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Leeds Catholic Post History

Newspaper for the Diocese of Leeds

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Dec 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 1

Dec 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

CATHOLIC POST THE NEWSPAPER FOR THE DIOCESE OF LEEDS DECEMBER 2012 www.dioceseofleeds.org.uk awww.catholicpost.org.uk FREE From November 1st 2012, eight Catholic schools have been formed into a multi academy trust, the first in the Diocese of Leeds under the title of The Bishop Konstant Catholic Academy Trust. The decision to become an academy was taken after a detailed and thorough examination of the advantages and disadvantages. Consultation began in July 2011 with a meeting open to all Governors from all Catholic schools across the district. Around 120 people attended. The freedom that academies have are already, in many respects, enjoyed by Catholic schools but the extra freedoms to determine our own curriculum were certainly compelling. The Catholic heads have a good record of close partnership working and working in a multi-academy trust extends that. Catholic schools have always had to work hard in promoting an alternative vision of life in the face of the challenges of secular society and those challenges certainly increased when Wakefield Council decided to take away subsidised transport for Catholic families. Staying faithful to the Mission of the Catholic Church through education was and always will be our primary concern. Whilst, on the one hand, Catholic schools are called to preserve, protect and promote Catholic education we will always serve the needs of the families of this District both Catholic and those of other faiths who attend our schools as well as continuing to work with partners in education including the Local Authority. In fact, far from cutting links with the LA the schools continue to work with Council services including buildings and premises, catering and cleaning, grounds maintenance, SEN and Behaviour Support, EAL support, School Leadership Programme and support network for subject leaders, Governor support and payroll. The schools have also begun to build stronger links with Catholic Care who plan to extend their range of support services to our schools. Becoming an Academy

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Page 2

Dec 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 2 Leeds Catholic Post On the night of the opening of the second Vatican Council just over fifty years ago, huge crowds gathered in St. Peter`s Square and the surrounding avenues and streets, carrying torches. The Pope- John XXIII- came out to address them in what became known as the ",Discorso della Luna", - Discourse under the Moon, as he spoke to the crowds with the moon looking down on the many thousands gathered there. They roared their approval. This is what he said: “,Dear Sons and Daughters, I feel your voices! Mine is just one lone voice, but it sums up the voice of the whole world. And here, in fact, all the world is represented tonight. It could even be said that the moon hastens close tonight, so that from above, it might watch this spectacle that not even St Peterʼ,s Basilica, over its four centuries of history, has ever been able to witness. We ask for a great day of peace. Yes, of peace! ʻ,Glory to God, and peace to men of goodwill.ʼ, After addressing specifically his people of the diocese of Rome, he added “,My own person counts for nothing —, itʼ,s a brother who speaks to you, who became a father by the will of our Lord, but all together, fatherhood and brotherhood and Godʼ,s grace, give honour to the impressions of this night, which are always our feelings, which now we express before heaven and earth: faith, hope, love- love of God, love of brother and sister, all aided along the way in the Lordʼ,s holy peace for the work of the good. And so, let us continue to love each other, to look out for each other along the way: to welcome whoever comes close to us, and set aside whatever difficulty it might bring”,. “,When you head home, go to your children. Hug and kiss your children and tell them: ʻ,This is the embrace of the Pope.ʼ, And if you find them with tears to dry, give them a kind word. Give anyone who suffers a word of comfort. Tell them ʻ,The Pope is with us especially in our times of sadness and bitterness.ʼ, And then, all together, may we always come fully alive —, whether to sing, to breathe, or to cry, but always full of trust in Christ, who helps us and hears us: let us continue along our path.”, A Very Happy Christmas and a New Year of Hope! The Post Says Blessing of the Prayer garden at St John the Evangelist Primary School FROM JUST £,299 R.G.R. MEMORIALS COLOUR CATALOGUE QUALITY MEMORIALS AT AFFORDABLE PRICES IN GRANITE, MARBLE &, STONE ALL PRICES INCLUDE DELIVERY &, FIXING Ogee top memorial 2’,6”, high Fully polished Black Granite, Delivered and Fixed for £,399 inc VAT FREE Tel: 0113 282 3888 43 High Ridge Park, Rothwell, Leeds LS26 0NL O n a beautiful autumn day, the Prayer garden at St John the Evangelist Primary School in Bradford was blessed by the parish priest, Father Kieran Walker at a special liturgy attended by representatives of each class and the school’,s Ethos Group. The garden has been some time in its development but a peaceful spot has been created in the school grounds. One of the schoolʼ,s Foundation governors, Mrs Caroline Handley, planned its layout and helped to choose and plant the flowers and shrubs, and the children designed and made a special mosaic during the schoolʼ,s art week. The garden has provided an area where class liturgies and masses are celebrated ,as well as a place for quiet personal reflection for children ,staff and members of the school community. Father Kieran also blessed three memorial stones which have been specially made for the garden .They are dedicated to the people who were a special part of St John the Evangelist, but who have died, a previous headteacher of the school, Mary Byrne, and three past pupils, Leah Kellett and Sam and Christopher Blowman, they will always be remembered in our Prayer Garden. St Patrick’,s Catholic Primary School at the Royal Albert Hall On Tuesday 13th November, St Patrick’,s Catholic Primary School Choir, Huddersfield set off in the early hours for a very special and momentous trip to the Royal Albert Hall in London. The 40 children that make up the school choir were invited to join a 500 strong massed chorus from the Huddersfield area under the direction of James Lewis. The massed choir, entitled ‘,Huddersfield Fusion’, due to its mix of ages, ethnicities, communities and families, performed two songs in the School’,s Proms run by Music For Youth. This was a truly magnificent experience that will live in the memories of pupils and staff for many years to come. We maximised the potential benefit of our visit to the capital city, by staying overnight in London and visiting many famous attractions the next day. Highlights included The Natural History Museum, a walk along the Mall in the sunshine to Buckingham Palace, Trafalgar Square, The British Museum, culminating in a beautiful even- song service at St Pauls Cathedral. St Patrick’,s School are very proud of the achievement of the school choir, and were delighted to be invited to share a stage with such talented young musicians from all over the United Kingdom. We would like to extend a thank you to all the families that supported us in this exciting venture.

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Page 3

Dec 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

R ecently, someone showed me a 1960 Leeds Graphic: what a different world that was. The Graphic (and Bradford Bystander and Sheffield Spectator) existed then to chronicle the doings of an aspiring Leeds county set, and allow advertisers a prestige showcase. They were somewhere, therefore, between Country Life and the old Tatler. All seemed as permanent as the Leeds Permanent, now a hotel. Not many of those once-familiar names in the advertising columns still exist. In the last fifty years, so much has changed. It was in that early 1960ʻ,s setting that Blessed John XXIII called an Ecumenical Council to the Vatican, where St Peterʼ,s was changed into a vast conference hall. Bishop Wheeler claimed to have been one of the most junior Bishops to attend, with a place near the doors. We who were growing up at that time were ready for it. Even whilst Pope Pius XII was still alive my school had its collective knuckles rapped for a “,dialogue”, mass in which we pupils collectively responded or joined in parts of the Latin texts in English. We still knew, though, that Latin was best because it allowed us to “,hear”, Mass anywhere in the world, even if we needed our parallel translations. Later, my school tried to obtain permission for the priest to “,say”, Mass facing us, but this was rejected. Never mind, they said, it will come. It did. Those years were exciting times in the church. My school had also for some years supplied everyone with one of those red Knox Bible translations: no longer was the Bible that big book in the cupboard which was so difficult to read. Even before the Council broke its brass clamps, on high days my Father would put away his Missale Romanum and go to the front- but not the sanctuary- and read the Gospel in English. A few things from the council constitutions stood out. Laity were now to be the people of God, with a role to play in the church. All were “,Priest Prophet &, King”, by virtue of their baptism, with a Ministerial Priesthood at the altar. “,Protestants”, (within which we had included Anglicans and anyone, really) were no longer utterly damned, and many elements of sanctification and of truth are found in their communions. The Liturgy was now to allow the full and active participation of the people of God. We must remember that in most churches there was not even a presiderʼ,s chair if there was never a high mass and so no stopping, no silence: there was no lectern just a pulpit for preaching and announcements often inextricably mixed together. For nearly the whole time, the priest faced the east wall of the church with his back to the people who could barely hear his speedy Latin, even if they could understand it. They got on with their private devotions and left Priest things to Priests.Those who look wistfully back to the Tridentine days probably never experienced them. The Church was to be governed by Pope and Bishops in collegial harmony. Most significantly, although I did not know it, the council prepared the way for the restoration of the diaconate as a distinct and permanent order of clergy. The work that was started at Trent, postponed at Vatican I and given fresh impetus in the priest huts of Dachau had come to fruition, and the threefold order of clergy was again complete. Anyone who wants to feel the atmosphere of the council should read Cardinal Yves Congar`s detailed diaries, recently translated, which give the atmosphere of the council and glimpses of the participants, with the Vatican old guard retreating as the deliberations of the council slipped from their grasp. They reveal the brilliance of some of the Bishops from Europe, South America and elsewhere- including, perhaps our own Bishop Butler- and the courage of the Pope in inviting observers from other churches in those beleaguered days. Amongst those observers was Brother Roger of Taize, a small ecumenical community in France. He, his Brother Max Thurian, a noted theologian, and a rota of two other brothers had obtained accommodation nearby. Brother Roger had got to know Pope John when he was nuncio in France. The little community provided constant hospitality for numbers of Council participants, anxious to find a meeting place, something missing from the council`s facilities. Twenty-five years later, through a number of coinciding events, we visited the same community on its little hill in Burgundy. Then, and in succeeding visits, we found a place that seemed to be living out the Council. It is ecumenical, with an emphasis on simplicity and participation in its liturgies and church: the scriptures are read and studied daily: Gospel values are lived in a community of mutual servanthood, and there is a welcome for all comers to share for a while a life of simplicity. The community employs excellent methods of communication dating from the Acts of the Apostles to todayʼ,s world-wide web, and a spirit of trust runs through all they do. There is a sense of wonder in all God is doing there- “,a life we never dared hope for”,. The Second Vatican Council emphasises the nature of our pilgrim journey, a life following Christ who tells us not to look back. “,Yet, until a new heaven and a new earth are built as the dwelling place of justice, the pilgrim Church, in its sacraments and institutions belonging to this world of time, bears the likeness of this passing world. It lives in the midst of a creation still groaning and in travail as it waits for the sons of God to be revealed in glory.”, Constitution- Lumen Gentium Twenty five years after that first visit to the Taize Community, I am a deacon in the church, as set out by the Council in that same Lumen Gentium: “,At a lower level of the hierarchy are to be found deacons, who receive the imposition of hands ʻ,not unto the priesthood, but unto the ministry.ʼ, For, strengthened by sacramental grace they are dedicated to the People of God, in conjunction with the bishop and his body of priests, in the service of the liturgy, of the Gospel and of works of charity. It pertains to the office of a deacon, in so far as it may be assigned to him by the competent authority, to administer Baptism solemnly, to be custodian and distributor of the Eucharist, in the name of the church, to assist at and to bless marriages, to bring Viaticum to the dying, to read the sacred scriptures to the faithful, to instruct and to exhort the people, to preside over the worship and the prayer of the faithful, to administer sacramentals, and to officiate at funeral and burial services. Dedicated to works of charity and functions of administration, deacons should recall the admonition of St Polycarp: ʻ,Let them be merciful, and zealous, and let them walk according to the truth of the Lord, who became the servant of all.ʼ, ”, Measuring up to the Councilʼ,s vision is not always easy. It is a break, too, with the immediate past: priests find themselves working with another member of the clergy, who is not a priest and does not always share their background. Many are generous, a few find it quite hard. A few lay people find this new “,lower level”, difficult too. In time, though, I am sure our parishes will have in diaconate a new dimension, a development of servanthood, a stronger link between laity and clergy. As one theologian said “,We do not need deacons because there is a shortage of Priests: we need deacons because there is a shortage of deacons.”, Some feel, fifty years on, that we have not taught people enough about this Second Vatican Council and the only changes people feel are liturgical and even then, they can be superficial. There must be a will- and a way to unlock all these treasures: do not be afraid, the Lord tells us. As in so much else we must preach by our lives- not just by repeating the words of the documents, but by living them fully and genuinely. Brother Roger of Taize was fond of talking about “,Communion”,, the people of God together in parish or whatever. He used to say “,Christ did not come to earth to create a new religion, but to offer to every human being a communion in God.”, If we in the church appear to be a communion, a pilgrim people in a relationship of trust with each other and God, then that is worth many programmes, a faith relevant to todayʼ,s spiritually hungry society., Lumen Gentium again: “,God, however, does not make people holy and save them merely as individuals, without bond or link between one another. Rather has it pleased Him to bring men and women together as one people, a people which acknowledges Him in truth and serves Him in holiness.”, Is every parish still striving to be a communion even if battered and bruised by closure and amalgamation? That is the challenge, in some places not yet addressed. Fifty years on, we need to ask if we, metaphorically, are still to be found lost in the pages of the Leeds Graphic, or are we a pilgrim people that has, by the breath of the Spirit in the works of that Council, moved on? We should not, after all, be only now considering the works of the Council, we should have taken them into our hearts and be fifty years further down that same pilgrim road. Leeds Catholic Post Page 3 A Communion in Christ: Fifty Years from Vatican II Vatican II Fifty Years On This October it will be 50 years since the opening of Vatican II –, over the months from now until the end of the Year there will be an article reflecting on the Council. These articles are not offered as deep reflections on the Council or the Documents from it, rather they are written from the point of view of those who experienced the Council in its time –, some are from people who were there, some are about people who were there –, some are by people who were the first to try and put into action the documents as they came out. They are all from a personal point of view and try to capture at least a little of that ‘,freshness of the Spirit’, as it blew through a church thrust into a modern World trying to find a Rock to hold fast to.

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Page 4

Dec 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 4 Leeds Catholic Post T he waiting is over and we are about to enter into the twelve days of Christmas. Twelve days of celebration for the birth of our saviour, our king, God Himself who secretly slid into the world as a fragile baby in a small, dark stable in a little known backwater of the Roman Empire so long ago. As we do so, we may not want to think about the death that was in store for Him, although some traditions say the ʻ,partridge in a pear treeʼ, refers to Jesus hanging on the wood of the cross. Whether we want to or not, Christmas can be a particularly difficult time when sadness and the memories of our loved ones, who are now ʻ,lostʼ, to us, through death or disease (like dementia) become painfully acute. Birth and death, light and dark, joy and sorrow intermingle in our daily realities, usually beneath the surface, but sometimes, suddenly, they come into sharp relief. Then, managing the paradox of grief in joy and joy in grief is a work we have to do, if we are to honour the reality of those lost to us and out own feelings of loss. Bereavement is always painful. It never goes away it just changes. We may think that we should have ʻ,got over itʼ,, we may even seem to be doing okay, when suddenly at a special occasion, like Christmas, while the whole world seems to be engaged in one long party, the memory of our loved one slices through us like a knife in the heart. Then, we can become ʻ,stuckʼ,, our memories can feel like a ʻ,spoilerʼ,. We may not feel able to mention the person we grieve for. Our grief can feel like an unwelcome guest at the feast. Unless, that is, we know that it is not just okay to remember them but is indeed right and proper to remember and that there are ways that this can be done without being ostentatious, without ʻ,parading our griefʼ, or ruining the party for others. We can find ways to acknowledge their importance in our lives, to celebrate the gift of them and the gift of their life (however long or short it was) and their enduring presence to us. For some this acknowledgement might take the form of a visit to the grave or lighting a candle at special occasions like Christmas. For some it might be meditating privately on a photograph. For those who have neither photo nor graveside to visit, nor memories that can be shared with anyone else (e.g. miscarriage) remembering can be very difficult. John Oʼ,Donahue said that ʻ,memory is not merely the reception of the raw imprint of experience nor its simple storage. , There is a harvesting imagination that works at the heart of memory which searches the lived substance of our days until it clarifies and settles into a form that abidesʼ, This is the work of a lifetime. To help us to ʻ,harvestʼ, our imagination and make a place at the table for those who have gone before us, in whatever circumstances and whether or not their life was acknowledged by any one else in the world, we started Advent with a Memories Workshop, open to all, in the Diocesan Pastoral Centre. We began in the chapel with quiet prayer and reflection. There was no requirement to share but in the course of the two hour workshop we learnt that those being remembered were of all ages and included mothers, fathers, husbands, children, babies. Creating our own personal timeline of important, ,formative, events, times and experiences formed one exercise. Marjorie Parker gently led us and also ,showed how we can help ourselves to manage our memories and respect those remembered at any time of the year, by creative, personalised activities like making our very own memory box. During the workshop we each created a very personal memento ,to take away and help ʻ,includeʼ, the person we are thinking about at the festivities: •, painting a plain wooden tea light holder •, decorating an angel for the Christmas tree •, making and decorating coloured glass tea light holders •, decorating an otherwise plain Christmas tree bauble We closed with a reading from John Oʼ,Donohue: “,Beannacht”, (blessing) On the day when The weight deadens On your shoulders And you stumble, May the clay dance To balance you. And when your eyes Freeze behind The grey window And the ghost of loss Gets into you, May a flock of colours, Indigo, red, green And azure blue, Come to awaken in you A meadow of delight. When the canvas frays In the currach of thought And a stain of ocean Blackens beneath you, May there come across the waters A path of yellow moonlight To bring you safely home. May the nourishment of the earth be yours, May the clarity of light be yours, May the fluency of the ocean be yours, May the protection of the ancestors be yours. And so may a slow Wind work these words Of love around you, An invisible cloak To mind your life. Two hours has never gone by so quickly. To book a Memories Workshop for your parish, group or organisation contact Breda at breda.familylifeministry@dioceseofleeds.org.u k or call 0113 261 8050 To see what else is available at Family Life Ministry visit our website at www.flm.org.uk MEMORIES ADVENT WORKSHOP T he very first Family Caring Trust (FCT) one-day introductory Initial Training for people interested in running parenting programmes has been delivered successfully at the Diocesan Pastoral Centre in Leeds. I am glad to report that it was an ecumenical matter, as I delivered the day with Health Visitor Val Preece of St Mark’,s Church in Harrogate. We are both Approved FCT Trainers. Attending the day were people from a wide range of backgrounds and experience. Clara Donnelly, who came from Shrewsbury diocese, has delivered parenting programmes for 25 years and recruited, trained and supported a team of about 25 volunteer facilitators. Yvette and Clara practice not being listened to Mums who had joined parenting programmes themselves at their childrenʼ,s school, Holy Rosary, Chapeltown, were also there, keen to learn how to share the benefits of the courses with other parents. Parish and school Parenting Facilitators, who have already done the Accredited Training with FLM, used the opportunity as a refresher day, and a family worker from Ralph Thoresby School joined us in order to learn how to deliver FCT parenting courses with parents in that school cluster. It was a richer day for the variety of experiences and I was glad that so many different people wanted to learn how to run parenting programmes. The FCT parenting programmes were designed to be used just as they are, by parents with parents, in friendship, family or local groups, which is how Clara started a small group with her husband and their friends all those years ago. The programmes are not only affordable but are also very clear and easy to use. They contain DVD material as well as a detailed timetable and ʻ,scriptʼ, to guide groups through each session. The day gave us time to do some of the fun exercises from the parenting programmes themselves and most of us agreed that they would have liked much more of that in the day. The courses looked at were the 0s to 6s, the 5s-15s and the Parenting Teenagers programme. Listening is a common thread in all the parenting courses and the experience of not being listened to was a salutary prelude to practicing good, or active listening skills. Busy moms and dads do not have all the time in the world to listen to their children but knowing how to listen when your child needs your attention is essential to growing the respectful loving relationships we all desire in our homes. Then we considered the practicalities of setting up a course: finding a venue, working with responsible authorities (eg local children and family centres, schools and parishes), never working alone but always in pairs and creating attractive posters and other means of encouraging mums, dads, carers and grandparents to come and see what itʼ,s like. How was it for them? Hereʼ,s what was said: It more than met my expectations…,a good refresher course for me which I plan to follow. I considered that all aspects of being a facilitator were covered. I thought the day was a good mixture of all aspects of leading and can’,t identify any improvement. All great –, leaders great and informative. Technology worked well. All breaks were beneficial to help concentration. Suitable for all, with no discriminations. Most enjoyable –, a very friendly group which helped me to relax. Leaders and participants very welcoming, leaders very knowledgeable and presented extremely well which made it easy to enjoy. And what more was needed? Maybe looking at the materials more –, not sure how this would fit in within one days training. There was probably not enough time on any of this and some things, like facilitation skills can only really be learned by doing, with the right guidance and input, which we introduced during the day. Once the attendees start their own parenting programme I will visit just one of the sessions to check that it is satisfactory and they will be able to be registered with the FCT as parenting facilitators. Angela and Andrea try listening Val and I enjoyed the day so much that we that we plan to offer another FCT Initial Training day next year. Watch out in your Catholic Post and at www.flm.org.uk for details. Who is it for? Initial Training is open to anyone who wants to run a parenting programme and is not just for faith groups (although the values, ethos and principles of respect plus the reflections at the end of the sessions make it very appropriate for use within the Catholic and other churches). To find out about the FCT go to www.familycaring.co.uk The Initial Training day does not lead to a qualification, but it does offer a very sound introduction to some key basics for anyone wishing to have a go at running a parenting programme themselves. These include the ethos and value base of the FCT, the national picture in terms of parenting and politics and the latest occupational standards for working with parents. It also allows those who complete it to register with the FCT as parenting facilitators at www.familycaring.co.uk. Those who want full parenting facilitator training will need Parenting Programmes: leading with confidence which is 20 hours contact time plus tutorials and assignments and is accredited to Level 3 with Open College Network and is also delivered by the FLM team. Contact me at breda.familylifeministry@dioceseofleeds.org.uk if you are interested in parenting, or facilitation training, for yourself, your school, your parish, your deanery. Or to find out whatʼ,s on in Harrogate contact Val at parentingfacilitator@gmail.com . Facilitating Parenting Programmes: a taster day

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Dec 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Leeds Catholic Post Page 5 If the amalgamation of our three local Anglican dioceses takes place, it seems possible that it will be led by another Bishop of Leeds from a pro-Cathedral in Leeds (which at least will make the Dubliners around here feel at home). In this age when so many people canʼ,t tell us all apart (the British obsession with denominational difference is dying of neglect) that will certainly add to the confusion. Fortunately, we have the answer: we are now in the diocese of Sedevacante, a little neotuscan hill town somewhere between Leeds and Bradford. It used to be called Pudsey, but could seized the chance- like Barnsley wants to- to be a city of towers and romance like San Gimignano, a world heritage site. We have acquired so many exotic new parish names, after all, that we need an exotic new diocesan name to go with it. Problem solved. *** Many people will read Robert Mickens in The Tablet: the American born correspondent worked for Vatican Radio through the 1990ʼ,s and his articles- often interesting- reveal someone at the centre, and aware of the inner workings of things. However, his latest venture was an hour long address to the City Club of Cleveland, in his home state. His “,dire assessment”, of the situation in the church seen from his present post “,offers little good news.”, He tries to analyse- to quote a US Catholic paper- some reasons for the “,parade of Catholics out of the church, the relentless decrease of priests with the accompanying mergers and closings of parishes in the Western world”,. This may strike a chord hereabouts. Nevertheless, this address not for the weak of faith or faint of heart. So far, there has not been a word in his own paper, The Tablet. How far, then, should we go in such analysis? As far as this? Should we just rely on the Holy Spirit to guide “,the church”, or should we wonder if the Holy Spirit expects us to listen to this guidance? Are we true to the inspired teaching of the Second Vatican Council, to the teachings of the Fathers and the Gospels? End of struggle- time for some contemplation. *** In response to this address, I noticed that one US parish bulletin included a reference to it in “,Pastorʼ,s Notes”, but in doing so marvelled at all the information (too much?!) that was also now available on the internet. He wondered what Thomas Aquinas would make of it when he had to travel miles to access one library. Now we can do it so easily: we should never take this for granted. Marshall McLuhan the Canadian Catholic Philosopher used to talk much about the effect of communications media and about the “,Global Village”,. We took little notice. He was right. Benchmark Sidelines I set a quiz recently, and one round was `Guess the year of these Christmas No 1 hits` –, with YouTube videos to help. Most songs had no Christmas connections, apart from `Mary`s Boy Child`, by Boney M. (What year? Who else had a hit with this song?***) It is a true Christmas carol, and I expect we will be hearing and singing plenty more in the next few weeks. I`m looking forward to singing carols at St Joseph`s Church Hall, Pudsey on 30th December from 3pm –, all welcome! You may be too late for the live Nativity at Corpus Christi Church, Halton Moor, at 3pm on Saturday 22nd December, but I want to mention it, since the Franciscan Sisters of the Renewal are continuing an ancient tradition adopted by their founder in 1223, with his Nativity Plays in Italy. Songs or “,canticles”, were sung which would tell the storyline. These choruses were often in Latin, but more typically they in the native language of the audience so that they could join in. St Francis was clearly an `early adopter` of `active participation` by the laity!! Some carols are more date specific than others –, so `O Holy Night!` is great on Christmas Eve - “,It is the night of the dear Saviour`s birth...”, But what about post-Christmas day carols? I think you can rule out angels and shepherds, but the Magi do not reach Bethlehem until 6th January, so anything featuring them is on the right track, commemorating good works in a world of highly unequal wealth distribution, `Good King Wenceslas` is still alas topical, and doubly so on December 26th! If the children in your household are little monsters by December 28th, soothe them with the Coventry Carol (Lully, Lullay), but note verse two is a little short on Christmas goodwill: “,Herod the King, in his raging, Charged he hath this day, His men of might, in his own sight, All children young, to slay.”, There are plenty more: `Mary had a baby`, `Go tell it on the mountain` and `12 days of Christmas` –, (do the gifts have religious symbolism or is this an internet myth? Check it out!). If you want more suggestions, I`ve named some useful books below…,. Happy Christmas! Tim Devereux tim.devereux@ssg.org.uk If you`d like to add your name for information about WYCM Network events, e-mail me. West Yorkshire Church Music Network: http://www.westyorkshirechurchmusic.org.uk/ National Network of Pastoral Musicians: http://nnpm.org/ Society of Saint Gregory: http://www.ssg.org.uk/ Books: `Penguin Book (s) of Christmas Carols`, Ed Elizabeth Poston `100 Carols for Choirs` ed &, arr David Willcocks &, John Rutter, New! `Instrumental Praise - Volume One` Much-loved carols ... “,ready-to-go”, arrangements for instrumental ensembles published by the Royal School of Church Music (RSCM). (*** Answer: 1978, Harry Belafonte in 1956 - quiz setting is a habit!) Musical Notes by Tim Devereux OFFICE FOR EVANGELISATION &, CATECHESIS 2012-13 Foundations in Faith Celebrations 2012 On Thursday November 29th there was a presentation evening at Hinsley Hall for those who had participated in the diocesan Foundations in Faith course which includes the Catholic Certificate in Religious Studies (CCRS). Twelve members of the group attended the evening and were accompanied by family members and some of the course tutors including Mrs Breda Theakston, Dr Bill Tomkiss, Mgr John Wilson and Mrs Linda Pennington. The celebrations began in the chapel with Evening Prayer during which the certificates were presented by Mgr Wilson, the Diocesan Administrator. The evening concluded with refreshments and a celebratory drink. Mgr John praised the participants for their hard work and commitment and thanked their families and friends for their support throughout the course. Foundations in Faith is a two year course for teachers, catechists and those involved in parish ministries and is approved and validated by the Catholic Bishopsʼ, Conference of England &, Wales. At present a group of twenty two participants are in their first year of Foundations in Faith. We look forward to celebrating with this group in due course. The Foundations in Faith participants –, Andrew Prowse, Carol Daley, Bernadette Noone, Jane Barber, Anne Pennock, Paul Sullivan, Susan Leake, Maria Burton, Ann Michaud, Rachel Webster, Mary Wilkinson and Margaret Cook. COURSES &, EVENTS Introduction to Catholic Foundation Stones –, Choice of dates &, venues Catholic Foundation Stones is a basic introduction to the Catholic faith. It is simple and straightforward and can be used with all kinds of different groups and individuals. As part of the Year of Faith the Vicariate for Evangelisation is holding evening sessions around the Diocese to offer an introduction to Catholic Foundation Stones and to discuss how it can be used in many different areas of parish and school catechesis and faith formation. Time: 7:00pm –, 9:00pm –, refreshments from 6:45pm. There is no charge but booking is essential . Please choose ONE of the following evenings: St Mary’,s Church, Selby, YO8 4HS Thursday 7th February, 2013 Holy Redeemer, 34 New North Road, Huddersfield, HD1 5JY Thursday 25th April, 2013 St Joseph’,s Church Hall, Harrogate, HG1 3HD Thursday 16th May, 2013 Ways of Praying –, LTUC, Chaplaincy, Saturday 2nd February 2013 This is a day for anyone involved in parish ministry - A day to reflect on the meaning of prayer, to experience different ways of praying and to explore methods of leading others in prayer. Workshops led by Canon Ann Hemsworth, Carol Daley, Canon Joseph Smith, Sr Anne Hammersley &, Linda Pennington. The day starts at 9:00am with the Celebration of Mass and concludes at 3:15pm. Cost £,20 –, includes lunch. Booking essential. Youth Ministry Day –, Saturday March 2nd 2013 Myddelton Grange, Ilkley, LS29 0EB. 9:30am - 4:00pm. This event is for anyone who works with young people in the Church including parish catechists, youth ministry co- ordinators, parish volunteers, school chaplains, school ethos staff, RE staff, parish clergy. Cost: £,33 - includes lunch &, refreshments. For group bookings: book four places and get a fifth place for £,16. Booking essential A Starter Course for Catechists: Learning and Teaching the Catholic Faith. Diocese of Leeds training for new &, existing catechists, leaders of the Liturgy of the Word with children and anyone interested in catechesis. Led by Mrs Linda Pennington and experienced catechists at Hinsley Hall. Dates: Saturdays from 10:00am –, 4:00pm: March 9, March 23 and April 20 2013. Cost: £,65 (for 3 days) to include resources, lunch &, refreshments. Booking essential WHO TO CONTACT AT HINSLEY HALL There are many courses and events organised by the Office for Evangelisation and Catechesis throughout the year which help to support formation in faith and training for catechists, leaders of the liturgy of the word with children and other parish ministries. Check this page in future editions and also the website: www.dioceseofleeds.org.uk/evangelisation - see Forthcoming Events. For further information or booking for any of the above events please contact Catherine Green on 0113 261 8040 or evangelisation.admin@dioceseofleeds.org.uk A Night Of Celebration by T Foley The PE Department at All Saints Catholic College, Huddersfield celebrated students sporting success with a ʻ,Celebration and Awardsʼ, evening on Thursday, 22nd November 2012. Former All Saints students, Andy Raleigh (Wakefield Wildcats) and Jermaine McGillvary (Huddersfield Giants), presented 53 awards to current students for their sporting commitment and achievement. Jermaine attended All Saints between 1999 and 2004. As a professional rugby league player, currently playing at Huddersfield Giants in the Super League as either a Wing or Full-Back, Jermaine served his apprenticeship and is now enjoying the fruits of his hard earned labours. Andy by contrast was at All Saints nearly a decade before Jermaine and is now representing Wakefield Trinity Wildcats in the Super League. As a second row forward or prop he represented Sheffield Eagles and Hull Kingston Rovers before signing for Huddersfield Giants at the start of their campaign in 2006. Both sporting celebrities presented the prizes as well as posing for photographs with all the winners and signing copious autographs at the end. Whilst there were many winners on the evening two individuals deserve special mention. Eleanor Ketteringham received three awards, and the evening concluded with Donae Lawrence being recognised as the Outstanding Sports Player for 2012 having earlier picked up four other awards.

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Dec 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 6 Leeds Catholic Post We should firstly record the death of Deacon Tony Winn of Pontefract, the first Deacon to be ordained in England since the restoration of a distinct, serving diaconate following the Second Vatican Council. An obituary appears elsewhere. May he rest in peace. *** Interesting happenings in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia: Deacon William Ditewig, a theologian and deacon who previously served as the head of the US bishopsʼ, secretariat for the diaconate, has been told his public presence in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia would cause “,doctrinal confusion”, Why? He has been told he is not allowed to speak publicly in the Philadelphia archdiocese because he co-authored a serious ecclesiological book investigating the possibility of ordaining women as deacons** Deacon Bill says he had no intention of discussing the question of women deacons during his talk, which was to be an update to diocesan deacons and candidates on the state of the diaconate. The cancellation came without consultation from the archdioceseʼ,s speaker approval commission, a group of six priests and one lay female theologian given the task of reviewing speakers for archdiocesan events. Dr Bill Ditewig is a distinguished theologian and also a writer on a number of diaconal matters. He is at present Director of Faith Formation, Diaconate, and Planning in the Diocese of Monterey in California, and has been a Professor of Theology. He was a keynote speaker at our national Deaconsʼ, conference in Lowestoft. Pope John Paul II did not, we must remember, forbid discussion on women Deacons: his 1994 apostolic letter Ordinatio Sacerdotalis declared that the church “,has no authority whatsoever to confer priestly ordination on women.”, He specifically referred to priests, not deacons. There are of course references to women deacons in the histories of the eastern and western churches, right up to the middle ages. St Paul mentions the deacon Phoebe in his letter to the Romans and women generally when referring to deacons in 1 Timothy. It remains the case that a national diaconate is probably the first priority in this country, and diaconal Ordination is now only for men. Women (permanent) deacons are ordained in the Lutheran and Anglican churches. Something interesting for the future. **Women Deacons Past President and Future: Gary Macy William Ditewig and Phyllis Zagano: Paulist Press, New York. Deacons Diary A s is now the custom, fraternal greetings were sent by the Vatican to the Sikh community around the world to mark Guru Nanak’,s birthday. Some Sikhs prefer to use the expression Guru Nanak Gurpurab to avoid using a human term, “,birthday”, in relation to their gurus, as they are believed to be beyond the limitations of mere mortals. Guru Nanak Gurpurab celebrates, the life of the first Guru of Sikhism (1469-1539), who preached truthful conduct, hard and honest work, and equality between men and women, and members of different castes and religions The text of the message reads: Dear Sikh Friends, The Pontifical Council for Interreligious Dialogue most cordially wishes you joy, peace and well-being on the Birth Anniversary of Siri Guru Nanak Dev Sahib which you celebrate on 28th November this year. Being a special moment of divine blessings to you, may this event shower harmony and happiness on you, your friends, families and communities! Truly, occasions such as this, while offering the much needed opportunity to make an inward journey for spiritual enrichment, invite us to reflect, individually and collectively, upon our responsibility towards making our society ever more humane and peaceful. On one hand, we admit that the need for our on-going and all-time engagement in forming the men and women of our society to have a true moral profile everywhere that is congruent and consonant with human nature is felt more and more in our times. On the other, we equally realize that religions with the noble values they propound need to show the way and take the lead in transforming human societies. We wish that starting from our own religious convictions, we can always respect more the innate dignity of every human being, including the religiously different other, by acts of compassion and cooperation, and assimilating values like forgiveness, truth, justice and freedom into personal and collective moral fabric so that the present and future generations can live in security, peace and hope. Conscious, courageous and concerted efforts by all - parents, teachers, socio-religious-political leaders and the media - therefore, are more necessary today than ever to avoid any further erosion of sound moral values. Let us together promote a way of life that respects differences and gives moral cohesion to the society. Equally important is to heal the wounds and to restore broken relationships in families and communities. Reconciliation leads to peace because it is forgiveness in action that rebuilds human relationships. Rooted in our respective religious traditions and being aware of the urgency of reconciliation and peace, may we, Sikhs and Christians, while joining hands with others, promote all that is true and good for the transformation of society and become “,builders of peace and architects of reconciliation”, (Pope Benedict XVI, Address during General Audience, 12 September 2012) so that all may live in peace and fellowship everywhere. Wishing you all a Joyous Prakash Divas of Siri Guru Nanak Sahib! Jean-Louis Cardinal Tauran President Rev. Fr. Miguel Á,ngel Ayuso Guixot, MCCJ Secretary INTERFAITH Events Saturday 12th January - Interfaith Forest Gardening 10.45am –, 2pm Meet at Parkwood Springs Forest Garden car park, Shirecliffe Road , Sheffield S5 8XB . Plants, people, faiths growing together –, beautiful and productive. Contactsheffieldinterfaith@hotmail.co.uk or Nirmalcurlsu@hotmail.com 07932017929 Thursday 17th January - CCJ Winter Concert 8pm Popular event featuring Christian and Jewish Choirs at UHC Synagogue, 151 Shadwell Lane LS17 8DW Tuesday 22nd January - Rites of Passage in Pagan Traditions 6.30 for 7pm Refreshments followed by a talk for Concord by Jay Anderson at the Quaker Meeting House, Woodhouse Lane LS2 9DX Everyone welcome. Further details: secretary@concord-leeds.org.uk Sunday 27th January - Holocaust Memorial Day 2pm A commemorative event in Leeds Town Hall with contributions from young people and Holocaust Survivors. Festivals January 24th –, Milad-ul-Nabi (Birthday of the Prophet)- Muslim Shia Muslims celebrate this 5 days later. Some Muslims do not approve of celebrating the birthday, and regard doing so as a religious innovation. January 26th - Tu B`Shevat - Jewish The Jewish New Year for trees - For religious accounting purposes all trees have their anniversaries on this festival, regardless of when they were planted. The Torah forbids Jews to eat the fruit of new trees for three years after they are planted. The fourth year`s fruit was to be tithed to the Temple. February 3rd –, Rissun - Shinto The Spring festival that marks the watershed between Winter and Spring. February 8th –, Nirvana Day - Buddhist Nirvana Day, also known as Parinirvana, is kept by some Buddhists on February 15th. Nirvana Day is the celebration of Buddha`s death when he reached total Nirvana, at the age of 80. Vatican greeting to Sikhs Guru Nanak’,s birthday Candle in the window O ne of the Sikh practices that underlines their commitment to equality between all people irrespective gender, caste, religion or nationality is the langar. At the Gurdwara a community meal (langar) is served each day to anyone who is present. The meal is prepared using offerings brought to the Gurdwara. Everyone sits together, without distinction, and is served –, food is brought to them. It underlines the need for social communion within a community and could give us cause to consider the balance between the sacramental and the social in our own parishes. Many traditions have a “,candle in the window”, custom for major celebrations and feasts. Sometimes literally a candle burning in a window of the house to indicate that any travellers who are unable to reach their own homes for the feast can be certain of a welcome if they approach. Others always have a spare place laid at table, ready for the knock at the door. When it comes the stranger can welcomed easily because they were expected. Yet again the door may be left unlocked or even ajar while the meal is eaten so that a traveller will not be missed because the family do not hear the knock at the door. One of the very powerful practices that has influenced my own liturgical thinking is the custom of prasad in the Hindu community –, offering a sweetmeat to visitors to the Temple as they leave. A Hindu scholar once told me that he only managed to put the theology behind it into words when he came to England and came across the expression about something leaving a nasty taste in oneʼ,s mouth. This was the reverse. He was adamant that prayer and attendance at Temple were a duty but he also recognised “,desert experiences”, when we mere humans do not feel nurtured or fulfilled by liturgy and prayer. “,If nothing else, at least you can leave with a sweet taste in your mouth,”, he said of the prasad. Not immediately, because it took a while to assimilate the idea, but since that day I have striven to have some element within liturgy that those who may be struggling can take away with them, just in case. At Christmas we shall have many guests in our churches, some regular attenders but away from their usual home, others who attend more spasmodically but want to attend at Christmas. The examples that those of other faiths can offer though their customs might give us pause for thought about our own candle in the window, the welcome that we give, and whether our guests leave with a sweet taste in their mouths. Holocaust Memorial Day 27 January 2013 Holocaust Memorial Day provides an opportunity for everyone to learn lessons from the Holocaust, Nazi persecution and subsequent genocides and apply them to the present day to create a safer, better future. The theme for Holocaust Memorial Day 2013 is ‘,Communities Together: Build a Bridge’,. To find out more, visit www.hmd.org.uk CONFERENCE ON DIALOGUE IN WASHINGTON, D.C. Catholic, Muslim, Sikh And Hindu Leaders Gather to Nurture Bonds of `Friendship, Solidarity And Respect` Leaders and young people from Catholic, Muslim, Sikh and Hindu traditions gathered for a day-long conference at St. Paul`s College in Washington, D.C. to exchange views of interreligious dialogue in U.S. society. Generations of Faith 2012 was the second such event sponsored by the Secretariat for Ecumenical and Interreligious Affairs of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB). Father John Crossin, executive director of the USCCB`s Secretariat for Ecumenical and Interreligious Affairs, presented a session on the importance of listening. ",This art of dialogue begins on the open canvas of mutual listening,", Father Crossin said. ",Listening is the first and ever- present step in a process that, through God`s grace, will take us to recognize the obstacles that separate us, heal old wounds, grow in our understanding of the other, grow in our understanding of self, and create a sacred space in which the genuine bonds of friendship, solidarity, respect, and peace can flourish.", Subsequent sessions dealt with, sharing one`s faith with people of other traditions, and the need for young people to provide a lead in interreligious dialogue. Young adults and religious leaders also shared personal testimony regarding the important role dialogue has played for them. Bishop Barry Knestout, co-chair of the Mid-Atlantic Catholic-Muslim Dialogue, gave the keynote address on the theme ",Dialogue of Life: Celebrating our Commonalities, Understanding our Differences.", Bishop Knestout said dialogue makes possible an understanding of differences that does not lead to strife and discord. ",We have high hopes for you –, for you are the future hands and feet of God in the world,", Bishop Knestout said. ",This task of interreligious dialogue, a task that requires your hands and feet, that is, your commitment to interreligious service and cooperation, as well as understanding and solidarity, is of immense importance at this point in history.",

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Dec 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

V isiting the ‘,Food&,SupportDrop-In’, Centre in St. James Road, Halifax on a Saturday morning is a humbling experience. Why? Seeing over a 100 people in this day and age, seeking help in terms of provisions of basic toiletries, food items, bedding and friendship all of which the rest of us simply take for granted! St. Josephʼ,s Catholic Primary School in Halifax has contributed to this Drop-In Centre in previous years. The need has not declined, rather it has increased and may get worse as Benefit cuts start to bite. Two committee members visited St. Josephʼ,s on 12th October in advance of the Harvest season –, they enacted and explained about the role and purpose of the Centre –, pupils as well as staff found this highly interesting. Result? Large contributions of tins or packets of non-perishable food, household goods, toiletries, pet food, etc. were received into school in the following days. Mrs. Hutton, the headteacher uttered warmly: “,Itʼ,s sheer Godʼ,s providence –, seeing the varied supplies increasing day by day –, sharing what we have and helping those less fortunate than ourselves. Thatʼ,s what we stand for –, Iʼ,m so thankful to my school. Iʼ,d like to thank all the parents who listen to and respond so generously to the message their children take home from school”,. The ʻ,Food&,SupportDrop-Inʼ, is a project of Christians Together Calderdale. It definitely needs the ongoing support from churches, individuals, companies, schools and other organisations. Admirable work is carried out by a team of volunteers who on Thursdays splits large boxes of cereals, pasta, toiletries, etc. into smaller packages. At least 40 volunteers help at each Saturday session: to pack bags, to befriend, to staff the kitchen, to ask what each client needs after criteria have been checked and to stack tinned goods in the cellar. Mrs. Hutton continued, “, I am sure there will be more opportunities in the not too distant future for St. Josephʼ,s School to support again and thereby improve the lives of needy people. It follows that children embrace first hand what Jesus asked all of us to do: Love One Another”,. Leeds Catholic Post Page 7 Leeds School South Partnership BIG SING E ight Leeds Primary schools came together last month to take part in CJM Music’,s ‘,Big Sing Liturgy Thing’, led by the renowned Jo Boyce. The event hosted by Mount St Mary’,s in their newly refurbished performing arts theatre was the first venture of the new schools partnership. The day, attended by over 200 pupils, was spent in song, prayer and dance. The morning activities saw the children practicing the original hymns of CJMʼ,s Boyce and Stanley in preparation for a ʻ,Big Liturgyʼ, in the afternoon. Children from each school took part in a signing and dance workshop to add style and movement to the Liturgy. Children and staff agreed it was a marvelous day and plans are already being made for next yearʼ,s event. Schools from the South Leeds Partnership that participated were: St Patrickʼ,s, St Philipʼ,s, Christ the King, Holy Family, St Anthonyʼ,s, St Maryʼ,s Rothwell, St Josephʼ,s Hunslet and St Francis Morley. Notre Dame wins Fairtrade status L ast month the Notre Dame Fairtrade team lead by Anna Case held a Teddy Bears’, picnic lunch to celebrate the college being awarded full Fairtrade status. ʻ,The team have worked really hard for over two years to get Fairtrade Status for the College and so when the Fairtrade Foundation awarded us the certificate we wanted to showcase it.ʼ, Said Miss Case The event took place at lunchtime and staff and students donated homemade cakes and other goodies made with Fairtrade ingredients. These were washed down with Fairtrade lemonade. The Fairtrade team also worked closely with Notre Dame catering manager Ian who was a great help on the day and also organised for some representatives of Cadbury to come in. The Cadbury team gave away samples of Fairtrade chocolate and offered students the opportunity to win prizes by completing small tasks. If anyone bought any Fairtrade products throughout the day then they were automatically placed in the raffle draw with the opportunity to win a prize of itunes vouchers and vouchers for other stores. The home-made goodies sold out at lunchtime and made over £,85. Being awarded full Fair trade status is an amazing achievement for the college and the team is delighted that their hard work has been recognised by the Foundation. It has also inspired the team to continue in their efforts to raise awareness of the importance of buying Fairtrade wherever possible. For more information on Fairtrade products visit http://www.fairtrade.org.uk/ Please show your support by ʻ,likingʼ, the Notre Dame Fairtrade page on Facebook, http://www.facebook.com/pages/Fairtrade-at-Notre-Dame-Catholic-Sixth-Form-College/268214463240217?ref=hl Harvest Bonanza Opening of new Prayer Garden: A s their second event for the Year of Faith, St. Edward`s Catholic Primary School, Boston Spa, has held an official opening of their new Prayer Garden. The garden includes a statue of the Madonna and Child, which was donated by the sisters at Ilkley, and renovated for school by a local artist. It also features a beautiful mosaic, which the pupils in KS2 designed and made. The mosaic celebrates our life of faith and reminds us that the mission of all Catholic schools is to ",Nurture Human Wholeness.", For the official opening, parish priest, Fr Michael Ingwell, cut a ribbon and blessed both the garden and all the staff and pupils who will pray in it. The blessing of the garden was attended by parents, parishioners and the School Council, before all the pupils in school, with all the visitors and staff went outside to release balloons. One hundred and seventy helium balloons in yellow and blue (the school colours) were released, each carrying a prayer written by a child in school. They were released with great joy and excitement! Parents and parishioners were then treated to refreshments in the school hall, and the Prayer Garden was open to view all afternoon.

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Dec 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 8 Leeds Catholic Post By D Beardsley Headteacher Holy Family Catholic High School, Carlton celebrated another successful year by holding our Prize Presentation Evening on Wednesday 28th November 2012. The evening included speeches from Chair of Governors Peter. A. O’,Neill, Headteacher Darren Beardsley and guest speaker Father A. Wilson. The evening also provided an opportunity to celebrate the musical talent that we have in school, with individual performances as well as an outstanding rendition of ‘,Won’,t back down’, from the school choir. Headteacher Darren Beardsley said, ʻ,This is an opportunity to celebrate the outstanding progress that students make at Holy Family School. We again achieved record results in the summer and it is a pleasure to welcome the students back into school to receive their certificates and to celebrate their success. We are rightly proud of the academic success, but we also take real satisfaction from developing the whole person at Holy Family. It is great to see that, with our strong partnerships with parents, we have played an important role in the development of well rounded young people, who have the values that will enable them to make a positive contribution to society.ʼ, ʻ,I would like to thank parents for their support, as well as, thanking all staff within school who have displayed real dedication, professionalism and affection towards the students, to enable them to achieve these outstanding outcomes.ʼ, Awards were presented for academic excellence, as well as for effort, achievement, service to the community and individual subject prizes. A wide range of sporting academic and artistic prizes, along with attendance awards were also presented to current students of the school, demonstrating the potential that we have for further success in the future. Progress Celebrated Youth Sunday In Carlton T he little Parish of St Mary’,s Carlton, near Selby, went out of its way on Sunday November25th to celebrate Youth Sunday, evidence for this was an overfull car park with people being asked to move their cars to let others in. Then all the talk in church before Mass started was that it was standing room only! The liturgy had been prepared by the children from the secondary school and they did it well even producing two young people to bravely stand forward and sing the responsorial psalm, which they did in fine style. In his homily Fr Anthony Wilson explained why the sanctuary was decorated with trappings of Kingly Power and fishing net. We were he said celebrating the Feast of the Kingship of Christ but the net was to say we were fishers of men –, just like Jesus. Also on the sanctuary was a picture of John Paul II whose motto was to put out into the deep, to be fishers of men Jesusʼ, apostles of the 21st centaury. It was our job to put ourselves at the service of others. Emmerdale Star Visits Catholic Care Supported Living Home M eet little Theo Tasker, who has Downs Syndrome and is helping to spread a positive message about the genetic condition through his starring role in Emmerdale. Despite only being 19 months old Theoʼ,s face has already been seen in millions of homes across Britain and Ireland in the much-loved soap, Emmerdale, through his role as baby Leo. Just a few weeks ago Theo and his parents, Dee and Gary, visited one of our Supported Living Homes for 3 adults who have been diagnosed with the same condition. These three, one gentleman and two ladies, have been living in their own home for more nine years. The ladies are keen ʻ,Soapʼ, watchers and were delighted to welcome Theo and his parents into their home. They and one of their parents entertained Theo, shared their own life stories with Dee and Gary, enjoyed a ʻ,buffet teaʼ, and had their photographs taken with Theo and the family. When asked about Emmerdale Dee commented, “,It is great that Theo can help people see that a baby born with Downs Syndrome is just the same as any other child - he laughs, smiles and is a great ʻ,weeʼ, character. The emphasis for my husband Gary and I is not on the syndrome but on Theo as a baby and his potential. We want him to be safe, healthy and happy and, to give him the opportunity to fulfil his dreams just as any other parent would”,. A special day, in a special place, remembering a special man R aymond was a 49 year old gentleman who resided in one of Catholic Care’,s supported living projects when he sadly died. To honour his memory his family and fellow tenants gathered to posthumously celebrate his 50th birthday. During the celebration his father presented a gift of £,500 in appreciation of the care and support Raymond had received for more than 10yrs. The people living in the supported house decided they should spend the money by remembering Raymond as he would want to be remembered and go to one of his favourite places’,, ‘,Blackpool’,. They also chose to invite with them four men who, also supported by Catholic Care, had recently moved into their own new home just a few miles away. The day was a great memorial - they shared in the company of one another, shared in Raymond`s favourite meal of fish and chips, walked the sights of Blackpool, and to finish the evening drove through the illuminations. The day was everything that was wonderful about Raymond - the generosity of family, the love of those close (family and friends) and the joy of sharing in what is special about the places close to us. Raymond`s friends remembered him in a special way and in doing this discovered once more what was special about him - friendship, sharing, caring, love and belonging.

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Dec 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Leeds Catholic Post Page 9 Papal Honour for St Austin’,s Parishioner A long-standing member of the congregation at St Austin’,s, Wakefield has been honoured by Pope Benedict for his exceptional service to the Church. At a Mass led by the parish priest, Fr Tim Swinglehurst, on Saturday 10th November, Dr David Chappell was presented with the Bene Merenti medal by the Diocesan Archivist, Robert Finnigan. Mr Finnigan told the congregation of Dr Chappell’,s work, which he started over forty years ago, to record the architectural heritage of the diocese since the late 18th century. This, he said, had produced a unique and invaluable source of information. He also highlighted his role in surveying the fabric of diocesan churches and how for many years Dr Chappell’,s reports formed the basis for a systematic approach to maintenance and repair works. At parish level Dr Chappell still makes his professional expertise available to Fr Swinglehurst as he did to his immediate predecessors, the late Canon Barr and Canon John Nunan, in support of various building schemes at St Austin’,s church, which is now one of the oldest in the diocese, dating back to 1828. For what was a notable occasion both for David and the parish he was joined by members of his own family as well as many fellow parishioners, while two of his grandchildren acted as altar servers for the Mass. “,Twinkle, Sparkle”, at St. John the Baptist Church by Tina Barry, Deputy Headteacher, St. John the Baptist Catholic Primary School, a Voluntary Academy The Annual Catholic Care carol concert was held on the 17th December 2012 at St. John the Baptist Catholic Church, Normanton. The school hosting the event this year was St. John the Baptist Catholic Primary School, Normanton. Canon Maguire, who is both Parish Priest and a member of the Academy Trust Board, opened the evening of festivities and gave a warm welcome to all present. Children from every year group performed a variety of activities including singing, dancing and poetry reading. St. Johnʼ,s choir, under the skilled musical direction of Mr Thomas Moore, Director of Music at The Cathedral, Church of All Saints, Wakefield, performed a host of splendid traditional carols from around the world, including Long Ago in Times of Darkness, Shiniest Star, O Tannenbaum, The Zither Carol, The Nature Carol and many more. The church of St. John the Baptist was filled to capacity and with standing room only, was treated to a festive medley of talent. The evening was opened with a captivating liturgical dance performed by the children of Year 6, to the accompaniment of ʻ,Do You See What I See?ʼ, Christingles lit up the church as children processed towards the altar, and the audience was treated to a lovely rendition of ʻ,The Shiniest Starʼ, by the children of Year 2. Gifts in abundance were then presented by the School Council Representatives in support of ʻ,The Gianna Project: When a Child is Born Christmas Appealʼ,, reflecting the generosity of the community and greatly supported by ASDA supermarket. The evening was an undoubted success and thoroughly enjoyed by all present. Mrs Carol Hill, Coordinator of Catholic Care, Diocese of Leeds, gave the final address and thanked all who had contributed to the tremendously successful event. Afterwards, children, families and guests enjoyed a warm Christmas drink and a bite of festive fayre in the Canon Oʼ,Grady Hall. The evening reflected the true sense of community and Christmas cheer and thanks are extended to all involved in its profound success.

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Dec 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 10 Leeds Catholic Post The Knights visit the Cathedral T he Equestrian Order of the Holy Sepulchre of Jerusalem held their Vigil Service and Mass of Investiture in Leeds Cathedral on Friday and Saturday November 30th and December 1st. Chief celebrant and preacher on the Saturday was Grand Prior Most Reverend Kevin McDonald, KC*HS along with Bishop Richard Moth, Bishop to the Forces and Bishop David Konstant, Emeritus Bishop of Leeds. There were about 300 knights present for the Mass of investiture on the Saturday morning –, just a few less than those who had attended the vigil on the night before in the Cathedral. They made an impressive site as they lined up outside the Cathedral for the procession in at 10am on the Saturday morning in their white cloaks. Along with them were about 20 Ladies also part of the Order in their own right. Archbishop McDonald welcomed everyone at the start of the service to the Cathedral and thanked them for coming despite the ʻ,Nip in the Airʼ, –, it was good, he said, to see so many people present. In his homily The Archbishop reminded the knights of the high ideals the order was founded on, touched on the unsettled conditions of the Middle East today and pointed out that they as knights had to take their place in society. He reminded them that what was happened in the Cathedral was not just a ceremony but had to affect their lives –, so that they found in themselves the space for God. They had to be open for change, open to the Spirit, open to the Lord who could make a difference to their lives. Following the Homily six new Knights were invested, nine Dames were invested and four priests were invested. A further two Dames were promoted and three knights were promoted. After the singing of the Te Deum and blessing the service finished with the singing of the National Anthem. St Joseph`s Catholic Primary School Barnoldswick, West Close Road, Barnoldswick, Lancashire BB18 5EN. (135 on roll). Headteacher Leadership Pay Spine ISR L8-L14, £,44,525 to £,51,614 a year. Required 1 April 2013. `With Jesus at the centre of all we do and say` An exciting opportunity has arisen to lead this outstanding primary school (Ofsted Sept 2009). Help us meet future challenges and continue to raise aspirations and achievements, enhancing learning throughout the school. St Joseph`s is a happy school with strong community links and supportive governors and parents. We are seeking to appoint a dynamic and vibrant Headteacher who is a practising Catholic with a deep personal faith, who can take the school forward on its next stage of development. Informal visits to the school are welcomed, please call Marie, our school bursar on 01282 813045. The post you are applying for is covered by the Rehabilitation of Offenders (Exceptions) Act 1975. If successful you will be required to apply to the Criminal Records Bureau for a `disclosure`. Application forms: If you require a hard copy application, please email: hrprecruitment@oneconnectlimited.co.uk or tel: 01772 535353, selecting the Recruitment option (8am - 6pm). Please quote the job reference number. Return to: hrprecruitment@oneconnectlimited.co.uk or Human Resource and Payroll Service, One Connect Limited, HR Schools Recruitment, PO Box 100, County Hall, Preston PR1 0LD. Ref: SCH01219. Closing date: 11 January 2013 Shortlisting: 30 January 2013 Interviews: February 14 and 15 2013

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Dec 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Leeds Catholic Post Page 11 St Wilfrid’,s Catholic Primary School Headteacher Peter Burdekin Deputy Headteacher For April 2013 start -permanent and full-time NOR 140 ISR L1 –, L5. St Wilfridʼ,s in Ripon is a much-loved school with a strong community and parish ethos and good relations within the Ripon Cluster. The dedicated governing body of St Wilfridʼ,s are looking to appoint a committed and practising Catholic to this post. They believe that our hard working pupils and staff deserve a professional and inspirational leadership team who lead and manage the school in the context of a community rooted in the Catholic Faith. We want to hear from you if you are: •, A practising Catholic who has a firm commitment to the ethos and values of a Catholic School, •, An outstanding classroom practitioner with proven whole school leadership skills, and •, Able to motivate, challenge and inspire staff Further details and the full application pack are available from the school by e-mail admin@riponst-wilfrids.n-yorks.sch.uk or by contacting the school at Church Lane, Ripon, North Yorkshire HG4 2ES, Telephone/Fax: 01765 603232. Closing date is 7 January 2013 and interviews will take place later in the month. St Wilfridʼ,s is committed to safeguarding and promoting the welfare of children and expects all staff and volunteers to share this commitment. The successful candidate will be subject to an enhanced CRB check. Diocese of Leeds

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Dec 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 12 Leeds Catholic Post ",Mary`s Knitting", Reception and Year 1 children at St Francis Catholic Primary School performed their nativity called ",Mary`s Knitting",. It told how Mary needed to knit a blanket ready for the birth of Jesus. The children all sang with great enthusiasm and helped those watching to appreciate the true meaning of Christmas.

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Dec 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Leeds Catholic Post Page 13 L eeds Trinity University College has met the criteria to be awarded the title of university, following the government’,s decision to lower the qualifying threshold for university title from 4,000 to 1,000 students. Leeds Trinity has over 3000 students and so submitted its application for full university title earlier this year. It will become known as Leeds Trinity University in the near future. Leeds Trinity was established in 1966 as two Catholic teacher training colleges –, Trinity College and All Saints College –, the institution merged in the 80s, and gained taught degree awarding powers in 2009. Throughout its history Leeds Trinity has maintained its strong reputation for teacher education, whilst diversifying to offer undergraduate, postgraduate and foundation degrees in a wide range of disciplines. An employer-focused university with high levels of graduate employment, it was one of the first universities to offer professional work placements with every degree, and these placements continue to form an integral, assessed element of every undergraduate degree. This announcement is a significant moment in Leeds Trinityʼ,s 46 year history, and culminates a fantastic year for the institution. The university has achieved its target for student numbers in 2012, whilst applications are already looking very healthy for 2013. Recognised for its high-quality education, The 2013 Sunday Times University Guide revealed that Leeds Trinity is in the top 10% of higher education institutions in the UK for teaching excellence. The university has also been exceeding national employability benchmarks for a decade, with the latest figures revealing that 93% of Leeds Trinityʼ,s 2011 graduates were in work or further study six months after graduating.* Professor Freda Bridge will soon become Vice Chancellor of Leeds Trinity University. Professor Bridge said: “,Iʼ,m delighted that we have met the criteria to become a university–, it is a major milestone in our 46 year history that recognises our collective hard work and achievements. In all but name, Leeds Trinity has been functioning as a university since its award of taught degree awarding powers in 2009, and Iʼ,m delighted that the governmentʼ,s decision will now allow us to use the title ʻ,universityʼ,. Ed Anderson, Chair of the Board of Governors at Leeds Trinity, added: “,The Board of Governors is thrilled that Leeds Trinity has been awarded university title. We are proud of the fantastic experience we provide to our students, which is reflected in student satisfaction surveys and the employment record of our former students. This announcement marks an exciting new chapter for Leeds Trinity, and the city of Leeds, and we are proud to be a part of the offer for people who wish to pursue their University education in Leeds.”, Leeds Trinity has held degree-awarding powers since 2009 and, despite outperforming many other universities in various league tables, the requirement for universities to have at least 4,000 full students had previously prevented it from using the universally- understood term of university. Professor Freda Bridge will retire this December after 6 years at Leeds Trinity, and adds: “,This granting of university title is not only a tremendous occasion for Leeds Trinity University, but also for the Catholic Church, who now have universities with Catholic foundations in England. We have always celebrated our Catholic foundations, and weʼ,re excited about our future as a university, which is a fitting start to this Year of Faith.”, Looking to 2013, Leeds Trinity is aiming to improve its academic provision even further with the launch of 18 new courses for 2013. These courses all have a strong vocational focus, including four 2-year accelerated degrees that will let students fast-track their studies and enter the world of work sooner. *HESA Destination of Higher Leavers Survey 2011 Leeds Trinity awarded full university status Farewell Freda L eeds Trinity is bidding Professor Freda Bridge a fond farewell this December, as she embarks on her retirement. Freda has been Principal and Chief Executive of Leeds Trinity for over 6 years, which rounds off an amazing 40 year career in education and public service. During her time at Leeds Trinity, Professor Freda Bridge has led on many momentous developments for the institution, including our conferment of taught degree awarding powers (TDAP) in 2009 and most recently, our successful application to the Privy Council that Leeds Trinity should be granted full university status. Current and former staff, students and partners came together to wish Freda well at a function on Wednesday 5 December. Freda regaled guests with the highlights of her time at Leeds Trinity, aided by a box filled with mementos and memories. As well as TDAP and our impending award of university title, Freda mentioned our hosting of the Vatican II Conference as a major highlight of her time here as well as being able to attend an event as part of the Papal visit to England Ed Anderson, Chair of the Governors at Leeds Trinity, also gave a speech at the event, in which he praised Freda for her contribution to the institution, and thanked her for the strong position in which she leaves Leeds Trinity. Professor Freda Bridge thanks staff for their dedication and commitment, commenting:. “,I have just one regret among all the memories, and that is that I will not be here to see the benefits that will inevitable flow from gaining full University title. But I do wish Leeds Trinity University all the very best for what is now a guaranteed successful future.”, On behalf of all staff and students at Leeds Trinity, we would like to wish Freda all the best for a long and happy retirement. Freda will be succeeded in January by Professor Margaret House, who joins Leeds Trinity from Middlesex University. Leeds Trinity launches new BA in Catholic Studies L eeds Trinity has launched a new BA in Catholic Studies that will offer lifelong learning to adults who are contributing to the work of a Diocese or Catholic organisation. Leeds Trinity and Catholic Dioceses in the north-east of England are establishing a new partnership through the BA (Hons) degree in Catholic Studies. Following validation in the spring, it is intended that the programme will be launched with a summer school in 2013. The degree will be a lasting fruit of the ʻ,Year of Faithʼ,, proclaimed by Pope Benedict, which has just begun. The programme has been designed in response to a request from representatives of the dioceses and in collaboration with them. They have identified a need for in-service theological education to degree level for a variety of categories of people working for or with the Catholic Church. These include parish and schools workers, chaplains, youth and community workers, and trainee deacons. Within their overall mission, the dioceses are already offering education courses, including teaching the Catholic Certificate in Religious Studies (CCRS). This programme offers CCRS graduates the chance to progress to degree level qualifications. To mark this new partnership a Memorandum of Understanding was signed at the recent Bishops` Conference at Hinsley Hall by Bishop Drainey, Bishop Rawsthorne and Mgr Wilson, representing the north-eastern Dioceses. Professor Kirsteen Kim, Head of Theology and Religious Studies at Leeds Trinity, who has been instrumental in setting up this degree course, commented: ",This Memorandum is an exciting sign of growing collaboration between Leeds Trinity and local Catholic Dioceses, especially in designing and delivering a new part-time degree in Catholic Studies to start next summer.", For more information about the course contact Prof Kim at k.kim@leedstrinity.ac.uk Leeds Trinity Carol Service T he Annual Christmas Carol Service took place in the Leeds Trinity Chapel on Thursday 6 December. About 200 people, including Cllr and Mrs Jude Arbuckle, joined together to enjoy a range of traditional and new carols from the Leeds Trinity choir, the children`s choir from Our Lady of Good Counsel Primary School, the choir from St Mary`s RC parish in Horsforth and the Horsforth Town Brass Band. Mgr Paul Grogan and Rev Jane de Gay officiated, and thanked Leeds Trinityʼ,s outgoing Principal and Chief Executive, Professor Freda Bridge, for all her work and support during her tenure at Leeds Trinity. Fredaʼ,s successor, Professor Margaret House, was also welcomed. The evening concluded with mulled wine and mince pies.

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Dec 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 14 Leeds Catholic Post O n Saturday 10 November, campaigners of all ages and from almost every diocese in England and Wales, gathered at Westminster Cathedral for the official launch of our new Hungry for Change campaign. Campaigners from Leeds diocese joined in an unseasonal picnic - complete with checked rugs, picnic hampers and a giant loaf and fish - outside the cathedral to raise awareness about Hungry for Change. The picnic was the centrepiece of a whole day of activities, including food for thought from speakers and workshops, a pop-up exhibition of previous campaigns, worship and the first viewing of a new animation explaining the food system. Campaigners left with an appetite for action, determined to take the message back to their dioceses. Why not join our ʻ,Hungry for Changeʼ, Campaign by ordering action packs and cards for your parish. Thereʼ,s a guide with lots of ideas for prayer, reflection and action. Last Lent our ʼ,Thirst for Changeʼ, campaign inundated David Cameron with more than 60,000 messages urging world leaders to make access to clean water and sanitation a priority for the worldʼ,s poorest people. From now on and in the build-up to the G8 meeting in June 2013, we want even more messages to reach David Cameron, who will chair the meeting. Weʼ,re asking for: •, Support for small scale farmers, like Emily above, who provide 50% of the worldʼ,s food. •, Checks on the power of global food companies, to ensure transparency, on the lobbying they undertake, their human rights record and to ensure their workers get a fair deal Donʼ,t just send a message—,become a multiplier and pass it on! We want to get 100,000 action cards before next June! Contact the Leeds office for further details Tel: 0113 2759302 or email leeds@cafod.org.uk Are You Hungry for Change? The Message of Christmas Around the World T he team at CAFOD Leeds would like to thank all our supporters for journeying with us during 2012 and helping to transform lives. We wish you blessing and joy for Christmas and the New Year, just as you have helped bring joy and blessing to our partner communities. In the final days before Christmas, we offer these daily reflections, taken from our interactive Advent calendar, which can be found at http://www.cafod.org.uk/Pray/Advent-Calendar We hope they will be a helpful resource for reflection. Friday 21st December ",Look, the moment your greeting reached my ears, the child in my womb leapt for joy.", (Today`s gospel: Luke 1:39-45) Elizabeth is filled with joy when she sees Mary and the child in her womb also leaps for joy. Haouaʼ,s 17 month old daughter Hassana was malnourished, but having been given plumpyʼ,nut, a food supplement from St Augustineʼ,s health centre, she is now starting to thrive. “,I am very happy to have received food for my baby and your support,”, Haoua says. “,Iʼ,m so happy. Thatʼ,s the truth. My child is doing well.”, As we prepare for Christmas, a time of great joy, we know that, for one reason or another, many among us will be struggling to find this joy in our lives. Let us take stock for a moment, think of the small things that bring us pleasure, and think about the little things that we can do, which mean so much and bring so much joy to others. God of hope, wipe away the sorrows and hardships that so many of us face. May your Spirit of joy flow through us all. Amen. Saturday 22nd December ",He has filled the starving with good things, sent the rich away empty.", (Today`s gospel: Luke 1:46-55) Maryʼ,s prayer of praise and thanksgiving is heartfelt and joyful, as she recognises that what has happened to her will turn the world upside down. It is a vision of the world that we can all aspire to –, a world where Godʼ,s justice will reign, the powerful will be pulled from their thrones and those of us who are hungry will be filled with good things. But we all have a part to play in making this vision a reality. There is enough food for all people to share, but nearly a billion people go hungry. There are many reasons for this, but underpinning them all is poverty and a lack of power. In Kenya, the amount of crops that Emily Mbithuka grows is not enough for traders to travel the bumpy road to her farm, so she sells to shopkeepers who then sell on her produce at triple the price. “,Itʼ,s difficult because they have control of the prices. We donʼ,t have an option of where to take our produce. Itʼ,s like weʼ,re being cheated.”, We can all play our part in redressing the balance of power. This Advent, will you follow Maryʼ,s example and be hungry for change in our world? God our Saviour, your love extends age after age. Work through us as we try to bring an end to oppression, so all people may be filled with good things. Amen Sunday 23rd December ",But the angel said to her, ʻ,Mary, do not be afraid`.", (Today`s gospel: Luke 1:26-38) Mary is, of course, frightened. Who wouldnʼ,t be in her situation? But Mary gathers all her courage and the strength of her faith, and agrees to what is being asked of her. In this Year of Faith, we are asked to be witnesses, so all may know what we believe. Pope Benedict has said, “,The renewal of the Church is…, achieved through the witness offered by the lives of believers: by their very existence in the world.”, We may be afraid of putting our head up above the parapet, but we are not being called to shout about faith, merely to live it. Standing in solidarity with our brothers and sisters who are in need, upholding the dignity of others and working together for the common good, are just some of the many ways we can be true witnesses to Christʼ,s love for all. Following Maryʼ,s example of courage, we can really put our faith into action this coming year as we try to make a change to our own lives and the lives of others. Mary, Mother of God, pray for us as we seek the courage to try to live out our faith, reflecting the love of your Son Jesus for all people, and being witnesses to the truth. Amen. Monday 24 December ",The rising Sun has come from on high to visit us, to give light to those who live in darkness", (Today`s gospel: Luke 1:67-79) Following the birth of John the Baptist, his father Zechariah speaks this prophecy of all that he will achieve. He sees that John will prepare a way for the Christ, the Son of God, who will bring light into the darkness and peace to all people. The work of St Augustine Health Centre in Niamey, Niger, is a beacon of light, treating up to 200 malnourished people per month. And Caritas Niger, CAFODʼ,s partner in the region, is also working to end the scandal of hunger, by supporting people to get enough food in the long term, helping people to take charge of their own lives and prepare for the future. “,We donʼ,t want to say every day weʼ,ll come to help. We are supporting local people so they can become autonomous,”, Harouna Tchadi explains. As we prepare to celebrate the coming of Christ, the light of the world, let us do all that we can to share the light of peace and hope with others. Bountiful God, all good things come from you. Encourage us to share your light with others, so that we may all live free from poverty and hunger, in peace and unity. Amen Christ Unexpected Lord, we expected you to be grand, but you have come as a helpless infant. We expected you at another time, but you have come in the silence of the night. We expected you to be dazzling, a king, but you have come as a fragile man, like us. We thought you would be different, but you are humble. Hardly anyone recognises you just seeing you is not enough. We have to believe that you are God, like this, so human. We had our own idea of you and you have defied all our expectations. Give us faith to believe in you and recognise you as you are and as you have come to us. This prayer was sent by Miguel Alonzo Mací,as, who works with CAFOD´,s partner COMAL, the Community Trading Network in Honduras.

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Dec 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

S outh African businessman Richard Chennells took time out of his busy schedule to spend two days at St. Mary’,s Catholic High School, Menston because of the school’,s work in South Africa with Mnyakanya School, which is known as the Bambisanani Partnership. Mr Chennells has witnessed, first hand, the schoolʼ,s work in one of South Africaʼ,s poorest rural areas and had promised to visit St. Maryʼ,s when he was next in Europe. Whilst at St. Maryʼ,s he spent time with students who had recently returned from volunteering in South Africa, students that would like to visit South Africa in the future and members of the Bambisanani Enterprises, a student led business which raises money to support the work of the partnership. Mr Chennells said, “,I have had a wonderful two days at St. Maryʼ,s. The teachers, students and support staff are quite inspirational. I have found a real sense of ʻ,teamʼ, and a genuine desire to make a difference in South Africa. There is a real energy and purpose at St. Maryʼ,s which is clearly driven by sound values. My commitment to support the fantastic Bambisanani Partnership has been strengthened by this visit.”, Whilst at the school, Mr Chennells also met with Mr Bill Hudson from the Rotary Club of Aireborough to explore the possibility of developing a joint project between St. Maryʼ,s, the Rotary Club of Aireborough and Rotary Clubs in South Africa, raising the required funding to build toilets at Mnyakanya School. Mr David Geldart, Assistant Headteacher at St. Maryʼ,s said, “,It was a pleasure to welcome Richard to the school, he, his family and his local Rotary Club have supported our work in South Africa for several years and it was great that he could meet more of our students and staff. His talks to students were inspirational, particularly his emphasis on ʻ,the dutyʼ, we all have to support those less fortunate than ourselves. Such visits help strengthen the sustainability of our partnership.”, Leeds Catholic Post Page 15 Classified Advertising MARRIAGE CARE Marriage isn’,t always easy —, Counselling can help For an appointment in confidence, with an understanding and experienced listener, please telephone: 0800 389 3801 A Relationship Counselling Service W. Lever Ltd BRADFORD 01274 547137 524 THORNTON ROAD, BRADFORD BD8 9NB FOR OVER 75 YEARS PROVIDING A COMPLETE PERSONAL &, CARING 24 HOUR FUNERAL SERVICE CHAPEL OF REST H UGHES F UNERAL S ERVICES (Catholic Funeral Directors) 180 YORK ROAD, LEEDS LS9 9NT. Tel 2480953/63 152 GREEN LANE, CROSSGATES. Tel 2326900 3 HOLLIN PARK PARADE, OAKWOOD ROUNDABOUT Tel 2499338 Web: wwww.hughesfuneralservices.co.uk Email: info@hughesfuneralservices.co.uk Family owned and managed. Fully Qualified in all aspects. 24 Hour Service Guaranteed Fixed Price Funeral Plans etc. “,At a time of bereavement we carry out our duties with dignity and respect”, In times of bereavement please contact: B. J. MELIA &, SONS (B. J. Melia Dip F.D.) F UNERAL D IRECTORS AND M ONUMENTAL M ASONS Private Chapel of Rest 64 GIBBET STREET, HALIFAX Telephone: 01422 354453 PRE-PAID FUNERAL SERVICE AVAILABLE DETAILS ON REQUEST Looking to advertise a company or an event –, why not advertise in the Leeds Catholic Post This space could be yours! We have good rates for adverts, reaching a local population of 15,000 Contact: Louise Ward, Catholic Post, Hinsley Hall, 62 Headingley Lane, Leeds LS6 2BX Tel: 0113 261 8028 louise.ward@ dioceseofleeds.org.uk Students out in the Cold N otre Dame Students are noted not only for their generosity in raising money for charity, but also for getting involved in consciousness raising projects. Already this term there have been a number of events and activities organised by the student senate and by Chaplain Andrew Sullivan. On November 9th over £,200 was raised by students and staff who were encouraged to attend College dressed in pink to raise money for Breast Cancer Awareness. On Nov 16th, in an attempt to focus attention on the plight of the homeless among our society, 16 students and 2 members of staff braved the elements and created their own cardboard city outside the College building, opting to spend the night in the open with only a sleeping bag between them and the elements. The event started at 8.00pm and finished at 6.00am when the buses re-commenced. On the night a representative from the homeless charity Shelter, addressed the students. Kate who has been homeless herself is very aware of the problems and was able to talk about the issues surrounding homelessness. Money raised through sponsorship for this event went to Shelter. Shoeboxes leave Holy Family bound for Belarus T he children at The Holy Family School recently despatched shoeboxes to the Samaritan’,s Purse charity which will arrange transport and distribution to children in Belarus. Each shoebox, nicely decorated as befits a Christmas gift, contained small gifts such as toiletries. toys, pencils etc and clothing such as gloves or hat together with £,2.50 to cover the costs of shipping the boxes. Ellen Curran, Pastoral Assistant with Year 7, said, “,The students have been very enthusiastic and very generous. The boxes contain a mixture of toiletries, The boxes are intended to cover, keeping clean, keeping warm, playing and possibly learning. The operation arises very year about this time under the banner Operation Christmas Child and is masterminded by Samaritanʼ,s Purse, an international relief organisation.”, The year 7 students organised 61 boxes. Star of the show was Ethan Humphrey and his family who filled several boxes. The shoeboxes from Holy Family will be going out to Belarus to benefit children still suffering after-effects of Chernobyl. Some children are, even now, in hospital, other live on the rubbish dumps and make their meagre livelihood selling scrap and recyclables South African businessman is impressed by St. Mary’,s

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Dec 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 16 Leeds Catholic Post THE NEED FOR MEDIA ETHICS We expect doctors to save us from injury and harm and do their utmost to protect life. We expect lawyers to work within our legal framework to ensure there is justice among people in our society and we expect journalists and those involved in the communications media (including the new social media) to communicate the truth about what is going on . There is a danger that the discussion around the implementation of the Levison report into newspaper abuses including “,hacking”,, loses sight of the essential ethical issues. Whether the death of Princess Diana or more recently the death of the nurse on the receiving end of an Australian radio prank can be traced back to irresponsible media pressure may be debatable but there is surely a question of thinking responsibly before acting and at least asking whether actions of harassment or mockery will end up damaging people regardless. The present trend of using Twiiter and You Tube to deride and abuse individuals hardly classes as responsible communication. But the use and abuse of people for media ends to gain publicity and make money is not a new innovation brought in with the internet. In politics, the number of occasions you were not only misquoted despite either your words being on a public Hansard record or indeed a video replay of the House of Commons or words that you never actually said being attributed to you in print in quotation marks were in my experience more numerable than was worth keeping count of . In the end you started to treat press reporting as a kind of rough hit and miss affair in which you hoped for an approximation that was not too damaging, Writing about James Joyceʼ,s work “,Ulysses”,, part of which is set in a newspaper office, the cultural critic Walter Benjamin argued that the way newspapers are organised necessarily fragments our knowledge and undermines building up the human community by turning us ito private isolated perverse individuals incapable of solidarity. In other words newspapers by their very nature contribute to dividing us up rather than binding together the human community. As worrying is the recent radio media trend to popular participation “,phone in”, programmes which under the guise of representative democracy, end up presenting opinions as fact. How ofetn is an ill informed opinion set against a trained expert and given equal weight. The problem is not all opinions are of equal value. Some are badly informed, if not plain wrong ( such as the current propagated myth that all the poor families in Britain get £,25,000 a year when very few do and those that do get a housing benefit for their rent to be fully paased over to an over charging London landlord). Not only is it foolish to count the advise of a surgeon on a par with the view of a person with no medical training or experience, it surely cannot be that all opinions are right simply because a person holds them . Some things are right and some things are wrong and need to be named as such. That is the whole basis of moral debate. In other words some views are more valid and more truthful than others and cannot be left to a simplistic difference of opinion based on an individualʼ,s right. The real danger of “,opinionitis”, swamping public discourse is the end of serious moral choices. It will not longer really matter not only what you think but what you do. In a section entitled “,respect for truth”, in the Catechism of the Catholic Church there is a section on the media which stresses that communication is to be “,at the service of the common good”,. It states “, society has a right to information based on truth ,freedom , justice and solidarity, the proper exercise of this right demands that the content of the communication be true and within the limits set by justice and charity, complete. Further it should be communicated honestly and properly. This means that in the gathering and publication of news the moral law and the legitimate rights and dignity of the person should be upheld.”,. More specifically it spells out that “,by the very nature of their profession, journalists have an obligation to serve the truth and not offend against charity in disseminiating information. They should strive to respect with equal care the nature of the facts,and the limits of critical judgement concerning individuals. They should not stoup to defamation”,. We should pray for those abused and defamed but also insist that it is time for a full debate of media ethics and why not rooted in Catholic social teaching. Meanwhile we should insist with James Joyce “,just give us the best news”,. John Battle KSG Fr Colum gets the special award A s part of the Port of Immingham`s 100 year celebrations. The local port authorities decided to create a one off award to honour someone who has made an outstanding contribution to the life of the port. The port users and local businesses were lobbied and the verdict view was that it should go to Fr Colum Kelly, AoS Port Chaplain to Immingham and a priest of our Diocese. Fr Colum told us ",I was very pleased, for as the head of ABP said, this is not an award from church folk but from the business community which recognises the value of all you do in the port. Surely a feather in the cap of AoS.", The aware was presented to Colum at the Immingham Annual Shipping Dinner, where he was asked to say a few words about his work and the work for the AoS. As a thank you and again to help celebrate the ports centenary anniversary, Colum helped organise a special Mass to honour ",A centenary of Goodness",. It was a chance to acknowledge the goodness of the local parish communities and their support of the work of AOS. Chair of Trustees Eamonn Delaney and National Director Martin Foley (pictured L-R with Colum in middle) also traveled up to Immingham to help celebrate the occasion. Images courtesy of ABP David Lee Photography Ltd Life As Port Chaplain by Fr C Kelly B engy was killed in a tragic accident as Bulk Australia left the port of Rotterdam, bound for Immingham. While trying to raise the pilot ladder he slipped and fell into the water. He didn’,t die immediately but his friends watched in horror as he was unable to inflate his life jacket and his body was swept out to sea. He left a young wife who is pregnant with their first child. On arrival in Immingham, the distress of the crew was further compounded by a delay of 3 days at anchor. And as if things could not get any worse, the ship was subjected to an intense search by Border Control acting on intelligence that an illegal shipment of goods was on board. Although the crew was not implicated, they were still refused permission to leave the vessel until the search was complete. The captain was on his first run as skipper and was deeply distressed. Mass was celebrated for Bengy, attended by crew and representatives of the shipping company. Phone cards were given and the crew was finally able to make contact with families. Mass on board is usually a cause of great celebration and joy, but this was filled with poignancy and tears. I was asked to bless Bengyʼ,s cabin and again the spot from where he had fallen. The cabin still contained his belongings and just looked like a place awaiting his return. Two of our ship visitors brought cake and chocolate to the ship and a touch of human kindness which was greatly appreciated. A call from the dock master alerted me to yet another death on board a ship entering the port. This time the death was the result of a tragic accident when a rope line to a tug snapped and wrapped itself around the neck of Ji-Yue Wang, killing him instantly. When I got on board his body lay where he died and was surrounded by crew, police, inspectors, and yet another distressed Captain. It was a further four hours later before his body was removed from the ship under the direction of the coroner. The crew was Chinese with little knowledge of English but I was able to give then phone cards and they were able to make contact with their families and share the dreadful experience. Next day the agent came to me with a formal letter from the coroner that was to accompany his body back to China. He asked if I could, at least, have it translated into Chinese. A kind lady in the local parish not only translated it but rewrote it in a lovely card. Somehow it seemed to add a softer touch to a dreadful situation. Maybe that is what we do –, add the soft touch of a loving God, bringing something MORE than what is expected. In the midst of all the gloom we had a wonderful celebration in the local parish to bless the “,goodness”, of the local people in their contribution to port life. Immingham Port celebrated its 100 years in so many ways throughout the year that I felt it appropriate to celebrate Mass to acknowledge the great gift of the local people. Prayers were said in different languages, reflecting the range of nationalities visiting our port. Children from the local Catholic schools brought symbols of the work of seafarers –,coal, wood, phones and rice. Others brought examples of what we give to the seafarers –, wooly hats, chocolate, warm sweaters and a prayer book. Christmas Crib Exhibition P upils from Year 6 at Christ the King Catholic Primary School, Leeds, have been helping Fr. Redmond set up his Christmas Crib exhibition in the Church hall. Fr. Redmond has dozens of cribs on display from all over the world, which show many different interpretations of the scene. Parents, School Children, Parishioners, others schools and groups will be invited to come and see the exhibition. The exhibition will be on for the whole of the season of Advent. Neil Ryan Headteacher

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Dec 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Leeds Catholic Post Page 17 Taizé,’,s ‘,Pilgrimage of trust on earth’, in Rome The Eternal City will be hosting some 32.000 young men and women at the end of December as they take part in the 35th European youth pilgrimage of the Taizé, community. Since the first such meeting, held in 1978 in Paris, members of the international, ecumenical prayer community have been organising these encounters, offering an alternative New Yearʼ,s celebration to tens of thousands of young Christians from all over Europe and beyond. From Friday December 28th through to Wednesday January 2nd, participants will be bringing the distinctive Taizé, style of worship and prayer to Romeʼ,s major basilicas and churches, including an evening prayer service in St Peterʼ,s Basilica on Saturday with Pope Benedict XVI. One of the cityʼ,s ancient churches, the Basilica of Santa Croce in Gerusalemme, will be available throughout the visit for silent prayer, confession or conversation with a priest or pastor. The programme also features guided tours, bible studies and workshops on many different topics of faith and social engagement –, such as a talk on faith and science by an astronomer from the Vatican observatory, a musical presentation of Danteʼ,s ʻ,Divina Commediaʼ, or a visit with a young rabbi to the Roman synagogue. During their five day stay in Rome participants will be hosted by local families –, at least thatʼ,s the hope of the organisers, who - half way through December - were still anxiously searching for extra accommodation in schools, religious houses and even military barracks. Italians are not known for opening up their homes to strangers, yet one of the main aims of the meeting is to enable the young pilgrims to experience parish life in places and contexts very different from their own. Another goal is to keep costs as low as possible and participants are encouraged to fund raise ahead of the event to support other, less-well-off youngsters wishing to attend. Itʼ,s easy to see why so many young men and women come to attend this ʻ,pilgrimage of trustʼ, and why so many more flock to the Taizé, community in central France each year. Founded during the Second World War by Swiss Protestant pastor, Brother Roger Schutz, the community today counts over a hundred brothers from around thirty countries and from different Christian denominations. They live the life of a traditional monastic community, supporting themselves through their work but also welcoming visitors from every continent and from all walks of life. They see their mission as a concrete expression of the power of faith to heal and reconcile, just as Brother Roger welcomed, Jews, Christians and people of no faith who were facing violence or persecution during World War II. In 1986 Pope John Paul visited Taizé, (heʼ,d been there twice before as Archbishop of Krakow), describing it as a place where a traveller stops to “,quench his thirst and continue on his way.”, The Polish Pope first met Brother Roger in 1962 during the Second Vatican Council and he continued to meet with him in private audience in Rome every year throughout his long pontificate. Pope John XXIII was also full of admiration for the community, calling it “,Taizé,, that little springtime.”, Over recent years the community has also become known worldwide for the simple, yet strangely moving meditative chants which are sung three times a day in the candle-lit church, interspersing prayer, scripture readings and long moments of silence. Brother Paolo, originally from Gloucestershire and a long-time member of the Taizé, community, told me heʼ,s always surprised to see how quickly and easily young visitors adapt to the daily rhythm of prayer, silence and shared reflections. The hope, he said, is that many of them will be “,touched by their experience and sense that the Church is a place where they are welcomed with their searching, with their questions, and feel a desire to search more.”, Brother Paolo is also involved with the organisation of a new project for schools and colleges in the UK, since he says heʼ,s discovered that many teachers there are looking for a place where students can get away from the hectic pace and high expectations of their daily lives. A week at Taizé, allows them to let go of those pressures, meet people from many countries, question what they would like to do with their lives in a safe and encouraging environment. Members of the community have set up centres in some of the poorest places in Africa, Asia or Latin America and visitors to Taizé, are also challenged to ask how they too can become promoters of justice, peace and reconciliation in their own local context. Students of all faiths and none are welcomed on these summer camps, with space provided for those wishing to pray or worship in their own faith tradition. Like the European pilgrimages at New Year, this programme aims to offer a place where young people can explore, question, share, and hopefully discover a deep sense of purpose in their lives. Further information about this programme and all other aspects of the Taizé, community can be found on their website http://www.taize.fr/en Philippa M Hitchen Our Rome Correspondent Football Success at St. Mary’,s, Menston Three Year 9 students from St. Mary’,s Catholic High School have recently been selected for the U14 Boys Leeds City Football squad. Ryan Smith, Oliver Armitage and Bradley Colburn went through a rigorous selection process including two trials and a game against last year’,s squad. The boys will represent the city, playing throughout West Yorkshire. A promising future lies ahead for all three students. Photograph: L-R Ryan Smith, Bradley Colburn, Oliver Armitage Squizzle Drops In Local author Donna Iliffe-Pollard visited St Paul`s Catholic Primary School, Alwoodley, Leeds on Friday November 9th to share her recently published poetic short story with the children. Her story is about `The Squizzle` - a little alien who travels the Solar System in a bid to save his planet from destruction. The children really enjoyed her recital of the story and had lots of questions all about the writing process. Donna is a parishioner of the Holy Family Parish in Wortley, Leeds. Notre Dame visits Cathedral On a dark and windy night in November, 23 Philosophy, Ethics and Religious Studies students from Notre Dame Sixth Form College, travelled to Ripon Cathedral to hear noted philosopher and writer Dr. Peter Vardy give a lecture entitled ‘,Capitalism, the Root of all Evil?’, As part of the trip the U6 students enjoyed a meal at a local pizzeria before engaging in a thoughtful lecture on the ethical issues surrounding the financial crash and subsequent recession. Dr. Vardy’,s central argument was that people needed to act as though everything they did was being observed and that altruism should be at the heart of any action, as people would be more responsible and have a greater sense of integrity. He also argued that young people needed role models that demonstrated these ideals. During the lively question and answer session at the end, in response to the question, what message would he give to students from Notre Dame College? his answer was impassioned and clear –, do as Aristotle suggested ‘,Be who you were meant to be’, –, it was not the career you had that counted as much as how you lived your life. Be the best you can be, but make sure you do unto others as you would have them do unto you, as every small action, however insignificant, helped to build a society where people lived lives of integrity. At the end of the evening Dr. Vardy hurried up to the students from Notre Dame obviously impressed that they had travelled so far, to thank them for attending. It was a warmer return to Leeds for students and staff alike after such a successful evening.

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Dec 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 18 Leeds Catholic Post First Friday of the Month SINGLE CATHOLICS (appeals mostly to over 35s) meet for mass at 7.30pm at Our Lady of Lourdes church, 130 Cardigan Rd, Headingley, Leeds LS6 3BJ, and a social afterwards. Events held during the month include walks, meals, cinema, theatre etc. For further details tel Sean (Chair) 07811 468939. Leeds Cathedral 20-35 Group Young people (20-35 years old) who attend St. Anne`s Cathedral in Leeds meet regularly every Thursday for spiritual, social and charitable activities. For further details search Facebook for “,Leeds Cathedral 20-35 Group”,, phone 07816 891872 or 07759 591233 or email leedscathedral20-35@hotmail.co.uk Crusade Mass The crusade Mass and Rosary of Mary Immaculate is held at St Patrick`s Church, Bradford, on the first Saturday of the Month after 12.15pm Mass , Second Sunday of Month 2pm Meeting of Bradford Fraternity of the Secular Franciscan Order at St. Anthony`s Convent, Clayton, Bradford.` `Third Sunday of Month 2.30pm Meeting of Leeds Fraternity of the Secular Franciscan Order at the Cathedral. Ampleforth Renewal Community Ampleforth Abbey, meet 1st Sunday each month, at Ampleforth. 11 .30am Praise, Speaker, Sharing Groups, Reconciliation, Exposition, Finishing with Mass and Healing at 4.00pm. All enquiries: Seamus McEneaney 01429 426181 Monthly Vocations Mass Mount St Josephʼ,s Chapel 11am First Wednesday of Month. Calix: An organisation for those recovering from addiction and working the 12 Step Programme of AA so that they can develop and deepen their relationship with Jesus as their Higher Power. Meets on the First Sunday of every month at Corpus Christi Church, Neville Rd. Osmondthorpe. Leeds. Mass at 4.30pm followed by meeting. Contact: Fr. Michael on 01977 510266 Helpers of Gods precious infants, prayer vigils, regular weekly prayer vigils at Marie Stopes Abortuary, 7 Barrack Road.LS7 4AB, next to Jaguar car showrooms. Fridays 12-30 to 1-30, and Saturdays 9am-l1am. Monthly all night vigil of reparation in St Marys Horsforth 12th of every month, 9-30pm to 6am . Other times variable. Further details Pat 0113 2582745 Rosary rally Sat Oct 9th 2010 12-30pm Leeds cenotaph, outside art gallery, Headrow. Contact 07747698553/ or 0113 2582745 Leeds Schola Gregoriana The Schola meets on the 2nd Saturday of each month (except August), at 2.00 p.m., for rehearsal, followed by sung Latin (Vigil) Mass in the Ordinary Form, fulfilling the Sunday Obligation. An opportunity to learn and sing Gregorian Chant on a regular basis. Contact Michael Murphy (Director) on 07810 808 530, or Peter Lawley (01423 884274), or Rev. G.M. Parfitt (01756 793794). Days Of Renewal St. Wilfid`s Deanery Day of Renewal led by Fr. Stephen Wright OSB. Second Saturday of the month beginning Sat. March 10th from 12 noon to 4pm. Venue St. Aelred`s Church hall, Woodlands Drive, Harrogate. Please bring a contribution for a shared table lunch. For more information ring Dolores Omand 01423870789 or visit the Diocesan web site www.ccrleeds.org Diary 20 –, 35 years group Email: leedscathedralgroup@gmail.com Facebook: Leeds Cathedral 20-35 Group Phone: 07810 291 154 Helpers of Gods precious infants/Leeds people for life. Regular weekly prayer vigils at Marie Stopes, to pray and offer help to women considering abortion and witness to the sanctity of life. Thurs 10am, Fri.12-30, sat 10am other days by arrangement. Monthly all-night Eucharistic vigil St Marys Horsforth, 12th of every month 9-30pm (Mass) till 4am. Rosary and divine mercy every 1st sat of month, Cenotaph, outside the art gallery the Headrow Leeds.10-30.am Enquiries Pat 07747698553/0113 2582745 Diary A few moments for thought and prayer Let us recognise Him with joy: it gives great delight to see the shining eyes of the children gathered around the crib- even greater is the tenderness when we ourselves return to the crib in simplicity and humility- with them and like them! Blessed John XXIII Christmas 1954 Be Still Deadline: For receipt of material for next edition: February 1st 2013 Parishes receive their copies: February 17th 2013 Send articles, reports &, pictures: Mr John Grady, Hinsley Hall, 62 Headingley Lane, Leeds LS6 2BX. Send text as word doc, pictures as jpeg, e-mail to: john.grady@dioceseofleeds.org.uk Tel: 0113 261 8022. Advertising Deadline February 12th 2013 Please note paid-for advertising is dealt with by: Louise Ward Hinsley Hall, 62 Headingley Lane, Leeds LS6 2BX Telephone: 0113 261 8028 Email: louise.ward@dioceseofleeds.org.uk Your Cath Post D eacon Anthony Winn, who has died at the age of 87, had the distinction of being the first ",permanent", deacon ordained in England and Wales after the restoration of the diaconate as a distinct order of clergy by Pope Paul VI in 1967, following the Constitution Lumen Gentium of the Second Vatican Council. He and the late Deacon Maurice Pearce were ordained by Bishop Wheeler on the 7th May 1971. In the second world war, Tony served in the RAF and after demob worked for a while in an office job before becoming aware of a vocation. He went to France and became a novice, but ill- health obliged him to return to England. Back home, he studied and became a teacher, obtaining distinction in Religious Education and showing proficiency in languages. Eventually, he became a teacher of the deaf at Boston Spa. Nevertheless, the vocation to ministry had not left him: the 1960ʼ,s Council called by Blessed John XXIII eventually proposed the renewal of the ancient, distinct diaconate and at an early stage Tony had seized on this idea: making it reality needed perseverance by both him and Maurice Pearce, but they succeeded. Ordinations world-wide had only begun in 1970 and so this was brave pioneering. His ordination created national media interest and there Tony declared his intention to serve the sick and the poor by visiting them, and this he quietly did. He served the rest of his life as a deacon in the Parish of St Joseph, Pontefract. When illness restricted his activities, he would attend services and deanery conferences on his mobility scooter. He was known by his various parish priests and curates as a humble and dedicated deacon, who loved those whom he served. He was assiduous in taking Holy Communion to the sick, and undertaking chaplaincy duties at the local hospital. His beloved wife Mary died in 2009: they had adopted three children, Anthony, Dominic and Margaret, and Anthony and Dominic spoke about their Father at his Funeral Mass at St Josephs on December 10th, attended by a number of the priests he had served, his brother deacons and people of his parish. Rev Deacon Anthony Winn

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Dec 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Leeds Catholic Post Page 19 T o launch their Christmas Appeal, Carol Hill (Director of Catholic Care) visited Our Lady of Lourdes and St Patrick’,s Catholic Primary Schools in Huddersfield to talk to the pupils, staff and families about the work Catholic Care do in the Diocese. Speaking at the Childrenʼ,s Celebration Assembly at Our Ladyʼ,s and at the Year 3 Anti-Bullying Assembly at St Patrickʼ,s , Mrs Hill told how the agency supported people, young and old, who were vulnerable in the Diocese. Their latest appeal, “,When a Child is Born,”, wants schools to collect items which an expectant mum would need for a new baby. All donations will be given to the Gianna Project, launched by Archbishop Roche, to support, advise and offer practical assistance to young, pregnant women in the Diocese of Leeds. Introducing Carol Hill, Harry Rowan, Head Teacher at both Our Lady of Lourdes and St Patrickʼ,s Schools, described Catholic Care as ʻ,a golden nuggetʼ, in the Diocese. Support Workers have been working in both schools for over four years, supporting and working alongside children and their families. Mrs Hillʼ,s visit was an opportunity for our children to see Catholic Careʼ,s work in other areas and for Carol Hill to speak to the pupils and families who utilise their services. Mrs Hill was shown around the schools by Eileen Holland, the Catholic Care Worker linked to our school communities. Both schools have fostered strong links with Catholic Care over the years. Every year the children raise money for the Good Shepherd Appeal during their Lenten Collections. At their Celebration Service in May, the two schools made up the choir in 2009 and 2011 and last year Catholic Care held their annual Carol Service at Our Lady of Lourdes Church as pupils from both schools told the Christmas story through singing, drama and prayer. When a Child is Born LIVING HISTORY AT ST STEPHEN’,S SCHOOL One-hundred and eighteen years after the first school on the site was opened by Sir Charles Tempest of Broughton Hall, Mrs Janet Tempest officially opened a new extension to St Stephenʼ,s Catholic Primary School on Gargrave Road, Skipton on 26 November 2012. The School has recently been judged as outstanding by Ofsted and by the Catholic Diocese of Leeds. Accompanied by her sons Roger and Piers, Mrs Tempest joined the children of the school for an Assembly and cut a ribbon to open the new entrance hall and teaching space after they had been blessed. Commenting on the simple ceremony, Mr Peter Thompson the head of the school said, “,the school is blessed with a great sense of continuity and community, enabling it to continue to welcome new generations of young people for years to come.”, (The photographs shows Mrs Tempest being presented with flowers at the end of the Assembly and the blessing and opening of the extension with Mr Peter Thompson head of the School and Mgr Andrew Summersgill, Parish Priest of St Stephen’,s) CATHOLIC PO S THE NEWSPAPER FOR THE DIOCESE OF L Reception and Class 1 children at St Francis Catholic Primary School, Morley performed the Christmas play ‘,A Little Nativity’,. It was an outstanding performance and the children participated throughout with confidence and enthusiasm. High praise was given by all that attended. As a school we feel that it is very important that the children understand the true meaning of Christmas. The Lady Mayoress of Morley, Judith Elliott, commended the children, parents and staff for their hard work in producing an enjoyable play. Mary –, Francesca Lambert, Joseph –, Kieran Ryan, Donkey –, Jack Mallinson, Angels –, Charlotte Benson &, Keira Pearce, Kings - Fintan Armour, Antionetta Sibanda-Ilimezekhe &, Daniel Brown. A Little Nativity CATHOLIC POST THE NEWSPAPER FOR THE DIOCESE OF LEEDS NOVEMBER 2011 www.dioceseo fleeds.org.uk www.catholicp ost.org.uk JIMMY SAYS A LAST GOOD –, BYE I t was fittin g that the F une ral M a ss for Sir Jim my S a vile, O B E KC SG w as held in L eeds Cathedral. T his w as the ch urc h he grew u p in a n d the on e w h ere he no t only w ent to o n a Su nday but a lso other days of th e w ee k as an d w hen h e c ould . p le w ho gathered for the ce lebration o f his life an d to pra y for his soul y strands of h is life. S o it was that th e M a rines ca rried his b ody in, ds read the P rayers of the Fa ithful, the Little S isters and he offe rtory, six people gave e ulogies, som e T he H om ily was delivered by M gr Ma ss in the Im m aculate tm an, an s FREE CATHOLIC POST THE NEWSPAPER FOR THE DIOCESE OF LEED CELEBRATING THE YEAR OF EDUCATION O v er the past tw elve m o nths the ed ucatio n de partm ent of the D iocese has been celebratin g th e Y ear of Ed ucation. S o on Thursday, O ctobe r 6th th e Bishop celeb rated M a ss for all the H eadte ache rs fro m across th e D io cese to bring th e Yea r to a fitting c lose. H e cho se to celeb rate a votive M as s Of B lessed Joh n H en ry New m an, for as the B ishop explained at the ope ning o f the M ass, Blessed John H enry N ewm an ‘,was a strikin gly original th eologian a nd a celebrated educationa l th eorist`. He con tinue d in his hom ily to expla in in m ore depth, ‘,A s m any of you w ill know , h e (Cardinal N ewm an) de livered a series of in fluentia l lectures w hich w e re g athered together in a book entitled ",The Idea o f a U n iversity.", Tw o of the points w hich he m ade in this bo ok are of particu lar relevance to us today. F irstly, he argued that reality is a single undivide d whole and that the d ifferent discipline s in an e ducatio nal institution n ee d to be coordinated in order to reflect tha t fact. S econdly, theology ne eds to b e taught in ou r schools a nd universitie s because religious truth ",b ears upon", all truth................... T he diverse subject area s which are taught in our schools have be en developed in the way they have p recisely b ecause th ey co rrespon d to the C atholic vision of edu cation which Blessed Joh n Henry N ewman articulated so be autifully.` T he Bishop concluded his hom ily by using a quote from the Leeds M e rcu ry printed a t the T im e of The C a rdinals de ath ‘,Few cultivated E nglishm en will hear w itho ut e m otion the n ews of C ardina l N ewm an`s death. In the fashion o f his death, indeed, there is nothing to regret, he had o utlived the storm s of controv ersy, the clouds of m isunderstanding, an d he is c alled away in the peacefu lness of an honoured old age. H is co untrym en will mourn for him w ith no bitterness, but in su ch w ise as is fitting w hen th e vene rated fig ure of a m an of consp icuous genius a nd goodness pass es fro m the scene.` The Bishop added ‘,H ow truly marvellous it w o uld be if the same could also be said o f us not only for w hat we person ally pu rsue in our C h ristian vocation, b ut for allow ing w hat lies a t its h eart to shape us. Ne wm an`s gre atness cam e not from self pursuit but fro m Christ his Lord an d his Teach er.` A t the conclusion of the M ass the B ishop thanked all the H eads for the work they a re doing an d then join ed th em for coffee. Why not subscribe and have the Catholic Post delivered to your home! Individual subscriptions, valid for one year (including postage and packing) cost: £,10, Europe: £,12 Complete the form below or email: louise.ward@dioceseofleeds.org.uk to register your interest Post cheque - payable to: Diocese of Leeds, Hinsley Hall, 62 Headingley Lane, LEEDS LS6 2BX –, Tel : 0113 2 61 8028 Name: ................................................................................................................................................ Address: ........................................................................................................................................... ................................................................................................................................................................ Postcode: .......................................................................................................................................... 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Page 20

Dec 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 20 Nativity –, Castleford Style T his year the children of St. Joseph’,s Castleford have performed not one but two nativity stories –, Key Stage One children treated their audience to a traditional nativity and the children in Key Stage Two took on the story of Papa Panov. Papa Panov is a musical based on Tolstoyʼ,s story of a Russian shoemaker who waits for a visit from Jesus to his workshop on Christmas Day. Throughout the day the weary shoemaker helps the disadvantaged people that arrive at his door these include a poor woman with her child, street urchins, and freezing cold road sweepers. Initially disappointed because Jesus didnʼ,t visit him, the shoemaker realises as the final Nativity Scene unfolds that he did meet Jesus in all the people he helped that day. All the children and staff worked extremely hard to produce these two wonderful Christmas performances.

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Page 21

Dec 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

“,Open Doors”, was the central theme which marked the Dedication, Blessing and Official Opening of the redesigned and refurbished Corpus Christi College, Leeds, on the Thursday 22 November 2012. The doors were indeed open from 9am when guests from the Diocese, Local Authority, Governors, former Members of Staff, Architects, Contractors, Franciscan Sisters and friends could tour the new school and see teaching and learning in action in the new buildings. The Chair of Governors, Mr Martin Dowling welcomed the Guests of Honour Mgr John Wilson Diocesan Administrator, Mgr Philip Holroyd Chaplain and Rt Hon George Mudie MP who officiated at the ceremony. The highlight was the symbolic opening of the chapel doors in this Year of Faith by the Headboy Ciaran Morrison and Head Girl Siobhan Flaherty and the revealing of the Exposed Blessed Sacrament and the Benediction of our school and each of us with the Body of Christ, Corpus Christi by Mgr Philip. Mgr John Wilson set the whole day in the context of a celebration of “,opening doors”,, the open doors throughout the school, education as the door to the future for our pupils and the door to faith. Headteacher Mike Woods said that “,Today is very special day for us at Corpus Christi. The school is so much more than just buildings, so it was really good to have all 940 pupils taking part in our Celebration and Dedication together with guests, governors, staff, Diocesan and Local Authority officers, architects and contractors”,. The event in the hall featured the School Band, the Choir, a very special Service of Dedication and Benediction, a time capsule and extracts from Godspell. The original Corpus Christi started off in 1935 as the four classrooms on the top floor of what is today Corpus Christi Primary School and moved to the current site in 1968 when the new school was opened by Denis Healey MP and Bishop Gerald Moverley. Today it is one of the few Catholic schools to benefit from the BSF (Building Schools for the Future) programme. It has had £,15m spent on redesign, new build and refurbishment. The new build and redesign is an excellent example of BSF at its best. Pupils, staff and governors are absolutely delighted with the new build. Tribute must be paid to the tremendous vision of the Mentor the firm of architects and in particular Paul Richardson the lead architect. He did a remarkable job in taking the best of the old, adding the new features which were needed and creating a harmonious and totally integrated new school. OPEN DOORS

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Page 22

Dec 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Over 200 teachers and support staff from St Nicholas Primary, Corpus Christi Primary, St Theresa’,s Primary, Our Lady of Good Counsel Primary School and Corpus Christi Catholic College enjoyed a very special joint Training day at Ampleforth led by Fr Bede Leach. In evaluating the day staff wrote “,Time to stop, think, pray and reflect on our relationship with God and one another”,. “,Beautiful and peaceful surroundings”,. “,The morning session made me think about the responsibility we have working in a catholic school environment and the differences we can make to a child’,s life”,. “,An opportunity to walk talk &, think about Fr Bede’,s words”,. “,I learned a new way of praying by looking at the picture of the Holy Family”, Fr Bede Leach led the joint training day The Leeds Trinity University College SCITT Board (School centred initial teacher training) has asked Corpus Christi to be the lead school in training new teachers in History and RE. This is alongside our existing role as support lead school in Science. Together with Leeds Trinity, the Teacher Agency has asked Corpus Christi to take responsibility for the teacher training six graduates in each subject. Pictured here with student teachers is Cath Bielby Deputy Head who leads the teacher training at Corpus Christi and put together the successful bid. Feeder Primary and High School training day at Ampleforth School Centred teacher training

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Page 23

Dec 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

The school has a very special link with the Franciscan Sisters, what wonderful neighbours. They are so out of the box and have a wonderful way of communicating with staff and pupils. They are part of our Chaplaincy team. Sr Jacinta, SR John Paul &, Sr Catherine pictured here on a tour while the building works were taking place. DIOCESE OF LEEDS In partnership with Leeds City Council St Theresa’,s Catholic Primary School Barwick Road, Leeds LS15 8RQ. Tel: 0113 293 0240 Email: headteacher@st- theresas.leeds.sch.uk [NoR: 420 + 91 in Nursery] This is a unique opportunity to join our new Leadership Team for September 2013 Two Deputy Head Teachers [Deputy Head of Lower School: EYFS &, KS1 &, Deputy Head of Upper School: KS2] Both posts have an ISR of 8 –, 12 Due to the retirement of the highly respected current post-holder, St Theresa’,s Catholic School governors are looking to appoint two excellent Catholic Leaders of Learning, each will have specific areas of responsibility for leadership, standards and line management in this large and exciting school. We are totally committed to a creative and innovative curriculum and we are looking for candidates who will embrace and enhance this vision. The successful candidates will be practising Catholics who have: •, A strong commitment to excellence in Catholic education •, Proven leadership experience that has led to sustained high standards of attainment and achievement or who have led rapid improvement in standards across school •, Excellent practice in all aspects of teaching and learning •, High expectations of self and others •, Exemplary interpersonal skills •, Strong organisational qualities We can offer: •, Well behaved and highly motivated children with very supportive parents •, An extremely skilled, committed and loyal workforce •, A good school (OFSTED S5 Jan 12) and an outstanding Catholic school (S48 Feb 12) •, A well resourced school with excellent facilities and extensive grounds •, Great CPD opportunities to enable candidates to develop as future head teachers. These posts are not class based but there will be an agreed level of teaching commitment. Visits are most wel- come and highly recommended, please contact Head Teacher, John Hutchinson either by phone or email (as above) for an application pack. Closing date for applications: Noon on Wednesday, 9 January 2012 Shortlisting: 11 January 2012 Interviews: w/b 28 January 2013 St Theresa’,s Catholic Primary School is committed to safeguarding the welfare of children and expects all staff to share this commitment. An enhanced CRB check will be required for the successful candidates. ’,Walking in Theresa’,s Little Way’, Part Of The Chaplaincy Team

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Page 24

Dec 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

It has been a very special privilege to work as Headteacher at Corpus Christi for the last fifteen years and I would like to say a very big thank you to our primary feeder schools and parishes who have given me and the school such brilliant support. I’,m 60 on the 8th January and slowing down! My vocation now is to find that inner tortoise at least for some of the time. My wife Glenys used to say “,an unexamined life is not worth living”, and she now adds “,an inactive life is not worth living”,. So fortunately it won’,t be too slow! We plan to visit Iceland in March and please God will be fortunate enough to see the Northern Lights. I’,m looking forward too to walking, spotting wildlife, gardening, travel, music and other cultures and have more time for each other and our five grandchildren. We plan too to keep our links going with Tanzania and Issenye. I hand over to our new Headteacher, Mr Steve Mort. It is not often that a new Headteacher is appointed from within a school. Governors had three years to see him in action and to see the excellent qualities he possesses which make him so fit for the post. Their appointment is a real vote of confidence. Steve brings a wealth of experience from leading Catholic High schools: from Notre Dame in Sheffield, St John Fisherʼ,s in Harrogate where he was Director of Studies for Humanities and Head of RE and All Saintʼ,s in York where he was Assistant Head and Head of the Lower School site. I know that Steve will really take the school further forward in its journey to outstanding. Steve is married to Manina, also a teacher and they have two children, Connor (aged 8) and Mille (aged 5). They are Parishioners of St Benedictʼ,s, Garforth. Steve is a coach of local junior football team, a Bolton Wanderers season ticket holder and enjoys running, reading and family time. He is delighted to be taking over the Headship of Corpus Christi and says “,Having been a member of this very special community for the past three years, I am delighted that the Governors have entrusted to me the leadership of the college and the huge responsibility of supporting local schools and parishes in providing a Catholic education for children in the east of Leeds”,. The whole school community is behind him. Goodbye to Old and Welcome to the New

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