celebrated in style with a number of events and activities both religious and secular organised by Chaplain Andrew Sullivan. On December 12th the annual Pensioners party took place with the usual good cheer. 53 guests enjoyed a lavish buffet and were entertained with a variety of musical treats from the College Jazz quartet and Alan Stoneʼ,s rock school musicians, as well as receiving a visit from Santa Claus. On Dec 19th there was a service in the college chapel led by Father John McCauley where staff had an opportunity to reflect on the challenges and successes of the term and of course join in with some familiar carols. The term finished with four advent services where students re-enacted the age old nativity story. Music was provided by a band led by Alan Stone, and there was some excellent haunting singing from Nicola Sharpe and Abi Scire. Father McCauley took two of the services and guests Father Eamon McGough and Sister Catherine the other two. During Advent, students were asked to collect donations and gifts for various local charities including, St Nicholas, Gipton, the Woman`s Aid hostel, St Anne`s homeless shelter, and Catholic Care homes. As always students responded generously with a tremendous array of colourfully wrapped parcels which were offered up during the services. Term ended on Dec 21st with many good wishes for a well-earned happy and peaceful Christmas. Live Crib S ixth form students from St John Fisher Catholic High School continued their strong tradition of performing a Live Crib, outside the Longcauseway Church (United Reform and Methodist), in Dewsbury. Taking the lead role of baby Jesus was Beth Buckley who performed wonderfully throughout her starring role sleeping soundly. Watching over the tot was Charlotte Pitts who played Mary and Billy Colleran, as Joseph. Accompanied by the School Choir and members of the School Orchestra the Live Crib was a celebration telling of the birth of Jesus along with prayers and carols. Theatre Production a resounding success N otre Dame’,s Theatre studies department triumphed once again with their recent production of Arthur Miller’,s ‘,The Crucible’,. Set in Salem in the 17th Century, the play recounts the events surrounding the Salem Witch Trials, a time when paranoia, hysteria, and deceit gripped the Puritan towns of New England The central role of John Proctor was played by Adam Leonard with tremendous conviction, and Ruby Trudgeon gave Johnʼ,s wife Elizabeth a cool and virtuous quality that contrasted dramatically with the spine chilling malevolence Hannah MahWhinney brought to the role of Abigail Williams. Hannah was ably backed by her chorus of girls, Sheree Webster, Sarah Moriarty, Megan Hardcastle, Rowan Howard, Charlotte Ford and chorus leaders Emily Driscoll Jess Fox and Georgina Noble. The amazing four part singing which punctuated the show was based on the Sacred Harp tradition and was arranged and conducted by Tom Greig who also played Rev Parish. The production was directed by the Drama department staff, ably assisted by student Conal Bronowski. Stage management was in the capable hands of Abi Makin, Lizzie Gunby designed the atmospheric lighting and Susie Newton was responsible for the sound design which underscored many of the more dramatic and movement based sections of the play. The detailed period costumes were designed and co-ordinated by Jess Wood The production was at capacity for each of the three nights and was attended not only by staff, parents and students from Notre Dame but also a number of High schools including Bradford Grammar, Leeds Grammar and Prince Henryʼ,s Otley. College principal Terry Coen commented “,The production was a tremendous success and a credit to the energy and commitment of all who took part.”, Leeds Cathedral Church of St Anne Celebrates Feast of Divine Mercy Date: 2nd Sunday of Easter, 7th April 2013 Venue: Great George Street Leeds LS2 8BE Time: 1:30 Adoration 2:00 pm Prayers, &, Readings 3:05pm Mass &, D.M.I Veneration 4:30pm Tea in the Cathedral Hall There will no Confession on DM Sunday as confessions 7 days before and 7 days after meet the requirement!! ALL ARE INVITED!

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Feb 2013 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

T he Pastoral Constitution, The Church in the Modern World (De Ecclesia in Mundo Hujus Temporis, but better know by its opening words, ‘,Gaudium et Spes…,’, (‘,The joys and the hopes…,’,)) was approved overwhelmingly by the fathers of Vatican II and Paul IV who added his signature. The council endorsed a document unprecedented in conciliar history and quite radical in its pastoral tone and outlook. From the opening sections of the Preface the pastoral tone is clear. The document asks us to bring all of our hopes, anxieties, joys and griefs to Christ (Preface, chapter 1), and to welcome the ʻ,news of salvation which is meant for every man.ʼ, (Preface, chapter 1) This constituted a major turn around in the Churchʼ,s conception of who is saved and who is not. The document addresses ʻ,the whole of humanityʼ, (Preface 1), not simply those who profess a faith in Christ. Immediately, we are made aware of the renewed sense in which the Council Fathers wished to proclaim the good news. It wishes to speak to all in the name of truth of justice. This means that the Catholic Church must seek to do the same in the world of today with its changed and, perhaps, more challenging circumstances. It must speak to, and engage with, all personʼ,s of goodwill. This notion is grounded in the fact that the dignity of the human person is a central motif in the Catholic faith. We believe that we are the children of God and, as such, each and every person deserves respect and consideration. As the Council puts it, ʻ,the human person deserves to be preservedʼ, and, furthermore, given that we live our lives in society, ʻ,society deserves to be renewedʼ,. (Preface, 1) With this in mind the document progresses to scrutinize the ʻ,signs of the timesʼ, and to bring the Church up to date with the challenges presented particularly by modern technology. ʻ,Technologyʼ,, the Council states, ʻ,is now transforming the face of the earth, and is already trying to master outer space.ʼ, (Preface 5). But the document does not wish merely to illustrate how we might become slaves to technology. Rather, it gives a positive appraisal of technological advances, along with the scope of the human sciences to tell us something about the nature of who we are today. The risk, however, of placing all of our hopes and desires in the possibilities of the sciences and technology to give us the answers to our human needs is that we might call into question certain values (preface 7). Advances in technology mean that we often want a part in life too quickly. We want to make our mark on society and to achieve at all costs. This places pressure on institutions and educators to deal with the impatience of a generation that is accustomed to having answers and solutions at their fingertips. The impact on religion is also clear here: ʻ,the abandonment [of God is] no longer unusualʼ,. But this is not to say that faith is dwindling in every sphere of life. Some are continuing to deepen their faith life and seeking a more intimate relationship with God, but, at the same time, others are confusing faith with a magical view of the world. The Council document clearly shows an awareness of the ʻ,signs of timesʼ, here, and this point in particular is one that we should reflect upon more deeply in the current climate. We need to ask ourselves, ʻ,who do we think God is for us?ʼ, ʻ,A magical Deity who performs miracles as quickly as technology?ʼ, ʻ,Or a God who gives us hope in times of despair, grief and loneliness, as we search for answers to our deepest longings?ʼ, We ought not to confuse the speed at which the contemporary world moves with the action of God. Things happen in Godʼ,s time, not ours. So, perhaps, we might say that a spirit of humility and patience is needed in todayʼ,s world so that we can approach, particularly difficult moral questions, with care and wisdom, rather than be rushed or bullied into making quick decisions that might have detrimental effects upon ourselves or those around us. But consideration of the changes in contemporary society that impact on our faith life ought not to make us so fearful as to worry that God might abandon us in our hour of need. For the Council stipulates that ʻ,beneath all changes there are many realities which do not change and which have their ultimate foundation in Christ, who is the same yesterday and today, yes and forever.ʼ, (Preface 10) With this in mind the Church feels that it can move confidently towards identifying the most pressing needs of todayʼ,s society and find solutions to outstanding problems with confidence. After giving an account of the centrality of human dignity, the Council makes an important point about the achievements of man through intelligence, through science, through the arts, through literature, etc. However, a striking note is also made in section 14 of Chapter one. We are told that we must listen and remain attentive to the voices of wisdom in the world: for ʻ,many nations, poorer in economic goods, are quite rich in wisdom and can offer noteworthy advantages to othersʼ, (Chapter 1, 15) The latter point is often forgotten in our contemporary world where our default position is to maintain that the most advanced societies, be that financially or technologically, are the wisest. The Council is keen to emphasise that the wisdom that might be sought from poorer nations can and might be the key to questions that we are asking in more affluent parts of the globe. Once again, although the document does not state this explicitly, we are invited to exercise humility as we seek the wisdom and teachings that we need to enhance our human dignity and live good moral lives. All of the above points which relate to morality and the search for truth and wisdom in the world culminate in what is perhaps one of the most cited paragraphs of this document: paragraph 16. Here we are told that we have a conscience. The tone is far from legalistic. It is refreshing and new. The Council seems to have moved away from the legalistic and sin- focussed approach of the manuals of moral theology and is here embracing a personalist approach to finding the truth. We are told that ʻ,in the depths of his conscience, man detects a law which he does not impose upon himself, but which holds him to obedience. Always summoning his to love good and avoid evil, the voice of conscience when necessary speaks to his heartʼ,. The emphasis on the interior voice speaking to a person as they discern the truth is perhaps the greatest achievement of this document. Although, in subsequent encyclicals, conscience is addressed again by the Holy See, in Gaudium et Spes the change in focus and methodology seems clear. The Council sought to make the search for truth one that is carried out in freedom without the demands of external pressure or the fear of punishment from an authority. Hence the text states: ʻ,manʼ,s dignity demands that he act according to a knowing and free choice that is personally motivated and prompted from within, not under blind internal impulse nor by mere external pressure.ʼ, (Chapter 1, 17) A further advantage that emerges from this treatment of moral conscience is that it unites us to all ʻ,men of goodwillʼ,. This means that the Church realises that the whole of humanity is united in the search for truth and understanding. The implication here is that Catholics should show a keen awareness of moral issues in every sphere of life and that they should seek to address them in dialogue with others, not simply amongst themselves in enclosed, safe environments. The Council challenges Catholics to engage with others in the search for goodness and truth. This is an important and challenging teaching indeed. In this Year of Faith, perhaps we should seek to concretise this teaching more fully in our parishes and in our communities. The moral themes continue in chapter II ʻ,The Community of Mankindʼ, as we are advised to ʻ,make ourselves neighbour of every person without exception …,actively helping him when he comes across our path, whether he be an old person abandoned by all, a foreign labourer unjustly looked down upon, a refugee...ʼ, (Chapter II, 27) The sentiments expressed here serve to develop the notion of dialogue with humanity in the search for what is fitting to all personʼ,s of goodwill. But there is a development here, too: the Council stipulates that we ought to be neighbour even to those who disagree. In a world that is marked by disagreement and debate, this is an important teaching. ʻ,Respect and love ought to be extended also to those who think or act differently than we do in social, political or even religious matters.ʼ, (Chapter II, 28) This is particularly fitting in our current climate where oftentimes we tend to isolate ourselves from those who disagree with us, or we remain silent in the discussion. But the Council tells us that ʻ,the more deeply we come to understand their ways of thinking through …, courtesy and love, the more easily will we be able to enter into dialogue with them. In addition, it is important that we remember that even when a person sins or is in error in their judgement, they never lose the dignity owed to them by virtue of their humanity. In the chapter on marriage, again, similarly to the pastoral tone found in earlier sections, the methodological shift seems apparent once more . The contractual language has changed into one that emphasises the loving covenant between the spouses rather than merely stressing the ends of marriage. The section of culture shows us that the Church is involved in the world in a deep and meaningful way and that it does not shy away from questions of culture. As Enda McDonagh puts it, ʻ,[i]t is in and through culture that divine as well as human creativity is revealed. To discern Godʼ,s activity in the world, to read the divine signs of the times, the Church must be in dialogue with and so understand the language of particular cultures.ʼ, This also applies to our reading of the biblical texts. Furthermore, the Church must seek to translates its message and liturgy to different and diverse cultures. This requires imagination and openness to what cultures demand and expect. It does not mean losing the central message, rather, it means opening it up to new and every more fulfilling manifestations. The challenge here will involve dialogue, patience and listening to the ʻ,signs of the timesʼ, of particular cultures so that the liturgy can take creative expressions and bring new people and cultures into the life of the Church. The final sections on economics and politics and peace and war are much shorter than previous sections but contain important messages similar to those contained in Pacem in Terris. An important message is conveyed regarding the need to place humans at the centre of our deliberations on politics rather than making them slaves to the political and economic systems which we construct. The sections on peace do not treat the question of the possession of arms in the case of deterrent but these are given a fuller treatment in subsequent documents issued by the Holy See. Overall, the account of the human person presented at Vatican II is a positive one. It is a pastoral account of human affairs and the issues that touch our deepest core and existence. Nevertheless, some ecologists have in subsequent years remarked that the emphasis on the human digresses from ecological concerns about the non-human world. Others have said that the issue of gender needs a fuller treatment here and that perhaps the sections on development need to be more focussed upon the Third World countries than upon First World concerns. In response, however, we might say that the issues of development are treated extensively in Paul VIʼ,s Populorum Progressio and John Paul IIʼ,s Sollicitudo Rei Socialis, although it is perhaps fair to say that we await an extensive treatment of gender with our Church. All is all, it can be said that, in spite of any deficiencies within the document, the Catholic Church has given us much to think about in a world where issues of social justice face us each and every day. We are given authoritative guidance on who we should be and how we should discern and dialogue as we search to overcome our anxieties and grief in an ever more complex and changing world. In short, the impact of Gadium et Spes remains decisive. Leeds Catholic Post Page 3 Revisiting Gaudium et Spes: A Moral Reflection by Dr Ann Marie Mealey, Leeds Trinity University Vatican II Fifty Years On This October it will be 50 years since the opening of Vatican II –, over the months from now until the end of the Year there will be an article reflecting on the Council. These articles are not offered as deep reflections on the Council or the Documents from it, rather they are written from the point of view of those who experienced the Council in its time –, some are from people who were there, some are about people who were there –, some are by people who were the first to try and put into action the documents as they came out. They are all from a personal point of view and try to capture at least a little of that ‘,freshness of the Spirit’, as it blew through a church thrust into a modern World trying to find a Rock to hold fast to.

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Feb 2013 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 4 Leeds Catholic Post By Breda Theakston A s the celebrations for marriage that took place during National Marriage Week (7th –, 14th February) come to an end, it’,s time to think of the future. What of couples who may themselves be wondering if marriage is for them and are probably feeling a little daunted by the prospect? Most young people long for the permanent loving relationship that is marriage but the disincentives to marry, from the financial cost of the wedding to fears of what the future might hold, including disharmony and divorce, are legion. I will look at just one or two key issues and suggest that good preparation can save the day in more ways than one. COST: Despite what people say, and all the commercial hype that surrounds the wedding industry, it does not cost a lot to get married. You do not need a white dress, a horse drawn carriage, top hats, or a lavish party. All of that is entirely optional paraphernalia that we are seduced into thinking necessary. Anyone looking at weddings photos from the 40s and 50s will see whatʼ,s possible on very little. What you do need to get married is to be free, competent, and willing to marry your chosen partner (and vice versa). Next step is to contact your parish priest. He will guide you from there. To celebrate the day, do something different. With a little creativity, imagination, and help from your family and friends, a minimal budget wedding will be a very personal day to remember: Make your own outfit, invite everyone to witness your vows and anyone who wants to, to join you afterwards at a local restaurant or hotel where they can buy their own meals. Anyone who really cares about you will be fine with this. On this day of all days what matters is you two. Everyone else comes and goes from a wedding. You two are changing your lives by it. FAMILIES: Whatʼ,s the protocol for seating my mumʼ,s boyfriend and my dadʼ,s wife? What form can the celebration take when I am Catholic and he is Muslim or vice versa? (ʻ,When Two Faiths Meet and Marryʼ, download at www.flm.org.uk). A wedding day highlights all possible problems that can face any family gathering. Usually though families are actually willing to leave aside enmities for the day to focus on you. On the positive side weddings can provide an interlude, a fresh perspective, a fresh start for the couple but also, God willing, quiet healing in the wider family web. And what of marriage? Marriage is what a husband and wife live all the days of their lives after the wedding day. It is a sacramental life, a voyage of discovery, undertaken together, whatever the weather. Like a never ending sea voyage marriage is a journey through life and has the potential to be as enriching and thrilling as it can be dangerous and depressing. So, what helps us to survive this voyage into the unknown? Faith, and reason. First of all you believe in it. Then, like all journeys, it helps to be prepared. Knowing how to prevent the sails tearing, and being able to mend them when they do, working together to bail the boat out, keeping radio and satellite contact with the other boats out there and recognising when you need to call the rescue services are all skills that can be learned. In a marriage this translates to knowing how to prevent unnecessary conflict and manage necessary conflict, how to be reconciled after conflict, how to trust each other and work together for the same ends, and how to communicate effectively with each other and with extended family, friends, church as well as being able to get help for your relationship when you get out of your depth. Given that the journey may be very long indeed, it is worth spending as much time preparing yourselves for the sometimes choppy waters of marriage. Taking time out to honestly (and prayerfully) focus on yourselves and whatʼ,s really important to you will help you deal with the most difficult issues of the wedding day, and your lives together. Marriage preparation is a whole church responsibility which begins in our families where the most enduring formation for our lives is experienced. It continues, supported in our Catholic schools and parishes, as we grow and learn about the world around us and our place in that world. By the time we come to marry, our upbringing is past but the influence, for good and for ill, lingers. A good marriage preparation course helps us to become more aware of this and how it affects our attitudes and behaviours in our relationship. If we do not become more aware we can find ourselves jumping to conclusions, misinterpreting signals and resenting one another without due cause. So, once you have got over the excitement and the fear of coming to ʻ,yes!ʼ, and are actually committed to planning the day that will mark the start of your marriage, look for focussed marriage preparation course that provides time to go beyond the good feelings and to reach deeper into inner dreams, desires and values. Good marriage preparation works on every level from the sacramental nature of marriage, to how to cope when things go awry. Always remember your marriage will be like no other marriage. All marriages have things in common but no two are ever the same. They cannot be because each person in a marriage is utterly unique. There are guidebooks and advice columns by the boatload but the boat will only reach the shore by you two believing it is possible and learning the basic skills you will need to sail it before you set off. Learning navigation and sail mending skills will seem time very well spent when you hit the doldrums or the perfect storm. What’,s available for engaged couples? MARRIAGE PREPARATION COURSES for engaged couples are provided in parishes and deaneries where there are trained marriage preparation presenters. Your priest is always the first point of contact for this. To find out about the Diocesan Marriage Preparation Programme go to www.flm.org.uk Most recent feedback: “,It was incredible the conversations that it brought up. Really brilliant exercises…,we thought we knew each other... there is so much we mis-read or mis- understand. I think every couple should do this every few years or so just to bring you back to the same page. And thatʼ,s coming from a couple who have been very happy for 9 years!!! I canʼ,t thank you enough for opening our eyes to all that we are discovering (all in a good way by the way!!)”, [TO BECOME A MARRIAGE PREPARATION PRESENTER for your parish or deanery talk to your parish priest and contact me. Four training evenings every November are provided for new Marriage Preparation Presenters. ʻ,In houseʼ, training for a parish or deanery team may also be arranged. Call 0113 261 8050] If your parish does not offer a marriage preparation course or you cannot attend it, ENGAGED ENCOUNTER Weekends are a great alternative offering an opportunity for couples to spend time away from the fuss and the fray to discover more about themselves, each other and what they value and hope for in their marriage wwme.org.uk/weekends MARRIAGE CARE runs marriage preparation courses for engaged couples, as well as counselling for individuals and couples. For Leeds and Middlesbrough Diocese contact Harold Mozley haroldmozley@btinternet.com and the new website is at www.marriagecare.org.uk What’,s available for married people? MARRIAGE ENCOUNTER WEEKENDS are a great way to find spiritual renewal and deepening intimacy in your marriage. Thanks to Phil and Rita Jackson and Fr Andy Burns for the latest information (see box). COUPLE ALIVE is an enrichment course for couples and can be taken at any point in a relationship from a few months to many years of marriage. YOUR PARISH Ceilidh evening at St Josephʼ,s Wetherby, Thanks to Ana and all the team at St Josephʼ,s for organising the Ceilidh evening there on 8th February as part of Marriage Week Celebrations. Contact FLM for more on marriage preparation and enrichment, parenting, bereavement, workshops, trainings and more www.flm.org.uk 0113 261 8050 CELEBRATING MARRIAGE A WEEKEND OF DISCOVERY- A LIFETIME OF LOVE Is your marriage important to you and your family? Would you like more joy and romance, more fun &, laughter, to be happier and closer as a couple, a lifelong adventure together? A Marriage Encounter Weekend enables deep communication between couples, no matter the length of marriage and teaches a way of enriching their couple life, it is a unique way for you to revitalise your marriage away from the distractions, tensions, and routine of everyday life. Marriage Encounter Weekends are also open to Priests and religious who want to renew the relationship they have with their people. The vision of Marriage Encounter is to help couples discover ever more deeply the meaning of their love for each other and their commitment to each other. It`s a way to help us to focus on God`s plan for our marriage, especially when we are being bombarded with different values and ideas from the world around us in which we live. Married love is a privileged sharing in God`s love –, not just for the sake of the couple, but for the Church and the world. Today there is a tendency to devalue marriage to a merely human relationship subject to the ups and downs of daily l ife. Our deepest desire as married men and women is to live united in loving affection and mutual respect, and although we all start off with great hopes and ideals, for many of us the routine of daily life and our weakness as individuals, soon exacts a toll on our relationship. Little things begin to niggle and before we know it, our lives are travelling on parallel, if not diverging, lines when we want to move together in the same direction. A Marriage Encounter Weekend provides us with an opportunity to recognise how our romantic ideals can turn into disillusionment, but then we are shown how, by making a decision to love, we can rediscover and deepen the joy of our loving relationships. To find out more about how Marriage Encounter can help enrich your married relationship please go to our Website: www.wwme.org.uk, where you can find testimonies of couples who have discovered new joy and satisfaction after the experience of a Marriage Encounter Weekend (or try: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C3SSBjfa1c4.) Details of future weekends and how to book can also be found there. Or phone 01538 385801. Phil and Rita Jackson an

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Feb 2013 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

What if you had joined the church in the heady days of the 70’,s and now think you feel a return to a Catholicism that you had never signed up to? T here are even those who still would return to the prescriptive repetitions of the Penny Catechism whose tone is foreign to many of todayʼ,s Catholics. You can, by the way, still find this publication on the internet: it reads now like a book of lists, and ends with that rather chilly injunction: 370. After your night prayers what should you do? After my night prayers I should observe due modesty in going to bed, occupy myself with the thoughts of death, and endeavour to compose myself to rest at the foot of the Cross, and give my last thoughts to my crucified Saviour. So much for your detective yarn…, but seriously, try this…, 367. When God sends you any cross, or sickness, or pain, what should you say? When God sends me any cross, or sickness, or pain, I should say, `Lord, your will be done, I take this for my sins`. So God sends sickness and pain…,.? A notion worthy of debate. Things have changed, indeed: Is there any reference in those 370 questions to a loving God who so loved the world that he gave his only Son? Anyway, we are not here to enter into an argument about the merits of the Penny Catechism, but to say that we must rather remain true, in this year of faith, to the second Vatican Council and its directions. Is it not better for us- and for those who have joined the church in more recent years to consider instead the Directory for Catechesis prescribed by the Council and published in 1997: or is this another of our best kept secrets? It presents a picture of those who have experienced through good recent catechesis: -a new and vital experience of God as merciful Father, - a more profound rediscovery of Jesus Christ, not only in his divinity but also in his humanity, - a sense of co-responsibility on the part of all for the mission of the Church in the world, - and a raising of consciousness with regard to the social obligations of the faith. Is this the better shape and form preaching and teaching should take in this century? We must beware of looking back too far, of ignoring the teaching and truths in documents such as this in favour of the rigid rules of childhood: otherwise, we risk alienating those who have found the way. Benchmark Sidelines The year seems t pre-used already, with Lent looming and my supermarket already tempting me with Creme Eggs...and this month, I bring news as well as comment, and I a Useful Fact that I just discovered –, my wife said `Oh, I knew that`, but then she is wiser than I am! First, news: there will be a West Yorkshire Network of Pastoral Musicians repertoire sharing afternoon on Sunday 7th April at the Newman Centre, (St. Theresa`s), Cross Gates, Leeds LS15 7JT from 2 until 4pm. The topic is `Psalms`. By an astounding coincidence, the rest of this month`s `Notes` is…,.. about Psalms! I often have twinges of guilt about psalms at Mass, when, even though other music is played, they are not sung. The full music editions of two popular hymnbooks, `Laudate` and `Celebration Hymnal for Everyone` have an “,official”, section with a `How important is it to sing?` rating from 1, very important, to 5: (for traditionalists, that`s I to V) - for the on line version see below. What is rated 1? The Gospel Acclamation, Sanctus, Memorial Acclamation and the Great Amen. 2`s are the Opening Procession, Gloria, Psalm, and Communion Processional [&,/or Thanksgiving] hymns. But life is hectic, the psalm is different every time –, so the singers drops the psalm, and the readers take it on. I had forgotten that the Second Vatican Council had `reintroduced the singing or recitation of a more substantial section of a Psalm …, after the first Reading from Scripture` (1). I have also been reading an informative article `Singing Psalms in the New Millennium` by Lourdes Montgomery (2) Here I learned the Useful Fact: `There are also ",common", psalms for each season in the church year which have been chosen for optional use in place of the text in the Lectionary.` So we don`t have to learn a new psalm every week!! `A congregation could initially learn to sing a small number of psalms as they begin to build their psalm repertoryʼ,, `Common psalms for Lent include two of the penitential psalms, Psalms 51 (",Have mercy on me, God",) and 130 (",Out of the depths I call to you",)` . `Yesbutnobut`, you may object, `the congregation won`t know what`s going on if it`s different from their missals!!` You have to tell them what is going on, especially if you want them to join in, and how many of the congregation manage to look at a missal, as they juggle with a hymn book and our new words? Tim Devereux tim.devereux@ssg.org.uk West Yorkshire Network of Pastoral Musicians: http://www.westyorkshirechurchmusic.org.uk/ National Network of Pastoral Musicians: http://nnpm.org/ Society of Saint Gregory: http://www.ssg.org.uk/ What parts of the Mass should be sung? http://www.liturgyoffice.org.uk/Resources/Music/Singing.shtml (1) Psalms: Yes, Wikipedia! http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Psalms (2) www.npm.org/Articles/SingingPsalms.pdf Musical Notes by Tim Devereux St Stephens’, Students in Orbit about Science! A group of talented students from St Stephens attended Holy Family School, Keighley for a day of science focussed on the wonders of the solar system. The students performed a variety of experiments designed to investigate features of the different planets in our solar system and to answer questions such as “,What is required to get a rocket to the moon?”, and “,Why is water so important for our planet”,. Students will take this knowledge back to their school and return to Holy Family School to present their reports to parents later in the year. In a Far Country The Story of the Leeds Diocesan Mission to Peru 1961 to 2011 Written by Father Gerard Hanlon Price: £,12 Please note that the price merely covers the cost of printing Copies can be obtained from: Colin Huntle 01274 717992 e-mail: huntley-c@sky.com If you would like copies of his latest newsletters or more information, please contact me. I should be grateful for any publicity. Yours sincerely Colin Huntley 15 Grosvenor Road, Shipley, West Yorkshire, BD 18 4RN Leeds Catholic Post Page 5 OFFICE FOR EVANGELISATION &, CATECHESIS 2012-13 Youth Ministry Training Day - On Saturday 2nd March from 9.30 - 4.00 This is a day at Myddelton Grange for anyone who works with young people in the Church including parish catechists, youth ministry coordinators, parish volunteers, school chaplains, school ethos staff, RE staff and parish clergy. For further information or to book, please contact: The Youth Office at Myddelton Grange - info@myddeltongrange.org.uk, 01943 607887. A Starter Course for Catechists: Learning and Teaching the Catholic Faith. Diocese of Leeds training for new &, existing catechists, leaders of the Liturgy of the Word with children and anyone interested in catechesis. Led by Mrs Linda Pennington and experienced catechists at Hinsley Hall. Dates: Saturdays from 10:00am –, 4:00pm: March 9, March 23 and April 20 2013. Cost: £,65 (for 3 days) to include resources, lunch &, refreshments. Booking essential BA (Hons) Catholic Studies at Leeds Trinity University Leeds Trinity University and the three Catholic Dioceses of Hallam, Leeds and Middlesbrough are establishing a new partnership through a degree in Catholic Studies. Following validation this spring, it is intended that the programme will be launched with a summer school in 2013. The degree will be a lasting fruit of the ʻ,Year of Faithʼ, proclaimed by Pope Benedict. The new BA (Hons) Catholic Studies offers lifelong learning to adults who are contributing to the work of a diocese or Catholic organisation, or who are otherwise involved in parish life and Christian ministry. It arises from the context of supporting ministry and mission in the life of the local church and seeks to address that context by drawing on rich resources from Scripture, Tradition and Catholic teaching. Further details to follow. WHO TO CONTACT AT HINSLEY HALL There are many courses and events organised by the Office for Evangelisation and Catechesis throughout the year which help to support formation in faith and training for catechists, leaders of the liturgy of the word with children and other parish ministries. Check this page in future editions and also the website: www.dioceseofleeds.org.uk/evangelisation - see Forthcoming Events. For further information or booking for any of the above events please contact Catherine Green on 0113 261 8040 or evangelisation.admin@dioceseofleeds.org.uk

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Feb 2013 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 6 Leeds Catholic Post Two encouraging events for Deacons in the last month: first the ordination of Sean Quigley at the Cathedral in January. Congratulations! Despite the inches of snow, the Cathedral was crowded and we must be grateful to Bishop John Rawsthorne for braving the conditions from Sheffield for the occasion. Bishop Johnʼ,s relaxed and pastoral manner was just right for the day: he had taken the trouble to meet Sean and Anne in the days beforehand. Bishop Johnʼ,s homily which was the fruit of that meeting, the simple yet inspiring music (including a beautiful English “,Ubi Caritas”, composed by Anne Quigley), and those wonderful words when the Book of the Gospels is handed to the newly ordained deacon all added to the occasion: “,Receive the Gospel of Christ, whose herald you now are: believe what you read, teach what you believe and practice what you teach”, A few days later, almost all our deacons, students and their wives went to Bishopʼ,s House in the evening at the invitation of the Diocesan Administrator, Mgr John Wilson, for an informal meeting. This was a great encouragement: deacons can find themselves alone in parishes or even deaneries, and sometimes subject to the slings and arrows of outrageous misfortune (to misuse a phrase) and it helps to meet together and be affirmed in a relaxed get- together such as this. A few thoughts: From the Prayer of Consecration in the Rite of Ordination of Deacons: “,Lord, look with favour on these servants of yours whom we have now dedicated to the office of deacon, to minister at your holy altar. Lord send forth upon them the Holy Spirit, that they may be strengthened by the gift of your sevenfold grace, to carry out faithfully the work of the ministry. May they excel in every virtue: in a love that is sincere, in concern for the sick and the poor, in unassuming authority, in self- discipline and in holiness of life. May their conduct exemplify your commandments and lead your people to imitate their purity of life. May they remain strong and steadfast in Christ, giving to the world the witness of a pure conscience. May they in this life imitate your Son, who came not to be served but to serve, and one day reign with Him in heaven.”, There will be a Deaconsʼ, social evening in the Spring. Deacons Diary I t is the custom at The Holy Family School in Keighley for the lay- chaplain to prepare a short reflection and prayer for use in tutor- time each day, usually following the liturgical calendar with occasional forays away from the ordo for good cause. Following the octave for Christian Unity, which was reflected in the offering each morning, the next week meditated on the unity of believers as a whole. After the Unity Post in January it is fitting that the reflections are offered in the Februaryʼ,s interfaith page as a reminder that the community of believers is not just Christian Monday - REFLECTION Islam teaches tolerance not hatred, universal brotherhood, not enmity, peace not violence. Pervez Musharraf President of Pakistan 2001-2008 The word Islam means “,surrender”, or submission to God “,. One of the five duties of Muslims is to pray five times each day . One of the things that Muslims , Jews and Christians have in common , is that many pray several times throughout the day- even if it is just for a moment each time. People find that this helps them realise that they live in Godʼ,s presence and so their attitude is more likely to be positive and joyful and loving. PRAYER - The prayer of Mohammedʼ,s father-in law. I thank you Lord for knowing me better than I know myself better than others know me. Make me, I ask you then, better than they suppose I am, and forgive me for what they do not know. Tuesday - REFLECTION “,Intolerance lies at the core of evil. Not the intolerance that results from any threat or danger. But intolerance of another being who dares to exist. Intolerance without a cause. Rabbi Menachem Mendle Sunday is the holy day and rest day for Christians, Friday is the day for Muslims, Saturday is the holy day and rest day for Jews. The Jewish Sabbath begins the evening before and there is a prayer service in the Synagogue , the Jewish place of worship. Then the family gathers at home to pray, it is always the mother who starts the Sabbath prayer by saying a blessing over two candles. Prayers are then said by the father over bread and wine. As we are going to use the words of blessing used every Friday night, let us pray for a blessing on all we love and care for. PRAYER May the Lord bless you and keep you. May the Lord shine his face upon you. May he show you his loving kindness And bring you peace. Amen Wednesday - REFLECTION If you donʼ,t find God in the very next person you meet, it is a waste of time looking for him further. Mohandas Gandhi Gandhi was a Hindu and by nature Hinduʼ,s are a peace loving people –, left to themselves they would not hurt anyone not even an ant or insects. Gandhi knew that violence was evil so when he began to campaign for better treatment of non-white people in India, he used non-violent resistance. At the same time he also sought to show the Indian people that they needed to remove prejudices and injustices among themselves, such as considering some people to be untouchables, the lowest caste of people in India. PRAYER - God and Father of all people never let me look down on others or make anyone feel inferior. Show me how to remove any prejudices so that I may appreciate individuals more for who they are. Inspire me to live in such a way that I may discover you in the people I meet today. Amen Thursday - REFLECTION Peace in the sense of the absence of war, is of little value to someone who is dying of hunger or cold. Peace can only last where human rights are respected, where people are fed, and where individuals and nations are free. The Dalai Lama The Dalai Lama is the head monk of the Tibetan Buddhists. Buddhism is different from other religions, as they do not believe in a creator God. Each individual is seeking enlightenment and they do this by meditation. PRAYER - Lord, there can be no peace where peopleʼ,s rights are not respected. Today I will meet many people whose life may be curled up in fists of fear, aggression or frustration. Help me to bring peace as a daily gift to others by feeding their deepest hungers, defending their human rights and taking risks and speaking the truth today. May I bring peace by making peace in my world today. Amen INTERFAITH Events Monday 18th March Wakefield Interfaith Group. AGM AGM followed by talk on Sufism, 6pm in Treacy Hall, next to Wakefield Cathedral WF1 1JP Contact Cynthia 01924 863956 cynthia9@phonecoop.coop 075863 27822 Wednesday 20th March Peter Bell Memorial Lecture Muhammed Amin and David Berkley from Manchester “,Learning from Muslim- Jewish Dialogue”, 7pm at Leeds Civic Hall. Admission free, all welcome. Further details via Leeds Concord secretary@concord- leeds.org.uk Festivals 24th February: Purim (Jewish ) Purim commemorates the time when the Jewish people were saved from extermination by the courage of a young woman called Esther. The Purim story features a villain called Haman, and everyone in the synagogue boos, hisses and stamps their feet whenever the name of Haman is mentioned during the service. March 3rd: Hina-matsuri - Festival of Dolls (Shinto ) This festival celebrates daughters in the family Shinto is in the Japanese tradition, marked by devotion to invisible spiritual beings and powers called kami, to shrines, and to various rituals. Kami are not deities and Shinto does not attempt to explain our world. The rituals enable human beings to communicate with kami which are spirits that are concerned with human beings - they appreciate our interest, they want us to be happy and if they will intervene in this world. March 21st: Naw-Ruz –, New Year (Bahai ) Naw-Rú,z is the first day of Baha, the first month in the Bahá,`í, calendar. The festival is usually observed with meetings for prayer and celebration, often including a feast as the day marks the completion of a 19-day fast. Time is spent visiting friends and relatives and exchanging gifts. Naw-Rú,z is one of the nine Bahá,`í, holy days on which work is suspended What we did…, from Holy Family School, Keighley Islamic scholars propagate Peace at Aalami Tablighi Itjemah F r Anbu, the secretary of ISA and Fr Victor Edwin SJ of St Xavier`s School, Delhi visited the Aalami Tablighi Itjemah (International Islamic gathering) in Bhopal. The following is narrative from Fr Victor aboit the gathering together with a short reflection. The 65th Aalami Tablighi Itjemah brought together Muslims in large number from different parts of Indian and the globe. I arrived in Bhopal on the day of itjemah. Fr Anbu was there in the station to get me home. Anbu is the rector of the SVD seminary ʻ,Vidya Bhawanʼ,. He teaches Islam and Christian-Muslim relations in Vidya Bhawan and a number of institutes of philosophy and religion around India. From Vidya Bhawan, we drove for half an hour on the Bhopal bypass road and then branched into the road that led us to a very large ground where Muslims had gathered. Muslim boys who are volunteers regulated the traffic. They were exceptionally courteous and helpful. We did not have any difficulty in reaching the venue. It was said that on that particular day there were, even by conservative estimates, more than half a million people! It was amazing to see more than 500 thousand people gathered at one place. They were from different States of India. There were a large number of foreigners among them. They were from Indonesia and Malaysia, Bangladesh and Afghanistan, Africa and Europe. It was told that on the third day the strength of itjemah would reach somewhere around a million people. We walked around. Several large tents were erected to house men who have come for the gathering. Every tent had well marked numbers so that one does not lose his way. The places were marked for each person to sit to listen to the speeches, to pray and to sleep. Food zones were established to provide meals at a nominal price. There were places for washing, and they were cleaned periodically. There was order everywhere, which in itself I felt was amazing. A young Muslim visitor spoke to us kindly and informed us that photographs were not allowed there for security reasons. On seeing us inside the main tent where the religious leaders addressed the itjemah, a volunteer came to us and inquired about us. On saying that we are Catholic priests and friends of Muslims and just wanted to come and see and meet some people, he was happy to welcome us. He was very happy to explain to us the dynamics of the meeting. He told us `itjemah ka matlab ... ummath ko ikate laana aur us mein josh lana`. In much detail he explained to us the ʻ,what and howʼ, of the itjemah and walked with us and took us to a coffee shop and gave us coffee. He told us that these Muslims make efforts to live their call to be Muslims in a committed way. They want to help one another to live the Muslim way of life with much dedication. We returned to Vidya Bhawan after a few hours of stay at itjemah. A few things stuck me very much . . . Itjemah condemned violence of any sort. The Islamic scholars emphasized the need to lead a peaceful life. Maulana Saad, who was one of the organizers of the gathering, said that the human person should show mercy to one another. He said that violence in any form is condemnable. No one should harm anyone as it is against Islamic norms. Another scholar, Maulana Zubair, said that Islam teaches that one must maintain good relations with neighbors and live in peace with all and everyone. They also highlighted the role that Muslims have to play in building up the nation by working for peace and justice. I was inspired by those Muslim brothers who take their faith so very seriously. Their leaders, in their speeches, insisted upon the importance of giving witness to the peaceful nature of Islam by living an honest and harmonious life with people of every religion and race in India. What these scholars were saying was reflected in the concluding dua. Maulana Zubair who prayed the concluding dua (prayer) along with close to a million Muslims prayed for peace among nations, peace between communities in India, and for brotherhood and sisterhood among all people in India. Not only in their communal prayer but also in their attitudes towards others their thirst for peace and friendship was expressed. The volunteerʼ,s attitude towards us is a beautiful example. He was so friendly and affectionate and took a very good care of us. Special welcome arrangements were made to welcome Muslims who are coming from different parts of the country and abroad for the itjemah. In a number of places free tea and breakfast was provided for those who are coming to participate in the itjemah. Their hospitality is something wonderful. This shows that a pluralistic culture is alive and is a feature of the India we live in. People belonging to different cultures, religions, languages, traditions and ways of life live together within their space and often interact with the others peacefully and actively. On the second day of itjemah 380 marriages were solemnized. It was said that they bear religious significance as they were performed strictly according to Islamic Law and in a very simple way without any fanfare. Something surprising was that only the bride grooms were present in the venue. Where are the brides? It was told that marriage formalities from the side of the brides are done at the time of registration which includes permission of the brides. The remaining rituals are performed at itjemah. The young volunteerʼ,s concern and hospitality to us Christians amidst half a million Muslims and their resolve to live their faith with commitment and the emphasis by their leaders on peace and justice in our Nation made me recognize that many of my prejudices continue to disappear whenever I make efforts to enter in to their world and participate in their life events.

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Feb 2013 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

T he Diocese of Leeds is very fortunate that high quality choral music is not limited to Leeds Cathedral each Sunday. In particular our Schools Singing Programme lays the foundations of vocal excellence across the Diocese, and our Youth Choirs provide wonderful music in liturgies and concerts in several centres. The Schools Singing Programme sees our team of Choral Directors working with over 2000 children a week across the Diocese, and we have recently made a number of changes to our provision in Bradford in order to widen access to our vocal expertise. Three new choirs have been launched as part of Bradford Catholic Youth Choir –, junior boys and girls choirs in Bradford and Keighley Junior Choir, based at Holy Family School. These choirs take young singers from Year 3 upwards and provide a brilliant musical foundation in a positive and engaging atmosphere. Charlotte Kitson, a Diocesan Choral Director and conductor of the Bradford junior choirs, feels this is a great step forward in providing a sustainable future for our music: ʻ,Itʼ,s been wonderful to see the obvious excitement as our new members discover the thrill of singing in a choir.ʼ, Her colleague Lucy Appleyard has seen similar enthusiasm with her new Keighley choir –, ʻ,Weʼ,ve gone from nothing to a really positive group of young singers in a matter of weeks –, thereʼ,s so much musical potential here.ʼ, The senior choirs also have vacancies, with tours planned for the boysʼ, choir (2013) and the girlsʼ, choir (2014) as well as forthcoming broadcasts, concerts and plenty of fun itʼ,s a great time to join our acclaimed groups. You can hear the senior girlsʼ, choir sing live on BBC Radio 4ʼ,s Daily Service on March 12th, 9.45am. Each choir rehearses once a week during term time. For more information please contact the Diocesan Music Office –, 0113 244 8634 / office@dioceseofleedsmusic.org.uk or visit www.dioceseofleedsmusic.org.uk Leeds Catholic Post Page 7 NEW DIOCESAN CHOIRS FOR BRADFORD Mount Bounce along Pupils at Mount St Mary`s High School, Leeds, are learning how to lead their own learning. They are developing many life skills such as communication, organisation and confidence. These skills not only impact on their life within school but contribute towards their future aspirations. The programme supports pupils in reinforcing their own learning and allowing them the opportunity to lead their own learning within and beyond the school curriculum. This approach is been developed across the school into key areas including English and Maths. Watch out for many other events which are to come in future months. This month the year 9 Young Leaders have been very keen to raise the profile of the role that they do, they presented their own idea of a bounce-a-thon to Mr Cooper who supported the event. The Bounce-a- thon requires the 19 students to ensure that they bounce for a full 10 hours between them. Students arrived at school at 6.45am on Friday morning ready to start the challenge ahead. They have raised approximately £,500 which will buy more kit to support the look of professionalism. Well done girls - keep bouncing!. Investigation called for as pupils become marooned on desert island! P upils from St Benedict’,s Catholic Primary School in Garforth became marooned on a desert island earlier this month. Governors and parents began to panic until they realised it was nothing to worry about and only the official opening of the new school library. Plans for the new library started a year before when pupils, staff, parents and governors began discussions on creating a comfortable and inviting space to encourage the enjoyment of reading for all pupils. The PTA gave an early commitment to fund the whole project. This encouraged everyone involved to think of a WOW factor experience that would inspire all. Early discussions with pupils came up with lots of themes, including a big top circus and villains and heroes, but children finally decided on a beach theme as they felt this would be most versatile. After working on their initial designs the children, staff and members of the PTA met a number of design companies to discuss their ideas. The school chose to work with FastSigns Leeds, as this company already had many links with the school, and the children felt Andy Simpson &, Vinny Symes, from Fastsigns fully understood the project. After three stages of consultations involving FastSigns, students, parents and staff, dreams grew into reality. Parker Construction, owned by a parent, built a three dimensional shipwrecked boat projecting from the sea wall to host the ICT facilities. Mr Storey the site superintendant sourced and collected an eight foot high fake palm tree from London and the whole library now has 360̊, scenic view from the island-thanks to the FastSigns team. Pam Neal &, Janet Jones who set up the new electronic scanning system and organisation within the library were supported by Audrey Forster from St Josephʼ,s Castleford, a partnership school, who had helped to develop the library in her own school. The school also worked closely with Leeds Schools Library Service in setting up the Library. Pupils were invited to visit the Schools Library Servicesʼ, offices in Headingley to choose age appropriate books of their choice for the new library. On the day of the opening pupils worked with childrenʼ,s book author and illustrator, Lynne Chapman and were enthused by her high quality work and enthusiasm and love of books. Lynne also had lovely things to say in her blog about St Benedictʼ,s: ʻ,Last week I opened a library: I cut a ribbon and everything, just like a proper celeb! It was the sensational, new, sea-themed library. The school was a really warm and friendly place. The atmosphere felt very optimistic (a hard thing to pull off in these tricky times) and every class displayed just the right level of interest - really enthusiastic and keen to learn, but not over-excited and silly.ʼ, The full blog is available at: http://lynnechapman.blogspot.co.uk/ 2013/01/from-snow-to-beach.html Inga Lunn Literacy Leader at St Benedictʼ,s expressed her thoughts about the project: ʻ,This has been a great project for enthusing the children about reading. They have been fully involved and are really keen to get into the library and relax with a book under the palm tree. This is one of many reading developments happening this year.ʼ,

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Feb 2013 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 8 Leeds Catholic Post CATHOLIC CARE 150 YEARS R aymond was a 49 year old gentleman who resided in one of Catholic Care’,s supported living projects when he sadly died. To honour his memory his family and fellow tenants gathered to posthumously celebrate his 50th birthday. During the celebration his father presented a gift of £,500 in appreciation of the care and support Raymond had received for more than 10yrs. The people living in the supported house decided they should spend the money by remembering Raymond as he would want to be remembered and go to one of his favourite places’,, ‘,Blackpool’,. They also chose to invite with them four men who, also supported by Catholic Care, had recently moved into their own new home just a few miles away. The day was a great memorial - they shared in the company of one another, shared in Raymond`s favourite meal of fish and chips, walked the sights of Blackpool, and to finish the evening drove through the illuminations. The day was everything that was wonderful about Raymond - the generosity of family, the love of those close (family and friends) and the joy of sharing in what is special about the places close to us. Raymond`s friends remembered him in a special way and in doing this discovered once more what was special about him - friendship, sharing, caring, love and belonging. A special day, in a special place, remembering a special man GOOD SHEPHERD APPEAL IN THE SCHOOLS 2013 Lent is historically the time of year when we promote our work through the Good Shepherd collection in the schools of the diocese. This Appeal provides the opportunity for children to hear of others more disadvantaged than themselves and how they can help other children and young people who need their support, prayers and understanding. Some of you will know that we have social workers based in schools and parishes, working alongside teachers and priests, offering help and support to children and families in need. In addition to this work we also offer: Children &, Young Peopleʼ,s Services Learning Disability Services Mental Health Services Older Peopleʼ,s Services Gianna: Pregnancy and Parenting Services The Good Shepherd “,Collection”, was first introduced in 1943 when Father JJ Kelly was appointed as the first Administrator of the “,Rescue Society”, as we were known then, and that, in the absence in those days of any Local Authority funding, it was the major source of funding for one or more of the Homes. In particular Lenten Alms funding helped the Saint Mary`s Boys Home at Boston Spa in the late forties. And, in the days of Saint Vincent`s Home for Boys in Claypit Lane, Leeds (in which Bishop Cowgill took a very personal interest) the home probably survived on this annual collection during Lent in the Schools of the Diocese. As time moved on Mount Saint Mary`s Orphanage and the Homes that replaced it in the fifties were largely funded by the Holy Family Sisters from the “,pub boxes”, that they had in countless hostelries throughout the cities of Leeds and Bradford. We are looking forward this year to engaging with our children to share with them the message that in everything we do, we strive to show how the teachings of Christina love, charity and justice can shape the way we live together. This year the Good Shepherd celebration will be on Friday 10th May 2013 at 10am in St Anneʼ,s Cathedral. We look forward to seeing some of you then. Archbishop of Westminster tells Parliamentarians care reform is a fundamental test for society O n 28 November 2012 Carol Hill, Director of Catholic Care and Chrissie Moran, Service Manager for the Schools and Families Social Work Service were invited to a Parliamentary Reception at the Houses of Parliament, London. Carol Hill described the reception, which was organised by Caritas Social Action Network, as “,an invaluable opportunity to meet with various Government Ministers, MPs and Peers and to address them directly on issues we are encountering both nationally and particularly here within the Leeds Diocese.”, Archbishop Vincent Nichols gave the address at which he emphasised the urgency and importance of reforming the UKʼ,s care system. He stated “,Perhaps one of the most important areas currently under consideration here is how we care for older and disabled people: a fundamental test of any civilised society. I applaud the efforts underway from many quarters to address short comings in the care system and encourage all those involved in this urgent and vital process.”, During the event, Archbishop Nichols also emphasised the importance of a safety net to “,protect essentials such as food and shelter for those who fall on hard times,”, and he paid tribute to Catholic charities in England &, Wales for providing “,Life affirming opportunity to those on the margins of society”,. Carol Hill commented that the Archbishops words confirm Catholic Careʼ,s mission of taking the caring church into the community. Schools and Family Social Work Service at Catholic Care by Chrissie Moran Service Manager for the Schools &, Family Social Work Service T he role of the School Social Worker and School Counsellor within our Academies and Schools nationally is probably one of the most understated roles within the field and quite often goes unrecognised in the arena of education. Ironically in Scotland and Wales and on an International basis, the role of school social work /counsellor is seen as an integral part of their school and academies pastoral support! America, Australia, Canada, Sweden, and South Africa –, I could go on, are champions in recognising and harnessing the importance of this specific role within their school educational systems. Today in catholic schools within the Leeds Diocese we are in fact making excellent progress by recognising the importance of this unquestionably needed role As a career choice, ʻ,school social workʼ, is regularly perceived by those working in parts of the statutory sector as perhaps something of a ʻ,soft optionʼ, along the social work spectrum. I hasten to add that, as soft options go, school social work is, most certainly, not one of them. Engagement in the field of School Social Work demands passion, energy, good communication skills, and an abundance of enthusiasm. Each day brings with it new challenges which in turn demand ʻ,social work in actionʼ, and which Catholic Care has the competence and capacity to meet. In the mid 1980ʼ,s catholic schools in the Leeds Diocese, began to notice that extensive time was being spent taking senior teaching staff from their core roles, to become involved in complex pastoral issues. It was during that decade that it was recognised there was a need to divert those matters to a more specialised sector and service. Catholic Care then known as Catholic Welfare/Rescue Society became that requisite social work partner. In the past decade the School Service at Catholic Care has grown considerably, it has re-shaped and developed. Currently as a team of twenty two, we are commissioned by Schools and Academies to provide school social work and a counselling service in almost two thirds of catholic schools in the Leeds Diocese. The Diocese and Catholic Care are working in collaboration, are committed to investing in and providing specialist support for our children, young people, their school communities and families and most importantly working totally within the Catholic ethos. The School Service, on a daily basis, functions by providing ʻ,social work in the fast laneʼ,, and predominantly on a one to one basis. The School Social Work team at Catholic Care is dedicated, competent and focussed upon working with schools and individuals in need, and their work is most definitely on the ʻ,front lineʼ,. Too often our children and young people become casualties to the many societal and familial pressures surrounding them and which often have a profound and adverse effect on their development, often academically, frequently emotionally, or all too often, physically. All children have an expectation and a right to benefit from a positive experience when they attend their chosen catholic school/academy. In order to cope with their specific challenges in life, schools and academies should be equipped with bespoke pastoral support systems. Stability is key and absolutely paramount to development, but unfortunately given the presence of any or all of the above pressures, stability is often evasive within many home environments. School is the environment where stability can be found. It is a well documented fact that if the basic needs of a young person are not met, it may form barriers to learning, and then the chances are that those affected will fail to meet their full potential. In conclusion, with all the above in mind, when the new Catholic Multi Academy Trusts (CMATʼ,s) were first mooted, it provided the ideal opportunity for Catholic Care to offer an extended range of specialist pastoral bespoke Services to our schools. Academies have control over their own budgets and are no longer tied into the local authority provision and may commission their own Services. The newly formed Catholic Academies Specialist Pastoral Support Service (CASPSS) provides (and is currently providing to the first ʻ,CMATʼ,- now known as the Bishop Konstant Academy Trust) the services of Education Psychologists, Education Social Workers, School Counsellors, Family Therapy, and Parenting Support. The CASPSS is managed totally `in house` by Catholic Care`s highly regarded School Service and has been heralded as a model for the future. ‘,Our Resolve is to Involve’, by Sharon Forbes, Service Manager R eflecting back on the various images of Catholic Care over the years as we approach our 150th anniversary they present a picture that has focused upon professional working, meeting deadlines, balancing budgets and making sure that people are well cared for and supported. This work, initially, was very much centred round children - in Residential settin gs, the Education system and Adoption - and what could be achieved on their behalf. Our reflected images highlight that Catholic Care has not remained stagnant but has progressed not only in years but also in skill, understanding, care, achievement and ability. This progression has highlighted the focus of inclusion and has changed to incorporate adults with a learning disability, people who suffer mental ill health, older people and young mothers. The inclusion of these has not diminished the quality and standard of our professionalism and care but has enhanced our ability to strengthen. Our strengthening abilities are witnessed in one of our services for adults who have a learning disability. Within this Service provision people share responsibility within their own homes, through planning menus and activities, by being aware that they have a voice and one that is heard, by living as a community with each person being recognised in their presence and participation. What is central to this practice is that it has become an outreach within life through taking an active role within their own homes and extending that activity into their local communities, by working within various areas of employment, by giving of time in voluntary groups and by participating in clubs such as walking, etc. This has now become the policy of working within Catholic Care in how this and other service provision has been facilitated in being more proactive within development and marketing. People have chosen the activities that are most enjoyed, have made the effort to get dressed up, have shared these activities with one another through action and visiting other ʻ,homesʼ, and have allowed themselves to be photographed so that their faces could be incorporated into our present and future marketing strategies. This begins to symbolise our ongoing development and facilitates the presentation of an organisation that moves with the times through logo creating, new strategies and practices and by the smiling faces that, by choice, are who and what we are. So as we move toward our 150th anniversary we are pleased to celebrate that, in so far as labels may or may not exist, it is people who continue to be the centre of who and what we are. We celebrate the unseen faces who are cared for, those who undertake the caring, the sharers, those of action and the sense of belonging that exists within one and all. Our emphasis, in all our services, is not to do for but to do with –, ʻ,Our Resolve to Involveʼ, is witnessed in our every thought, word and action, within all our care and practice.

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Page 9

Feb 2013 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Leeds Catholic Post Page 9 New experience T he first weekend of the new year brought a new experience for the retreat staff at Myddelton Grange as we attended the National Retreat Centre Conference at Swanwick in Derbyshire. This was the first time Myddelton Grange has been represented at the conference which brings together staff from the majority of diocesan retreat centres across England. Myddelton brought easily the smallest team, with our 3 members paling in comparison to SPEC from Westminster and their army of 23. The weekend consisted of a variety of prayer times and services, workshops, some chaotic games and some useful advice on where to go next for the large amount of volunteers present. The key note speaker was Canon Luiz Ruscillo from Lancaster diocese who gave three engaging and enlightening talks about scripture, lectio divina and the importance of our roles as youth ministers. The most encouraging aspect was simply getting to meet and spend time with people doing similar work from all round the country. It is always useful to have your eyes opened from the bubble we create for ourselves and see how prominent Godʼ,s work is. This has also given us the opportunity in the future to visit other centres and hopefully bring back ideas to improve our work here. All in all it was a very joyous and successful start to 2013 and on behalf of all the staff at Myddelton Grange we hope you all have a very blessed year. Leeds Diocesan Youth Service Leeds Diocesan Youth Service Calendar 22nd –, 24th February Aglow@Leeds, Youth 2000 Retreat, Notre Dame, Leeds Thursday 28th February Closing Deadline for Applications for the Youth Service Assistant Positions, Myddelton Grange Saturday 2nd March Called To A Noble Adventure Youth Ministry Training Day, 9.30am-4pm, Myddelton Grange Sunday 10th March March for Life Birmingham , TBC, Leeds –, Birmingham Tuesday 12th March School Chaplain Meeting, TBC Thursday 14th March Interviews for the Youth Service Assistant Positions, Myddelton Grange Saturday 16th March The Faith Story, CYMFed Congress, 10.30am-3.30pm, The Sage, Gateshead Saturday 16th March Pio Day of Prayer, 1.30-5pm, St. Josephʼ,s Church, Bradford LENT (date TBC) Films of Faith, TBC, Hyde Park Picture House Wednesday 24th April REVELATION, 7-9pm, Hinsley Hall Leeds Saturday 18th May Pio Day of Prayer, 1.30-5pm, St. Josephʼ,s Church, Bradford Wednesday 22nd May REVELATION, 7-9pm, Hinsley Hall Leeds Wednesday 19th June REVELATION, 7-9pm, Hinsley Hall Leeds 4th –, 11th July Diocesan Pilgrimage to Lourdes, France 22nd-26th July WYD@Home “,Annouce”,, Leeds St. Robert’,s at Myddelton Grange H ere at Myddelton Grange we have a packed retreat programme, with two school groups every week, from Year 5 to Year 13. Each retreat is tailor-made to the requirements of the group. At the end of November we welcomed a large group of students from St. Robertʼ,s Catholic Primary School in Harrogate, with their teachers and parish youth worker, Joy. The theme was ʻ,Let your light shineʼ, with an emphasis on team work to explore the theme in a fun and interactive way. There were opportunities for prayer and reflection and to deepen faith in God. When they returned to school, the children wrote thank you letters which expressed their enjoyment of the retreat. Ethan McLaughlin wrote “,I thought that the walk was the best activity and we had an absolutely amazing hot chocolate to welcome us back. The chapel was just mind-blowing. The skull of Christopher Wharton was just brilliant - to see a part of history. The games were brilliant. The food was so tasty and the whole experience was just amazing. To combine such good fun with R.E. was just so good. I would definitely recommend it to other schools”,. The children were impressed with Fr. Anthonyʼ,s gangnam style dancing “,I didnʼ,t expect that at all”, wrote Christina. Eliza Whitely thought “,Going into the chapel at morning and at evening was very special”,. The retreat team very much enjoyed their time with St. Robertʼ,s and hope the pupils will remember the messages they learnt while on retreat. Myddelton Grange is fully booked for this year. Schools interested in booking for next year please contact 01943 607 887 or email info@myddeltongrange.org.uk MY FAITH : EMILY W hy hello there! It looks like you’,ve found your way onto the LDYS page, congratulations! I’,m Emily, I’,m 21, and I am very lucky to be in the position of retreat/youth service assistant at Myddelton Grange, which is a fantastic place to be, but it took me a while to get where I am today. I have always been Catholic, being brought up in a Catholic household and regularly attending mass with my family and various extensions of it, as a young girl church to me meant singing, playing with my little sisters in that tiny space between the pew in front and the kneeler, and getting to put on nice clothes. However, once I joined the Leeds Cathedral Girls choir aged 11 that changed, bringing into my life choral singing, vespers and plenty of big Masses. I found myself to be very good at the external portrayal of my faith, but sadly lacking in my personal conviction. It was only through two trips to Lourdes with school that I started to explore my own faith a bit more, as separate from church going, taking part in body but not spirit. At Lancaster University I found the Chaplaincy centre, a weirdly shaped building that houses even weirder (but really lovely!) people. They welcomed me in with open arms (it helped that I was willing to muck in) and I found a lifelong group of friends from all different Christian backgrounds. The community there is very ecumenical, and they showed me a deeper insight into what else was out there –, including Rob Bell, the One Year Bible (a way of reading the Bible in a year, which I am still trying to complete), and many diverse forms of worship and prayer. Having opened my eyes to all the differences, it only strengthened my Catholic faith and made it richer. Nevertheless, when I unexpectedly left in September 2011, that faith was shook to its core. It took me a long time to understand why the Lord had let me fail, and what I had done wrong, and to learn how to take responsibility rather than trying to blame everyone else. A lot of good came out of that failure, one being this wonderful job (which often feels more like play than work!) and my 2 months in Virginia, USA. I spent an incredibly difficult 2 months at Camp Baker, which is a special needs facility, working with the summer camp programme. I worked with people from as young as 6 to in their 70s, with a range of disabilities ranging from mild intellectual disabilities to non-communicative completely dependent clients. I helped to provide around the clock care, and what amounted to basic nursing, as well as a constant happy attitude and fun! The experience is one that will stay with me forever, as the privilege of being able to care for others is truly a gift. The grace of God was to be found everywhere, in the beautiful song of a girl I didnʼ,t even know could speak, sitting with a 7 year old as she was scared in the night by the thunderstorm, dancing until you couldnʼ,t stand yet being pulled out onto the dance floor again, and in the love that was shown by everyone to everyone. My faith now is slowly building in strength as I spend more time with the people who visit us here up at Myddelton, and through a more structured routine in which to explore the religion that I am a part of. I am also very lucky to get to work with one of the people who first inspired me in school –, the one and only Anna Cowell! Through our Lourdes preparations, she was the first person to show me that being a Christian didnʼ,t have to mean being boring, but could be an exciting and fulfilling way to live out your life. If you are to take one thing from my story, I would like it to be that it is always worth pushing yourself to do things that you didnʼ,t think were possible –, you never know who youʼ,ll meet or how theyʼ,ll change your life. Aglow@Leeds 22- 24 February 2013 P erhaps you wouldn’,t think that putting a group of young people in a room for 48 hours with the Blessed Sacrament would work, but surprisingly this is one of the key ingredients in the winning formula for Youth 2000 retreats. So what are the other ingredients? Well, itʼ,s a combination of providing young people with an opportunity to hear about and respond to Godʼ,s love through listening to inspiring talks, taking part in engaging workshops about how to live out faith in the modern world, peer group discussions, plus Adoration of the Blessed Sacrament, Mass, the Sacrament of Reconciliation, Eucharistic healing and amidst all this ʻ,holy stuffʼ, meeting other young Catholics and working out together how support each other in putting the ʻ,holy stuffʼ, into practice while having good fun along the way. We are really excited that Leeds Diocesan Youth Service are once again partnering with Youth 2000 to host another retreat at Notre Dame Sixth Form College, Leeds, 22nd –, 24th February 2013. The retreat is for young adults aged 16 –, 30. Aglow@Leeds is primarily a residential experience for young adults however, day participants are more than welcome. We`ve been planning for a good number of months now and we are pleased to see from the Facebook event (which can be found on the “,Leeds Diocesan Youth Service”, group) that we are expecting a wonderful crowd to be with us at Notre Dame. All parishes and schools have received publicity postcards and posters. For more information or to get a booking form, please email info@myddeltongrange.org.uk or call Anna or Su (01943 607 887 / 01943 885 478). We look forward to seeing some of you at Notre Dame …,and if you canʼ,t make it, perhaps youʼ,d like to come to the big Youth 2000 festival in Walsingham with us over the August Bank Holiday weekend! The role of a youth service assistant Here at Myddelton Grange we have started advertising for youth service assistants for next year. I have had this role for five months now and I can encourage applications as it is a great opportunity. Anyone interested in applying their faith, working with youth or working for the Church will find it very rewarding. The chance to help young people with their faith is an invaluable one and the Grange is excellent at helping you to progress in your ability to lead and to be creative. The role includes helping to deliver retreats to all ages and working for the youth service in a variety of ways. The gap year also opens up many other opportunities - I have just begun a volunteer role with CAFOD. Myddelton Grange is a wonderful place to live and work and we are very well looked after here by the rest of the team. I encourage any person who can dedicate a year to the youth of the diocese to apply. God bless and good luck to those who do so, Simon

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Page 10

Feb 2013 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 10 Leeds Catholic Post A Grand Entrance H eadteacher Peter McQuillen Strong, welcomed the Guests of Honour Mgr John Wilson Diocesan Administrator and Fr Francis McGrath chaplain, to officiate at the ceremony to open the new entrance hall, teaching rooms and offices at Holy Family Primary School in Armley Leeds. Mgr John Wilson set the tone of the celebration reminding the children to remember each time that they pass through the doors, that, ‘,They are special, God Loves them and Jesus is their friend.’, Headteacher Peter McQuillen Strong said that ",Today is very special day for us at Holy Family. After 3 years of planning, preparation and building the school finally has a warm and welcoming building that is in harmony with the atmosphere people in the school create. The school is so much more than just buildings, so it was really good to have all 226 pupils taking part in our Celebration and Dedication together with guests, governors, staff, Diocesan and Local Authority officers, Architects and Contractors",. Mgr John Wilson led a liturgy with the children and blessed the new building before the ceremonial cutting of the ribbons. The highlight was the symbolic opening of the doors for the first time by Fr McGrath who made a Grand Entrance emerging through the doors to a spontaneous raucous of cheers and clapping by the children. The children sang a song especially written for the occasion by teacher Jane Ruane, and then it was time to cross the threshold. The youngest child in school on the afternoon, Blanka was given the hounour of being the first pupil to enter through the new entrance accompanied by Mr Strong. After the school had paraded through the entrance Mgr Wilson and the other guests were given a guided tour of the new building and the rest of school by members of the school council. The children had produced some fantastic Art, ICT and Literacy work about the old main entrance and new building, which were displayed in a classroom for guests to view as they enjoyed cakes, buns and hot chocolate made by the staff and children. New Deacon For East Leeds S pecial arrangements have to be made for an Ordination when you don`t have your own Bishop and so, following a night of very heavy snow, Bishop John Rawsthorne of Hallam made the journey north to Leeds Cathedral to ordain Sean Quigley as a Deacon. Sean is a parishioner of Our Lady of Kirkstall Parish in Leeds and has worked as a Librarian at Corpus Christi High School. He started his studies for the diaconate on the diocesan programme but transferred to the programme of preparation run by the Maryvale Institute when the Diocese adopted their programme. As a result Sean has been preparing for the diaconate with men who will serve in Scottish dioceses and two of them made the journey south for the occasion. Throughout his studies, and on the ordination day itself, Sean has been supported by his wife Anne and their family, many of whom filled the front part of the Cathedral. Sean was also supported by colleagues from Corpus Christi School, his Parish Priest, Fr Pat Smythe and the Co-Ordinator of Deacons in the Diocese, Mgr Paul Fisher both of whom took a special part in the Ordination Mass. Sixteen Deacons were present to welcome Sean into the Order of Deacons and share with him the Kiss of Peace at the end of the ordination rite. Sean will now serve in the parish of Blessed John Newman in the east of Leeds, the parish which incorporates Corpus Christi school.

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Page 11

Feb 2013 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Leeds Catholic Post Page 11 St Wilfrid’,s Catholic Primary School Headteacher Peter Burdekin Deputy Headteacher For April 2013 start -permanent and full-time NOR 140 ISR L1 –, L5. St Wilfridʼ,s in Ripon is a much-loved school with a strong community and parish ethos and good relations within the Ripon Cluster. The dedicated governing body of St Wilfridʼ,s are looking to appoint a committed and practising Catholic to this post. They believe that our hard working pupils and staff deserve a professional and inspirational leadership team who lead and manage the school in the context of a community rooted in the Catholic Faith. We want to hear from you if you are: •, A practising Catholic who has a firm commitment to the ethos and values of a Catholic School, •, An outstanding classroom practitioner with proven whole school leadership skills, and •, Able to motivate, challenge and inspire staff Further details and the full application pack are available from the school by e-mail admin@riponst-wilfrids.n-yorks.sch.uk or by contacting the school at Church Lane, Ripon, North Yorkshire HG4 2ES, Telephone/Fax: 01765 603232. Closing date is 7 January 2013 and interviews will take place later in the month. St Wilfridʼ,s is committed to safeguarding and promoting the welfare of children and expects all staff and volunteers to share this commitment. The successful candidate will be subject to an enhanced CRB check. Diocese of Leeds Leeds Diocesan Justice and Peace Commission Name ___________________________________________________________________________________ Address _________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ Post Code _______________ Tel _____________________________________________________________ E-mail ___________________________________________________________________________________ I would like to book ______ places If you are booking more then one place please supply additional names below. Please return to Leeds Diocesan Justice &, Peace Commission. Hinsley Hall, 62 Headingley Lane, Leeds, LS6 2BX. For more information—,shelagh@leedsjp.org.uk 0113 261 8055 Author drops in to Cas As part of their continuing drive to further improve writing across school St. Joseph’,s Castleford invited author Alan Gibbons into school to work with the children. The children thoroughly enjoyed the assemblies led by the author and were eager to develop the writing from the writing workshops. Deputy Head teacher and Literacy Co-ordinator Mrs. Spencer was delighted with the enthusiasm and responses that the children gave after such an exciting day and purchased a set of books by the author for the school. During the ten sessions we will explore how: •, Non-violence is an act of faith in the God of Love and Justice. •, Human beings are called to love and be loved •, Reality is connection, we are called to transform all that divides human beings from themselves, from one another and from the earth •, Active non-violence is an effective way to break the spiral of retaliatory violence and to create options for a more humane world And much more…,…,. The course facilitators will be Shelagh Fawcett Trish Sandbach Chijioke John Ojukwut

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Page 12

Feb 2013 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 12 Leeds Catholic Post Building Peace in Nigeria T he Archdiocese of Jos`s work on peace-building in Northern Nigeria has reached new heights with the establishement of a Dialogue and Reconcilation Centre. Their activities aim to transform the societal ambience from aggression to amity. Jos the capital of Plateau State has experienced intensive ethno-religious violent conflict over the past two decades. Thousands of lives have been lost with extensive damage to property, high youth unemployment, an unstable business environment and dire development prospects. The dominant discourses in the conflicts refer to political exclusion on the basis of ethnicity and religion, on the Muslim side, and fears of religious and cultural domination, among Plateau Christians. Due to his determination to work for social justice, peace and equity, CAFODʼ,s long standing partner –, and friend –, the Archbishop of Jos decided to intervene by setting up the Dialogue, Reconciliation and Peace Centre (DRPC), with financial support from CAFOD. According to Archbishop Kaigama, “,You do not teach peace, but inspire peace and live peace!”, St Francis of Assisi, Bradford is part of the story The DRPC is a modern piece of architectural design with about a 300- seater capacity, one conference hall, two dialogue/ reconciliation rooms, accommodation for key staff and office space. According to the Director of DRPC, Fr. Blaise Agwom, the vision of DRPC is “,to bring people together for peace and dialogue including reconciliation”,. He further mentioned that the centre shall serve various categories of people irrespective of religious, ethnic, political, social, economic and cultural affiliations. Fr Blaise Agwom is one of three priests who were supported by CAFOD to undertake an MA in African Peace and Conflict Studies at the University of Bradford. Fr Blaise, together with Fr Philip Jamang and Fr Norbert Gokum, were generously hosted by Fr. Pat Wall and the parishioners of St. Francis when each priest came to Bradford for the one-year MA course. The beauty of this initiative is embedded in its ownership. It is fascinating to discover that the board of trustees are both Muslims and Christians. The centre will be frequently utilized to work with disengaged young people who are easily drawn into violence. In addition, the multi-purpose hall will provide the platform for peace meetings, seminars, training and inter-faith dialogue. The long-term aims of the centre after the inauguration ceremony on Thursday 14 February 2013 will be to provide the platform for research programmes on African traditional conflict resolution/ transformation approaches. Also, it will focus on the development of peace studies curriculum in Catholic seminaries across Nigeria. There is great hope that all these activities will change attitudes and help build a more secure peace. Walk for water and Hungry for Change Picnic For the past two years we have been inspired by how our young people have taken part in our ʻ,walk for waterʼ,. This year our walk will focus not only on the need to pro- vide clean water but also weʼ,ll be thinking of our ʻ,Hungry for Changeʼ, campaign and will reflect on food is- sues as we walk. Weʼ,ll end with a special ʻ,Hungry for Changeʼ, liturgy and picnic. Why not walk with us? Friday 22nd March 10.00 Granary Wharf, Leeds—,please let the Leeds office know if you wish to join us 0113 275 9302 Get ready for Fairtrade Fortnight 2013! (25th February –, 10th March) I t is this time of the year again! Fairtrade Fortnight will kick off in a few weeks with a strong focus on food and small farmers. Like CAFOD, the Fairtrade Foundation is part of the Enough Food for Everyone IF campaign. Despite growing half of the worldʼ,s food, small-scale farmers often struggle to provide for themselves and their families and theyʼ,re hit hardest in uncertain times. Buying Fairtrade products or supporting the movement is one way to ensure farmers and workers can farm into the future and earn enough to provide for their families and invest in their communities. Thereʼ,s still a lot to be done to support the millions of people who grow the food we love. Thatʼ,s why the Fairtrade Foundation is asking the nation to go further for Fairtrade in 2013! There are many ways to get involved: buy a Fairtrade coffee on the way to work, join a local campaign or spread the message online. Find out more by visiting cafod.org.uk/fairtrade Pray, Give, Act with CAFOD this Lent We’,re Hungry for Change –, are you? God created a world of abundance with enough for everyoneʼ,s needs and itʼ,s a scandal that weʼ,ve turned it into a world of poverty and want. Does that make you hungry for change? The significance of fasting, prayer and giving this Lent is all the more relevant because of CAFODʼ,s Hungry for Change campaign, which aims to tackle the severe injustices of the global food system. Lent is a time of reflection and there is much food for thought. •, 1 in 8 people in our world donʼ,t have enough to eat •, thatʼ,s 870 million people, equal to the populations of America, Europe, Australia and Canada •, for them going hungry is a fact of life, not a voluntary abstinence. 1. Pray, using our Lenten calendar •, Why not set up a daily reminder to yourself to use our Lenten calendar online at cafod.org.uk/pray. •, Each day it offers food for reflection and includes a simple action. •, Making quiet space and time for prayer and reflection each day isnʼ,t easy, but Lent invites us to try again. 2. Give, Lent Fast Day, Friday 22nd February In 2011/2012 through your generosity we helped over 80,000 families feed themselves and supported over 11,000 households in their small businesses. Weʼ,re asking you to show your compassion for those who are hungry again this Lent Fast day by donating to the Fast Day collection. 3. Act - Join Hungry for Change and campaign for a fairer Global Food System Throughout Lent and the rest of this year we will have plenty of opportunity to turn reflection into action with the Hungry for Change campaign. From now on and in the build-up to the G8 meeting in June 2013, we want even more messages to reach David Cameron, who will chair the meeting. Weʼ,re asking for: •, Support for small scale farmers, like Emily, who provide 50% of the worldʼ,s food. •, Checks on the power of global food companies, to ensure transparency, on the lobbying they undertake, their human rights record and to ensure their workers get a fair deal Donʼ,t just send a message—,become a multiplier and pass it on! We want to get 100,000 action cards before next June! •, Sign up online at cafod.org.uk/hungry or sign an action card. You can then share your card with a friend and spread the word by passing on the other half of the card. •, If you want to make an even bigger impact, why not organise a parish card-signing after Mass and display your messages of solidarity in church. Action cards can be ordered through the CAFOD Leeds office. Hungry for Change supports IF Campaign Wednesday 23rd January saw the national launch of a new campaign from the UK`s leading development organisations, including CAFOD. We are joining together for one of the most important and exciting campaigns in recent years –, Enough Food for Everyone - if •, we give enough aid to stop children dying from hunger, and help the poorest people feed themselves through investment in small farmers •, we force governments and big corporations to be honest and open about their actions that stop people getting enough food •, we stop big companies dodging taxes in poor countries, so that millions of people can free themselves from hunger •, we stop poor farmers being forced off their land, and use crops to feed people, not fuel cars …,then there really will be enough food for everyone CAFOD Director Chris Bain says “,Thousands of Catholics up and down the country have already signed up to Hungry for Change. Joining Enough Food for Everyone IF as well means that the incredible commitment of our supporters and volunteers will play a vital part in this joint campaign.”, Your support for both of these campaigns will help us have the biggest possible impact in 2013. Fact: Targeted aid can empower farmers This situation could be transformed if aid was better targeted to support small-scale farmers. Thatʼ,s why our Hungry for change campaign is calling for more ʻ,empowering aidʼ,, to help small-scale farmers wield greater power in the market place, increase their influence over how decisions about food policy are made and so be better able to support themselves and their families. Read the full story at cafod.org.uk/News/Campaigning- news, including an article from George Gelber, CAFODʼ,s food adviser, also featured in The Independent. Fact: Food waste: small-scale farmers hit hardest A new report has identified that food is wasted at every stage as it travels from farm to fork. In 2011, a staggering US$4 billion worth of food was lost or damaged in Sub-Saharan Africa –, out of an estimated total production of US$27 billion. Small-scale farmers bear the brunt of these losses as they can see their harvests eaten by rats, birds and insects and ruined by mould and damp. The crops they are able to sell command low prices when they get to market What to do next? •, Add your name to the IF campaign at cafod.org.uk/if •, Tell your friends, family, local community or parish: online, face-to-face, everywhere! •, Read the IF policy report and summary at cafod.org.uk/ Policy-and-Research/Food •, Read more from CAFOD Director Chris Bain at blog.cafod.org.uk Contact CAFOD Leeds for more information about any of the above 0113 275 9302 leeds@cafod.org.uk CAFOD News

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Page 13

Feb 2013 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Leeds Catholic Post Page 13 L eeds Trinity University has announced that Gabby Logan will become its first Chancellor. Gabby is a major public figure and through her achievements and endeavours, embodies much of what the University represents. She will be a role model for people in the University and in the City. Born in Leeds, Gabby is an inspirational figure in the worlds of sport and journalism, with a string of achievements that include becoming the first female presenter of a live football match and the first woman to host Match of the Day. Gabbyʼ,s career is continuing to flourish, having been one of a select few presenters given the honour of covering the London 2012 Olympic Games for the BBC. Gabby will also present a new BBC Saturday Night show in 2013. Gabby is a keen advocate for higher education, holding a law degree from Durham University and an honorary degree from Leeds Metropolitan University. More recently, Gabby has turned her attention to business, building on her vast experience within sports to become a non-executive director for Perform Group, a leading digital media enterprise. Gabby also has a strong commitment to several charitable causes, and is currently Patron of The Disabilities Trust, The Princeʼ,s Trust and Great Ormond Street Hospital, as well as vice president of Sparks. Commenting on her appointment, Gabby said: ʻ,Iʼ,m honoured to be appointed as Leeds Trinity Universityʼ,s first Chancellor. I support its ethos which is very close to my own. Iʼ,m a firm believer in the importance of higher education, having seen the enormous benefits that my own university experience has given me. I hope I can help talented young people realise their ambitions. Last but not least it is so good to be able to hold this position in Leeds, which I still think of as my home city.ʼ, Mr Ed Anderson, Chair of the Board of Governors commented, ʻ,We are absolutely delighted about Gabbyʼ,s appointment as Chancellor. Itʼ,s a perfect fit on so many levels. We are proud to have Gabby as a champion for our university and Iʼ,m sure that her appointment will be warmly welcomed by students, staff and people in Leeds.ʼ, Prof Margaret House, who recently took up the position of Vice Chancellor, commented, ʻ,To have gained university title and to have someone as impressive as Gabby as our first Chancellor, says much for what Leeds Trinity can achieve in the futureʼ,. Gabby will be Chancellor of one of only two universities with Catholic foundations in England, which aligns perfectly with her Catholic Faith. She attended Leeds-based Cardinal Heenan Roman Catholic High School and Notre Dame Catholic Sixth Form College, whom Leeds Trinity maintains strong relationships with through its strong commitment to widening access to higher education. A sector leader, Leeds Trinity works closely with 100s of schools and colleges such as Notre Dame, to motivate and encourage students to reach their full potential. Gabby Logan announced as Leeds Trinity University`s First Chancellor Leeds Trinity welcomes new Vice Chancellor L eeds Trinity is pleased to welcome Professor Margaret House as its new Vice Chancellor. Professor House took up her post on 2 January 2013, joining Leeds Trinity University from Middlesex University where she was Deputy Vice-Chancellor with responsibility for academic strategy, as well as being the Executive lead on the student experience and employability. Professor House has gained a national and international reputation for her research in the area of water quality management and in particular for the development of the House Index of Water Quality. Professor House joins the University at an exciting period in its development, after it was granted full university status in December 2012. Commenting on her new role, Professor House commented: “,I am delighted to have joined Leeds Trinity University as its new Vice Chancellor. I am looking forward to working with students and colleagues to further advance the reputation and standing of the institution and ensure our on-going financial sustainability. Itʼ,s particularly exciting to join the university just after it has been granted full university status, which will no doubt bring with it a number of advantages and opportunities.”, On behalf of everyone at Leeds Trinity University, we wish Professor House a very warm welcome, and looking forward to working with her. Professor House succeeds Professor Bridge, Leeds Trinity Universityʼ,s former Vice Chancellor who retired in December 2012. Professor Bridge led the university for over 6 years, during which she led on many developments for the university including its recent award of full university status. Leeds Trinity sponsors national Catholic Education conference L eeds Trinity University was proud to sponsor the annual National Conference for Senior Leaders of Catholic Secondary Education. The Conference took place on Thursday 24 and Friday 25 January at the Thistle Hotel, Marble Arch in London, the conference explored the challenges faced by leaders in Catholic Secondary Education during the Year of Faith. Liz McGuire, Leeds Trinity University`s Associate Principal Lecturer in Secondary Education attended the Conference, and shared her thoughts: ",This is an invaluable annual national conference which brings together the Catholic Education Service and Catholic school leaders to focus on current challenges in education, supported by key speakers. We heard from speakers from the Catholic Education Service and Nick Gibb MP, former Minster for Schools, who supports faith schools. There were additional key speakers such as Professor Gerald Grace, the key researcher for Catholic Education IoE London who urged us `to ensure good Catholic formation rather than just training as a counter-cultural response to secularism using our spiritual capital as a resource`. We also heard from Mona Siddiqui, OBE Professor of Islamic Studies and Public Understanding at the University of Glasgow, who was educated at one of our partnership schools Salendine Nook Huddersfield. Mona spoke eloqently of the need for faith schools and `the essential role faith schools play in the Common Good in society`. All members of the conference were interested in the CPD and Initial Teacher Training work available at Leeds Trinity University, and a good number of the delegates sought information on specific support.", Leeds Trinity University plays a key role in supporting Catholic Education, and alongside sponsoring events such as this conference, weʼ,re committed to training the Secondary Teachers of the future. The University has an excellent reputation for its teacher education, and has extensive experience in SCITT and School Direct projects, including alliances, in the North of England. The University is also proud to be the regionʼ,s ʻ,Premier Providerʼ, (External Examiner), and to have its partnership with schools rated as ʻ,outstandingʼ, (OFSTED, March 2010). The University`s Schools and Colleges Liaison team has also developed successful partnerships with many Catholic Schools. Through on-going outreach work that includes the delivery of presentations and arranging school visits to the universityʼ,s campus, Leeds Trinity gives students the opportunity to gain a wider understanding of higher education and what it could mean for them. Events Postgraduate Open Evening Studying for a postgraduate qualification is a great way to take your studies to the next level or enhance your career prospects. Our next PG Open Evening will be held on Wednesday 27 February 2013 from 5.30pm to 7.30pm. This informal event will give you the chance to meet with our Postgraduate tutors, find out about our comprehensive student support services and get answers to all your questions about Postgraduate Study. Refreshments will be served, so don`t worry about missing your dinner! Our Postgraduate Courses include •, MA in Education •, MA in Business Management, MA in Business Management `top up` •, MA in Creative Writing •, MSC in Health and Wellbeing •, MA/PGDip in Journalism including - Broadcast (Radio &, TV), Magazine,Print, and Radio •, MA/PGDip in Victorian Studies •, PGCE for Secondary Education including - Business Studies, Mathematics,Modern Foreign Languages and Religious Education •, PGCE Primary (5-11) QTS (Level 6) •, School Centred Initial Teacher Training (SCITT) To book your place for this event call us on 0113 283 7150 or email enquiries@leedstrinity.ac.uk.

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Feb 2013 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 14 Leeds Catholic Post T he Keighley Schools Heritage Group have been working their way around the schools in Keighley &, District helping them correctly to archive old photographs and other ephemera. David Kirkley of the KSH said, “,We became conscious that, with various changes hitting the schools –,in extreme cases a demolition and rebuild –, that a lot of history was being last so we are offering to help schools archive their historical material. It is a huge task and we have had to approach schools in turn to keep the work down to a manageable level.”, Tim Garthwaite from Holy Family School said, “,Schools Heritage approached us with a view to archiving our photographs and other items. We try to live up to our name as a family and we do keep photo albums as any family does, not only for the historical record but also for the stories that lie behind it.”, “,As the Catholic community is fairly tight-knit we decided that rather than simply focussing on Holy Family we would gather anything pertaining to Catholic heritage whether from the schools, parishes or wider community. All the material gathered will be archived both by the individual schools and by the LHS so that it is protected and retained for future study”, The labours of several weeksʼ, work came to fruition in an exhibition held in the Local Studies Library in Keighley Masterminded by David Kirkley and Jan Rotheram both of SHG, who prepared the displays, together with support from the schools, the exhibition had a sample of the photographs collected on display boards together with files of the whole collection and the photograph albums from Holy Family School Pupils from Our Lady of Victories School were on hand to record interviews and generally glean any additional information about the material collected while students from Holy Family School guarded their precious photo albums –, all 200 of them –, and manned the café,. Tim Garthwaite, Development Officer at The Holy Family said, “,It was a genuinely good day. We had about 340 visitors and many of those stayed far longer than they intended because they got caught up in looking out photographs of themselves from years ago or bumped into old friends and chatted over coffee. We also had some long distance visitors, one family drove down from County Durham while a former member of staff arrived in mid-afternoon after 8 hours on the train from Penzance.”, The oldest photos collected were 1911 and 1912, both taken at St Anneʼ,s School, Keighley and coincidentally both gathered on the same weekend. There was also the very first photo of Holy Family School taken when the ground was broken to begin the building work on the new school Tim Garthwaite continued, “,It is a great credit to David Kirkley and Jan Rotheram that they are prepared to put themselves out to help schools salvage photographs and other ephemera that may otherwise be lost. We are very grateful for their interest and hard work. The attention that this particular day has generated provoked a bid to the All Our Stories heritage lottery and we have been successful, so the work will be able to continue on a more secure footing and I would urge anyone interested in helping the project to make themselves known via the school.”, Catholic Heritage Day Celebration of Achievement at Holy Family School, Keighley M ayor George Metcalf was guest of honour at the Holy Family School’,s recent Celebration of Achievement Evening. The event was hosted by Head Girl Hannah Eastwood and Head Boy Adam Stewart. In his keynote speech Mr Metcalf opened by congratulations to the governors, staff and students on its recent “,Good”, OFSTED result, he then offered a personal biography focussing particularly on the opportunities he had to further his education and the people who had offered him an example to follow. His own children had been and now his grandchildren were members of the student body at Holy Family School, The Mayor concluded by saying how proud he was of Keighley, to be the Mayor of Keighley and to be associated with the school. The Danny Ryan Cup for Sportsperson of the Year, awarded to honour the memory of the Deputy Headteacher who opened the school, was won by Sam Hallas The Stephanie Sutcliffe Award for a student facing adversity was awarded to Jake Lowndes The evening concluded with a buffet, made and served by student members of the Lets Get Cooking Club which runs weekly in the school. Sheila Hastings the club leader explained that the Lets Get Cooking rationale was to give young people a range of opportunities to cook, bake and provide meals. A large catering event for 200 people was very ambitious, especially as the club had not been together for long, but it provided a valuable opportunity for budgeting and working to a deadline. Lawrence Bentley, Headteacher at The Holy Family School said, “,It was a splendid evening as a result of a lot of hard work by many people but I would particularly like to commend George Metcalf. He made it into a very warm family event with a light-hearted atmosphere and we are very grateful GODSPELL IN LEEDS I n the Beginning was the Word but the word was not quite funky enough…,.Original Press release for Godspell 1971. Following last year’,s huge production of OUR HOUSE we decided to get back to basics a little this year with Godspell. The show is a contemporary retelling of the Parables using Music, Dance and Storytelling. The original show was put together in 1971 and starred David Essex and Jeremy Irons. It quickly went on to be made into a film and has become one of the most regularly performed musicals of all time. At Corpus Christi College, Leeds, the main aim of shows was inclusion with opportunities for all underpinned by commitment and hard work. Godspell is a very flexible piece of theatre with everyone getting lines and many playing 2 or 3 different characters. The cast brought huge amounts of energy to the many characters they portray. As is in keeping with the school, all gave their all and it was well received by those lucky enough to be there!

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Feb 2013 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Leeds Catholic Post Page 15 Classified Advertising MARRIAGE CARE Marriage isn’,t always easy —, Counselling can help For an appointment in confidence, with an understanding and experienced listener, please telephone: 0800 389 3801 A Relationship Counselling Service W. Lever Ltd BRADFORD 01274 547137 524 THORNTON ROAD, BRADFORD BD8 9NB FOR OVER 75 YEARS PROVIDING A COMPLETE PERSONAL &, CARING 24 HOUR FUNERAL SERVICE CHAPEL OF REST H UGHES F UNERAL S ERVICES (Catholic Funeral Directors) 180 YORK ROAD, LEEDS LS9 9NT. Tel 2480953/63 152 GREEN LANE, CROSSGATES. Tel 2326900 3 HOLLIN PARK PARADE, OAKWOOD ROUNDABOUT Tel 2499338 Web: wwww.hughesfuneralservices.co.uk Email: info@hughesfuneralservices.co.uk Family owned and managed. Fully Qualified in all aspects. 24 Hour Service Guaranteed Fixed Price Funeral Plans etc. “,At a time of bereavement we carry out our duties with dignity and respect”, In times of bereavement please contact: B. J. MELIA &, SONS (B. J. Melia Dip F.D.) F UNERAL D IRECTORS AND M ONUMENTAL M ASONS Private Chapel of Rest 64 GIBBET STREET, HALIFAX Telephone: 01422 354453 PRE-PAID FUNERAL SERVICE AVAILABLE DETAILS ON REQUEST Looking to advertise a company or an event –, why not advertise in the Leeds Catholic Post This space could be yours! We have good rates for adverts, reaching a local population of 15,000 Contact: Louise Ward, Catholic Post, Hinsley Hall, 62 Headingley Lane, Leeds LS6 2BX Tel: 0113 261 8028 louise.ward@ dioceseofleeds.org.uk Never one to shirk a challenge, Fr Stephen Brown took on the army last month. During an innovative careers fair at St Bedeʼ,s Grammar School, Bradford, he was raising awareness about the priesthood in one room whilst down the corridor Sergeant Steven Martin of the Royal Dragoon Guards was seeking to interest the Year Nine lads in a career in her Majestyʼ,s forces. Fr Brown, who is Catholic Chaplain at Bradford University, has recently become a member of a three-man team to promote the priesthood in the diocese. The other members are Vocations Director Mgr Paul Grogan and our youngest priest, Fr Michael Doody, the Assistant at the Parish of St John Mary Vianney in Leeds, who recently gave four back-to-back presentations on the priesthood at a similar careers fair at St Wilfridʼ,s High School, Featherstone. Blog Extract: A Priest’,s Life Praying to St Hilda (2nd February) We had a blessed, if long day, today. We went on a pilgrimage to Whitby, the second of our Discernment Walks during the Year of Faith. Leeds and Middlesbrough diocesan vocations and youth services have teamed up to offer these experiences to young people aged between 14 and 19. We were inspired by something that Pope Benedict wrote recently commending the traditional practice of pilgrimage. Our county is replete with holy sites, we thought, let`s go and pray at them and help our young people to rediscover our Catholic patrimony. The first walk before Christmas was to Ripon and the shrine of St Wilfrid. Today we stood by the ruins of Whitby Abbey, site of the famous seventh century Synod of Whitby when St Wilfrid persuaded the British bishops of the Celtic tradition to adopt the date of Easter followed by the Roman Church, thus bringing unity to the Church on our island. Fr Massie, the Middlesbrough vocations director, invited the sixteen people present - young people and some youth leaders - to imagine the scene on today`s feast day - Candlemass - in the fourteenth century in the very ruins before us. Times have changed but Christ is still calling on us to carry his light into the world, he said. There was a pleasing silence as we reflected on our shared responsibility, while hardy tourists wandered around in the background. Earlier, we had been welcomed at Madonna House in Robin Hood`s Bay where we ate our packed lunch. The members of the community there (pictured in the foreground) made much of us and gave us lots of tea and then showed us a short DVD describing their life, testifying to the God of love through simplicity of life, poverty, community, the whole underpinned by prayer. During the seven-mile walk from their house to the abbey, after we had recited together the Joyful Mysteries, I was privileged to take part in innumerable edifying conversations: one young woman described her passion for keeping a youth group going, another described how she said the rosary each day in the family home, a young man spoke of his desire to do a degree at Leeds Trinity precisely because of its Catholic foundation, and a young African man described with pride how he had played Jesus in Passion Plays in his homeland and showed us a picture of himself, crucified. On the way back the young people in the minibus were saying things like ",I`m definitely going on the next Discernment Walk", and ",I don`t want this day to end.", Job satisfaction rating: pretty massive. Mgr Groganʼ,s blog: http://priestslife.blogspot.co.uk Invocation 2013: a discernment festival for the north More than one hundred young people are expected to attend the north of Englandʼ,s first discernment festival which is taking place between 14th and 16th June this year at Ampleforth Abbey. The abbeyʼ,s abbot, Dom Cuthbert Madden, has given his strong backing to the festival and has ensured that costs be kept low to maximise attendance. Keynote speakers include scripture scholar Bishop Michael Campbell OSA of Lancaster and Sister Rosanne Reddy of the Sisters of the Gospel of Life. Workshops, which will be delivered by experts from around the country, will be on the following themes: vocation in the catechism, Benedictine spirituality (pray, study, work), Carmelite spirituality (finding God in the desert), Priesthood (the Love of the Sacred Heart of Jesus), New Evangelisation –, new ecclesial communities, Ignatian spirituality (testing the spirits). The festival, which is open to all young people aged between 16 and 35, is being organised by the vocations services of all the dioceses in the north of England. Invocation, which is now in its fourth year, has until now been held at Oscott College, Birmingham. Leeds Diocese will be arranging transport to the event. Accommodation will be in dormitory accommodation or in tents. The cost will be approximately £,55 per person. A Facebook Page has been created: Invocation in the North 2013. Mgr Grogan is pictured at the most recent planning meeting with Fr Massie from Middlesbrough Diocese and the Abbeyʼ,s Hospitality Administration Manager, Katherine Whitbourn-Hammond. Bookings are now being accepted: please see the poster on this page for further details. A Good Book “,To Save a Thousand Souls: A Guide for Discerning a Vocation to the Diocesan Priesthood”, by Fr Brett A. Brannen. Vianney Vocations, Valdosta, Georgia, 2010. Available from the Leeds Diocesan Vocations Office. As I read this excellent book I was reminded of so many of the fifty plus men whom I have accompanied during my time in vocations director. Each manʼ,s personal journey is markedly different from anotherʼ,s yet there are common features: initial disbelief that God could be calling the young man to such a significant role, a sense of unworthiness, a gathering sense of excitement, a new desire for prayer. Fr Brannen charts the signs of the action of the Holy Spirit in the soul of a man whom He is calling to the priesthood with extraordinary precision. He boldly entitles one chapter, “,The Seven Stages of a Diligent Discernment”, and as I read it they all rang true. The book is the best of its kind I know. It is imbued with the pastoral experience of its author, a former Vice Rector and Vocations Director form the Diocese of Savannah, Georgia, in the United States. I remember when I was discerning all those years ago I had come to a point of moral certainty that God was indeed calling me to the priesthood but I could not figure out how exactly I was going to break the news to my father! I know now that this is a common anxiety. This book includes a chapter entitled: “,How Do I Tell My Parents That I Want To Be a Priest?”, He also covers such vital areas as finding a spiritual director and developing a spiritual plan of life. My favourite chapter touches upon the sensitive area of celibacy. Sometimes fears about this overwhelm a man and prevent him from taking the next step. Fr Brannen puts it into context beautifully in a chapter whose title conveys his balanced approach: “,Celibacy, Chastity, Charity and Cheerfulness.”, My favourite line, though,is the following: “,When should I contact my vocations director? The short answer is now.”, Mgr Paul Grogan Vocations –, News Mgr Paul Grogan Shoulders back!

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Feb 2013 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 16 Leeds Catholic Post CARNIVAL before Lent Before the austerity of the long Lenten fast and abstinence there has been a long tradition in most Catholic countries of “,Carnival”, a festival of riotious indulgence and turning the world upside down. In the four Sundays before Ash Wednesday in Italian villages the people gather in the village square dressed up in outlandish costumes (some mocking politicians and public figures of Church and State) to sing and dance , eat and drink and play games and races. This Catholic tradition goes back to the Middle Ages, the Venetian Carnival is mentioned in documents from 1092 and the festival went on from Epiphany to Shrove Tuesday and these festivals were backed by Papal edict, though always eager to ensure they did not slip into criminal licentiousness. In Britain the Reformation dampened down these Catholic practices and the Puritans banned them. Only Shrove Tuesday survived before the first day of Lent as the day to “,shrive”, to get absolution of sin and receive penance in order to approach the austerity of Lent in a state of penitential purity. It became “,pancake”, day as a convenient way of using up any remaining eggs, milk and butter before the fast began. “,Carnival”, took its name from the medieval Latin phrase “,carnem levare “, meaning “,to remove meat”,, the idea being to use the cycles of the farming calendar to shape the year into seasons of feast and famine. Of course the “,carnival”, adopted the general political tone of peasants mocking their masters and turning the world upside down in a playful challenge to the existing order but the main aim in the Churchʼ,s year was to move on from feasting and celebration into a period of deliberate austerity, abstinence and fasting, even in the medieval context of some years of experiencing bad harvests when there was not too much to feast on. Identifying with the sufferings of Christ in preparation for the Passion and Easter was also about sharing what little you had with your neighbours in hard times. Having lost the sense of “,Carnival”,, (reduced in our culture “,pancakes”,) perhaps our sense and practice of Lent has also been weakened. In our new “,age of austerity”, it seems almost perverse to suggest a tightening of belts, not least for two thirds of the working population who have seen their incomes stagnate or fall and in which both the working poor and the unemployed and the sick are experiencing real reductions in their income and consequent hardship. But what characterised the medieval approach was the ability of the people together, almost regardless of personal circumstances, to enter together into the full spirit of both Carnival and Lent. They threw themselves into it. This year Cafod have launched a new campaign “,Hungry for Change”, as part of a wider international effort to make 2013 the year when we begin to end the global hunger crisis. Tonight 870 million people worldwide will go to bed hungry, many parents without enough food to sustain their children. Even though there is enough food produced to feed everyone in the world, one in eight still go hungry. As Cafod spells out “,the way that food is grown, sold and shared out isnʼ,t working for the worldʼ,s poorest people”,. Given the recent horsemeat scandal, itʼ,s tempting to add it isnʼ,t working for most of us but poor farmers trying to sell their maize in, for example Kenya, are in a diabolical position when it comes to trade and marketing. They have no chance against the global companies. Cafod need both donations for seeds to invest in small scale farmers and our supportive pressure for their campaign for more practical aid which empowers small scale farmers and for checks on the power of global food companies. Our money contributions and our campaign support are needed this Lent. Reorganising our own and family consumption and putting aside some savings which we then pass on to Cafod reconnects us to our human family. And for those with a few extra minutes and access to a computer then campaigns@cafod.org.uk is the site to go to get more involved . We may have missed out on “,Carnival”, here this year but if we do Lent well with Cafod perhaps we could really revive it next spring and with a greater sense of a world coming together to demand justice for all. John Battle KSG Sport inspires Art and Creative Writing in international school partnership T he Bambisanani Partnership is a collaboration between St. Mary’,s Catholic High School, Menston and Mnyakanya School in rural Kwa Zulu Natal, South Africa. For the past six years the two schools have gained international acclaim for their work using sport as a catalyst to promote education, health, global citizenship and leadership. Over the course of the last year, the two schools have run competitions based on the theme of “,The Power of Sport”, in both Art and Creative Writing. The 2010 World Cup in South Africa and the Olympic and Paralympic Games in London have always been an important focus for the Bambisanani Partnership as have the profound words of Nelson Mandela:- “,Sport has the power to unite people in a way that little else can. Sport can create hope where there was once only despair. It breaks down racial barriers. It laughs in the face of all kinds of discrimination. Sport speaks to people in a language they can understand.”, Remarkably, over six hundred students from both schools entered the competitions. For both Creative Writing and Art, three bespoke trophies were commissioned in both countries. Over the past few weeks, these have been presented to the twelve recipients for their outstanding work. All students that took part in the competition received a specially designed certificate. Special thanks are due to all the teachers in both schools that facilitated and supported the competitions. At Mnyakanya, Art is not taught as a discrete subject so the Bambisanani Partnership was indebted to long term supporter Peter Engblom who spent several days at the school. Peter is an internationally renowned artist and photographer who is based in Eshowe, South Africa. Peter was very impressed with the enthusiasm of the Mnyakanya students:- “,In only a few days they have started to produce some really interesting work. There are some very talented students here and I hope that they continue with this interest.”, Same-Sex Marriage M gr Paul Grogan, Chaplain of Leeds Trinity University, argues that children will be those who lose out most if the government succeeds in introducing same-sex marriage. Many people do not understand how anybody could object to same-sex marriage. What is not to like about a Bill that would extend a right to one section of the population which was formerly denied it? The values of equality and justice would seem to require corrective legislation. The students with whom I spend most of my time are especially sensitive to the welfare of minorities and are full of inspiring idealism. Many cannot understand why I oppose the Bill, indeed, some find my attitude hurtful. They imagine that my arguments must be based on an objection to homosexual acts, they are not. Alternatively, they think that I must be arguing from theological first principles which most people do not share: I am not. I just think that the arguments in favour of the proposed legislation are thin and that the long-term consequences for our nation could be serious. We can immediately dismiss the idea that same-sex marriage would make our society more equal. It would not confer any benefits upon same-sex couples which are not already available to them through civil partnerships. How about freedom? Should not all citizens be free to participate in any institution? Yes, unless there is a good reason why not. Here, there is such a reason. It is that marriage, which as a human reality predates the state, has a “,givenness”, which the state does not have the right to destroy. Some of the students to whom I have spoken find this idea difficult. Surely progress means that every institution needs to evolve if it is to retain its significance. To oppose such evolution strikes them as both futile and wrong. Is it true, however, that nothing stays the same? If I look at myself, I see somebody who will always be male. Astonishingly, even such a seemingly self-evident statement is being challenged in some intellectual circles. Gender theory, at its most radical, proposes that our gender is a mere construct. And building on this, queer theory proposes that sexual orientation is always a question of choice. Underlying such theories, insofar as I understand them, is a sense of righteous anger at injustice within society. Yet they do not correspond with most peopleʼ,s sense of themselves. Men and women remain men and women. Might not marriage be similarly unalterable? I think that it is and hence that it cannot legitimately be used as a vehicle to correct injustices suffered by homosexual people. Indeed to understand marriage properly, I suggest that we have to forget about grown-ups for a moment: marriage is fundamentally about childrenʼ,s rights. Marriage is ordered to the procreation and bringing up of children. It always has been. This does not exhaust marriageʼ,s meaning –, lots of marriages are childless –,but it is a feature of marriage which cannot be deliberately excluded if a marriage is to be authentic. Against this, one could argue that marriage may formerly have been understood in this way but that it need not be so in the future. Modern developments such as contraception, some forms of fertility treatment and surrogacy have provided a new frame of reference for understanding marriage vis a vis children. The introduction of same-sex marriage would constitute another such development, or rather it would mark a definitive moment when the intrinsic connection between marriage and children was formerly severed. Yet before society assents to this, it needs to ask why in previous generations this connection has been so celebrated? The answer, I suggest, is that marriage as hitherto understood upholds precisely those values of equality and freedom which the Bill also seeks to foster (but which it would in fact, if passed, undermine). My sense of this proceeds from a reflection on our ordinary experience. The child of a married couple generally knows that his/her father and mother entered into marriage with a view to conceiving a child. This helps such children to understand themselves as both beholden to their parents and as the equals of them. If the meaning of marriage were to be reduced to it being a committed relationship, any children who were the fruit of it would de facto be perceived to be of less significance than adults. Their existence would be characterised by a certain arbitrariness. Of course, the love of good parents and foster parents compensates for all sorts of difficulties as we grow up and I do not wish to be alarmist. What I do want to underline however is that marriage currently acts as an institutional reminder of the importance of children. It helps all of us –, according to our many varied personal circumstances –, to understand our responsibility towards them. We should be wary of dismantling something which is a source of such good however noble the motivation of supporters of the Bill may be judged to be. Winners of the Art Awards:- Winners of the Creative Writing Awards:- Mcebiseni Mngadi Sinenhlanhla Khangile Samukela Mkhanazi Thabile Magwaza Kholka Magwaza Hlengiue Zuma Ciaran Miller Alessandra Valle-Metaxas Sara Riley Aidan Corkett-Beirne Madeline Smith Rebecca Wilson

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Feb 2013 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Leeds Catholic Post Page 17 Tales of Peace in Oceania Ten years ago, in April 2003, seven members of an Anglican religious community known as the Melanesian Brotherhood were killed as they tried to bring lasting peace between rival ethnic factions waging war in the Solomon Islands. On Friday February 1st, a member of Romeʼ,s lay Catholic St Egidio community, Monica Attias, held a press conference for the publication of her new book about the Melanesian martyrs and the legacy of reconciliation they left behind on these remote Pacific islands. So whatʼ,s the connection between these seven men who lost their lives in the former British Protectorate and the Rome based prayer community renowned for its work with the poor and marginalised? Monica Attias earns a living as a researcher with Italyʼ,s National Institute for Statistics but since 1978 sheʼ,s also been an active member of the St Egidio community, working especially on the rights of immigrants and the search for Christian unity. As part of the Commission on 20th century martyrs, set up by Pope John Paul II ahead of the new Millennium, Monica studied the ecumenical impact of the modern martyrs, particularly within the Reformed, Lutheran and Anglican traditions. Thatʼ,s how she first uncovered the story of the Melanesian brothers murdered as they tried to persuade rebel warlord Harold Keke to lay down his weapons. “,When we heard the story of the brothers killed in 2003 by Harold Keke,”,Monica told me, “,we were very struck by the story because of their particular way of (seeking) solutions to conflict......For several years theyʼ,d been trying to reconcile the two factions that were fighting in Guadalcanal, camping between the barricades and praying with the two different factions, trying to persuade them to put down the weapons...”, One of the brothers, who knew Keke personally, went to talk with him but didnʼ,t return, prompting six other members of the community to go in search of him. When their bodies were discovered a few days later, it was revealed that several of them had been brutally tortured and all seven had been shot by the rebels. Among the friends that Monica made as she followed the trail of the Melanesian martyrs was the Rev Richard Carter, currently part of the clergy team at St Martin in the Fields opposite Trafalgar Square. From 1987 to 2005 he lived in the Solomon Islands, working first as an English teacher, then as tutor and chaplain to the Melanesian brothers, before deciding to join the order himself. He was a close friend of all the murdered men and, a decade later, is still unable to tell their story without tears in his eyes. Hardly surprising, since it was his task to visit the families and tell them exactly what had happened to the seven brothers who had given their lives to bring peace to the islands. I met up with Rev Carter in the Basilica of St Bartholomew on Romeʼ,s Tiber Island, where St Egidio has set up a memorial to all the martyrs of the past century. On the main altar and in the six chapels are paintings, plaques, personal objects and documents detailing the lives and deaths of those who paid the ultimate price as witnesses of justice and peace –, in communist gulags, in Nazi death camps, under Latin Americaʼ,s military dictatorships or in Africaʼ,s ethnic conflicts. In the chapel dedicated to martyrs from Asia, Oceania and the Middle East, we looked at a black and white sash, a silver medallion and a walking stick belonging to the Melanesian brothers. In 2006 the former Archbishop of Canterbury, Rowan Williams, a close friend of the St Egidio community, came to Rome to bring these memorials to St Bartholomew and to speak movingly about the sense of martyrdom for modern society. Rather than a single act of courage, he said, martyrdom is more about a whole life lived in the service of the poor and most marginalised, as the Melanesian Brotherhood continues to do today. “,As Christian in the West today, Monica told me, “,we are like.... sleeping, so the memory of the martyrs helps to give a new orientation to our lives, to remember that people are suffering for their faith - think of the martyrs of the mafia or camorra in the south of Italy, or the persecuted Christians in Pakistan, or those who are living and working for justice in different parts of the world. Itʼ,s not a sad memory, she concluded, but a reason for hope that is celebrated by the many St Egidio members and their families who worship in the Church each Sunday morning. Monicaʼ,s Italian volume, entitled ʻ,Racconti di pace in Oceaniaʼ, (Tales of Peace in Oceania) is published by Urbaniana University Press Philippa M Hitchen Our Rome Correspondent ADVENT CRAFTS Keystage 1 and Foundation Stage Advent workshop. by Miss A Ramsden Foundation Stage &, Ley Stage 1 Leader It is the first year that we have tried this at our school, St Clareʼ,s Bradford, and it was very successful! The children wrote their own invitations to their parents and grand parents to invite them to come into school to participate in some Advent crafts as well as having tea, coffee and mince pies as refreshments. More than half of the children had a family member attend and they worked together to make paper plate wreaths, decorate Christmas biscuit, make decorations, Advent promises, collage Christmas trees, angel chains as well as many other fun activities. It was lovely to see all parents helping their own child as well as those children whose parents couldn`t make it due to work commitments. The parents all enjoyed themselves and have already asked if it is something that we will be doing again next year - the answer is YES of course! Due to the success of this event we have already decided to run a similar workshop during Lent. Christmas Celebrations at St. Paul’,s Primary School, Alwoodley T he children in Key Stage 1 at St. Paul’,s Primary School in Alwoodley retold the Christmas Story to their parents and grandparents through their musical production of ‘,Baa Baa Bethlehem’,. The older pupils led a carol service in church which retold the story in music, song and scripture readings to their families and parishioners. In the run up to Christmas, staff and pupils have shared their musical talents with the local community by singing at St Gemmaʼ,s Hospice, in their local community care home, Yew Tree Court and also in Sainsbury at Moor Allerton. They have raised funds to continue sponsoring two pupils at Sylvia Wrightʼ,s School for the Deaf in India. Father Christmas paid them a visit in school to say a special thank you to everyone! St John Fisher Hosts ThunderBall to raise money for New All-Weather Pitch S t John Fisher Catholic High School has embarked on a series of major building alterations that will enhance its faç,ade, sporting, food tech and meeting facilities. The work, which commenced in October 2012, has so far included a new front elevation for the reception area of the school, a bright and airy entrance hall and reception office, and a new meeting room on the ground floor. The next priority is a brand new all-weather pitch, which the Parents Association will support through community events, sponsorship and donations. Thunderball –, 9th March The first fundraiser for the sports pitch is a 007 themed black tie ball on Saturday 9th March at the Cedar Court Hotel, Harrogate. ʻ,Thunderballʼ, aims to raise in excess of £,10K through ticket sales, sponsorship, a charity casino and a promises auction. Paul Jackson, Headteacher, explained, “,St John Fisher is a unique school with a wonderful heritage and many excellent facilities. However we are always striving to improve our surroundings to meet the demands of modern school life. Over the past few years we have upgraded our Sixth Form, Performing Arts, canteen and toilet facilities, provided a purpose built outdoor classroom, a new art suite and installed a fantastic new fitness suite. We are carrying out improvements to the school site in line with governorsʼ,, parentsʼ, and above all, studentsʼ, priorities.”, “,Next on our agenda is a top class sports pitch that can be used by St John Fisher, our partner primaries and our local community. We are incredibly proud of our studentsʼ, sporting talent and achievements and believe that a brand new all-weather pitch will really enhance our sporting provision. We are also hoping to build partnerships with local community groups and sports clubs. Our Parents Association is working incredibly hard to raise money towards the cost of the pitch. We are looking forward to the 007 Thunderball and hope that it is well supported by parents, their friends, local groups and businesses. It should be a great night.”, Tickets for the ThunderBall are priced at £,42.50 each and include a champagne reception, a three-course meal and all entertainment. Please reserve tickets via Josi Mackinnon on 01423 818467. The school is also hoping for offers of support and partnership from local groups and suppliers. If you are able to help, please contact the school office. SJF Dance Students Perform Live for Artsmark St. John Fisher Dance students were selected to perform for a special regional celebration event called ARTSlive!, run by CapeUK from York Theatre Royal. The ARTSlive! Event is part of Artsmark, the Art Council Englandʼ,s flagship programme, celebrating art and cultural provision. The performance took place at St. John Fisher Catholic School with St. Peterʼ,s C of E Primary School joining the SJF performance, showcasing their dance and Taiko style drumming on dustbins. As well as a live audience of 250 parents, guardians and pupils, the performance was streamed live to the delegates at the ARTSlive! Event in York. The performance was not confined to the North Yorkshire region however. The show was available to all who tuned in to the Pilot. TV broadcast across the globe. Mrs. Claire Noonan, Head of Dance at St. John Fisher said, “,This is an incredible opportunity to showcase our work to north Yorkshire and the wider community. It is an absolute privilege to be invited to participate in such a prestigious event.”,

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Page 18

Feb 2013 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 18 Leeds Catholic Post First Friday of the Month SINGLE CATHOLICS (appeals mostly to over 35s) meet for mass at 7.30pm at Our Lady of Lourdes church, 130 Cardigan Rd, Headingley, Leeds LS6 3BJ, and a social afterwards. Events held during the month include walks, meals, cinema, theatre etc. For further details tel Sean (Chair) 07811 468939. Leeds Cathedral 20-35 Group Young people (20-35 years old) who attend St. Anne`s Cathedral in Leeds meet regularly every Thursday for spiritual, social and charitable activities. For further details search Facebook for “,Leeds Cathedral 20-35 Group”,, phone 07816 891872 or 07759 591233 or email leedscathedral20-35@hotmail.co.uk Crusade Mass The crusade Mass and Rosary of Mary Immaculate is held at St Patrick`s Church, Bradford, on the first Saturday of the Month after 12.15pm Mass , Second Sunday of Month 2pm Meeting of Bradford Fraternity of the Secular Franciscan Order at St. Anthony`s Convent, Clayton, Bradford.` `Third Sunday of Month 2.30pm Meeting of Leeds Fraternity of the Secular Franciscan Order at the Cathedral. Ampleforth Renewal Community Ampleforth Abbey, meet 1st Sunday each month, at Ampleforth. 11 .30am Praise, Speaker, Sharing Groups, Reconciliation, Exposition, Finishing with Mass and Healing at 4.00pm. All enquiries: Seamus McEneaney 01429 426181 Monthly Vocations Mass Mount St Josephʼ,s Chapel 11am First Wednesday of Month. Calix: An organisation for those recovering from addiction and working the 12 Step Programme of AA so that they can develop and deepen their relationship with Jesus as their Higher Power. Meets on the First Sunday of every month at Corpus Christi Church, Neville Rd. Osmondthorpe. Leeds. Mass at 4.30pm followed by meeting. Contact: Fr. Michael on 01977 510266 Leeds Schola Gregoriana The Schola meets on the 2nd Saturday of each month (except August), at 2.00 p.m., for rehearsal, followed by sung Latin (Vigil) Mass in the Ordinary Form, fulfilling the Sunday Obligation. An opportunity to learn and sing Gregorian Chant on a regular basis. Contact Michael Murphy (Director) on 07810 808 530, or Peter Lawley (01423 884274), or Rev. G.M. Parfitt (01756 793794). Days Of Renewal St. Wilfid`s Deanery Day of Renewal led by Fr. Stephen Wright OSB. Second Saturday of the month beginning Sat. March 10th from 12 noon to 4pm. Venue St. Aelred`s Church hall, Woodlands Drive, Harrogate. Please bring a contribution for a shared table lunch. For more information ring Dolores Omand 01423870789 or visit the Diocesan web site www.ccrleeds.org Diary 20 –, 35 years group Email: leedscathedralgroup@gmail.com Facebook: Leeds Cathedral 20-35 Group Phone: 07810 291 154 Helpers of Gods precious infants/Leeds people for life. Regular weekly prayer vigils at Marie Stopes, to pray and offer help to women considering abortion and witness to the sanctity of life. Thursday 10am, Friday.12-30, Saturday 10am other days by arrangement. Monthly all-night Eucharistic vigil St Marys Horsforth, 12th of every month 9-30pm (Mass) till 4am. Rosary and Divine Mercy every 1st sat of month, Cenotaph, outside the art gallery the Headrow Leeds.10-30.am 10-30am -11-30am a Holy Hour of Eucharistic Adoration to pray for an end to the culture of death and the healing of wounds caused by abortion. Enquiries Pat 07747698553/0113 2582745 ANNUAL EVENTS. Monday 8th April 2013 Annunciation. Pilgrimage of Reparation to Walsingham , minibus/cars from Leeds and surrounding areas £,15 Sunday, 28th April YORK WALK FOR LIFE. Coach from Leeds.£,10. Further details/to book contact: Pat Sammon Mob: 07747698553, Tel:0113 2582745, or email patriciamarysammon@btinternet.com. Diary A few moments for thought and prayer Commit your way to the Lord, trust in him, and he will act. He will make your vindication shine like the light, and the justice of your cause like the noonday. Be still before the Lord, and wait patiently for him…, Psalm 37 Be Still Deadline: For receipt of material for next edition: March 8th 2013 Parishes receive their copies: March 24th 2013 Send articles, reports &, pictures: Mr John Grady, Hinsley Hall, 62 Headingley Lane, Leeds LS6 2BX. Send text as word doc, pictures as jpeg, e-mail to: john.grady@dioceseofleeds.org.uk Tel: 0113 261 8022. Advertising Deadline March 19th 2013 Please note paid-for advertising is dealt with by: Louise Ward Hinsley Hall, 62 Headingley Lane, Leeds LS6 2BX Telephone: 0113 261 8028 Email: louise.ward@dioceseofleeds.org.uk Your Cath Post Following the success of the GB Dressage Team at the Olympics, St. Mary’,s student Isobelle Palmer is making a name for herself, also in the field of Dressage. Isobelle, who is in Year 7, has been riding since she was two years old and competes regularly in adult dressage events on her pony Gregonne Coco Chanel, a 14.2hh Welsh/thoroughbred mare, stable name Coco. Isobelle competes both as an able bodied rider and a para rider as she suffers from right sided haemoplegia. She has won numerous competitions and is due to compete at the Para Festival of Dressage and Winter Championships in March. The successful partnership has also half qualified for the 2013 National Championships. A promising future lies ahead for Isobelle and Coco. Dressage Success T wo young church organists are being given the opportunity to play the organ in Bath Abbey this summer. The Royal School of Church Music (RSCM) is inviting applications for organ scholarships at the 2013 Summer Course for Young People, which is being held in the city from 19th to 25th August. The deadline for applications is Friday 19th April. For more information visit http://www.rscm.com/courses The scholarships will be awarded to players aged between 16 and 21 and at Grade 8 standard or thereabouts. The successful candidates will assist the course organist in accompanying rehearsals and services, and play Bath Abbeyʼ,s four-manual Klais organ, where the course is located for part of the week. The 2013 Summer Course for Young People, held at Kingswood School, is a popular annual fixture for over one hundred young singers from RSCM-affiliated choirs around the UK and the world, who enjoy its mix of expert teaching, singing, fun and friendship. For the organ scholars, the musical experience has proved to be invaluable, in the past many have then taken up full scholarships at universities and cathedrals. Last yearʼ,s holders, James Leitch and Eleanor Kornas are respectively now organ scholars at Carlisle Cathedral and Trinity College Chapel, Cambridge. “,Having the opportunity to work with so many talented professional musicians was very inspiring,”, says James Leitch. “,I really enjoyed the experience, especially playing the Bath Abbey organ!”, Eleanor Kornas added: “,There was a very friendly environment in which I felt at ease to ask questions. I would certainly recommend the scholarships to anyone wishing to gain more confidence in their playing and musicianship.”, Applications will be considered by Rosemary Field, the RSCMʼ,s Head of Education and herself a former cathedral assistant organist. “,I know how important such courses are for the development of church musicians. What you gain from this is guided practical experience, which will stand you in good stead in your future playing and help with CV building,”, she said. Full details of the course and scholarships can found on the RSCM website at www.rscm.com/courses or by calling 01722 424843. YOUNG ORGANISTS SOUGHT FOR POPULAR CHORAL COURSE Youth Service Assistant T he Diocese of Leeds is looking for committed young Catholics to be part of the dynamic Youth Service Team. Duties include assisting with retreats for young people at Myddelton Grange and with Youth Service provision across the Diocese. The successful candidate will commence work in late August 2013. Living at and working from Myddelton Grange, Ilkley, you should be reliable, able to communicate well, in good health and well disposed to living and working as a member of a team. Board and lodgings are provided at Myddelton Grange along with a monthly allowance. For a more in-depth job description visit our website: www.myddeltongrange.org.uk For an application pack contact the Administrator at: Myddelton Grange, Langbar Road, Ilkley, West Yorkshire LS29 0EB 01943 607887. Closing date for applications 28th February 2013. Interviews scheduled for 14th March 2013. All employees must be committed to the protection and safeguarding of children and young people. Successful appointment is subject to references and an enhanced Criminal Records Bureau disclosure. Rev Anthony Baxter MSC F r Anthony Baxter, who died on Monday 14th January aged ninety-one, is well- remembered in the Huddersfield area on account of his time as Headmaster of the former St. Gregory’,s Grammar School. Fr Baxter attended Ratcliffe College in Leicestershire and went on to study science at London and Cambridge universities. In 1938 he joined the Rosminian Order and was ordained to the priesthood in 1952. He came to Huddersfield in 1958 to take up the post of deputy-head at the newly-established Catholic grammar school. In 1956 Bishop Heenan had invited the Rosminians and the Sisters of the Cross and Passion to provide the core staff of the school, as it was intended to be the first co-educational Catholic grammar school in the country. In 1964 Fr Baxter succeeded to the headship of St Gregoryʼ,s, now established in new buildings on a site at the Bradley Bar. In his eight years in post he became a much-loved and highly respected head teacher, as well as a popular priest in the Huddersfield deanery. At St Gregoryʼ,s he was always supportive of his staff and students and skilled at drawing the best out of people. He left Huddersfield in 1972 and is still remembered for his abundant priestly, spiritual and personal qualities. He was also a gifted sportsman and in his younger days he had turned down the opportunity to pursue a career in professional cricket, such was his vocation to education and the religious life. In 2011 he returned to the diocese for the celebrations at All Saints High School marking half-a-century of Catholic secondary education at Bradley Bar. After leaving St. Gregoryʼ,s Fr Baxter became the headmaster of Ratcliffe College, finally retiring ten years later in 1982. Thereafter he served as a priest in a number of Rosminian parishes until his death. His funeral and burial took place at one of these, St Marieʼ,s in Rugby, Warwickshire, on Thursday 23rd January 2013. May he rest in peace. Obituary

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Page 19

Feb 2013 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Leeds Catholic Post Page 19 T he Feast of the Holy Family, 30th December 2012, was a unique day of celebration at St.William’,s Church in Bradford. Mr.David Kennedy, parish organist and choirmaster, was presented with the Papal Award ʻ,Pro Ecclesia et Pontificeʼ, in recognition of 56 years of dedicated service to liturgical music at St.Williamʼ,s. Presenting the Papal Decree and the Cross ʻ,Pro Ecclesia et Pontificeʼ,, Father Jim Callaghan remarked that David had joined the choir as a 14 year old boy, became principal organist and choirmaster by the age of 20 and had steered the choir through an era of liturgical renewal, remaining always faithful to the norms and tradition of the Church. Generations of parishioners and the priests who have served them, have every reason to be grateful to David Kennedy for his many years of service to the Parish. David and his wife Jean were accompanied at Mass by their five children and nine grandchildren, who had travelled from various parts of the country to be present at the celebration. After New Year, at a dinner hosted by Mr and Mrs Kennedy, choir members presented them with two framed prints to commemorate Davidʼ,s award from the Holy Father. [Photo courtesy of Mr Peter Barusevicus] St Vincent de Paul Society &, The Chordiality Choir A CONCERT OF SACRED MUSIC The SVP in the Bradford District are fortunate to link up with the renowned choir “,Chordiality”, and its director Peter Sherlock to present an evening of sacred choral music including a performance of Stabat Mater”, by Karl Jenkins –, “,The Mother Stood”, on Calvary to witness and suffer the death of her Son, The performance will take place at St. Winefride’,s Church, St Paul’,s Road, Wibsey, Bradford on Palm Sunday 2013 (March 24) at 7.30pm, and will be, for us, a meditation in music for Holy Week. Tickets can be obtained from the Bradford SVP conference members priced at £,5 (no charge for children), or application can be made to treasurer P.J. Walsh: contact 01274 543330. Cheques and composit cheques made payable to “,SVP Bradford District Council”, All proceeds to support SVP works for the needy Our grateful thanks in St. Vincent de Paul. Registered Office: 291-299 Borough High Street, LONDON SE1 1JG www.svp.org.uk A Company Limited by Guarantee Registered in England &, Wales No: 3174679 Charity Registration No: 1053992 Prestigious Scholarship offered to St Mary’,s Student A t a recent Masterclass for talented young pianists, Year 7 student Annabelle Connor was successful in winning a prestigious scholarship. Richard Meyrickʼ,s ʻ,Pianomanʼ, Masterclass recently took place at Woodhouse Grove School. Annabelle was one of ten pianists from St. Maryʼ,s Catholic High School, Menston. The performers ranged from 11 to 18 years of age. Annabelle, at 12 years, was one of the youngest participants. Head of Music at St. Maryʼ,s, Mrs Victoria Chapman said:- “,Annabelleʼ,s performance was stunning. She responded to the advice and pointers offered during the Masterclass with such maturity and professionalism and we are extremely proud of her!”, Funded by the Pianoman experience, Annabelle will travel to London for a monthly lesson with Richard Meyrick who said:- “,Itʼ,s a once in a lifetime opportunity for a talented young musician and we are all excited to see her progress.”, Pope Benedict Honours Bradford Organist Enrolment into the Archconfraternity of St Stephen S erving at the Altar is important: working as a team with other ministers, servers have special responsibilities which, when well done, help the whole congregation to pray better and to join in worship as a community. The Archconfraternity of St Stephen for Altar Servers has as its objects: to encourage, positively and practically, the highest standards of serving at the Church`s liturgy and so contribute to the whole community`s participation in a more fruitful worship of God. To provide altar servers with a greater understanding of what they are doing so that they may serve with increasing reverence and prayerfulness and thereby be led to a deepening response to their vocation in life and to unite servers of different parishes and dioceses for their mutual support and encouragement. Recognising this, Emilia Martin was enrolled by Fr Michael McLaughlin as a member of the Archconfraternity of St Stephen at the 12.30pm Mass on St Stephenʼ,s Day, 26th December 2012in the parish of Our Lady of Mount Carmel, Silsden. As the words of the Services says “,a good server is one who not only knows what to do, but understands why it is being done, serves regularly, with care, attention and reverence.”, Above, we see Emilia being congratulated by Adam Tabbane, who has been a members of the Confraternity for 3 years in the parish of St Anneʼ,s Keighley.

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Page 20

Feb 2013 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 20 If you are what you should be, you will set the whole world ablaze O n Thursday 10th January 2013 the school and parish communities of eight Catholic schools came together at Ss Peter &, Paul in Sandal for an Inaugural Mass of Dedication of the schools in the Bishop Konstant Catholic Trust. The congregation felt honoured to have Bishop Konstant with them as the main celebrant of Mass and he, the priests who were concelebrating and everyone present was warmly welcomed by Emma Everett from St Joseph`s, Pontefract. A group of children from St John`s, Normanton began proceedings by performing a liturgical dance to ‘,Do You See What I See` which was followed by the procession of banners carried by students from the each of the eight schools - St Joseph`s, Castleford, St Wilfrid`s, Featherstone, St John`s, Normanton, St Ignatius, Ossett, St Thomas a Becket, Wakefield, St Joseph`s, Pontefract, St Benedict`s, Garforth, and Sacred Heart, Hemsworth. Bishop Konstant opened the Mass by saying how pleased and honoured he was to be asked not only to preside at the Mass but that his name was being used as the name of the first Academy Trust in the Diocese of Leeds. The Mass continued in such a way that every school contributed and came together to ensure that the stated Mission of the Trust was reflected. This was particularly true when a member of six of the eight schools came and read a bidding prayer which related to each one of the Six Principles of the Mission of the Trust - Jesus Christ at the Centre, The Dignity of Each Human Person Made in the Image of God, Education and Vocation, Solidarity and Life Together in Christ, Service and the Summons to Love, and Subsidiarity and the Little Way. In his Homily Bishop Konstant spoke about the words in the first hymn ʻ,The Servant King` and also about the Gospel which the congregation had just heard in which St John speaks of Love. He ended the homily asking those present to consider three things as they moved forward in their new venture - to always act in Love for each other, to always ensure that Joy has a real presence in their actions, and to always behave in a way that strengthens Friendship. Before the Final Blessing each headteacher and a student representative processed to the altar carrying a Trust Candle and in front of the congregation made dedication promises on behalf of their individual communities. Each candle was then lit in readiness for the procession from the Church. However, some of the candles refused, at first, to remain lit which caused the Bishop to comment that whilst it was a very human problem it also gave him great comfort in the knowledge that just like a candle we sometimes don`t follow the path of light but that just like a candle we can be re-lit at anytime over and over again and continue to follow the path of light. There was a great ʻ,buzz` in the Church and the hall following Mass, all who had been present agreed that it had been a wonderful occasion and more importantly it felt that something which had begun its legal entity last November was now blessed and dedicated into the Catholic family.

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