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Leeds Catholic Post History

Newspaper for the Diocese of Leeds

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Sept 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 1

Sept 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

CATHOLIC POST THE NEWSPAPER FOR THE DIOCESE OF LEEDS SEPTEMBER 2011 www.dioceseofleeds.org.uk www.catholicpost.org.uk T welve months ago our country and Diocese were gripped by the joyful visit of our Holy Father Pope Benedict XVI! A long awaited and prayed for visit! Those days remain for many a topic of conversation, the Pope’,s homilies and addresses as source of inspiration in people’,s lives and a means of deepening the faith within the Church! During the Holy Father’,s last major address of his visit, given to the Bishops of England, Wales and Scotland, gathered in the splendid setting of the chapel of Oscott College in Birmingham, Pope Benedict spoke about the new English translation of the Roman Missal. The Holy Father encouraged his brother Bishops and through them all Catholics “,to seize the opportunity that the new translation offers for in-depth catechesis on the Eucharist and renewed devotion in the manner of its celebration.”, Since Easter our Diocese has been engaged in this ‘,in-depth catechesis’, on the Mass by considering the texts of the new English translation of the Roman Missal. Both at Diocesan and Parish level there have been many opportunities to deepen our knowledge of what happens at Mass, and what the words we pray mean and where they come from, which as Bishop Roche reminded the Church in England and Wales: “,When these new prayers are assimilated I believe that the great gift that they will give to our people is that they will help them to pray scripturally, because the nuances are there very clearly in those new prayers.", So it was after all the preparation that on the first weekend of September the parishes, religious communities and other institutions of the Diocese began opening the door behind which “,lie treasures that most of us have never glimpsed”, (Mgr B Harbert, Magnificat, September 2011 p.4). As the days and weeks pass the new responses of the new English translation will become more familiar as they are prayed, as the words of the Prefaces and Eucharistic Prayers are heard being prayed we begin to glimpse more deeply the reality of Treasures Revealed - The new translation of the Roman Missal FANTASTIC RESPONSE Leeds Diocese donations for CAFOD`s East Africa Appeal By the beginning of September donations from our diocese had reached £,187,000.00 - which is a magnificent effort. Very many thanks indeed, especially to the parishioners of St. Joseph`s Wetherby, who raised over £,10,000 for the appeal, which is fantastic. 08 08 Vauxhall Corsa 1.4 Design Auto (9,065 miles) ................. £,6,250 07 56 Mitsubishi Colt 1.1 CZi (11,500 miles) .............................. £,2,750 05 05 Renault Clio 1.2 Dynamatique (22,390 miles).................. £,3,450 04 54 Mitsubishi Shogun Equippe Diesel 4x4 (44,000 miles) .... £,5,975 04 54 Vauxhall Corsa 1.2 Design 5 Door (43,000 miles) ........... £,2,999 04 04 Mini One 1.6 (43,100 miles) ............................................. £,5,250 03 52 Renault Megane Privilege 1.6 5 Door (56,350 miles) ...... £,1,999 02 02 Vauxhall Corsa 1.2 Comfort (50,503 miles)...................... £,2,250 what happens at Mass when heaven and earth are united, where we are taken “,out of ourselves and drawn up into the sacred, the transcendent and the divine”, (National Pastoral Letter May 2011). A year on from the Holy Father’,s visit which gave such great encouragement to the Catholic community in our country, the new translation of the Mass is a great opportunity in which to pray that the fruit of that visit may strengthen the Catholic community of our Diocese and lead to an ever deeper and greater devotion to the Lord truly present in the Most Holy Eucharist where as Blessed John Henry Newman said ‘,heart speaks to heart’,. More information on the new English translation visit www.missal.org.uk

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Page 2

Sept 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 2 Leeds Catholic Post P upils and staff at St Mary`s Catholic Primary School in Halifax have been celebrating an awe inspiring success story very similar to the one portrayed in the famous London show and film `Billy Elliott`. Gerard White - a Year 6 pupil - has obtained a boarding place at the prestigious White Lodge Ballet School in London from September. The school is the main feeder for The Royal Ballet and produces many of the world`s greatest dancers. Gerard only started dancing at the age of 7yrs and had to attend several gruelling interviews and auditions before being offered a place. The 11yr old owes much of his success to his teachers at the Jane Elizabeth Dance School in Halifax. The school only admits 12 boys and 12 girls each year from the whole world - so this is definitely a massive achievement and a dream come true! `BILLY ELLIOTT ALL OVER AGAIN!` You are cordially invited to our ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING Thursday, 22nd September 2011 at 2 p.m. at Wheeler Hall, St Anne’,s Street Leeds LS2 8BE Guest Speaker: The Rt Rev AW Robinson, Anglican Bishop of Pontefract FROM JUST £,299 R.G.R. MEMORIALS COLOUR CATALOGUE QUALITY MEMORIALS AT AFFORDABLE PRICES IN GRANITE, MARBLE &, STONE ALL PRICES INCLUDE DELIVERY &, FIXING Ogee top memorial 2’,6”, high Fully polished Black Granite, Delivered and Fixed for £,399 inc VAT FREE Tel: 0113 282 3888 43 High Ridge Park, Rothwell, Leeds LS26 0NL A Taste of Science at St Andrews A 15 year old Harrogate student has quite literally enjoyed a taste of science at St Andrews University, Edinburgh. St John Fisher Catholic High School pupil Cedric Conboy was selected to take part in a national scheme that introduces the merits of a scientific higher educational route to the nation’,s academically gifted and talented youngsters. Identified by his science teacher as a prime candidate to benefit from the scheme, Cedric was the only pupil from Harrogate to attend the three-day event at St Andrews. He teamed up with likeminded secondary school students from all over the UK to conduct a range of visually engaging scientific experiments in the physics and astrology laboratories, and experience the social side of one of the UK’,s best universities. “,It was a great privilege to experience the science offering at St Andrews at such an early stage of my pathway options,”, said Cedric. “,I was very impressed by the facilities and staying at the University was a lot of fun. The experiments we conducted were fascinating and included making our own ice cream out of liquid nitrogen, cream and fruit. I hadn’,t considered a career in science, but this experience has definitely left me with a greater interest in chemistry, and I will definitely look at St Andrews when the time comes for me to apply for universities.”, Most parishes have now started using the new translation of the English of the Mass- or some of it. The final stage- the full missal- has to wait until Advent. In the meantime, we have a plethora of temporary books, cards, leaflets and booklets. Hymnbooks, too, have had to change and multiply, especially those that contain the various new settings of the Mass for congregational singing. Gone to rest, at last, are the versified versions like the “,Israeli”,, but there are some good alternatives. “,What do you think”, has produced the response “,We’,re going back”, from older people who remember those early, heady days of Mass in our own language, and those first translations, not unlike the “,English”, column in your dual-language Missal. We don’,t always like change, especially when it lacks novelty: our Mass- whatever the words- has been taken into our hearts, and the words come with only the lightest reminder from a book or sheet- if we use one at all. That’,s the hard bit: reading the less familiar rather than speaking the words we have made our own. We can only try to reflect on this year’,s Gospels from Matthew, and especially the calling of Matthew himself: “,As Jesus was walking along, he saw a man called Matthew sitting at the tax booth, and he said to him, ‘,Follow me.’, And he got up and followed him.”, Like those other new disciples in the Gospels, Matthew didn’,t look back, but had only the thought of following this man, whose words transcended words, whose message was one of freedom: from sin, from doubt, from fear. So we don’,t go back, either: we pick up these new words and we move on, as Jesus told Matthew, Peter and us. There is much to do with our hand to the plough, and no time for looking back The Post Says Editor’,s Note To purchase photographs from the Catholic Post please either go to www.catholicpost.org.uk/form.html or contact Patrick on 01977 556088 If your parish or school are having a special event at which you would like photo coverage in the Catholic Post please contact the Editor, John Grady on 0113 2618022 or john.grady@dioceseofleeds.org.uk You can view the current Catholic Post and previous editions plus all the photographs taken at events online at www.catholicpost.org.uk

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Page 3

Sept 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Leeds Catholic Post Page 3 Let your light shine A nd that’,s what many of our students did during the weeks of assessment and exams and were duly rewarded during August as Diocesan schools and colleges celebrated some of their best ever GCSE and A level results. Yet again the hard work of the students and the staff has reaped dividends for students who have managed to gain an excellent set of results this year. Congratulations to all students who have worked hard to achieve their own personal goals, and thank you to staff and parents for the encouragement and support you give so generously. A successful close to a rewarding career Pupils staff and parents were sorry to hear that the Christine Russell, the headteacher at St Malachy’,s Catholic Primary School would be retiring in July 2011. If Christine thought it would be a quiet time then others had different plans as the school was called for inspection by Ofsted in June. There were no worries as the school is a haven of fun and industrious learning that any inspector could not fail to observe. As the Ofsted report states ‘,Through their sterling work as school councillors, junior wardens, members of the ‘,lunch bunch’, and also gardening club, pupils contribute outstandingly well to the school community and to the local environs. Pupils are proud of their school, feel safe within it and have the highest regard for the adults who work with them, commenting, ‘,They are always there when we need them!’,’,. After every Ofsted inspection, there is a Diocesan inspection of the school and St Malachy’,s was judged outstanding. The role of the whole team of staff, governors and the community was praised. One governor with expertise in speech and drama, had enabled pupils from Reception to year 6 to build confidence, enjoy performing and raise self-esteem, through choral speaking. (101 pupils gained either merit or distinction in their LAMDA exams). As Christine said at her farewell: ’,There are three of us retiring today from St. Malachy’,s: Mary Bareham after 37 years at St. Malachy’,s Jim McGowan after 14 years at St. Charles’,, Leeds and 23 at St. Malachy’,s Me (Christine Russell) after 20 years at St. Cuthberts, 4 years as Deputy at St. Columba’,s, 7 years as Head at St. Joseph’,s Otley, 4 years as Head at St. Malachy’,s and 35 years in the Diocese . That’,s a total of 109 years in the Diocese!’, YEAR OF CATHOLIC EDUCATION Excellent Results at Cardinal Heenan S tudents and teachers at Cardinal Heenan Catholic High School, Meanwood, Leeds, are celebrating an excellent set of public examination results this year. 83% of Year 11 pupils passed five or more GCSE subjects at grade C and above, 66% including English and Mathematics. 34% achieved the new English Baccalaureate qualification by passing GCSEs in English, Mathematics, two Sciences, a language and a humanity at grades A* - C. Amongst the school’,s highest achievers were Maria Smickersgill who achieved nine starred A passes and one A. Robert Kyles passed eight GCSEs at the top A* grade and two at grade A. Sam West gained eight starred As, one A and one B. Elizabeth Cox, Headteacher, at Cardinal Heenan said: “,Staff and students are especially pleased with this very strong set of examination results. The great majority of our students have met their targets and are well equipped to go onto A level studies and higher education. Their successes are the result of dedicated teaching, high levels of commitment by students and the support of parents.”, St. Mary`s Catholic High School, Menston: A level students break all records again! Students at St. Mary’,s Menston again exceeded all expectations on results day 18 August 2011 when they achieved the school’,s best A2 results in recent years. The average points score per candidate of 380 is equivalent to AAA*, and we expect that we will once again be in the top twenty comprehensive secondary schools nationally. The great majority of students attained their predicted grades and have been placed in their first choice university or chosen career. Over half of the grades achieved were A* - B and nearly a third of the grades achieved were A* and A. Mr. Pritchard (Headteacher), said “,these are an outstanding set of results. They are the culmination of a tremendous amount of hard work by our students and our staff. I congratulate them all, and wish them luck in their future. We are particularly pleased that so many have got their choices at University this year as there has been a record number applying for degrees. Students have applied across the country in large numbers to avoid the introduction of higher tuition fees next year.”, Patrick Kirkham is outstanding in the year group. He has secured his place at Pembroke College, Cambridge to read Natural Sciences with 6 A level passes, A* in Biology, Chemistry, Mathematics, Physics and an A in French and General Studies. Eleanor Klejnow secured her place to read Medicine at Newcastle University with 5 passes, A* in Biology, Chemistry, Religious Studies and General Studies and a grade A in Mathematics. Francesca Wright gained grade A* in four subjects, Biology, Chemistry, Mathematics and Physics. Francesca is taking a gap year. Director of Student Progress and Achievement (Post16) Mrs Gerry Sayers said, ‘,Once again our Year 13 students have achieved at the very highest level. This is another outstanding set of results and we are delighted that our students have again been successful in their chosen subjects. An average points score per student of 380 is superb and is testimony to the consistent hard work and commitment shown by the students and the staff. I would like to congratulate all the students and wish them well for the future.’, At GCSE, St. Mary`s Menston expect to top the league tables yet again. This year the school has surpassed its targets with 85% of its students achieving 5 or more A* to C including English and Maths, and virtually the whole cohort achieving 5 or more top GCSE grades overall. Mr Pritchard (Headteacher) said ",these are outstanding results, we could not have asked for more. They are the reflection of the hard work and effort from the staff and students. There are some excellent individual performances, Aine Donnelly and Christina Graham achieved 11A* grades. Charlotte O’,Byrne achieved 11A* and 2 A’,s, and Joe Gaskin achieved 7A*’,s and 4A’,s. However I want to congratulate all of our students who have made outstanding progress.", These GCSE results come on the back of excellent A level outcomes which were published last week. Mr Pritchard went on to say ",there are many challenges in education at the moment, but when your students do so well, it makes me proud to lead such a wonderful school. I am looking forward to working with these students in the sixth form and building further success in all areas",. At St. Mary`s the curriculum offers opportunities for all students, but contains a core of high quality GCSE qualifications at Key Stage 4. The coalition government has decided that they want to promote the more academic courses by introducing the English Baccalaureate measure of attainment. St Mary`s has 42 % of their students attaining this measure. This compares with a national average in 2010 of 15% and a LA average of 13%. This is another indication of their success this year. Sam West (left), Maria Smickersgill and Robert Kyles, all aged 16, were star performers at Cardinal Heenan Catholic High School, Leeds. They gained 25 GCSE passes at the top A star grade between them.

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Page 4

Sept 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 4 Leeds Catholic Post Ella is rewarded for her Generosity Representatives of the St Vincent de Paul Society, Our Lady Immaculate &, Saint Francis conference, Eccleshill, Bradford, visited St Winifreds School, Wibsey to present one of their pupils Ella Littlewood with a Certificate and a St Vincent de Paul Medal to thank her for her generosity and kindness to a stranger. Pictured are Mrs Berenice Scanlon, S.V.P, making the presentation to Ella with Mrs Maureen Cairns, Headmistress of St Winifreds. Although neither she or her family had any previous connection with the S.V.P, Ella donated a substantial number of her own valuable toys to us after hearing we were helping a little girl who didn`t have any. A credit to herself, her family and her school, she brought joy to a little girl who she will never meet. The third part of the Celebrating Family Funded Parent Support Project, which has already produced 25 trained Parenting Facilitators in our diocese, is about to begin in Wakefield Deanery. Wakefield will become the very first deanery to have volunteers from all of its primary schools and most of its parishes undertake the Parenting Programmes: Leading with Confidence course. This year’,s volunteers form a rich tapestry of talents and experiences and include parents, parishioners, school support workers, Catholic Care social workers and school governors. Each has been nominated by their parish or school to attend the training. And most will aim for accreditation at Level 3 OCN (Open College Network). The course equips people to run simple but effective parenting programmes from The Family Caring Trust (www.familycaring.co.uk). It includes practical skills in setting up and presenting a parenting course in schools and parishes as well as some academic content on child development, learning styles and group dynamics. Three of the people already trained as Parenting Facilitators to Level 3 have been able to move into higher education at universities and colleges in Leeds. Of those who attended the parenting courses, two parents have gained the confidence to apply for and get part time classroom support work in their children’,s schools. Others have been encouraged by their experience of a parenting programme to move on to adult literacy and numeracy classes. The stories of ordinary lives changed are deeply moving and everyone involved has been stretched and enriched. Blessed John Paul II said ‘,The future of humanity passes by way of the family’,. It is also true that the family is the first place of evangelisation. Parents in their words and actions model Gospel values day in and day out so support for parents is a matter of the utmost priority. Every volunteer, and every head teacher and parish priest who supports them, as parenting is part of this great work of supporting the institution through which ‘,the future of humanity passes’,. A short film has been produced, recorded at the annual parents (and grandparents) gathering earlier this year at the Pastoral Centre in Leeds. It is on www.flm.org.uk Marriage Preparation Who helps engaged couples prepare for the life long commitment that is the sacrament of marriage? It could be you. Training for new Marriage Preparation Presenters begins on November 7th at Hinsley Hall, Leeds and takes one evening a week for four weeks. If you would like to help engaged couples delve a little deeper into what marriage is and the factors in their own lives, personalities and value systems that can have a big impact after the wedding day then talk to your parish priest and contact me for an application form. Training is completely free and open to anyone recommended by his or her parish priest. Marriage is a sacrament and parish, or deanery, based marriage preparation is one of the best community building opportunities parishes have. Please take a moment to think about this. If you are called to this ministry you will be given all that you need. Contact Breda at flm@flm.org.uk or 0113 261 8050 Familias Consortio: 30 years this year This month’,s inclusive quote celebrates the wider family context, appropriate for Grandparents Day (2nd October) “,All members of the family, each according to his or her own gift, have the grace and responsibility of building, day by day, the communion of persons, making the family ",a school of deeper humanity”,…,: this happens where there is care and love for the little ones, the sick, the aged, where there is mutual service every day, when there is a sharing of goods, of joys and of sorrows.”, (22) Dementia I am about to walk the Irish pilgrimage to St James in northern Spain to raise funds for Admiral Nurses. Admiral Nurses help the families of people with dementia. I am doing this with my sisters, one of my sons and one of my nieces because when my dad was dying of dementia my elderly mother had sole responsibility for him and very little help. Not understanding this fatal disease, which physically destroys brain cells, she struggled to cope with her husband of 53 years who was perplexing beyond even the usual marital disharmonies. After he died we heard about Admiral Nurses who help people to understand dementia. Then we discovered why we had not heard of them while dad was alive: There were only 76. Over 800,000 people suffer from dementia. This is urgent. It is too late for my mum and dad but if we get more Admiral Nurses someone else’,s family will not suffer as mine did. We have already had great support and raised over £,3,000 of our target is £,25,000. If I survive this trek, next year we will climb Kilimanjaro, God willing. To see more and to donate go to www.justgiving.org.uk/somethingmadfordad For more information on anything here contact Breda Theakston or Angela Fieldhouse on 0113 261 8050 or go to www.flm.org.uk Next Month: Parents’, Week 17th –, 23rd October ‘,Family Friendly’, see parentsweek.org.uk Parenting Support Proj ect On Y’,er Bike! Deacon David Arblaster, of St Aelred`s Harrogate writes: ‘,With my daughter Kathryn we cycled from Whitehaven to Tynemouth, which is 150 miles over some of the hilliest, but most beautiful and unspoilt countryside in England. Overall the weather was very kind to us however on the final day as we cycled through torrential downpours I couldn`t help thinking how the water that cascaded down on us would have brought such relief to the drought-torn people of East Africa.’,

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Sept 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Leeds Catholic Post Page 5 International week at Holy Family School Meeting God in Friend and Stranger at St. Wilfrid’,s T he new document on inter- religious dialogue was fully embraced by the RE Department at St. Wilfrid’,s Catholic High School and Sixth Form College during ‘,Activities Week’, in July. Pupils in Year 7 to 9 became “,Inter- religious Navigators”, as they navigated from workshop to workshop exploring faith and culture. The pupils who explore different religions in their studies were able to learn from the experiences of many people who had been invited into the department to share their faith and life. The teaching document of the Bishops of England and Wales, ‘,Meeting God in Friend and Stranger’,, encourages Catholic schools to enter into dialogue with members of many faiths. Pupils at St. Wilfrid’,s were very keen to talk and ask questions. By entering into dialogue, St. Wilfrid’,s pupils ‘,navigated’, away from seeing a person or group as being strange or different and becoming genuinely interested and deeply respectful of other expressions of faith and lifestyle. Year 7 ‘,navigated’, their way into the Hindu religion. A classroom had been transformed into a Hindu Temple for the day as Stephen Hopkins and Kavita Gupta dressed pupils as demi- gods of the Hindu religion. At the same time, Rabbi Russ Shulkes, chaplain to Yorkshire Universities demonstrated various Jewish artefacts with Years 7 and 9. Pupils were fascinated by which foods Jewish people could or couldn’,t eat and many enjoyed trying to blow a Shofar, the horn used during Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur. Joshua Nyamadi, a Ghanaian, encouraged pupils and staff to dance and sing to Black History storytelling and Akemi Solloway, a Japanese Shinto teacher dressed pupils in a Kimono and demonstrated Japanese etiquette. Year 9 ‘,set course’, for a workshop by Mohammed Hoque, a recent RE PGCE student at Leeds Trinity University College, who through the use of artefact, dress and game explained the Five Pillars of Islam. Roop Singh, a Sikh, agreed to be ‘,Hot- Seated’, during quite an intensive question and answer session. Fr. Sebastian and Br. Oisin from the Franciscan Friars of Renewal in Bradford shared their life in community. Year 8 took the route towards Rise Theatre company who invigorated pupils to demonstrate their gifts and talents through drama in keeping with the school’,s theme for the year: ‘,Many Gifts –, One Spirit’,. Extremely creative members of the RE department worked with pupils to create their own Rosary beads and Gospel bracelets. Lauren Jackson, Assistant Youth Officer for the Diocese of Leeds, led pupils in religious sign language. James Aitchison, Head of RE said: “,It has been a fantastic week. Our pupils were genuinely interested in every workshop and even wanted to continue navigating their way round after each school day. This week has been a wonderful demonstration of St. Wilfrid’,s pupils meeting God in both friends and in strangers.”, L ong-time holder of the coveted International School Award The Holy Family School celebrated a week of international activities. As well as the traditional school trip, both to France and from Spain there was exploration of oriental martial arts, cooking food from many lands, quesadillas, tortillas and chilli. The incoming visitors from Spain found the experience in an English school enjoyable The week culminated in Sports Day which took on an international flavour with “,Olympic”, teams from Spain, Italy, Greece, France and Germany as well as a team doing their best to uphold the honour of Team GB. The usual non-uniform day to round off activities took on a more serious note this year as the school mobilised to collect money to support relief work in East Africa following news of the drought in that area

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Sept 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 6 Leeds Catholic Post Mega –,Mix Special The Year 6 children of St Columba’,s Catholic Primary School Bradford wrote and produced their own end of term production called ‘,Year Six Mega-mix’,. It involved the pupils researching music from the different decades of the century and then dramatised a song or dance from each period. Parents gave very generously of their time to produce the costumes for the budding stars and to apply the make up needed on the night. The pupils’, passion and enthusiasm produced a truly stunning performance which at the end left hardly a dry eye in the house!

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Sept 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Leeds Catholic Post Page 7 Every Christian has an instinct to spread the good news. This can in- clude the Missal and of course, the Bible: but that is where problems arise. It is very difficult to download extracts from some of these texts from the internet. The New Jerusalem Bible can now be found, but not the Jerusalem version which we use at Mass, although the separate daily and Sunday readings can be found on the splendid Universalis daily office site. The New Revised Standard Version of the Bible, which may succeed the Jerusalem at Mass is on the even better “,Oremus”, website. When it comes to Mass, though, things are harder. There does not seem to be a definitive order of Mass on an English website, al- though the American Bishops’, Conference (USCCB) have published one on line, much to the relief of all trying to fill in the various gaps left by the commercial publishers: Funeral Masses, Communion for the Sick and more. ICEL (www.icelweb.org/- otherwise you will be deep into electron- ics) explain their relaxed copyright policy when the “,publication”, is an in- ternal one, not for sale, and booklets for special school Masses and so on can easily be produced…,.but, apart from the USCCB version, where do we find an original? We need to be careful that we are not still won- dering about moving on from solid type when our young people are wanting this material on their smartphones, i-pads and Kindles! I have been awaiting anxiously news of the English Mass Society, which seeks to preserve the old English Rite of Mass. I don’,t think it has actu- ally been formed yet, but given the Catholic penchant for nostalgia- the Rite of Benediction is linked inextricably for me with log fires and but- tered pikelets (this is Yorkshire)- it will not be long.I am still disappointed that we do not have an Ebor Mass Society, preserving (if you have ever wondered) what we folk round here did before the Tridentine or Extraor- dinary form came along around 1570. There are versions around, per- haps those used by the reformers before the Book of Common Prayer: I like the prayer that goes with the pre-Mass hand-washing: we could have reintroduced it for pre-Mass ablutions at times of swine or bird flu. “,Grant to our understandings, Almighty Father, that like as the filth of our hands is here washed away, so the defilement of our minds may be cleansed by Thee, and the growth of holy virtues may increase in us, through Jesus Christ our Lord.”, Talking of virtues, do you ever watch those reality police shows, where real policemen chase real and possible villains around places we know? Did you ever get depressed at the sentences meted out to people who have, for example, stolen and wrecked cars, having driven them round residential areas without insurance at death-dealing speeds? How do you reconcile these with the sentences resulting from the summer riots? Some of the perpetrators doubtless expected the former- say 200 hours community service- and got the latter- real prison…, what will the oucome of this clash of cultures be? Benchmark Sidelines Autumn is truly here –, already I`ve twice swept my drive clear of leaves. The Summer School of the Society of St Gregory is just a fond memory –, a spiritually and musically uplifting week in early August. The event was at Belsey Bridge Conference Centre, set in idyllic Norfolk countryside. The week was a blend of the spiritual (morning Mass, afternoon liturgies), the intellectual (lectures, workshops) and the exuberant (the evening Big Sings, the bar and the Thursday night concert). Next year the Summer School is in Whitby and I look forward to being there! Closer to home, if you are quick, you may just manage to come (just come along) to the next West Yorkshire Church Music network afternoon - `Songs of Glory!`, on Sunday September 18th 2011 from 2pm to 4pm at English Martyrs Church, Dewsbury Road, Wakefield, WF2 9DD. We will be looking at some of the new Gloria settings , and exploring of hymns glorifying God. This year, the SSG`s Annual Day Conference will be held here in Leeds, at Wheeler Hall, Leeds Cathedral Pastoral Centre on Saturday, 12 November 2011, 12:00pm –, 5:00pm. The conference includes a lecture by Fr Daniel O`Leary on `The Human Heart of Liturgy`, so it should prove an interesting afternoon. A long time ago, when I was an undergraduate, one of the lecturers lent me a book, `The Poverty of Historicism` by Karl Popper. I read it over the summer, and took away one key idea –, incremental change works better than `big bang` total upheaval. Revolutionaries and reactionaries, please note! With that in mind, the folk group at St Joseph`s will be playing an updated version of Christopher Walker`s Celtic Mass until Advent. It uses the new translation, but retains much of the familiar music. We are being a little bolder with a new setting of the Gloria, written by our keyboard player, Helen Edwards. So the new translation is at least encouraging the composition of good new music, a definite plus, even if folk plainsong may be beyond us. Tim Devereux tim.devereux@ssg.org.uk Links: West Yorkshire Pastoral Music Network: http://www.westyorkshirechurchmusic.org.uk/ Society of St Gregory: http://www.ssg.org.uk/ National Network of Pastoral Musicians: http://nnpm.org/ Independent Catholic News: http://www.indcatholicnews.com/ Musical Notes by Tim Devereux ST.FRANCIS CATHOLIC PRIMARY SCHOOL , BRADFORD RETAIN 5 –, SIDE TROPHY Yes - for the second year running a team of Y6 budding footballing stars from St. Francis Catholic Primary School, Bradford were victorious in winning the annual Bradford and Keighley Catholic Primary Schools 5 –, a side competition held at St. Bedes on Saturday June 25th. The team of Sam Wright, Casey Taglione, Sam Watson, Callum Ward (Capt ) Mason Casey, Ryan Hines and Josh Hall successfully defended the trophy which they won last year. The boys were unbeaten throughout the whole tournament. They beat St. Winefride’,s in the semi final and St. William’,s in the final. Captain Callum Ward accepted the trophy from ex St. Bedes’,s boy and former England international, QPR, Sunderland, Birmingham and Huddersfield player Mike Helliwell. It was a great honour that Mr. Helliwell accepted our invitation as he is the only St. Bede’,s boy ever to play football for his country. The tournament was a great success for Catholic education in Bradford and Keighley as 18 Catholic Primary Schools took part and the spirit of the competition was excellent. `Stride and Deliver` P upils, staff and parents from St Joseph`s Catholic Primary School in Castleford were challenged to `Stride and Deliver` when a highway man came a visiting on Friday. The children had won the Castleford Walk to School as an Historical Character Competition organised by Johny Gibson from the Road Safety Team. As their prize, the school could choose a figure from history to meet them at the local Castlefields` Car Park, walk to school with them and perform an assembly. A highway man was chosen to fit in with creative activites during Book Week and murderous tales of old were shared. Two Community Police Officers were roped in to keep an eye on `Swift Nick` to ensure he didn`t return to his terrible ways! Acting Headteacher, Annie McNally, stated: `What a fantastic, safe start to the day! The response to our Park and Stride was amazing this morning. I hope more families will be encouraged to park further away from school, enjoy a stroll through the park and help to ease traffic congestion at opening and closing times.`

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Page 8 Leeds Catholic Post `On 17th July, Sunday evening, a group of forty three people gathered in the hall of the Holy Name, Our Lady of Kirkstall Parish, to listen to a talk on `Jewish Family Life` by Mrs. Lucille Winburn. Mrs Winterburn is an orthodox Jew who, until recently, was Vice President of the Leeds Beth Hamidrash Hagadol Synagogue. Lucille, a languages teacher in Leeds, is a wife and mother of two sons. She spoke personally and movingly about her own experience of Jewish family life, in the context of the weekly celebration of shabbat, kashrut (kosher food laws) and the home. Like all good teachers, Lucille engaged all five senses of her audience in her discourse. There were many items to touch - the mezuzah, her prayer book, the tallit, the (empty!) Shabbat wine bottle - which were passed around the audience. It was very moving to hear the Hebrew that the mother recites when lighting the Shabbat candles. The display of artefacts to illustrate the topic was a feast for the eyes. Lucille had baked the two loaves of challah bread, eaten during the celebration of Shabbat, and slices of these loaves were eagerly eaten by members of the audience, thus satisfying the sense of taste. We were all invited to smell the spices of cinnamon and allspice from the spice box used in the closing ceremony of Shabbat. This beautiful ceremony is a reminder to members of the Jewish family celebrating Shabbat to take something of the sweetness of the ceremony with them into the coming week. The talk motivated the audience to ask many interesting questions and led many to a deeper understanding of the Jewish roots of our Christian faith tradition. Lucille was over-whelmed by the interest and good-will shown to her by the audience. She said, “,In all of the twenty years I have been speaking to different groups, I have never met such a receptive and biblically educated group as this one!”, This talk formed part of the exploration of Judaism, the faith of our Holy Family, being undertaken by parishioners of Our Lady of Kirkstall, in direct response to the Bishops’, recently published document, ‘,Meeting God in Friend and Stranger’,. The next talk, on the Jewish festival of Chanukah, by Mr. Ralph Ross, will take place at the same venue on Sunday 20th November beginning at 7.30pm. Further details via the Interreligious commission e-mail interfaith@dioceseofleeds.org.uk Deacons (and their wives) are meeting up in Bradford in the evening of 12th October. We already have a good list of attendees but if you are coming (and/or have any business matters to raise) contact Deacon Nick Shields on nick@laloge.co.uk or 01924 377921. That well-known Diaconal blogger Dcn Greg Kendra has published a recent address by the Pope to Seminarians, applicable to students for the Diaconate alone or Diaconate and Priesthood- and to the ordained. “,Dear friends, you are preparing yourselves to become apostles with Christ and like Christ, to accompany your fellow men and women along their journey as companions and servants. How should you behave during these years of preparation? First of all, they should be years of interior silence, of unceasing prayer, of constant study and of gradual insertion into the pastoral activity and structures of the Church. A Church which is community and institution, family and mission, the creation of Christ through his Holy Spirit, as well as the result of those of us who shape it through our holiness and our sins. God, who does not hesitate to make of the poor and of sinners his friends and instruments for the redemption of the human race, willed it so. The holiness of the Church is above all the objective holiness of the very person of Christ, of his Gospel and his sacraments, the holiness of that power from on high which enlivens and impels it. We have to be saints so as not to create a contradiction between the sign that we are and the reality that we wish to signify. Meditate well upon this mystery of the Church, living the years of your formation in deep joy, humbly, clear-mindedly and with radical fidelity to the Gospel, in an affectionate relation to the time spent and the people among whom you live. No one chooses the place or the people to whom he is sent, and every time has its own challenges, but in every age God gives the right grace to face and overcome those challenges with love and realism.”, Number Crunching (1) Diocese of Joliet, Illinois, USA Catholics 650,000: Priests 150: Deacons 223 Deacons Diary On 1 January this year, after the Angelus, Pope Benedict XVI announced that he wished to commemorate the 25th anniversary of the historic meeting in Assisi, instigated by Pope John–,Paul II, that took place on 27 October 1986. On the day of the anniversary, the 27th October this year, the Holy Father intends to hold a Day of Reflection, Dialogue and Prayer for Peace and Justice in the world , making a pilgrimage to the home of Saint Francis and inviting fellow Christians from different denominations, representatives of the world`s religious traditions and, in some sense, all men and women of good will, to join on this journey again The day will take as its theme: Pilgrims of truth, pilgrims of peace . Every human being is a pilgrim in search ultimately of truth and goodness. Believers too are constantly journeying towards God: hence the possibility, indeed the necessity, of speaking and entering into dialogue with everyone, believers and unbelievers alike, without sacrificing one`s own identity or indulging in forms of syncretism. On the morning of 27 October in the Basilica of St. Maria degli Angeli the theme of the day will be explored in greater depth. Leaders of some of the Delegations present will make speeches and the Holy Father will likewise deliver an address. There will follow a simple lunch, shared by the delegates to express fraternal conviviality. There will follow a period of silence for individual reflection and prayer. In the afternoon, all will make their way towards the Basilica of Saint Francis. The journey is intended to symbolize the journey of every human being who actively and assiduously seeks truth justice and Peace. The final stage of the Day will include a solemn renewal of the joint commitment to peace. In preparation for this day, Pope Benedict XVI will preside over a Prayer Vigil at St. Peter`s on the evening of October 26th. Churches and communities throughout the world are invited to organize similar times of prayer. Extracted from Vatican press release, 2nd April 2011 A parish explores Jewish family life Twenty-fifth anniversary of Assisi gathering commemorated Forthcoming events *** Please do log details of *** *** local events with *** *** the Interreligious Commission *** interfaith@dioceseofleeds.org.uk Thursday 22nd September –, Ripon The Question of God at Ripon Cathedral God and the human person by Catherine Pepinster, editor of The Tablet. 7pm Ripon Cathedral. Admission free but by ticket only. To book a ticket email judithbustard@riponcathedral.org.uk or telephone 01765 603462. For further information visit www.yorksj.ac.uk/stwilfridlectures Wednesday 5th October –, Leeds Concord Visit to Leeds City Museum Discovery Centre 2pm –, 4pm Talk and viewing of faith artefacts by Museum Curator, Antonia Lovelace. Carlisle Road, Leeds LS10 1LB (near to Royal Armouries). Further details secretary@concord-leeds.org.uk Tuesday 11th October. Hinsley Hall Christian Engagement with Islam:Context and Developments in England. A day specially intended for those less comfortable with or new to Christian-Muslim Relations Tuesday, 11 October 2011, 10.30 –, 16.00, Hinsley Hall Speakers: Rt Rev Tom Butler “,Reflections on the Inter-faith Landscape Today, Dr Philip Lewis, Islam in England: “,Who`s who and where?”,, Dr Helen Reid, “,Christian perspectives on Islam in the last 50 years”,, Anjum Anwar, Julian Bond “,Working together for a healthy society”,, Shaykh Ibrahim Mogra, Julian Bond “,Mission vs. dialogue?”, Workshops: Dialogue and Witness –, are they in conflict?, What are you doing on the ground? -shared social action, Less visible leaders? Women’,s role in developing dialogue, Getting to know you better –, opportunity for questions, The bigger picture - politics and international impact Cost: £,40 waged £,25.00 unwaged inclusive of lunch and refreshments. Contact Lorraine Shannon (lorraine.shannon@cte.org.uk), tel: 020 7529 8131 for further information and to book for this event. Wednesday 2nd November Leeds Leeds Concord’,s Annual Peace Service 7.30pm in Leeds Civic Hall. Further details: secretary@concord-leeds.org.uk Thursday 10th November- Ripon The Question of God Islam and the question of loving by Mona Siddique, academic, broadcaster and consultant. Ripon Cathedral, 7pm. Admission free but by ticket only. To book a ticket email judithbustard@riponcathedral.org.uk or telephone 01765 603462. For further information visit www.yorksj.ac.uk/stwilfridlectures Interfaith Week November 20th –, 26th The third national Interfaith week will be held in November (20th -26th). The intention is that local groups can organise their own activities while taking advantage of national consciousness-raising publicity. For help in organising an event in your area please do contact the Inter- religious commission. interfaith@dioceseofleeds.org.uk Oct Thu 6 Dussera (Hindu ) Celebrates Lord Rama`s victory over the evil demon Ravana. Oct Sat 8 Yom Kippur (Jewish ) Day of Atonement - Yom Kippur, the most sacred and solemn day of the Jewish year, brings the Days of Repentance to a close. The day is marked by an absolute fast fro 25 hours. On Yom Kippur, God makes the final decision on what the next year will be like for each person. The Book of Life is closed and sealed, and those who have properly repented for their sins will be granted a happy New Year. Oct Sun 9 Birthday of Guru Ram Das (Nanakshahi calendar) (Sikh ) Guru Ram Das (1534-1581) was the fourth of the Sikh Gurus. Oct Thu 13 Sukkot (Jewish ) Sukkot or The Feast of Tabernacles, commemorates the years that the Jews spent in the desert on their way to the Promised Land, and celebrates the way in which God took special care of them under impossible conditions. Sukkot lasts for seven days, and work is not permitted on the first two days. Oct Wed 19 Hoshanah Rabbah (Jewish ) The 7th day of Sukkot. Oct Thu 20 Birth of the Bab (Bahai ) Celebrates the birth of the precursor of the founder of the Baha`i faith. Oct Fri 21 Simchat Torah (Jewish ) Simchat Torah means ",Rejoicing in the Torah.", This holiday marks the completion of the yearly cycle of weekly Torah readings. Oct Wed 26 Paryushana (Jain ) The most important Jain festival, it consists of eight (Swetambara) or ten (Digambara) days of intensive fasting and repentance. A time of reflection. Oct Wed 26 Diwali (Hindu ) Diwali, the festival of lights, is the most popular of all the festivals from South Asia. It is an occasion for celebrations by Hindus as well as Jains and Sikhs. Oct Wed 26 Diwali (Sikh ) For Sikhs, Diwali is particularly important because it celebrates the release from prison of the sixth guru, Guru Hargobind, and 52 other princes with him, in 1619. October festivals

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Leeds Catholic Post Page 9 WYD seminarians pray for perseverance Five of our seminarians animated groups of young pilgrims from our diocese in Madrid for the World Youth Day last month. Their duties ranged from leading their groups in prayer, guiding them around Valladolid and supporting young people who were succumbing to heat exhaustion! They also had the honour of seeing Pope Benedict at a special event for seminarians. The photograph shows the seminarians at the shrine of Saint Raphael Arná,is at the Cistercian monastery of Saint Sisidore of Duenas. St Raphael, who died in 1938 aged only 27, was one of the patron saints of this year’,s World Youth Day. He is a model of somebody who persevered in his vocation: he repeatedly had to leave the monastery because of ill health but always returned there because he was convinced that God was calling him to the monastic life. Promoting vocations in Madrid The ever-resourceful National Vocations Officer, Fr Christopher Jamison, osb, manned a special stand during the World Youth Day Pilgrimage. One thousand young people from England and Wales visited the stand and gave their contact details –, their names were entered into a competition to win a Kindle and each was given a bandana to advertise the work of the National Office for Vocation. Leeds Vocations director Fr Paul Grogan also attended and answered questions throughout the ten-day event on the priesthood from interested young men. Faith movement summer session Fr Paul Grogan attended the summer session of the Faith Movement in Woldingham, Surrey last month and met up with some fellow clergy from our diocese –, Fr Michael Kelly and Fr Stephen Brown (both longstanding supporters of the Movement, which seeks to promote a synthesis of science and religion) –, and young men from St Augustine’,s parish in Leeds (pictured). The theme of the well-attended conference was “,The Vocation to Love”, and speakers included Professor Tom Pink of London University and Canon Luiz Ruscillo of Lancaster Diocese. As well as the talks, the conference offered young participants lots of opportunities to play sport and to socialise. Trusted psychologist dies Royston Williams, who has assessed candidates for the priesthood and the diaconate for Leeds Diocese for many years, died suddenly last month after having been diagnosed with cancer more than a year ago. Mr Williams had unparalleled experience in helping clergy and religious who were suffering from addictive behaviour, not least through his work at Our Lady of Victory treatment centre in Stroud. His assessments of prospective candidates for the diocese usually took place at Hinsley Hall and generally lasted a whole day. He also used to visit the English College in Valladolid to provide ongoing support and help students to address issues which had emerged in the earlier assessments. Mr Williams, who was an Anglican, had long felt drawn to Catholicism, and was received him into the Catholic Church in the presence of his Catholic wife, Olive, in his home near Worcester a few days before he died. May he rest in peace and rise in glory. Samuel Group launched Young people aged between 18 and 35 are being invited to attend a monthly Sunday-afternoon group at Leeds Trinity to reflect on God’,s call to them. The group, which is one of a number which are starting throughout England and Wales this year, is based on an idea of Cardinal Martini, the charismatic former Archbishop of Milan. The sessions, which begin at 4pm on each given Sunday and conclude after evening Mass with a pasta supper, will be based on lectio divina and occasional talks. The first will take place on Sunday 9th October. In addition, a new group for boys is being launched in October: Vocation Pathways. Young men aged between 14 and 18 are being promised “,fun plus prayer”, during the six meetings of the group scheduled for this academic year. There will be outings to Xscape, the Shrine of Our Lady of Mount Grace in Osmotherley and York, as well as sports sessions and talks. Finally, the new programme for the monthly Men’,s Discernment Group has been published. This will meet on the evenings of the first Thursday of each month at Leeds Trinity. This year the talks given by priests will focus upon the documents of the Second Vatican Council in preparation for the celebration of the 50th anniversary of the opening of the Council next year. The series begins on 6th October when Mgr John Wilson (pictured) will speak on the Dogmatic Constitution on the Church. Details of all these groups are available on the diocesan vocations website: www.leedsvocations.org.uk Vocations ST JOHN FISHER CATHOLIC HIGH SCHOOL HOOKSTONE DRIVE, HARROGATE, HG2 8PT Tel: 01423 887254 Fax 01423 881056 Email: office@sjfchs.org.uk SCHOOL LAY CHAPLAIN The Governors of St John Fisher Catholic High School invite applications for the above post from practising Catholics in good standing with the Catholic Church. Lay or religious applicants are welcome to apply for the post, which will commence in November 2011 (or as soon as possible thereafter). The School Lay Chaplain provides spiritual and pastoral support to students and staff of the school and co-ordinates school liturgies and retreats. This full-time position, working alongside the Priest Chaplain, is seen as crucial in fulfilling the school’,s mission in Catholic education and developing the spiritual and prayer life of the school. The school Chaplain will play a central role in bearing witness to this mission and maintaining the distinctive Catholic nature of the School. Salary to be paid on NYCC Band 10 in the range £,23,000-£,27,000pa depending on the successful candidate’,s qualifications and experience. Further details and an application form are available from the school (tel 01423 887254) or on the school website www.sjfchs.org.uk. St John Fisher welcomes applications regardless of age, gender or ethnicity. The school is committed to safeguarding children and protecting their welfare. Closing Date: Friday 14th October 2011

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Sept 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 10 Leeds Catholic Post P an is from Cambodia. At the age of 11 he tested positive for HIV. Another tragedy happened not long after when Pan’,s parents died within weeks of each other through AIDS. Alone, ill and frightened, Pan went to live with an aunt. She was poor and struggled to feed and clothe him and he was forced to leave school and sell rice on the streets to earn money. Life saving medication was available but Pan had no idea how to access it and, as the months passed, he grew weaker and weaker. A priest called Father Jim heard about Pan’,s situation and stepped in to help. Father Jim worked for Maryknoll, a Catholic organisation funded by CAFOD, which offers medical care, nutritious food, school support, and loving, caring homes to children affected by HIV. Shocked by Pan’,s physical condition, Father Jim took him straight to hospital and staff from Maryknoll visited every day to keep his spirits up. After Pan’,s discharge three weeks later, Father Jim arranged for Pan to live with caring people in a safe and happy home. He started taking medication and was soon strong enough to return to school. Four years on, Pan’,s life has been transformed. “,When I started lessons I was so happy!”, he told us. “,I felt like a normal boy, doing normal things. Every day I feel lucky.”, Sadly, Pan’,s experience is shared by thousands of children. Today, Pan is healthy, happy and filled with excitement for the future. But his story could have been so different. “,If it wasn’,t for Maryknoll’,s help, I don’,t think I would be here. I couldn’,t carry on living with so much pain,”, he told us. Saving lives is just the start Let’,s give the world’,s poorest children the childhoods they deserve, free from fear, hunger and illness. By donating to CAFOD this Harvest you can help the world’,s poorest children get the care and support they so desperately need. In other words, you could give them back the childhoods they deserve: free of pain, hunger and worry. Please support Harvest Fast Day, Friday 7th October, and if you are a UK tax payer, remember you can increase your gift by filling a Gift Aid form. HARVEST FAST DAY FRIDAY 7TH OCTOBER Fear-Hunger-Survival - The Stuff Of Childhood Dreams? S taff and students at Holy Family High School in Carlton have raised a stupendous £,3,300 to bring fresh water to Nigeria. Over the last two years the school set itself a mission to provide 100 clean water filters –, costing £,33 each –, to communities in Nigeria. Often people in rural communities in Nigeria have to walk miles to get access to water which is dirty and infected and can kill the children and adults who drink it. CAFOD has developed a simple water filter which uses sand, charcoal and granite to filter the dirty water and these can be set up anywhere. On July 21st in a moving service involving the whole school, the cheque was handed over to Father Phillip Jamang, a visiting priest from Nigeria, by the students during the Liturgy. Also in attendance was Margaret Siberry the manager of CAFOD. “,I am amazed”,, said Fr. Jamang “,at the marvellous work done here in Holy Family, Carlton. These filters will bring not just clean water to people in my country but also bring love from the children of Carlton to the children of Nigeria”, To raise the money the school organised dozens of activities such as a Gospel Readathon, Fairtrade Non-Uniform Days, a Fun Run and a Fairtrade Chocolate Fest. The project was led by Mrs Marie Evans, (Head of RE). Marie Evans said, “,When we started this project our goals were relatively small scale but it became clear that the children of Holy Family were up for a bigger challenge. They have done brilliantly to raise so much money but also to understand how this challenge fits in with their responsibility as citizens of the world .”, Dr. Greg Lodge Carlton School Provides Clean Water In Nigeria O ur Climate Justice campaign is guided by the gospel imperative to act in solidarity with our brothers and sisters around the world so that all may flourish. Every day, the world’,s poorest men and women juggle all sorts of threats, including famine, drought, and devastating natural disasters. Their survival often depends on traditional ways of coping, passed down through generations. But climate change throws another ball into the mix –, one which threatens to overwhelm them completely. Such communities unfairly bear the brunt of a changing climate. Funds aimed at helping these communities to adapt could lighten their load. In the run up to UN talks in Durban, South Africa this December, it’,s an important time to lobby the UK government on this urgently needed finance. What are we calling on the UK government to do? •, Ensure the UK provides its fair share of finance to help people in developing countries adapt to climate change over the long term. Specifically, ensure a plan is adopted at the next UN talks in Durban to mobilise the money needed, •, Champion the setting up of a new Green Climate Fund in Durban, •, Commit to channel the UK’,s contribution through this Fund. Order action cards for your parish by calling 0113 275 9302 or email leeds’,cafod.org.uk. Send them back to the Leeds office before 10th November 2011 when we’,ll hand all the action cards you’,ve signed to the UK government. CAMPAIGNING THIS AUTUMN - KEEPING THE PRESSURE ON FOR THE DURBAN SUMMIT Thanks to your generosity, we are: •, providing emergency food aid •, improving water supplies •, delivering vital medical supplies •, providing feed for animals Chris Bain, CAFOD’,s Director, says: “,Every donation is having an impact on the front line of this crisis. You can literally make the difference between life and death for thousands of people over the coming weeks.”, In August Bishop John Arnold, incoming Chair of CAFOD, visited northern Kenya, severely affected by drought itself and coping with an influx of refugees. Here are some of his thoughts. ‘,The main impression I have is of the pride and courage of the people. There have been three consecutive years of drought. No one, even the oldest people in these communities, can remember a drought like this. The first need is water. Then there is the question of food being supplied to these communities.’, Is there anything that sticks in your mind - something that touched your heart? I think just being with them, standing in that sunshine beating down among the dust and the arid surroundings. These are people who have come to the end of their ability to cope. In one community when we asked about food stocks, they held out some small plastic bags with some berries. There were also some nuts from the acacia tree which they feed to the livestock, but most of the livestock is dead . We saw a few goats left, there were a couple of chickens, but the rest of the livestock has either been sold off or died. Even when the rains come and they can begin to grow their crops again, they have lost all that investment in their future. Immediate crisis in Somalia ‘,The focus of attention has quite rightly in many ways been on the huge refugee camps in northern Kenya and Somalia. But there is the wider picture. Several hundred kilometres away from those camps, there are pastoral communities that are facing the full devastation of this drought in Kenya, Ethiopia, Djibouti, Uganda and Tanzania as well. We need to act now because otherwise there will be a catastrophe here too. There are hundreds of communities looking for survival. One of the greatest strengths of the Catholic Church is that it is in all these regions already. There are priests, there are catechists and lay people in the church in all these communities, and CAFOD is working with them. It just takes determination to meet those basic needs. Do our donations really make a difference? ‘,Quite simply, I know aid works. I have seen it working. And I have seen in the places I visited groups of people who are proud and do not want to ask for help but are driven to. They ask for the minimum. If we provide the minimum, they will work very hard to provide for anything else that they need. And this is not only here in Kenya, it is in other places where CAFOD is working. People do not want to receive charity. They want to be proud of what they can do for themselves. ‘, For full interview WITH Bishop Arnold, visit http://www.cafod.org.uk/news/emergencies- updates/east-africa-drought-2011-07- 07/bishop-arnold-isiolo-2011-08-02 Thank-you for making our work possible. CAFOD EAST AFRICA APPEAL: LEEDS DIOCESE DONATES OVER £,135,000 IN THE FIRST SIX WEEKS

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Leeds Catholic Post Page 11 Mgr Andrew Celebrates 25 Years of Ministry C ardinal Cormac Murphy O’,Connor made a first visit to the Yorkshire Dales on 7 September 2011 to join Bishop David and parishioners of St Stephen’,s Skipton and St Margaret Clitherow, Threshfield, for Mass and a reception to celebrate the Silver Jubilee of Mgr Andrew Summersgill. Although it was a wet and blustery evening, the marquee on the lawn of St Stephen’,s meant that over 200 parishioners and guests enjoyed drinks and a reception prepared by the Parish Social Committee and served by amongst others a group of younger parishioners. During Mass, Mgr Summersgill, who was appointed by Bishop Arthur to Skipton in January, having organised Pope Benedict’,s visit last year, reflected on the role of a priest to discern the good in people. He drew on St Paul’,s counsel to the community to have a common purpose and a common mind “,in the Spirit we have in common”,. Almost twenty priests from the deanery, friends and colleagues concelebrated, including Fr Paul Conroy, General Secretary of the Scots Bishops’, Conference who had come directly from a Bishops’, meeting in Edinburgh. Clergy from Churches Together in Skipton and in Upper Wharfedale were present as were Fr Andrew’,s parents family members and friends. At the end of the Mass a presentation on behalf of the parish was made by Norah Boylan, with both Bishop David and Cardinal Cormac offering warm personal tributes to Fr Andrew for his work as Bishops’, Secretary and as General Secretary of the Bishops’, Conference. Commenting to the Catholic Post, Mgr Summersgill said, “,It’,s eight months since I arrived here and I have been warmly and generously welcomed to Skipton. It was a joy to be able to mark this anniversary with the people here. The preparations were enthusiastic and enjoyable, and it was a very special celebration for me and I hope for everyone who was there.”, T he staff at The Holy Family School, Keighley, met in the school chapel to begin the new school year. Damian Moore, Deputy Head, led a reflection on nurturing the human spirit by being alive to the presence of the Holy Spirit. 6 candles were lit, five for the various groups making up the immediate school community and one for the people of the town as whole The candles were brought back from Dachau over the summer by Damian Moore. “,I intended obtaining some chucky candles that would last though the year,”, he explained, “,but when I saw these at Dachau, made to celebrate the triumph of the human spirit over tremendous odds –, odds that we hope we never to have to face –, I decided that they were the better option.”, I’,ve found that God likes dressing up Likes playing hide and seek Especially when I’,ve work to do And timetables to keep I’,ve got so many plans He could help get off the ground But God’,s not around At least he’,s not where I can see him Or feel he’,s on my side He’,s not in all the plans I’,ve made to bolster up my pride To bolster up my pride But in the interruptions Through which I ride roughshod There is God So I missed God in the sunshine That warmed my hands and face Missed God in the youngster That I sent off in disgrace Missed God in the person Who would not let me speak I think I’,ll have to work some more At playing hide and seek In their turn the incoming Year 7 students met together to pray Morning Prayer as the first act of their new school career. It has been the custom for some time at The Holy Family for Morning Prayer to be read in the school Chapel each day as the school opens in the mornings. In recent years that responsibility has deliberately been devolved to the new student cohort on their first day. “,Nurture the human spirit,”,

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Sept 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 12 Leeds Catholic Post In the footsteps of Bishop Arthur... The first days of the pilgrimage were spent in the city of Valladolid two hours from Madrid. All the pilgrims were impressed with the tour of the English College there, the place where our very own Bishop Arthur studied to become a priest. The College is home to many priceless books, artefacts and paintings that have survived Catholic persecution throughout the ages. A trip to the English College’,s summer house was definitely a first week highlight for many of the Leeds pilgrims due to the huge pool, although perhaps not for the pilgrim pushed into the pool fully clothed by none other than Fr. Martin himself! ‘,Solo Dios Basta’, Another day trip saw the Leeds-Lancaster- Middlesbrough convoy heading to Avila, the home to St. Teresa of Avila, one of the World Youth Day patrons. Mass was held in a beautifully ornate chapel in the Carmelite monastery after a tour where pilgrims learned about St. Teresa’,s life and how she changed her order. Her phrase ‘,Solo Dios Basta’, ‘,God Alone Suffices’, was also a mantra echoed in the life of St Rafael Arnaiz, whose monastery we also visited during our days in Valladolid. The Love and Life Centre : Home for English Speaking Pilgrims After four days we found ourselves in Madrid, the host city of World Youth Day 2011. Every morning we left the lap of luxury (aka Hotel Osuna) to travel to central Madrid and attend Catechesis in a 12,000 seat stadium where we were joined by English speaking pilgrims from all over the world. MC’,d by the Sisters of Life we listened to talks on a host of spiritual topics after which we celebrated Mass with numerous bishops and tens of priests. The Festivities Begin Our first taste of the real masses gathered in Madrid came when the group attended the opening Mass, held in the open air in central Madrid. The Mass was primarily in Spanish but thanks to our Magnificat Booklets most were able to come out with the right responses! Even the fact we were sat on a roundabout for the Mass didn’,t deter us from participating! The Arrival of the Holy Father The Pope’,s arrival was met with a mixture of excitement and apprehension. Despite getting to Cibeles Square early there were still masses of people. As time went on, more and more people came along to climb up trees and hang off park railings. The Pope arrived in a flurry of camera flashes and screaming youth, the delight that flowed through the crowd was infectious. When a man who is the successor of St. Peter is literally feet away, when the Pope comes so close, somehow faith becomes a lot more personal. The feeling is one to blow you away. Despite the hysteria and all the people around the moment becomes very individual and graceful. The Pilgrimage Walk The Saturday Papal Vigil was an event we were all looking forward to. Despite 46°,C heat we all trudged on to find our allotted section E5. The walk was long and the group suffered a good few casualties, but the majority managed to stay in high spirits, partly due to the local fire brigade spraying us with water! E5 turned out to be close to the front of the airfield, with an excellent view of the altar. Unfortunately, it was not to be –, Leeds Diocese was turned away because the section was so full. Leeds Pilgrims eventually found themselves right at the back of the airfield with not much of a view at all –, but we didn’,t let that put us down! The Infamous Storm Soon the heat gave way to clouds and the temperature dropped. And then dropped again. And then the clouds became very dark…, and it began to thunder. The heavens opened upon us all and many found themselves regretting their wistful prayers for rain earlier in the day. But still, nothing could make the Leeds Pilgrims pack up and go home –, even if the Blessed Sacrament was retrieved due to a lightning strike! A group sing-along was all that was needed to put a smile on everyone’,s face. In spite of a less than perfect day the Leeds pilgrims managed to stay very reverent to the Holy Father as he conducted the Vigil and fell to complete silence during Adoration of the Blessed Sacrament. A Church of Hope We headed home the following day, excited with the news that the airfield had held 2.5 million pilgrims that morning with another 500,000 turned away. The experience of World Youth Day is like no other out there. Together with thousands from all over the world, young people stand as testament to the faith. Whoever said young people have left the Church has clearly never been to World Youth Day! Come and join us at the next WYD ... in Rio de Janeiro! WORLD YOUTH DAY By Georgia O’,Rourke Leeds Diocesan Youth Service ‘,All who are thirsty, come!’, (Rev 22:17) Tickets: £,22 Concessions £,20 Performances 7.15pm, Saturday 1pm and 5.30pm Tel: Anne Copley 017505 948909 Email: tcpticketsw@live.co.uk

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Sept 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Leeds Catholic Post Page 13 Specialists in wedding photography 01977 556088 07716728109 Your wedding is a unique day which involves considerable thought, planning, time and effort. Once your special day is over you will be left with many lovely memories some of which will inevitably fade over time. Investing in good photography can ensure that the mood and emotion of your day is captured to form a permanent reminder to enable you to relive your memories for years to come. On the occasion of the 43rd Communications Day Pope Benedict encouraged young believers to bring the witness of our faith to the digital world. With this in mind, the Leeds Diocesan Youth Service have taken up Pope Benedict’,s call and are now on Twitter. Follow us atLeedsDYS.

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Sept 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 14 Leeds Catholic Post T he Parish of St Anne, in Keighley, played host on Saturday July 30th to one of the Oriental Churches that are in communion with Rome. People from Kerala using the Syro-Malabar rite were celebrating the feast of St Alphonsa, a newly created Saint. The Rite they belong to has over 3 million Catholics and is know spread across the world from where its home is in Kerala, in South India. The Mass started with the lighting of the Candle symbolizing the driving out of darkness and the coming of light and from there broke into full music giving the impression that there was a full orchestra and a choir of some numbers. It turned out to be a sound mixing desk, a main celebrant that definitely could sing and a small group on microphones –, that was until others arrived along with the prayer books, so everyone could join in. Once the Mass had finished there followed a procession with banners, and the children carrying flowers, then a return to church for the final prayers, before a celebration in the Catholic centre. The purpose of the celebration was for the people from Kerala to invite the people from the Parish to their celebrations to better get to know each others ways of celebrating, and it was indeed a truly colourful celebration and though conducted in Malayalam, plus lasting three hours it was a joyful celebration. Kerala comes to St Anne’,s

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Sept 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

L eeds Trinity University College has celebrated the conferring of awards in its own name for the first time at a graduation ceremony on its Horsforth campus. Leeds Trinity was granted Taught Degree Awarding Powers by the Privy Council in 2009, earning the status of University College. Previously the University of Leeds awarded Leeds Trinity’,s degrees through an accreditation agreement. The first cohort to graduate with Leeds Trinity University College awards were newly qualified secondary teachers who had successfully completed the Postgraduate Certificate in Education (PGCE). Three graduates of the MA in Business Management also received their degrees on the night. Presenting the awards, Professor Freda Bridge, Leeds Trinity’,s Principal and Chief Executive, said, “,This first ceremony represents a proud moment for me personally and for all those who work and study here, fulfilling the affirmation that we are an institution worthy of awarding our own degrees. Tonight we feel privileged to be celebrating with the very first graduates of Leeds Trinity University College.”, Andy Gilliland, PGCE Tutor for Business Studies, said, “,Leeds Trinity has a long and distinguished record of training teachers in all subjects, many of whom are subsequently snapped up by our partnership schools to teach across the region.”, “,For me, it is very significant that some of the first students to graduate in Leeds Trinity colours are about to embark on exciting new careers, bringing the skills and experience they have gained in other professions to their new roles as teachers.”, Former chartered accountant Leigh Rainford (pictured) has a teaching post at Bradford Academy next year, and said, “,I chose to retrain as a teacher so I could use the knowledge of real businesses I gained throughout my accounting career to enthuse students about business. The tutor support has been excellent - the course is well structured and gives students a wide variety of experiences in different schools.”, NEWS FROM LEEDS TRINITY UNIVERSITY COLLEGE Leeds Catholic Post Page 15 Leeds Trinity celebrates first graduations as University College Events at Leeds Trinity University College Please visit our website at www.leedstrinity.ac.uk for more details and a full events listing. Open days for prospective students Saturday 22 October Our Open Days are a great opportunity to find out about studying at Leeds Trinity as an undergraduate, postgraduate or foundation degree student. The events run from 11.00am to 3.00pm at our campus on Brownberrie Lane, Horsforth, LS18 5HD. Call 0113 283 7150 or visit www.leedstrinity.ac.uk for information and to book. Vatican II 50 Years On: The New Evangelization 26 to 29 June 2012 In order to reflect on the impact of Council and deepen understanding of the New Evangelization, Leeds Trinity University College is hosting an international Catholic theological conference. The conference is jointly organised with the Centre for Catholic Studies at Durham University and is the first in a series to celebrate Catholic higher education in the UK. For further information contact Kathy Stenton, by email to k.stenton@leedstrinity.ac.uk or call 0113 2837102. F or diocesan youth worker and student Lauren Jackson, the World Youth Day celebrations in Madrid in August were much more than just part of the job. Lauren, from Leeds, is about to start her final year of a BA in Theology at Leeds Trinity while continuing with part-time youth work for the Leeds Diocese. She attended the event in Madrid with young people from the diocese and Leeds Trinity Chaplain Mgr Paul Grogan and Assistant Chaplain Sister Anne Hammersley. World Youth Day is a celebration of faith that draws hundreds of thousands of young Catholics together in one city. The event is held every three years in a different country, and for Lauren it was her third World Youth Day after the events in Cologne in 2005 and Sydney in 2008. Reflecting on how these experiences have helped her own spiritual journey and those of the young people she works with, Lauren said, “,Although my own faith was not very strong at the time, I went along to Cologne with friends from my parish. I was overwhelmed by the numbers of young people and the festival atmosphere, and when I got back I realised that they had something that I wanted and started to explore my faith in more depth.”, “,By the time I went to Sydney in 2008, it was much more faith- centred for me, focusing on prayer and catechesis, and all the more special because the experience was shared.”, “,This time in Madrid, the real joy for me was being with all the young people I’,ve mentored, answering their questions and hearing what they got out of it. As I have found from my own experiences, World Youth Day is a great celebration of faith that offers something for everybody appropriate to their needs.”, Sister Anne said, “,I felt privileged to be alongside our young people at World Youth Day, their faith, good humour and generosity strengthened my own belief in our God of Love. Their tremendous sense of devotion was deeply moving as they prayed silently in church at the beginning of Mass or sang joyfully of their faith and commitment.”, Lauren is pictured (second left) in Madrid with Mgr Grogan, Sr Anne and Leeds Trinity graduate Danielle Roman (right). World Youth Day celebrations mark another milestone for student Lauren Papal honour for Leeds Trinity chaplain with appointment as Monsignor Pope Benedict has appointed Leeds Trinity’,s Resident Chaplain as Monsignor, following a petition to His Holiness by Bishop Arthur Roche. Monsignor Paul Grogan received the papal honour in recognition of his roles as chaplain at Leeds Trinity University College and Vocations Director for the Leeds Diocese. Mgr Grogan said, “,I feel very proud and delighted to receive the honour. It is like a tonic to me - often when working as a priest it can be rather solitary and this affirmation of my role is very welcome and deeply reassuring.”, “,The honour was requested by the Bishop to enhance the contribution I can make to the life of Leeds Trinity and help to foster the Catholic identity and religious life of the institution. In this way my work is officially recognised by the Pope and its importance is underlined.”, Mgr Grogan was ordained priest 17 years ago after six years at the Venerable English College seminary in Rome. He had previously worked for three years as a journalist for the Universe following his degree in English. In his role as Vocations Director, a post he has held for seven years, Mgr Grogan works with young men to encourage exploration of the possibility that God is calling them to the priesthood and to support those preparing at seminary. Mgr Grogan joined Leeds Trinity as Resident Chaplain in 2007. The chaplaincy is at the heart of campus life, offering a full programme of worship as well as social activities and spiritual support for students and staff.

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Sept 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 16 Leeds Catholic Post St. Joseph’,s primary School together with St. Barnard’,s Parish, Halifax decided this year that they would like to sponsor a Charity as part of their Easter Project. The charity chosen was that of the Holy Innocents Children’,s Hospital, Mbarara, Uganda. This Hospital, the first Children’,s Hospital to be built in Uganda, opened in July 2009. Fr. Charles Beirne smm, a de Montfort priest from Leeds, had previously discussed this new Hospital with his friend Canon Taylor of St. Bernard’,s. When the Easter Project was started, Canon Taylor approached Fr. Beirne for more information. It was revealed that in Uganda, 1 child in 7 dies before the age of 5, and in the Mbarara district approx 13,000 children under 5 die each year. Thousands more, aged 6 –,12, die from Malaria and other treatable diseases. £,5 a day would be the cost of treating a sick child. The Easter Project in Halifax managed to raise £,2017-33 for the Hospital. At the end of term Mass at the Parish school of St. Joseph, the children were able to present the cheque to Fr. Beirne who was there to concelebrate. The success of this project follows that of 2010 when £,2000 was presented to “,Mary’,s Meals”, a project to feed hungry children. St Josephs Easter Project LEEDS CATHOLIC HISTORY DAY Saturday 22nd October 2011 Wheeler Hall, St Anne’,s Street, Leeds LS2 8BE (Adjacent to Leeds Cathedral) 10.00am to 3.00pm The speakers this year are: Mgr John Dunne Country parishes in 19th century Yorkshire Fr Nicholas Hird Leeds priests and the 1847 typhus epidemic Janet Douglas (Leeds Met University) John Kelly –, a Yorkshire Catholic architect of the Victorian era All welcome Admission £,5 (to include refreshments) Payable on the door Dear Brothers and Sisters in Christ, You Are Cordially Invited To LEEDS CATHEDRAL CHURCH OF ST ANNE Great George Street Leeds LS2 8BE FOR African &, Caribbean Mass Date: Sunday 30 October 2011 Time: 1:00pm All Are invited Written prayer petitions are collected at start of mass. Refreshment and Music follow immediately after mass in the Cathedral Hall. For further enquiries please contact Rev. Dr. M.C. Mkpadi on 0113 2959718 or 07884197261 There will be Thanksgiving/Second collection at the end of the Mass. PLEASE SEND THIS INVITATION TO THOSE WHO MAY BE INTERESTED. International Youth Vincentian Meeting F rom the 12th-15th August, Madrid held host to the International Youth Vincentian Meeting. Representing England and Wales were a group of seven students from the University of Leeds St Vincent de Paul Society. “,Vincentian, a lifestyle for today”, provided the main theme of the weekend, looking into how the values of the Vincentian way might be practiced in the lives of the youth today. Attended by over 1500 youth, countries represented at the gathering included America, Australia, Italy, the Philippines, Brazil, Portugal, the UK and many more. United by the same belief and able to share in the same Vincentian message, the meeting provided a rare opportunity to mix alongside other cultures and thereby recognise the far- reaching appeal of the society. It also allowed the chance to discover the work currently being done around the globe, providing a platform for ideas to be shared on an international scale. Each day the group celebrated Mass in which songs, prayers, readings and dance made the celebration alive and dynamic. The Welcome Mass utilised and set a further theme “,to be rather than to appear”,. Masks were used to reflect the way in which we often hide behind real selves, projecting false and incorrect realities. These masks, a physical metaphor for our potential to be two-faced and deceitful, were used consistently throughout the remainder of the weekend. By the end of the gathering, pilgrims were invited to rid themselves of their mask, representing a blossoming of the genuine person one should aim to be. Daily Catechesis saw speakers address the group about various aspects of the Vincentian lifestyle. Speakers included the International President of the St Vincent de Paul society, Michael Thio, who reinforced the importance of serving the poorest and most vulnerable within society, but also to recognise that providing help is as affective in the smallest of gestures, as it is in the largest. Providing a smile, showing care, lending your time are all acts that show love. Pilgrims were then encouraged to share ideas and participate in debate. Trips out also allowed pilgrims to see SVP-run projects currently working in Madrid, a real chance to see the Vincentian values put into practice in a successful and entirely beneficial way. Informal celebrations were also in abundance. One night held host to an ‘,International Folklore’, event in which groups representing the different countries were invited to perform an act, whether it be song, dance or both. Set in the style of the Eurovision song contest, the evening caused much laughter and a chance to appreciate other cultures. The weekend ended aptly with a truly Spanish festival, full of music, dancing, traditional foods, performances and more, providing the perfect way in which to celebrate a final night with new international friends. Held in accordance with, and as forerunner to World Youth Day, the Vincentian weekend provided a very unique and special celebration, in which the Vincentian beliefs and values were shared and celebrated, in which international ties were created, and most importantly where faith became a communal and exciting experience for all the youth involved, from all across the World.

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Page 17

Sept 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Leeds Catholic Post Page 17 Classified Advertising LEEDS CATHOLIC MARRIAGE CARE Marriage isn’,t always easy —, Counselling can help For an appointment in confidence, with an understanding and experienced listener, please telephone: 0800 369 3801 A Relationship Counselling Service W. Lever Ltd BRADFORD 01274 547137 524 THORNTON ROAD, BRADFORD BD8 9NB FOR OVER 75 YEARS PROVIDING A COMPLETE PERSONAL &, CARING 24 HOUR FUNERAL SERVICE CHAPEL OF REST H UGHES F UNERAL S ERVICES (Catholic Funeral Directors) 180 YORK ROAD, LEEDS LS9 9NT. Tel 2480953/63 152 GREEN LANE, CROSSGATES. Tel 2326900 3 HOLLIN PARK PARADE, OAKWOOD ROUNDABOUT Tel 2499338 Web: wwww.hughesfuneralservices.co.uk Email: info@hughesfuneralservices.co.uk Family owned and managed. Fully Qualified in all aspects. 24 Hour Service Guaranteed Fixed Price Funeral Plans etc. “,At a time of bereavement we carry out our duties with dignity and respect”, In times of bereavement please contact: B. J. MELIA &, SONS (B. J. Melia Dip F.D.) F UNERAL D IRECTORS AND M ONUMENTAL M ASONS Private Chapel of Rest 64 GIBBET STREET, HALIFAX Telephone: 01422 354453 PRE-PAID FUNERAL SERVICE AVAILABLE DETAILS ON REQUEST Jennings Funeral Services (Catholic Funeral Directors) 13 Racca Green, Knottingley WF11 8AT Telephone: 01977 677715 •, Highest standards of care •, Family owned and managed •, Pre payment plans •, 24 hour service •, Personal attention of Barry and Elizabeth Jennings A Personal and Dignified Family Business that Cares S J F Basil Loftus, one of our retired priests, who describes himself as “,a wandering minister I”, recently helped out in parishes in the Outer Hebrides. This is his account. “,It turned out to be my happiest parish for I never went to bed for the next seven years without a hearty laugh”,. Those are the words with which, in the parish magazine, Canon Angus McQueen describes his time fifty years ago as Parish-Priest on the island of Eriskay. His further claim, that such hearty laughter is “,the cure of all ills in this world of ours”,, is borne out by the fact that this month, now Parish-Priest on the neighbouring island of Barra, he celebrates his Diamond Jubilee as a priest, and approaches his ninetieth birthday. The new kid on the block in Eriskay, a mere stripling who doesn’,t celebrate his Diamond Jubilee until next year, is Calum MacLellan, whom some readers will know from his starring role in the current Television series –, “,Island Parish”,, the second tranche of which is now being filmed and will be broadcast soon. The island is of course famous as the setting for Compton Mackenzie’,s ‘,Whisky Galore’,. This is the ‘,factoid’, book, and later film, of the wrecking there of the ‘,S.S. Politician’, during the Second world War, and the consequent ‘,liberation’, by the islanders of its cargo of tens of thousands of bottles of whisky. One of them is still on display in the bar of the local hostelry, aptly named ‘,The Politician’,, but I didn’,t dare to ask the price of a dram when on a recent visit there to help out in the parish. But while there I quickly learned that it is not the transient fame of books, television or a reputation for defeating the excise-men, which is the island’,s principal characteristic. From the moment one arrives there, continuously until one leaves, the secret of the daily “,hearty laugh”, is revealed –, a deep, abiding and joyous Faith. Nowhere are the words of the prayer said after the ‘,Our Father’, in every Mass more descriptive of the spiritual ethos of the place where they are recited –,“,as we wait in joyful hope for the Coming of Our Saviour, Jesus Christ Famous men have long been associated with Catholicism on Eriskay, and its neighbouring Catholic islands of Barra and South Uist. In the Seventeenth Century St Vincent de Paul sent one of his missioners there, a Father Duggan, who at that time was the only Catholic priest in what we now call the Highlands and Islands of Scotland. As Compton Mackenzie recalls in his “,The Book of Barra”,, Saint Oliver Plunkett, then Archbishop of Armagh, also wanted to adopt Eriskay and the neighbouring islands. But after learning that it would be necessary “,to dress after the manner of these people which is very different from that of every other part of the globe”,, he stayed at home and contented himself with sending a number of Franciscan priests instead. So the Faith, which had been brought originally by Irish monks in the Sixth Century, was re- invigorated by Irish Friars over a thousand years later. And today it flourishes, with home-grown vocations providing the Gaelic- speaking priests for the Islands, as well as for a good tract of the mainland portion of the beautiful diocese of Argyll and the Isles. Then, as now, the Faith was not an academic pursuit. The tangible facets of devotion were, and indeed are, much in evidence. Father Duggan’,s letters to St Vincent de Paul comment on “,the many marvels resulting from the use of Holy Water, and there are roadside shrines and statues throughout the islands. Today, the parishes, which all own their own crofts or small-holdings, also influence those recently approved ‘,buy-outs’, which enable the people to own their own community land, even against the wish of the landowner. The Church in South Uist and its neighbouring, smaller, islands has always been marked by self-reliance and by total community participation. Effectively, the Church there is using that knowledge and experience to lead parishioners, virtually the same people who make up the civil community, in the assertion of their civil self-reliance and ownership. Thanks to an inspired and people-friendly Scottish Devolved Government, it is possible for the Catholic Church to encourage this version of ‘,Liberation Theology’, without the violence and politics which often characterises it in South America. In the past that self-reliance was very evident in the building of the parish churches. Not only were they nearly all physically erected by the parishioners, but the materials were salvaged. So it comes as no surprise to discover on Eriskay that the altar is an old life-boat. The German writing on the church bell is not ecclesiastical –, the bell was salvaged from a sunken German cruiser. And so it goes on. And what is true of the Faith in Erisaky is true also in the other Catholic islands in the Western Isles. Some parishes require the lone priest to celebrate Sunday and Feast- day Mass in four separate churches. All are full, men are at least as numerous as women, and in some parishes outnumber them. And if you are not there a quarter of an hour before Mass you risk not getting a seat. In the parish of Bornish, on South Uist, I got lost. Fortunately I have learned from previous experience and always build- in a ‘,getting lost’, factor when calculating how long it will take to get to a given place. But on this occasion I only just made it in time. For half an hour I drove up and down road after road without seeing another vehicle or pedestrian. I knocked on the doors of seven separate croft- houses, but got no response. It was only when I eventually found the church that I realised that all the motor-cars were in the car-park and all the people in the church, which was of course full. But there, as elsewhere in the area, the traditional Faith is just that –, a Faith which has been handed on (from the Latin tradere), not a Faith which hangs on to every last unimportant detail. So it was a banjo which accompanied the singing of all parts of the vernacular Mass. The tiny island of Eriskay, at the Southern end of the archipelago of the Outer Hebrides, with a current population of about one hundred –, virtually all Catholic and at Mass every Sunday, has exported the Faith by the emigration of so many to Canada, the United States of America, and Australasia. And it has also nurtured the vocation to the priesthood of one of its most illustrious sons, Father John Kenneth Campbell. He was the Franciscan priest who worked from 1967 to 1985 in the pioneering days at the Catholic Radio and Television Centre in Hatch End, succeeding Father, later Bishop, Agnellus Andrew as its Director. He is now buried on the island, where, with the others “,who have gone before us marked with the sign of Faith”,, he must rest very happily because that same Faith lives on. A Magical Parish: ST MICHAEL’,S, ERISKAY York Newman Lecture, 10 October 2011 T his year’,s York Newman Lecture, The Oxford Movement in Retrospect: its historical and contemporary significance, will be given by Dr. George Herring. Dr. Herring researched the Oxford Movement at Keble College, Oxford and later taught for twenty years at York St. John University. He currently teaches part time for the Centre for Lifelong Learning at York University and is the author of two books, What was the Oxford movement? and An Introduction to the History of Christianity: from the early Church to the Enlightenment. A third book, on the tractarian parochial revival, is in preparation. Last year, less than a month after the beatification of John Henry Newman by Pope Benedict at Birmingham, Fr. Richard Duffield, Provost of Birmingham Oratory, gave a lecture on Newman’,s Spirituality and the audience were privileged to be shown some of the very few surviving relics from Newman’,s grave. Fr. Duffield traced the development of Newman’,s spirituality from his early life to his conversion to Catholicism and beyond. His lecture made a big impression and several people commented afterwards that they had been very moved by the story. An edited version of the lecture was published in the January 2011 edition of the The Newman, the journal of the Newman Association. This year, as we celebrate the first anniversary of the beatification, the York Newman Circle is delighted that George Herring, a specialist in the history of the Oxford Movement in which Newman played a significant role, has agreed to give the York Newman Lecture on a subject which has also, as the title underlines, considerable contemporary significance. The Lecture, which will take place at St. Bede’,s Pastoral Centre, is open to all and non-members will be especially welcome at this event. Drinks will be served from 7 pm and the lecture will begin at 7.15. There will be a charge of £,2 for members and £,4 for non-members. St. Paul’,s Bookshop will be providing a bookstall, with a range of publications about Newman and the Oxford Movement. For further details contact Judith Smeaton 01904 704525, judith.smeaton@btinternet.com Batley Torchlight Procession This yearmarks the 60th Anniversary of the first Procession, which was organised by Fr. Laurence Gallon on 20th October 1951. So we hope that this anniversary will be a very special occasion. The event will be held on Monday 3rd October 2011 and will be LED BY RT. REV. ARTHUR ROCHE Service begins at 7.30pm Batley Market Square processing to St Mary of the Angels Church for Benediction AFTERWARDS YOU ARE INVITED TO A PIE AND PEAS SUPPER IN ST. MARYS SOCIAL CLUB, MELTON STREET, BATLEY. Please join us!

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Sept 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 18 Leeds Catholic Post FASTING AND ABSTAINING TO TACKLE FAMINE Some years ago whilst serving on Parliament’,s International development Select Committee I had the great privilege of attending the annual “,Pastoralists Conference “, in Ethiopia, a gathering of representatives of pastoral peoples throughout the world but mainly from Africa, people who for generations have lived with their flocks and cattle following their animals from pasture to pasture, travelling thousands of mioles with their families as seasons and climate change around them. And if a first outside impression is poverty then the first question I was asked by a head man from the regions of Northern Nigeria was a lively cultural reminder. “,Are you a rich man in your country?”, he asked. I fumbled about thinking of my pay scale and private property values, but he was more specific “,How many head of cattle do you have?”, He went on to explain that he considered himself and his family rich with over 100,000 cattle that he and his people moved around. Compared with him I was a poor man. But the precariousness of the pastoralist life has been tragically exposed by climate change and drought in East Africa now in the grip of a terrible famine affecting some 12 million people from Kenyan, Somalia, Ethiopia and Djibouti.. Hundreds of thousands have walked miles to Dadaad in Northern Kenya, overwhelming the world’,s largest refugee camp but even that camp itself is suffering from desperate drought. Two and a half million have fled from neighbouring Somalia now officially declared a famine region by the United Nations.It is the worse famine for over twenty years and putting real strain on the UN relief agencies ability to cope. Whilst Britain to its credit has responded well in terms of aid there are some European countries that have donated less than Sudan, which despite its own poverty is doing what it can to help its neighbours Having learnt from previous famine relief emergencies aid especially food aid is channelled through the world food programme and partners such as Unicef and trusted charities such as Cafod Save the Children, Christian Aid and Islamic Relief, British agencies with solid and respected track records of reaching the people who need relief. There is no issue therefore this time of misapplication or waste of aid money, nor of siphoning off by corrupt governments. The British agencies are working closely together coordinating their response, acting rapidly and efficiently to ensure that humanitarian aid reaches the people . But this time there are two major problems, firstly the massive scale of the crisis, affecting so many people and secondly the conflict chaos situation in Somalia. Aid agencies reporting back from the refugee camps in Kenya and Ethiopia point out that most of the people there are women and children in desperate hunger. Less than two per cent of those arriving are adult men. The reason is that the militant Islamist rebel group al Shabaab fighting a civil war since the fall of President Siad Barre and collapse of government twenty years ago, that now controls much of southern Somalia, is forcing the men to join them and take up arms with them, thus preventing them travelling with their families and leaving the country. These rebels were actually forcibly stopping aid agencies from coming in over the border to help address the famine continuing to deny that any famine exists. Since 2008 14 United Nations World Food programme workers have been killed there. Tackling the famine crisis in Somalia and at present the international community is pressing for humanitarian aid to be allowed to get through to the people in need. Last month al Shabaab lifted its ban on aid organisations on the condition that they had “,no hidden agenda”, and some humanitarian aid has been airlifted in to the southern town of Baidoa.. But the chaotic politics of Somalia is no excuse for the world to turn away from the twenty first century’,s first major famine crisis. In times when our own media in the wealthy world are turning inwards at own economic pressures, to media corruption and continuing celebrity commodity values there is little space for regular reports on a famine in East Africa and certainly not one that is both complex and overwhelming. Yet surely we should not look away and simply forget that millions in our world today are dying of starvation. The images of mothers holding their infants close as their lives ebb away in their laps may not appear regularly on our news bulletins but it is now a daily reality. What can we personally do? The straight forward answer is “,give more now”, to the UK British Aid DEC appeal in which CAFOD is playing a major part. Every little helps. £,1 would keep a malnourished child alive for a day, £,10 can sustain 14 animals. £,25 can provide drinking water for 400 people And £,50 provide vaccines for 2000 children suffering from malnutrition related curable diseases. £,100 would purchase emergency food packages to feed 100 families? And in answer to the question where would we manage to find even a modest donation in hard times? The Bishops of England and Wales recently proposed that from now on we should be reinstating the good practice of “,Friday abstinence”, from meat. Simply suggesting a diet shift to fish perhaps missing the point, not least when fish and chips bought in for a family can now be an expensive treat. Since the point is to introduce a sense of more regular “,fasting”, with the specific purpose of remembering that Friday is the special day of the memorial of Christ’,s Crucifixion we should really make it a day of abstaining, of “,less on our plate”, and sending what we save as a family immediately to the DEC and CAFOD to help take down some of the desperately suffering poor from their present crosses. John Battle KSG C ardinal Arthur Hinsley died on St Patrick’,s Day, 1943 aged 78. For 61 years he lived outside his native county. His boyhood years were spent in Carlton, from 1865 until 1876. He then entered Ushaw College and subsequently the English College, Rome. He was a professor at Ushaw from 1893 until 1898 when he became a curate at St Anne’,s, Keighley. From 1900 to 1904 he was headmaster of St Bede’,s Grammar School, Bradford. Following a disagreement with Bishop Gordon, Hinsley left the Diocese of Leeds in 1904 and never returned. Of his priestly ministry spanning fifty years only six were spent in Yorkshire. In 1905 Hinsley was incardinated into the Diocese of Southwark and in 1917 became Rector of the English College, Rome. From 1928 until 1934 he served as Apostolic Visitor and Apostolic Delegate in British Colonial Africa and was consecrated Bishop of Sebastopolis in 1926 and Archbishop of Sardes in 1930. In 1935 Hinsley succeeded Cardinal Francis Bourne as Archbishop of Westminster. He positively influenced the public perception of the English Catholic Church and made a reputation for himself during World War II as a vociferous patriot comparable with Winston Churchill. King George VI said that he trusted only Churchill and Hinsley to speak about the war on England’,s behalf. When Hinsley died he was mourned by the Catholic community, the nation and by many countries which welcomed his denunciation of fascism. Yorkshire Connections St Mary’,s, Carlton, has mementoes of the Cardinal, his origins and the visit he paid to his parents’, grave in 1936. His house behind the church is still there. At St Anne’,s, Keighley, the church, presbytery and school are very much as they were in Hinsley’,s time. His biretta and headmaster’,s chair are at St Bede’,s. The Diocesan Archives contain information on Hinsley’,s student days and his time at St Bede’,s. The portrait in the entrance of Hinsley Hall reminds us of the Cardinal and inside other facets of his life lie hidden in the Episcopal portraits. Bishop Cornthwaite, who confirmed Hinsley in 1874 and who like Hinsley was Rector of the Venerabile, is not there –, his portrait hangs in Bishop’,s House - but Bishop Gordon who clashed with Hinsley certainly is. So too is Bishop Cowgill who dealt with Hinsley, St Bede’,s, and the transfer of the troublesome priest to another diocese. Bishop Cowgill had the joy of seeing Hinsley translated to Westminster. Bishop Poskitt took on Hinsley’,s wartime Sword of the Spirit movement and followed his lead in the run-up to the 1944 Education Act. He was considered as Hinsley’,s successor. There are portraits too of Bishops Heenan and Dwyer, Hinsley’,s students at the Venerabile. Bishop Konstant was ordained by Cardinal Griffin who, like Heenan and Dwyer, was also a student under Hinsley. Bishop Wheeler was ordained by Cardinal Hinsley for the Diocese of Westminster in 1940 and it was Bishop Wheeler who ordained Bishop Roche in 1975. Yorkshire Ministry In Keighley Hinsley served as curate to Canon Watson and worked diligently on the mission. He was an enthusiastic curate who was remembered with affection but his stay in Keighley was short-lived. In 1899 the Bradford Catholic Union, anxious to provide secondary education for boys, obtained the agreement of Bishop Gordon to open a school to be named after St Bede and asked for Dr Hinsley to be its founding headmaster. Bishop Gordon consented but what followed was mixture of high achievement and clashes of obstinate personalities. The governors supported Hinsley but neither they nor Gordon could keep pace with the speed and extent of his ambitions and his abrasive personality. Mental and physical exhaustion drove him from St Bede’,s but not before he had laid firm foundations for the school’,s future. Heenan wrote that Hinsley would not have left his beloved Yorkshire if his disagreements with Gordon and the governors had not been so deep. His impetuous departure left his colleagues and students saddened and disillusioned. The Bishop, however, could not get rid of Hinsley quick enough and said that he would not wish him on his worst enemy! Hinsley returned to St Bede’,s until 1925 when he and Cardinal Bourne attended the opening of new extensions. Hinsley should have been principal guest at the opening of the new St Bede’,s in 1939 but was prevented from attending by the outbreak of World War II. Conclusion Hinsley spoke with the accent of the north all his life and never lost the characteristics normally attributed to Yorkshire people –, truculence and obstinacy but also generosity and warm-heartedness. His influence on those who came into contact with him whatever their station in life was strong. In the Second World War his Yorkshire character made him one of the most popular and visible of churchmen, a patriot who was admired and loved by many, both inside and outside the Catholic community. Hinsley’,s life stretched from the time when Yorkshire in its entirety was a diocese –, that of Beverley –, and he came into contact with and was educated by priests of that huge diocese. At Ushaw and in Rome he trained with and in turn trained men who were to minister in the Dioceses of Leeds and Hallam. Some of these priests were to die after Hinsley but ministered within the lifetimes of some of us who are here today. Cardinal Hinsley: Priest and Patriot (hardback, illustrated, 415 pages) is available at £,10.00 (including p+p) from james.hagerty@ntlworld.com or 0113 2250853. See www.jameshagerty.co.uk for further details. CARDINAL HINSLEY’,S YORKSHIRE CONNECTIONS

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Sept 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Leeds Catholic Post Page 19 Retirement at SS Peter &, Paul, Yeadon T om Robertshaw retired from SS. Peter &, Paul School, Yeadon, after 5 years as Headteacher. He had previously worked at the school as Deputy Headteacher for 10 years between 1979 and 1989. Other schools where Mr Robertshaw taught include St. Edward`s - Boston Spa, St Joseph`s - Brighouse, St Joseph`s - Pudsey and St Joseph`s - Halifax. He leaves at a time of great excitement as the new school build is well underway - Tom was instrumental in the planning and development of this project. Tom has been a wonderful Headteacher and has had a great impact on the whole school community. He will be greatly missed. All the pupils, staff, parents and Governors wish him a very happy, healthy and relaxing retirement. Visit to St John’,s Boston Spa D uring the summer term members of the diocesan Pastoral Commission for People with Disabilities visited St John’,s Catholic School for the Deaf in Boston Spa. The group was made very welcome by Jacqueline Butterworth and Headteacher Ann Bradbury. The group heard of the history of St John’,s and of the various methods involved in teaching young deaf people and were also able to explore the chapel and some of the teaching and specialist rooms as well as appreciating the pupils’, work in the colourful displays. All of the group enjoyed the visit and were impressed by the dedication of the staff, the friendliness and hard work of the pupils and the facilities. One member reflected that “,the commitment and care of the staff shone through their presentations and words. The wall displays and classroom facilities were excellent and it was clear that the young deaf pupils were given every opportunity to achieve in a most supportive environment.”, Another member, after the visit, said “,I thoroughly enjoyed our visit to St John’,s. The commitment and obvious vocation of the staff to provide a very ‘,Person Centred Approach’, to the care and education of each pupil was a pleasure to witness.”, REVELATION 2011-2012 “,DARE TO BELIEVE –, FIRM IN THE FAITH”, A t the end of World Youth Day 2011 in Madrid, Spain, our Holy Father speaking to the young people of the world gathered for the celebration of Mass encouraged them as follows: “,Dear young people, today Christ is asking you the same question which he asked the Apostles: “,Who do you say that I am?”, Respond to him with generosity and courage, as befits young hearts like your own. Say to him: “,Jesus, I know that you are the Son of God, who have given your life for me. I want to follow you faithfully and to be led by your word. You know me and you love me. I place my trust in you and I put my whole life into your hands. I want you to be the power that strengthens me and the joy which never leaves me”, (Pope Benedict XVI, Cuatro Vientos Air Base, Madrid Sunday, 21 August 2011 ). Here in the Diocese of Leeds the Youth Service invites you to take up this challenge with enthusiasm –, “,with generosity and courage”,! We want to invite you to gather with other young people once a month to pray together, to study the faith and spend time with each other. Over the coming months we are going to begin looking together at YOUCAT –, the Youth Catechism of the Catholic Church, which our Holy Father urges us to study “,with passion and perseverance”, alone, in study groups and on the Internet –, in fact by all means possible! ‘,Revelation’,, is the monthly gathering for young people across the Diocese of Leeds in school years 9-13. It takes place in Wheeler Hall at Leeds Cathedral, on the following dates over the coming months: Wednesday 21st September 2011, Wednesday 19th October 2011, Wednesday 16th November 2011, Wednesday 14th December 2011, Wednesday 25th January 2012 (Look out for information about special LDYS events during Lent!) Wednesday 25th April 2012, Wednesday 23rd May 2012 &, Wednesday 20th June 2012. It is necessary to fill out LDYS Registration Form and to bring this with you to the first Revelation. They are available from www.leedsyouth.org.uk or from the Youth Office at Hinsley Hall. They are also available from your parish and schools. So why not ask your friends at church, at school or college, if they are interested in coming along with you? We hope to see you there! ",It takes place in Wheeler Hall at Leeds Cathedral, from 7pm- 9pm, ....", ST.FRANCIS CATHOLIC PRIMARY SCHOOL , BRADFORD RETAIN 5 –,A SIDE TROPHY Y es - for the second year running a team of Y6 budding footballing stars from St. Francis Catholic Primary School, Bradford were victorious in winning the annual Bradford and Keighley Catholic Primary Schools 5 –, a side competition held at St. Bedes on Saturday June 25th. The team of Sam Wright, Casey Taglione, Sam Watson, Callum Ward (Capt ) Mason Casey, Ryan Hines and Josh Hall successfully defended the trophy which they won last year. The boys were unbeaten throughout the whole tournament. They beat St. Winefride’,s in the semi final and St. William’,s in the final. Captain Callum Ward accepted the trophy from ex St. Bedes’,s boy and former England international, QPR, Sunderland, Birmingham and Huddersfield player Mike Helliwell. It was a great honour that Mr. Helliwell accepted our invitation as he is the only St. Bede’,s boy ever to play football for his country. The tournament was a great success for Catholic education in Bradford and Keighley as 18 Catholic Primary Schools took part and the spirit of the competition was excellent. Headteacher Ann Bradbury with members of the Pastoral Commission for People with Disabilities. To advertise in the next issue of Leeds Catholic Post contact Louise on 0113 261 8028

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Sept 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 20 Leeds Catholic Post Sylvia Wright’,s Christmas Cards for sale F riday June 24 was chosen this year for the Mass of ‘,Celebration Of Priesthood’,. As is now the custom this was celebrated at the Cathedral in Leeds with just under a hundred priests taking part including most of those who were celebrating a Special Jubilee –, those with a Jubilee who were not able to be present were remembered in the Bishop Roche’,s opening remarks as he welcomed everyone to the celebration and thank all of them for their ministry as priests in the Diocese. He also welcomed Monsignor Adrian Toffolo to the celebration and explained that he had come all the way from the South of England for the occasion. In his homily Mgr Toffolo started by using the text ‘,Truly God Was In This Place’, from Genesis Chapter 28 and pointed out how it was good for all the Priests to gather together and look back at all their years in ministry –, years when God was in this place. It was also fitting he said that they should be celebrating on the Feast of John The Baptist, the man who pointed the way to Jesus just as they pointed the way to Christ. Concentrating on the song of Zacharias Mgr Toffolo pointed out that they had to have compassion, Strength and Gentleness. There were he said three points he wished them to remember –, not to quench the smouldering wick, that dark moments could be moments of grace and that they were to be a light to all nations. At the end of the Mass Bishop Roche thanked everyone for coming –, thanked again those celebrating an anniversary and led the people in a well deserved round of applause. Truly God Was In This Place

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Sept 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Leeds Catholic Post Page 21 Friday Penance The Visit of Pope Benedict XVI evoked for many people the spiritual reality of life and rekindled hope and faith: hope in the goodness that is within people and in our society, and faith in God. Even if it is not easily articulated, a spiritual yearning is to be found within most people. This yearning is found also among Catholics who have lost touch with their faith or whose faith was never deeply rooted in a personal relationship with Christ. Wishing to respond to this yearning but perhaps lacking in confidence in talking about their own spiritual life, many Catholics are asking how they can witness to their faith, what can they do to help introduce their faith in Christ to others in simple and straightforward ways? The Bishops of England and Wales recognise that simple acts of witness, accompanied by sincere prayer, can be a powerful call to faith. Traditional Catholic devotions such as making the sign of the cross with care and reverence, praying the Angelus, saying a prayer before and after our meals, to name only a few, are straightforward actions which both dedicate certain moments in our daily lives to Almighty God and demonstrate our love and trust in His goodness and providence. If these devotions have been lost or even forgotten, particularly in our homes and schools, we have much to gain from learning and living them again. The Bishops have looked again at the role of devotions and the practice of penance, both of which can help to weave the Catholic faith into the fabric of everyday life. Our regular worship at Holy Mass on Sunday, the day of the Lord’,s resurrection, is the most powerful outward sign and witness of our faith in Jesus Christ to our family, friends and neighbours. Sunday must always remain at the heart of our lives as Catholics. The Bishops also wish to remind us that every Friday is set aside as a special day of penitence, as it is the day of the suffering and death of the Lord. They believe it is important that all the faithful again be united in a common, identifiable act of Friday penance because they recognise that the virtue of penitence is best acquired as part of a common resolve and common witness. The law of the Church requires Catholics on Fridays to abstain from meat, or some other form of food, or to observe some other form of penance laid down by the Bishops’, Conference. The Bishops have decided to re-establish the practice that this penance should be fulfilled simply by abstaining from meat and by uniting this to prayer. Those who cannot or choose not to eat meat as part of their normal diet should abstain from some other food of which they regularly partake. Student wins Heythrop Theology Prize E ve Bontoft a student from St. Wilfrid’,s school Featherstone, won third prize in the prestigious academic competition offered by Heythrop College, the specialist Philosophy and Theology College of the University of London. Eve, a Theology student at St. Wilfrid’,s Catholic High School and VI Form College, entered an essay into the competition in February titled: Is there a difference between knowing God and knowing about God? She received a cheque for £,250. James Aitchison, Head of RE and Eve’,s Philosophy teacher spoke of Eve’,s brilliant philosophical ability: ‘,St. Wilfrid’,s is extremely proud of Eve. She has consistently demonstrated an academic approach to her writing and has sagaciously evaluated the views of scholars and schools of thought, as well as offering personal insights and independent thought. The essay she wrote and for which she was congratulated upon demonstrated a sophisticated and elegant expression of this deeply philosophical issue.”, Eve is pictured with James Aitchison, Head of RE and Nicola Couttie, Eve’,s Ethics teacher. Information sessions for carers G rowing Old Grace-fully (GOG) is organising a short programme of information sessions for carers of older people, particularly those with dementia. Anyone who looks after a spouse, other relative or friend who would not be able to manage without their help is a carer, and people are still carers when their loved one moves into a care home. The sessions will take place on Tuesday 27 September, Tuesday 25 October and Tuesday 29 November 2011 (last Tuesdays in the month) from 1.30 to 4.00 pm at Wheeler Hall (St Anne’,s Cathedral Hall) in Leeds City Centre, and all are welcome. The sessions will cover the support available for people with dementia and their carers, and there will be refreshments and a chance for carers to share their own experience. Voluntary organisations working on dementia and the needs of carers will talk about what they can offer, and support workers will be present to talk to people about their particular issues. GOG also wants to find out more about what help and services carers want to support them as they look after their loved person. For more information, Cath at GOG on 07739 975 019. Walking in the footsteps of Francis and Clare You may have visited the Umbrian hill town of Assisi and you may have been inside the great basilica where St Francis is buried. But have you seen the spot where he received the stigmata, the site where he created the first Christmas crib scene, or the places in Rome where he stayed while seeking approval for his newly founded Franciscan order? Walking in the footsteps of St Francis was the original goal of a pilgrimage programme, started in the early 1970’,s by some enterprising Franciscan friars from the United States who wanted to bring the spirit of their founder to life in a very vivid way. Focusing on what they called ‘,the spirituality of place’,, they began taking young novices and friars on tours to the familiar and lesser known Franciscan sites, delving deep into the cultural context and historical circumstances that inspired their founder in the early years of the 13th century. The aim was to encourage the brothers to complement their intellectual knowledge with a profound, physical experience, “,breathing the air that Francis breathed and seeing the places he saw.”, Fr John Cella from Wisconsin is the current director of Franciscan Pilgrimage Programs, which over the decades has grown into a flourishing business offering guided tours not only to Tuscany, Umbria and Rome, but also to the Holy Land, to Prague, Paris and Canterbury, to the US and Mexico, to places where the legacy of St Francis and St Clare is thriving today. From its modest beginnings, he says his organisation is now putting together over 40 programmes a year and the demand just keeps on growing. There are special packages designed for doctors and health administrators working in Franciscan hospitals or clinics, others catering for students and staff in Franciscan schools, colleges and universities in countries all over the world. Not all participants are Catholics or even Christians –, a number of Jewish and Muslim hospital staff have also been on pilgrimage –, yet the spirit and message of St Francis has much to say to anyone attempting to make a stand for peace and justice in contemporary society. The high school programme has been especially adapted for kids living in tough inner city areas, offering an alternative vision from the gang violence and ghetto life that many grow up with in their home towns. There’,s a new programme tailored to the needs of war veterans, based on the experiences of Francis as a young soldier who went to war, was captured and imprisoned in Perugia before hearing the call to go and ‘,rebuild the Church’, of Christ. Working with a military chaplain and experienced psychologists, this pilgrimage offers reflections on the experience of violence and combat for those who may be finding it hard to adapt back into society. Marketing director for FPP, Sr Ann Bremmer from the St Francis of Millvale community in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, describes this and the other programmes as ‘,a conversion experience’, for all those who come to understand more about the spirit of Francis in the context of today’,s world. Both Sr Ann and Fr John are particularly proud of the way their organisation reflects a real spirit of collaboration between the many different branches of the Franciscan family. Just as Francis and Clare modelled a rare spirit of cooperation between men and women in the early Church, so the tours are all run by teams of men and women, ordained and lay people, who bring their particular expertise to the pilgrimage experience. In the pipeline is the idea of a programme for business people focusing on the work of Francis and his friars who’,ve worked for justice down the centuries, fighting against usury, starting up banking and loan systems to help the poor or standing up against exploitation and abuse by the rich and powerful. And for those who are elderly or unable to cope with the tough, early morning treks up the Tuscan hillsides or through the Umbrian valleys, they’,ve also come up with a virtual pilgrimage package, complete with videos, maps, menus and tickets to offer a flavour of the actual experience alongside the talks and pictures of the familiar Franciscan locations. Find out more about all of the programmes on www.franciscanpilgrimages.com Philippa M Hitchen Our Rome Correspondent

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Sept 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 22 Leeds Catholic Post First Friday of the Month SINGLE CATHOLICS meet at 8.00pm for mass at our Lady of Lourdes, Leeds. We also a have a program of 4-8 events during the month, walks, meals, cinema and theatre trips, etc. Phone David Easterbrook Chairman LDSC on 0113 2289468 evenings between 6 and 7.30pm only. Membership is open to all single Catholics who are free to marry within the church. Leeds Cathedral 20-35 Group Young people (20-35 years old) who attend St. Anne`s Cathedral in Leeds meet regularly every Thursday for spiritual, social and charitable activities. For further details search Facebook for “,Leeds Cathedral 20-35 Group”,, phone 07816 891872 or 07759 591233 or email leedscathedral20-35@hotmail.co.uk Crusade Mass The crusade Mass and Rosary of Mary Immaculate is held at St Patrick`s Church, Bradford, on the first Saturday of the Month after 12.15pm Mass , Second Sunday of Month 2pm Meeting of Bradford Fraternity of the Secular Franciscan Order at St. Anthony`s Convent, Clayton, Bradford.` `Third Sunday of Month 2.30pm Meeting of Leeds Fraternity of the Secular Franciscan Order at the Cathedral. Ampleforth Renewal Community Ampleforth Abbey, meet 1st Sunday each month, at Ampleforth. 11 .30am Praise, Speaker, Sharing Groups, Reconciliation, Exposition, Finishing with Mass and Healing at 4.00pm. All enquiries: Seamus McEneaney 01429 426181 Monthly Vocations Mass Mount St Joseph’,s Chapel 11am First Wednesday of Month. Calix: An organisation for those recovering from addiction and working the 12 Step Programme of AA so that they can develop and deepen their relationship with Jesus as their Higher Power. Meets on the First Sunday of every month at Corpus Christi Church, Neville Rd. Osmondthorpe. Leeds. Mass at 4.30pm followed by meeting. Contact: Fr. Michael on 01977 510266 Helpers of Gods precious infants, prayer vigils, regular weekly prayer vigils at Marie Stopes Abortuary, 7 Barrack Road.LS7 4AB, next to Jaguar car showrooms. Fridays 12-30 to 1-30, and Saturdays 9am-l1am. Monthly all night vigil of reparation in St Marys Horsforth 12th of every month, 9-30pm to 6am . Other times variable. Further details Pat 0113 2582745 Rosary rally Sat Oct 9th 2010 12- 30pm Leeds cenotaph, outside art gallery, Headrow. Contact 07747698553/ or 0113 2582745 Leeds Schola Gregoriana The Schola meets on the 2nd Saturday of each month (except August), at 2.00 p.m., for rehearsal, followed by sung Latin (Vigil) Mass in the Ordinary Form, fulfilling the Sunday Obligation. An opportunity to learn and sing Gregorian Chant on a regular basis. Contact Michael Murphy (Director) on 07810 808 530, or Peter Lawley (01423 884274), or Rev. G.M. Parfitt (01756 793794). Diary A few moments for thought and prayer For all, the source of confidence and trust is God. God is love and forgiveness, and dwells at the heart of each person’,s soul. From Living for Love: Brother Roger of Taize: 2010 Be Still Deadline: For receipt of material for next edition: October 7th 2011 Parishes receive their copies: October 23rd 2011 Send articles, reports &, pictures: Mr John Grady, Hinsley Hall, 62 Headingley Lane, Leeds LS6 2BX. Send text as word doc, pictures as jpeg, e-mail to: john.grady@dioceseofleeds.org.uk Tel: 0113 261 8022. Advertising Deadline June 20th Please note All paid-for advertising is dealt with by: Louise Ward Leeds Diocesan Curia, Hinsley Hall, 62 Headingley Lane, Leeds LS6 2BX Telephone: 0113 261 8028 Email: louise.ward@dioceseofleeds.org.uk Your Cath Post Sunday 18 September 12 noon Day for Commemorating the Papal Visit, Westminster Cathedral Tuesday 20 September 7pm Mass &, Blessing of Statue of St Jeanne Jugan, St Urban’,s, Leeds Wednesday 21 September 11am VGs’, Meeting, Bishop’,s House Thursday 22 September 10.30am Catholic Care Trustees’, Meeting, Hinsley Hall Friday 23 September 10.30am Northern Bishop’,s Meeting, Bishop’,s House Wednesday 28 September 11am Chapter Meeting, Leeds Cathedral Thursday 29 September 9.30am Visitation, St Clare’,s Primary School, Bradford 11am Visitation, St Brendan’,s Primary School, Bradford Friday 30 September 10.30am Meeting with Diocesan Finance Board &, Trustee Directors, Hinsley Hall 12 noon VGs’, Meeting, Bishop’,s House Bishops Engagements –, September YORKSHIRE CATENIAN CHARITIES Y orkshire Catenians and their families have once again supported local and national charities through a programme of lively and sustained fundraising. The total distributed to charities in the year 2010-2011 was just over £,13,200. Charities receiving help included: the St Anthony’,s Project in Bradford, CAFOD, Cancer Research, Cystic Fibrosis, Yorkshire Scanner Appeal, Parkinsons UK, and HCPT. In addition, donations were made to Holocaust Survivors, the Harrogate Homeless Project, the Poppy Appeal, the Humber Rescue Boat, the Yorkshire Air Ambulance, the International Military Pilgrimage to Lourdes, and to Ethiopia. The Middlesbrough Catholic Primary Schools Soccer Tournament was sponsored as were Catholic youngsters making a pilgrimage to Lourdes. Young Catholics engaged in charitable work overseas were supported from the Catenian Bursary Fund. The Catenian Association is an international social organization of Catholic men with over 10,000 members. It is non-political and members commit themselves to support each other in times of distress. Catenians also support the National Vocations Initiative through funding the resources required by diocesan Vocations Directors. The Catenian Bursary Fund also provides financial assistance to Catholics aged 18 to 25 who are undertaking community projects both at home and abroad. Further details are available on the Association`s website. Membership of the Catenian Association is open to men who are practising Catholics and over the age of 21. Further details may be obtained by visiting the Catenian Association website www.thecatenians.com or the local Provincial website catenianprovince3n.org.uk Our Lady`s Army Sunday October 2nd Reparation Pilgrimage To Osmotherley, Saturday October 8th Public Rosary Cenataph, Headrow 10.30 Details Patriciamarysammon@Btinternet.Com Tel 0113 2582745 Mob 07747698553 Disappearing Christians in the Holy Land B oth the Archbishop of Westminster and the Archbishop of Canterbury have made appeals this summer for UK Christians to support the diminishing Christian communities in the Holy Land. This provides us with an opportunity to reflect on a number of issues concerning this part of the world. Over the past century, the Christian population in Israel, Jordan and Palestine has reduced from more than 17% to less than 1.5%. What events have caused Christians of the Middle East to flee their sacred land? And what can be done to support these marginalised communities? The 20th century was a time of much social and political turmoil for Israel and the Palestinian territories, as world leaders struggled to reach a compromise whereby Christian, Jewish and Muslim communities could peacefully and respectfully live side by side in the Holy Land. The failure to reach a workable compromise has come at an enormous cost to the local people: the reality of daily life in the Holy Land ranges from the inconvenient to the catastrophic, as the land divisions complicate every aspect of community life including access to healthcare, education, employment, security, freedom of movement, and of course there is sadly the ever-present threat of military attacks. In these circumstances, it is not surprising that we have seen an exodus of Christians from the Holy Land. However, as the Archbishops have underlined, it is crucial that we take this opportunity to support the remaining Christian population: we must not allow them to be forgotten or marginalised and must encourage and support their growth and development. How can we as UK Christians support the Christian communities of the Middle East? Making a journey to the Holy Land to both experience the holy places and meet the local people is perhaps the single most important thing that Christians can do to express their solidarity. It is one thing to read about the plight of the local communities in newspapers, and to watch TV reports, but to really understand the complexity of life in the Holy Land it is essential to travel there, take the time to speak with the local people, and with an open mind gain an understanding of the multi-layered problems faced by the local communities. For those who cannot travel to the Holy Land, donations for key health and education projects are invaluable in a region where a stagnant economy and oppressive political conditions prevent the local people from building the infrastructure necessary for a vibrant and thriving economy to emerge. In response to these problems, the Catholic Diocese of East Anglia has been working to strengthen links between UK Christians and the Christian population of the Middle East for over a decade. This work has included twinning the diocese with the Catholic Diocese of Jerusalem, and in 2010 supporting the establishment of Palestine Pilgrimage, a niche not-for-profit company based in Cambridgeshire and led by Fr Paul Maddison, which organises bespoke tours to the Holy Land throughout the year, and donates all surplus income to humanitarian projects in the Holy Land. Palestine Pilgrimage is running several tours to the Holy Land in 2012. For further information about the full range of tours available –, from religious pilgrimages to fact finding tours –, as well as information about the humanitarian projects Palestine Pilgrimage supports and how to get involved and offer support to this cause, please visit www.palestinepilgrimage.org.uk or email office@palestinepilgrimage.org.uk This is a crucial time for the Christian population of the Middle East: without support from the international community the existing 1.5% could shrink even further –, now is the time to act and show our solidarity.

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Sept 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Leeds Catholic Post Page 23 To advertise in the next issue of Leeds Catholic Post contact Louise on 0113 261 8028 VERY REV CANON HUGH BARR H ugh Joseph Barr, or Eimar to his family and friends, was born on 21st June 1929 at Moville in County Donegal. As a student at school in Derry he offered himself for the priesthood and entered the seminary at All Hallows College in Dublin. In due course he became a student for the Diocese of Leeds and was ordained at All Hallows on his 24th birthday, Pentecost Sunday 1953. In September of that year Bishop Heenan appointed him to St Peter’,s parish, Doncaster, as an assistant to Fr. Francis Manogue. He left there in the summer of 1959 when Bishop Dwyer moved him to St Peter’,s, Bradford, where he remained until August 1965 and his appointment to St Nicholas’, parish, Leeds. Three years later Fr. Barr became a parish priest for the first time, taking charge of the parish of St Michael, Knottingley, and then in 1972 he transferred to St Brigid’,s at Longwood, Huddersfield. In June 1979 Bishop Wheeler asked Fr Barr to take the helm at one of the leading parishes in the diocese, St Patrick’,s, Huddersfield, succeeding Mgr Kevin O’,Brien, who was soon to become the Auxiliary Bishop of Middlesbrough. Fr. Barr also inherited one of the more historic churches in the diocese, dating back to 1832. In readiness for its 150th anniversary he set about the restoration of the fabric of the church and a major re-ordering of the interior, which gave it the appearance that can be seen today. On the occasion of the anniversary in September 1982 Bishop Wheeler celebrated Mass in the newly- designed sanctuary alongside Bishop O’,Brien. By now Fr Barr’,s contribution to the life of the diocese had been recognised by his appointment to the Cathedral Chapter. Among his parishioners in Huddersfield were many who hailed from the West Indies and he became a particular favourite of theirs, especially after he visited the Caribbean to learn more about their heritage. In return they kept in touch with him long after he had left St Patrick’,s. Canon Barr’,s achievements in Huddersfield undoubtedly prompted the new Bishop of Leeds, David Konstant, to appoint him to St Austin’,s, Wakefield in August 1986. Here he succeeded Mgr Henry Thompson, who had been parish priest for the previous forty-two years, and he was given the task of modernising both the church and presbytery, two early 19th century architectural gems. Again, this was a major undertaking and for a time in 1990 the church had to close while the work was carried out. The hospitality of the then Bishop of Wakefield, David Hope, enabled the congregation from St Austin’,s to celebrate Mass in Wakefield Cathedral during this time. While in Wakefield Canon Barr received an award for gallantry from West Yorkshire Police, after an incident in which he climbed to the roof of the cathedral and persuaded a man bent on jumping to his death to come down. The final years of Canon Barr’,s active ministry were spent at St Edward’,s, Clifford from 1998 until his retirement in 2005. There, as elsewhere, parishioners welcomed his calm and reassuring manner and his pastoral care for people. He celebrated his Golden Jubilee of priesthood at Clifford in the summer of 2003 and retired to nearby Wetherby two years later. By then his health and mobility were impaired and he soon decided it would be best to take up residence with the Little Sisters of the Poor at Mount St Joseph’,s in Headingley. Although he travelled less and less after this time he continued to take part in the annual diocesan pilgrimage to Lourdes and he was there again in July 2011. At home he was happy receiving visitors and catching up with friends and with the latest news from around the diocese, often over a glass of red wine. He was an engaging and humorous companion who retained his equanimity despite the trials and tribulations of age and infirmity, and for that he won great admiration in recent years. He was admitted to hospital at the beginning of August 2011 and died suddenly, aged 82, on Friday 19th August. His funeral took place at Leeds Cathedral on Friday 26th August and in the absence abroad of Bishop Roche, the Bishop Emeritus, Bishop Konstant celebrated the Mass, The homily was preached by Mgr Kieran Heskin V.G., who recalled that his friendship with Canon Barr began in the early 1970s when, as a newly- ordained priest from All Hallows, he arrived in Yorkshire to become the curate at St Brigid’,s, Huddersfield. Another of the Canon’,s long- standing friends, Mgr Bryan Sharp gave the Final Commendation and from the Cathedral Canon Barr’,s remains were taken to Clifford for burial in the graveyard at St Edward’,s. Canon Barr served five successive Bishops of Leeds and the people of the diocese for nearly six decades. He did so with unswerving loyalty, a profound love for the Church and for the people in his care, and in a manner that was both unassuming and yet deeply impressive. For this earned widespread affection and respect and he will be greatly missed. Obituary ANN JONES The former Superintendent of Killingbeck Cemetery, Ann Jones, has died aged 78 after fighting breast cancer for a number of years, both before and after her retirement from the cemetery. She was the widow of her immediate predecessor as superintendent, Tony Jones, and spent almost 20 years in post, working with many priests in the diocese. The Requiem Mass took place at Immaculate Heart of Mary Church on Tuesday 9 August, followed by cremation at Rawdon Crematorium at 1pm. Ann`s family would be grateful for any donations in her memory to the Yorkshire Cancer Centre Appeal and to the upkeep of the Chapel at Killingbeck Cemetery.

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Page 24

Sept 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 24 Leeds Catholic Post Is This For You? T hroughout the last week of July the Sisters of the Cross and Passion held their Chapter meeting at Leeds Trinity College University and on Friday 29th July, they launched their ‘,Passionist International Volunteer Project’, [PIVP ]. The Sisters are looking for self-funding volunteers who would work alongside them in their work with vulnerable people around the world. Volunteers of all levels of expertise and skills will be involved in Helping to provide Medical Care, Social Services and a variety of teaching activities. The volunteers’, accommodation will be within the Passionist communities. The PIVP is open to volunteers who are fit, healthy and able to give service for 3, 6 or 12months-usually without financial support from the Passionist community –,many will already have some volunteer experience . The PIVP is designed to prepare and debrief volunteers and it will be a life changing experience! Key characteristics of prospective volunteers working alongside the Sisters are seen to include: a need to serve, flexibility, patience, problem-solving skills, determination, resilience, a good sense of humour, willingness to learn, confidence, realism and for South American placements –, competence in Spanish. If you are interested in becoming a volunteer please contact: The PIVP Co-ordinator, Sisters of the Cross and Passion. 38, Victoria Avenue, ILKLEY. LS29 9BW or E-mail briery@btconnect.com for fuller details Guests at the launch included representatives of the Leeds Trinity University College Chaplaincy, Diocesan Vicariate for Evangelisation, Diocesan Youth Ministry, Peru Commission, Diocesan Lay Chaplains, Benefactors and Friends of the Project. Professor Freda Bridge, Principal of LTU commented how appropriate it was that this new initiative of the Sisters of the Cross and Passion be launched in a Higher Education community which the Sisters of the Cross and Passion founded more than 50 years ago. Although unable to be present, Bishop Arthur gave assurance of his support for the Project and sent his good wishes for the Launch Donations from Readers wishing to support the Passionist International Volunteer Project would be very gratefully received via the address above and would be promptly acknowledged Members of the PIVP Core Group will be visiting interested groups and gatherings over the next few months should your association or organisation wish to know more please contact us at the address above for further discussion and booking.

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