Church Papers Archive
Feb 2013 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Feb 2013 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Jan 2013 U edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Jan 2013 U edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Dec 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Dec 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Nov 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Nov 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Oct 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Oct 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Sept 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Sept 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Jul/Aug 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Jul/Aug 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Jun 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Jun 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
May 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
May 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Apr 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Apr 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Mar 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Mar 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Feb 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Feb 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Jan 2012 U edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Jan 2012 U edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Dec 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Dec 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Nov 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Nov 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Oct 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Oct 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Sept 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Sept 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Jul/Aug 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Jul/Aug 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Jun 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Jun 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
May 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
May 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Apr 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Apr 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Mar 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Mar 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Feb 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Feb 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Dec 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Dec 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Nov 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Nov 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Oct 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Oct 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Jun 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Jun 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
May 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
May 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Apr 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Apr 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Mar 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Mar 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Feb 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Feb 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Dec 2009 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Dec 2009 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Nov 2009 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Nov 2009 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Oct 2009 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Oct 2009 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Sep 2009 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Sep 2009 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Leeds Catholic Post History

Newspaper for the Diocese of Leeds

.

Apr 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 1

Apr 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

CATHOLIC POST THE NEWSPAPER FOR THE DIOCESE OF LEEDS APRIL 2012 www.dioceseofleeds.org.uk www.catholicpost.org.uk FREE Despite all the warnings that the Spring was over the sun did in fact shine in Leeds on the Morning of Palm Sunday as the traditional blessing of the Palms took place in the City Centre. This year it was possible for everyone to gather in front of the Town Hall rather than round at the Civic entrance as has been the case in the last few years. Gathered along with Bishop Roche were the clergy and congregations from all the City centre Churches in the presence of the Lord Mayor Councillor Rev Alan Taylor, he it was who welcomed the sizable crowd to the blessing service saying how good it was that we all could gather together for this service starting the period of Holy Week. After Bishop Roche had blessed the Palms the joyful procession set off (this year without a Donkey or even a Llama) first to the Cathedral then on to the other Churches. In his homily Bishop Roche pointed out that it was this unity among people that had been prophesied as a mark of the future Kingdom and that it was Jesus who fulfilled it –, the signs of his kingdom being Poverty, Peace and Universality. His cross he said was the rainbow that joined Heaven and Earth –, the celebration of the Eucharist, he said , binds the Church together, our Faith is the leaven in the World –, this Faith endures to eternal life. At the end of the Eucharist Bishop Roche thanked the Civic party for being present for the service –, pointing out that it was much appreciated by the Catholic Community. PALMS IN THE SUNSHINE ■, family firm established in 1979 ■, service, repairs and M.O.T’,s ■, full vehicle sourcing service available ■, after care necessary for trouble free motoring ■, member of the GoodGarageScheme.co.uk ■, free collection and delivery from home or work All makes serviced to manufacturer’,s specifications, Manufacturer’,s warranty unaffected and service history maintained. Contact Brendan Grogan on (0113) 248 4441 11 Cowper Road, Leeds www.bgmotors.co.uk

Read in full

Page 2

Apr 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 2 Leeds Catholic Post The Prime Minister, Leeds Station and the Pasty…,. at least there was a touch of local interest in this story. Does one Leeds pasty (the shop closed, it seems in 2007) equal the Leader of the Opposition’,s eight sausage rolls from Greggs? Fortunately, the great petrol crisis of March 2012 intervened before we could find out. Forgive our flippancy, especially as matters of much greater moment have been taking place at a church near you. We have been celebrating Easter. It is a shame if these cosmic events are ever seen merely as a spring holiday, flower festival or an excuse for a good sing: they are real, and determine the way, the future of everyone. As Peter tell us, God’,s wisdom and power is nothing other than the Holy Spirit poured out on his early people so that we can live in forgiveness and share what we have received. In just six month’,s time, we will celebrate a great event- involving the Holy Spirit, blowing through the church- the fiftieth anniversary of the opening of the Second Vatican Council in 1962. One of its greatest achievements was the document “,Lumen Gentium”, which we tend to take for granted, until we need reminding, as the Pope so rightly sees in the coming “,Year of Faith”,, of the the treasures it contains- and the way it opens up for us. One extract from “,Lumen Gentium”, for Easter: ‘,Each individual layman must stand before the world as a witness to the resurrection and life of the Lord Jesus and a symbol of the living God. All the laity as a community and each one according to his ability must nourish the world with spiritual fruits. They must diffuse in the world that spirit which animates the poor, the meek, the peace makers—,whom the Lord in the Gospel proclaimed as blessed. In a word, ",Christians must be to the world what the soul is to the body.",’, The Post Says Pupils at St Mary’,s, Halifax are celebrating the completion of a new wildlife learning zone in their KS2 playground. The project, partly funded by the school’,s PTA has turned a neglected corner of wasteland into an imaginative and exciting space that will encourage wildlife and mini-beasts to make their homes within the school grounds. Among other things, the area now has a camp-fire, a pond, mini-beast house, spider trap-door, mountain-top seating area and a willow tree lounge for the children to enjoy and explore! The work was undertaken by the British Trust for Conservation Volunteers (BTCV) based in Leeds and has cost £,7000 and lots of hard graft to realise. Headteacher, Mark Brennan said “,We have been planning to develop this area for a few years and now it is a reality we are very excited about the enjoyment and learning opportunities it will bring for our pupils, especially as the area matures”,. ST MARY’,S GO WILD!! ",The whole of St. John Fisher Catholic High School, Dewsbury held a non-uniform day on Friday 3rd February 2012, where each student paid £,1 to wear their own clothes. All the proceeds were divided between the different charities that each year group supports. The 6th form donated £,50 out of their fundraising efforts to CAFOD. This was presented to Peter Hill by the school Presidents` Jack Maguire and Aimee Rhodes at a special assembly delivered by the school`s CAFOD Group on Wednesday 7th March 2012. This was one of 4 assemblies presented by the group to raise awareness of the Thirst for Change campaign and to recruit new members from other year groups. Mr Hill, speaking at all the assemblies, highlighted the need for basic sanitation and clean water for those in the developing world. Mr Hill also spoke about the UK government`s initiative to match £,1 for £,1 any monies raised by CAFOD during Lent and appealed for support.", The names of the students photographed with Mr Hill from L to R are: EMMA WILLANS - Year 7 THOMAS RHODES - Year 7 CHELSEA NORTH - Year 7 ALISTER SALTER - Year 10 LEE TOOTILL - Year 7 JAMES SWEENEY - Year 7 SCHOOL PRESIDENTS: AIMEE RHODES &, JACK MAGUIRE - Year 13 Supporting Charity S t. Mary’,s Catholic High School, Menston is to become a Youth Sport Trust Gold Partner School for its commitment to PE and school sport following a recent review and inspection. Youth Sport Trust Partner Schools can demonstrate how they are delivering high quality school sport and improving the PE experience for every young person. Importantly, they are also using sport to raise achievement levels across the school. As a partner, St. Mary’,s will receive additional training and development opportunities and can become involved in national education and sport initiatives. Mr Robert Pritchard, Headteacher said:- “,We are absolutely thrilled with the Youth Sport Trust Gold Award which recognises our commitment to delivering the best possible experiences for young people through PE and School Sport. As a Sports College and leader of a successful School Sport Partnership we are highly committed to sport and its wider potential. There are a whole range of educational, health and wellbeing benefits from delivering high quality PE and school sport and we see on a regular basis that when sport is delivered well, it can transform the lives of a whole range of pupils.”, Mr David Geldart, Assistant Headteacher and Director of PE and Sport at St. Mary’,s was also delighted with the award. “,This award recognises all the hard work, enthusiasm and dedication of the St. Mary’,s Physical Education and Sports Department and the wonderful opportunities provided for students to achieve in sport and through sport”,. Annette Montague, Education Director at the Youth Sport Trust said:- “,Youth Sport Trust Partner Schools share our belief that sport changes lives and understand how it can be used across the curriculum to improve attainment. PE and school sport can be a catalyst for young people to live healthy, active lives and we are delighted to be working with schools across the country to support them develop this provision. We have an increasing number of schools applying for our partner school status which is a testament to the ongoing commitment that schools have in making a difference for young people and creating a world class system for PE and sport”,. National PE and Sport Award for St Mary’,s FROM JUST £,299 R.G.R. MEMORIALS COLOUR CATALOGUE QUALITY MEMORIALS AT AFFORDABLE PRICES IN GRANITE, MARBLE &, STONE ALL PRICES INCLUDE DELIVERY &, FIXING Ogee top memorial 2’,6”, high Fully polished Black Granite, Delivered and Fixed for £,399 inc VAT FREE Tel: 0113 282 3888 43 High Ridge Park, Rothwell, Leeds LS26 0NL

Read in full

Page 3

Apr 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

T hese words came to me moments after I put the phone down having agreed to John Grady’,s request that I write something for the Catholic Post to mark the Golden Anniversary of the opening of the 2nd Vatican Council. John had pointed out to me that I had been a student in Rome for three years of that Council and consequently I might well have reflections or memories to share with you all. I tried to wriggle out of it but then I remembered some words of our Rector to us all: “,don’,t cultivate the cult of incompetence”,. So I said Yes. I then thought of the song of my old school : Forty years on when afar and asunder parted are those who are singing to today, when we look back and forgetfully wonder what we were like at our work and our play.... So here goes as I forgetfully wonder after 50 years Rome is always a place where one can experience and profit from its countless treasure houses from its glorious and varied past. So much to see and admire so much from which to learn. So when one adds to that the fact that Pope John XXIII had summoned all the Church’,s 2,000 plus bishops to deliberate in council on the whole life of the Church, this with the consequent spin offs in ceremonies etc made Rome a heady place to be. An Aladdin’,s cave indeed. First of all let’,s not forget that the Council had been called to have a look at the whole of the church’,s life (not simply this issue or that problem). No other council in the history of the Church had been so comprehensive. When Pope John XXIII died, having called the council and presided over the preparatory meetings. Pope Paul VI succeeded and presided over the deliberations and decisions of the Bishops of the Universal Church. The Council produced 16 basic documents covering all aspects of the Church’,s life and ministry. They are a veritable gold mine and as with all the councils of the Church it would take time to assimilate the contents of the documents into the Church’,s life. The documents need to be read and reread. In this article I can only give a morsel as a taster in the hope that the reader might well feast on the documents themselves. They are worth it. If you do so, it soon becomes obvious that the Bishops were well aware of the rich heritage of doctrine and Church practice they inherited. Vatican TI did not demolish the past, but rather built on it in an exciting and far reaching way. It reminds me of the adage: don’,t throw away your old clothes, they may well come back into fashion! Continuity does not exclude development. The first document issued by the Council was in December 1963, it was on the Liturgy. It came not only first in time but as we were reminded it also comes first in that it would have the most immediate and lasting effect on everyone’,s lives. For as the document reminds us: The Liturgy is the summit toward which the activity of the Church is directed: it is also the source from which all its power flows. The document gave the green light for the introduction of the vernacular. I can still remember when I said the words of Consecration in English for the first time and the impact it had on me. The Concelebration of Mass was soon introduced. The Councils document decreed that the treasures of the bible are to be opened up more lavishly. Apart from what the Decree on the Liturgy said one can look at the document on. Divine Revelation to appreciate the vital (life-giving) importance of Scripture in the life of the Church. The celebration of the Sacraments were to be revised and we may have forgotten how Baptisms, Holy Communion etc. were previously celebrated and prepared for. A little reflection will help us to see how much was opened up to us all. As we have experienced recently with the revised translation of the Mass, the fruits of the Councils liturgical document are still being unpacked. After the Document on the Liturgy the other documents were soon coming hot off the press and many a lecture was hastily amended. Talk about having up to date theology! The Constitution on the Church and the Decree on the Laity were landmarks in helping to clarify and give impetus to the mission of the Church and all its members. One has only to see how lay people are now formally and massively involved in the life of the Church in so many way. This fact will help us to appreciate what has been implemented and developed over the years. I remember one lay non-catholic observer remarking: thank God you will have real laity. The huge involvement of laity at parish and diocesan level is testimony to this. One has only to look at the Diocesan Directory to discover this. I think that it might be in place to note that involvement of the laity isn’,t because the Parish Priest needs a hand (because he can’,t do it all by himself!). But one also needs to remember the contribution of the laity prior to Vatican II and give thanks for that. Being in Rome for the Council brought with it the chance to see many of the towering figures of the Church (there were many opportunities to go to the ceremonies in Rome). In particular I remember the privilege and joy of seeing the Polish Cardinal Stefan Wyszynski (a walking legend). Apart from attending the numerous celebrations and seeing many of the famous figures in Rome, there were always those who came to the college as guests for a meal, but I’,m sorry to say that I never came across Archbishop Karol Wojtyla or Father Joseph Ratzinger. But that omission has been well and truly rectified since! Just after the closing of the Council I witnessed in St Pauls outside the Walls, Pope Paul VI giving his ring to the Archbishop of Canterbury Michael Ramsey. That gesture mirrored the impetus given to the search for Christian Unity by the Council in its document on Ecumenism. The Church had invited observers from other Churches to the Council and their comments were full of appreciation for that gesture. One has only to realise the great strides in understanding, co-operation and mutual respect between the Churches to realise the impact the Council has had. It is almost most important to note that the Church now has a special Eucharistic Prayer for Christian Unity. It is difficult to assess the total impact on myself of being in Rome for the Council, because words like enjoyable and exciting can’,t do justice to what actually happens to someone in circumstances like that. I remember a bishop telling me that they were all conscious of literally being swept along by a force that was greater than themselves. There are no prizes for guessing the identity of that gale force wind. Looking back I can say that I was more than privileged to have had a taste of the Universal Church in Council and witnessed history in the making. For all of us so much has happened in the last 50 years. We have experienced changes that are now accepted as normal and seem to have been part of us for all time. Let’,s pray that all of us in the Pilgrim Church on earth will continue to be nourished and inspired by that unique and memorable Council so that the Kingdom may come. At the end of this forgetfully wondering of mine it might be appropriate to conclude with words from that same school song: “,Echoes of dreamland will bear us along”,. Leeds Catholic Post Page 3 Vatican II Fifty Years On This October it will be 50 years since the opening of Vatican II –, over the months from now until the end of the Year there will be an article reflecting on the Council. These articles are not offered as deep reflections on the Council or the Documents from it, rather they are written from the point of view of those who experienced the Council in its time –, some are from people who were there, some are about people who were there –, some are by people who were the first to try and put into action the documents as they came out. They are all from a personal point of view and try to capture at least a little of that ‘,freshness of the Spirit’, as it blew through a church thrust into a modern World trying to find a Rock to hold fast to. by Mgr Peter Grant Forgetfully Wondering Mr. Terry Coen has been confirmed as the Principal of Notre Dame Catholic Sixth Form College. Following the lengthy interview process at the college, the Chair of Governors, Mrs Margaret Ramsden, announced the news to the staff who greeted the result with warm applause. Terry started his teaching career at All Saints in Huddersfield and taught in High schools for 17 years before moving from Cardinal Heenan High School to Notre Dame as Head of Science in 1989 when the college first opened. He has been acting Principal since the retirement of Dr Anthony Adlard in August 2011 ",Notre Dame has always been a wonderful place to work and to learn,”, he said “,and I am delighted to have the opportunity to lead the college to even greater success in the coming years. I am confident that with our able and dedicated staff, we will continue to provide an outstanding experience for students from all backgrounds", New Principal Appointed GUILD OF ST STEPHEN ALTAR SERVERS Is your parish a member? For further information, please contact: Frank Sheridan, Diocesan Director New email address: f.sheridan595@btinternet.com To serve Christ is to reign

Read in full

Page 4

Apr 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 4 Leeds Catholic Post O ur pilgrimage week will be busy with large diocesan and other groups attending from across the world. In terms of UK pilgrimages we shall find ourselves alongside the Archdiocese of St Andrew’,s and Edinburgh and a party from Ampleforth College. In fact the priests and people of Ampleforth will join us to celebrate a Grotto Mass early Wednesday morning. Bishop Roche will preside, the homily will be preached by Abbott Father Cuthbert Madden OSB on what will be his first visit to the Sanctuary. The 2012 Lourdes theme is ‘,with Bernadette pray the Holy Rosary.’, It is the third of three pastoral themes focussing on the life of prayer. Two years ago during the July 2010 pilgrimage we ‘,planted’, our 1.75 metre tall Leeds Cross at the Breton Calvary facing St Michael’,s Gate. The Cross has stood there for 2 years and will remain in place for another 12 months. You might like to see if you can find it and pray by it. This is the first time in my seven years as pilgrimage director that we have not been allocated the Rosary Basilica for at least one of our Masses, this is a disappointment. That said, we have successfully negotiated several additional opportunities to visit the Baths. Going to ‘,Wash in the Waters’, is popular with our young pilgrims. This year the Youth Section will be about 500 strong and is our largest youth group ever. By sizeable margin we remain the Diocese with the largest youth contingent. An early word about our 2013 Diocesan Pilgrimage: Next July will be our 75th Pilgrimage to Lourdes. The first Leeds Diocesan Pilgrimage was in 1928 only 70 years after Lourdes became a pilgrimage destination after the Apparitions had been accredited by the Church. Of course we did not come on pilgrimage to the South of France during the second world war. That said, our Leeds Pilgrimage has been coming to the Sanctuary for virtually half of the Sanctuary’,s lifetime and, following Liverpool and Salford, we are the third oldest Diocesan pilgrimage from the UK. In the autumn of 2013 it is hoped that a Leeds Diocesan Pilgrimage Photo Album will be produced in time for Christmas 2013. It will contain quality images and some commentary featuring pilgrimages from recent years. It will, in part, pick up our diocesan story from the time of our 50th Jubilee pilgrimage. The youth section of the pilgrimage is always buoyant in number. If the adult sick and less able section of the pilgrimage is to grow in number and in depth we are all going to have to pray about it. Then each of us will need to invite a new adult pilgrim to accompany us to join in procession to the place where Our Lady appeared to St Bernadette. From the Lourdes Pilgrimage Director: If you haven’,t already –, it is time to book your Pilgrimage to Lourdes email: chris.irving@dioceseofleeds.org.uk or phone 01484 86669 Celebrating 150th Anniversary of St Patrick’,s Primary School S t Patrick’,s Primary School in Huddersfield is due to celebrate its150th anniversary in 2014. The school which was located behind St Patrick’,s Church near the centre of Huddersfield for over 100 years before moving to its current location, has a rich and interesting history and has served the needs of many thousands of pupils over the years . This important occasion will be marked by the production of a book providing information on the history of the school, together with memories and recollections from former staff and pupils of their time at St Patrick’,s. Consideration is also being given to the production of an audio disc, as well as a photographic display charting interesting parts of the school’,s history. It is planned to submit a bid to the Heritage Lottery Fund and volunteers are being sought to form a group to that will take this project forward. If you have experience of writing bids, researching for historic information, photography, editing of information, proof reading, good admin or I.T skills, or you simply have ideas and want to contribute to the project then please get involved. You do not have to be based in Huddersfield to participate as there will be many tasks that can be done remotely. If you have documents, photographs etc that you think may be of interest or you are prepared to get involved in the project please contact the Project Co-ordinator Justin Roche by e-mail at stpats150@yahoo.com or by telephone on (01484) 519708. If you know of a family member or friend who you think might be able to contribute to the project it would be helpful if you please pass this information on to them Youth Development Officer T he St Vincent de Paul Society is looking for volunteers to help co-ordinate the SVP Youth Programme in the Leeds Diocese. The Society currently runs Youth SVP, which is open to all secondary schools and sixth forms, and SVP 1833 which is for young adults either at University or parish based. In the coming year `Mini Vinnies` will also be introduced in primary schools in participating Dioceses. In order to roll out all of the elements of the SVP Youth Programme, the Society relies on volunteer Youth Development Officers (YDOs) to provide assistance with new startups and maintain contact with established group leaders. Volunteers come from all walks of life but have an affinity for working with young people. The role involves speaking to groups generally in a class, assembly, chaplaincy or parish setting as well as a small amount of administration. Full training will be given both in terms of the role and Vincentian ethos. No previous experience of SVP is necessary. Ongoing support will be provided through the national YDO network and SVP National Office. These are voluntary posts, but all travel expenses would be reimbursed. If you would like to receive further information about this opportunity please contact Lewis or Vicki on 0207 407 4644. ",I feel that I am able to give my love, joy and time to those who need it....sharing our stories and our lives and helping the people and communities who need our help.", Youth SVP Member Help us to make this experience a reality for more young people. Leeds People For Life “,...a great prayer for Life is urgently needed..”, Ev Vit: YORK. SUNDAY 29th APRIL 2012 5th 100 CROSSES FOR LIFE WALK With Our lady of Guadalupe, in the steps of the Yorkshire Martyrs Led by Rev Fr Sebastian, and CFFR community 1-30pm Opening prayers at York Tyburn (off A1036, park Knavesmire Rd) 2pm Process to Bar Convent (car park and access to school grounds, Nunnery Lane) Prayers and veneration of Relic of St Margaret Clitheroe. 3pm Divine Mercy prayers, process to Ousebridge, and Skeldergate for riverside memorial and naming service for nearly 8,ooo,ooo aborted babies since 1967 4pm approx. Holy Mass in St Wilfrids, and Consecration of England to Immaculate Heart of Mary 5pm refreshments and fraternal sharing. For enquiries and offers of help with stewarding, publicity, transport etc tel Pat 0113 2582745 mob 07747017109 mob/07747698553 email patriciamarysammon@btinternet.com

Read in full

Page 5

Apr 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Leeds Catholic Post Page 5 Trawling round the internet in search of some information, I came across Eucharisticum Mysterium, a 1967 Instruction on the Mystery of the Eucharist, the principles of which hold good today, as it flows from Sacrosanctum Concilium, the great Constitution on the Liturgy from the Second Vatican Council. This in turn is an antidote to those who hark back to some imaginary golden days, thinking the only way forwards is to go backwards. Eucharisticum Mysterium exudes common sense, a feeling of the people of God gathered around the Lord’,s altar at Mass as a com- munion: very much the Council’,s intention. Seamlessly, it connects faith and liturgy. If you need inspiration for your parish liturgies, read again this document, surprisingly nearly fifty years old. ***** We need to regain the optimism of those days. You can contrast that document with a report recently on CNN giving reasons from a poll of lapsed Catholics why they form the third largest religious grouping in the US. You can guess what most of these reasons are. Fifty years ago, we hadn’,t heard much about the abuse cases which have wrought so much damage, and so we go on through the list. Criticism of the church’,s perceived attitude to women figures, and so do “,bor- ing or inadequately prepared homilies”,: two things which are not as diverse as they seem, but a sign that we need to address the changes in culture and education over the last half century, seeking always what is good in what is new. With a trusting, forward-going hand on your plough the intractable needn’,t be the insoluble. ***** High on that list of the unthinkable, 50 years ago, are the problems in Ireland. Recently, there has been a Vatican visitation because of them, which includes the remark that that there is “,a certain ten- dency, not dominant but nevertheless fairly widespread among priests, religious and laity, to hold theological opinions at variance with the teachings of the Magisterium”, You mean they got as far as Craggy Island, you think- but seriously, what is it saying?... but there are more positive words about some “,exemplary”, clergy too: and the report calls for “,A new focus on the role of laity, the recommendation that the bishops consider `adapting` diocesan structures to meet cur- rent needs and the great need for the Irish Church to establish a `proper relationship` with media”,. “,Only a united Church can be an effective witness to Christ in the world”, Benchmark Sidelines When I am away from home, I like to see what sort of music other parishes are making. A few weeks ago I had the pleasure of visiting Dublin, so found myself at a 9.30 Mass in a large church not far from the city centre. Double disappointment awaited me –, very few parishioners (around forty) and no music played or sung. I know the Celtic Tiger is very poorly but on the basis of this small sample, the Church is suffering too! I was nearly forty when I became a teacher, and even now, semi- retired, I`m still happily surprised when school holidays come along and I can do non-work things. However, some non-work things refuse to schedule themselves so conveniently, and I recently had one of those busy weeks, evenings bulging with AGMs and committee meetings, well, one of each on successive days, both for a (secular) choir. There were a couple of contentious resolutions at the AGM. A couple of months ago, I would have predicted a bit of a battle over repertoire –, some members were not happy that we do quite a few religious songs. Among my favourites are `Thapelo` –, the lyrics translate as “,Our prayers we sing to praise our Father in heaven”, which I can see might upset an atheist, and `De noche iremos`, a Taizé, chant. We call it `Peace` (well, we do sing it in English): `By night we listen in darkness, and look for the peace within us, Only our hope lights us onward, sending out peace to the whole world` But it transpired that the conflict was centred on entirely different matters –, and I was pleased and relieved that after lengthy but courteous discussion, the issues were actually resolved amicably. The folk group at St Joseph`s are having a meeting + social + curry supper (We know how to have a night out!) soon to see what we`re doing well and what we can improve. I hope we can sort ourselves out in a similarly civilised fashion!! And finally, the NNPM and SSG events in July are filling up so if you are keen to go, book now! The NNPM National Conference is at Worth Abbey, West Sussex, (20th –, 22nd July), while SSG`s Summer School is at Sneaton Castle, Whitby, from (23rd –, 27th July). See links below Tim Devereux tim.devereux@ssg.org.uk If you`d like to add your name to the email list to receive information about WYCM Network events, I`d be happy to hear from you. West Yorkshire Church Music Network: http://www.westyorkshirechurchmusic.org.uk/ National Network of Pastoral Musicians: http://nnpm.org/ Society of Saint Gregory: http://www.ssg.org.uk/ Thapelo: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PZgpLY_RLeE De noche iremos. Canto de Taizé,: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zkjDNdrzj1k&,feature=related Musical Notes by Tim Devereux P upils and staff at Cardinal Heenan Catholic High School, Leeds, are celebrating their win in a national competition. The Leeds school is one of only six schools and colleges nationwide to top a BBC Schools Questions &, Answers contest. A BBC film crew will visit the Leeds school in May to film a BBC Question Time show. A Cardinal Heenan pupil will be on the panel alongside celebrities and well known politicians. The programme will be broadcast by the BBC on The Internet as a live webcast. It will also be shown on the BBC Parliament channel. For their winning entry Cardinal Heenan pupils filmed their own Question Time style debate on the protestors outside St Paul`s Cathedral, London, and in other major cities including Leeds. Pupils then sent their film off to the BBC. Maura Rutherford, a teacher of English at Cardinal Heenan, said: “,By holding their own debate on the issues arising from the protest camps our students showed BBC judges that they enjoy discussing issues that affect them, their communities and the wider world. “,This live BBC broadcast is a wonderful opportunity for pupils to debate directly with leading politicians and people who hold power. Our pupils will be the studio audience. They will be as much part of the programme as those sitting on the panel. ‘,“,Everyone here is delighted. It shows that young people can change opinions and hold those in power to account.”, Cardinal Heenan pupil Victoria Milne, aged 16, said: “,Pupils here are good at debating. We have been very successful in debating competitions run by The English Speaking Union. It’,s a big deal because Cardinal Heenan is one of only a few 11 to 16 schools to take part. We are nearly always up against older sixth formers from private schools.”, Joe Mylan, Head Boy at Cardinal Heenan, 16, said: “,We have a big School Council here. It’,s run by students, so we are used to debating and arguing a case. We are really looking forward to being filmed by the BBC.”, As part of their prize Cardinal Heenan pupils are taking part in workshops run by Parliament`s Education Service. The pupils are learning about politics and how to host a stimulating debate. The BBC Schools Questions and Answers Challenge is a national competition for 14 –, 19 year olds in schools and colleges. It uses the format of the popular Question Time programme on BBC One and Any Questions on Radio 4. Question Time has been running for over 25 years on BBC One. It is Britain’,s most watched political programme. The radio show Any Questions? on BBC Radio 4 has been on air since 1948. Cardinal Heenan Pupils Win National Competition YOUNG CHEFS MAKE AN IMPACT Congratulations to Amir Khan a Pupil at Immaculate Heart of Mary Catholic Primary School, Moortown, Leeds who took first prize in The Hummingbird Children’,s Recipe Competition 2012. Amir fought off stiff competition with his accomplished cookery skills and wowed the judges with his Lamb and Yorkshire Fettle Burgers with Mango Zing. Amir’,s burgers will now play a starring role on the Hummingbird Restaurant menu. Also, well done to William Font, another pupil from Immaculate Heart who won ‘,Chefiest Chef’, with his Leek and Wensleydale Tarts. OFFICE FOR EVANGELISATION &, CATECHESIS F oundations in Faith –, incorporating the Catholic Certificate in Religious Studies validated by the Bishops’, Conference of England &, Wales. The current Foundations in Faith (CCRS) course has just finished with members of the group participating in a variety of specialist modules. Topics included Liturgy, Philosophy, Youth &, Family Life Ministries, Catechesis, Catholic Schools and RE, Catholic Social Teaching and Interreligious Relations. Foundations in Faith is a two year course of adult formation in the Catholic faith. It aims to help people deepen their relationship with Jesus Christ and develop their understanding of the teaching of the Catholic Church. The next Foundations in Faith course begins in September 2012 at Hinsley Hall. It runs on Tuesday evenings from 7:15pm –, 9:30pm Starter Course for Catechists For three Saturdays in March a group of 21 have participated in the new diocesan Starter Course for Catechists. The course was led by Mgr John Wilson &, Mrs Linda Pennington and included sessions on The Trinity, The Church, The Sacraments, Prayer, Living a Christian Life and Catechesis. One participant said: “,I really liked the mixture of group talk, reflection, prayer, teaching and use of Scripture –, it was a lovely mix.”, The course will run again in the spring of 2013. (The group are pictured on the steps of Hinsley Hall with Mgr John) RCIA DAY –, Saturday May 12 This event will be held at The Holy Name Parish Centre, 52, Otley Old Road, Leeds, LS16 6HW. Tea &, Coffee from 9.30 am - Beginning at 10.00 am –, until 4.00 pm. This is an opportunity for catechists and RCIA teams to explore ways of encouraging Catechumens and Candidates to deepen their faith during the Period of the Catechumenate. This is the main period of formation for those on the Journey in Faith. The day includes workshops, exploration of available materials and experience of relevant liturgies during this period. Please bring a packed Lunch. £,10.00 per person or £, 30.00 per parish group. Please book with Linda Pennington by Friday 4th May. Catechist Forum –, Nov 17 –, Wheeler Hall All catechists are invited to this day of reflection, discussion, resources &, networking. 10:00am –, 2:30 pm at Wheeler Hall, St Anne’,s Cathedral. There is no charge for this event but please bring a packed lunch. WHO TO CONTACT AT HINSLEY HALL There are many courses and events organised by the Office for Evangelisation and Catechesis throughout the year which help to support formation in faith and training for catechists, leaders of Children’,s Liturgy of the Word and other parish ministries. Check this page in future editions and also the website: www.dioceseofleeds.org.uk/evangelisation - see Forthcoming Events. For further information or booking please contact Linda Pennington on 0113 261 8043 or linda.pennington@dioceseofleeds.org.uk Cardinal Heenan pupils Victoria Milne and Joe Mylan, both 16. Photographs by Ben Taylor

Read in full

Page 6

Apr 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 6 Leeds Catholic Post Recently, Bernard Farrell-Roberts came to speak to the clergy of the diocese about the formation of deacons. He is Director of Diaconal Formation at Maryvale in Birmingham (and otherwise is himself a student deacon, working with the Brotherhood of the Holy Cross in Tarragona, Spain) and Leeds Diocese has recently subscribed to this programme. The norms for the formation of deacons were set out in a Vatican document in 1998, although outlines were available prior to this. It is based on the study and proclamation of scripture, on prayer, the sacraments and the service of the altar, and on the service of those in need. Leeds Diocese was fortunate in having its own formation programme for a number of years, with directors of formation starting with Mgr Billy Steele and running through to Fr Kevin Firth, assisted by Deacon Keith Ballard. It was an excellent programme with an intensive range of study opportunities- a weekly weekday evening and regular Saturdays and weekends, together with home study. With a wide range of speakers and tutors- some of whom those training seemed to hardly deserve- it was a programme that stood on its own merits as an excellent formation course. Now is perhaps the time to thank the directors (and assistant) for this. **** Meanwhile, a new graduate institute is to open in Rome next year to focus on the renewed diaconate. The Institute of St. Lawrence will be based at the Lateran University in Rome, with courses being taught at several of the other pontifical universities. The institute will provide an opportunity for advanced research on the diaconate, and to create an archive of such research to support future scholarship. Students can either take all of the courses offered over a three-year summer program and obtain a Master`s degree in diaconal study from the Lateran, or they may take courses to be applied to an existing program at another accredited institution. **** The Diaconate is an international brotherhood and is appropriate here to mark the death of one Canadian deacon who pointed the way to a ministry of service. Norberto “,Bert”, Cambre was ordained in 1983 and appointed Director of Deacons in Toronto in 2000. He was instrumental in the creation of a number of ministries such as the Friends of Dismas, a ministry to ex-prisoners and El Sembrador, a ministry to the migrant farm workers- to name but two. He was also a “,passionate and vigorous promoter of the Diaconate.”, May he rest in peace. Deacons Diary Queen’,s Diamond Jubilee T he Queen opened the festivities for her Jubilee Year with a multi-faith reception at Lambeth Palace. The Queen’,s personal faith has been a significant guide to her during her entire life and more particular since she took accepted the role of monarch. The Church of England is the established faith, that is, everyone irrespective of background or culture is allocated to the care of a Church of England parish (based on where you live). It is the Anglican Church that is normally responsible for the religious elements of national and civic events. Members of faiths other than Christianity sometime speak of the Church of England as “,an older brother”, that they can rely upon to see fair play and make sure that other faiths as well as other Christians are actively involved when the nation prays together. It is significant at this time when religious observance is under attack that the Queen should choose to open her Jubilee in a religious context. The text of the Queen’,s speech: Your Grace, Ladies and Gentlemen, Prince Philip and I are delighted to be with you today to pay tribute to the particular mission of Christianity and the general value of faith in this country. This gathering is a reminder of how much we owe the nine major religious traditions represented here. They are sources of a rich cultural heritage and have given rise to beautiful sacred objects and holy texts, as we have seen today. Yet these traditions are also contemporary families of faith. Our religions provide critical guidance for the way we live our lives, and for the way in which we treat each other. Many of the values and ideas we take for granted in this and other countries originate in the ancient wisdom of our traditions. Even the concept of a Jubilee is rooted in the Bible. Here at Lambeth Palace we should remind ourselves of the significant position of the Church of England in our nation’,s life. The concept of our established Church is occasionally misunderstood and, I believe, commonly under-appreciated. Its role is not to defend Anglicanism to the exclusion of other religions. Instead, the Church has a duty to protect the free practice of all faiths in this country. It certainly provides an identity and spiritual dimension for its own many adherents. But also, gently and assuredly, the Church of England has created an environment for other faith communities and indeed people of no faith to live freely. Woven into the fabric of this country, the Church has helped to build a better society –, more and more in active co-operation for the common good with those of other faiths. This occasion is thus an opportunity to reflect on the importance of faith in creating and sustaining communities all over the United Kingdom. Faith plays a key role in the identity of many millions of people, providing not only a system of belief but also a sense of belonging. It can act as a spur for social action. Indeed, religious groups have a proud track record of helping those in the greatest need, including the sick, the elderly, the lonely and the disadvantaged. They remind us of the responsibilities we have beyond ourselves. Your Grace, the presence of your fellow distinguished religious leaders and the objects on display demonstrate how each of these traditions has contributed distinctively to the history and development of the United Kingdom. Prince Philip and I wish to send our good wishes, through you, to each of your communities, in the hope that –, with the assurance of the protection of our established Church –, you will continue to flourish and display strength and vision in your relations with each other and the rest of society. Jubilee –, Just as there is a Biblical injunction to hold every seventh day (the Sabbath) as a day or rest, every seventh year was also a time of rest for the land. Every seventh-seventh year was a Year of Jubilee when a positive effort was made to set the world to rights and re- establish things as God would want them. To mark the Jubilee this year has been declared a Year of Service, practical voluntary action to make things better –, donating food to feed the hungry, participating in a local clean-up, fund-raising. It is an opportunity for faith communities to co-operate in marking the Queen`s Diamond Jubilee in a practical way - service being an important theme of Her Majesty`s long reign. Further details at http://ayearofservice.org.uk/ One of the simpler projects, led by the Eden Project, is The Big Lunch. Have a shared Sunday lunch on Sunday June 3rd, inviting strangers, friends and neighbours. An ideal opportunity for sharing Christian hospitality following on from our Sabbath observance. Further details at www.thebiglunch.com Events Saturday 28th April Concord’,s 7th Annual Walk of Friendship 10am –, 1pm. Meet at 10am at Jamia Masjid Bilal, Conway Road LS8 5JH, then on to St Augustine’,s RC Church and St Aidan’,s Anglican Church. Further details: secretary@concord- leeds.org.uk Saturday 28th April Start of Treasures Revealed in Leeds Visit ‘,treasured’, places of worship between Saturday 28th April and Monday 7th May Further details: Jamie - bethandjamie@ntlworld.com Saturday, 28th April Inter Faith Peace Event at Halifax Minster 11:30 - 14:30. Speakers from the different faith groups present their religion as a faith of peace More details (and pre-booking to assist with catering) David Ramanauskas, david@godinhalifax.com, 01422 330770 Saturday 12th May Contemporary Judaism 9:30-12:30 Fee £,3. Woodlands Methodist Church, Wetherby Road, Harrogate HG2 7SG. Further Details: Stuart Vennart 01765 676024 Saturday 16th June Talking with Jews, enriching our Christian calling 10:00-15:30 Fee £,16.50 (includes lunch) or £,10 (bring your own lunch). The Mirfield Centre, Stocks Bank Road, Mirfield WF14 0BW Further Details: The Mirfield Centre 01924 481920 or www.mirfieldcentre.org.uk Thursday 17th May. Leeds Faith Hub Meeting 6pm. Meeting in the Civic Hall where people of faith discuss issues to raise with Leeds City Council. Is your faith represented? Does your parish have a voice? Further details: Jay lobsang.sherap@googlemail.com Tuesday 12th June Rites of Passage in the Sikh Traditions 7pm Chapeltown Road Gurdwara LS7 4HZ May Festivals 2nd May Birthday of Guru Arjan Dev Ji (Sikh) Guru Arjan Dev is the fifth of the Sikh Gurus and the first Sikh martyr 5th May Wesak (Buddhist) Wesak, or Buddha Day, celebrated on the full moon, is the most important of the Buddhist festivals. It celebrates the Buddha`s birthday, and, marks his enlightenment. Buddha literally means `one who is awake` and has become enlightened. It is a term that denotes a person who has attained the supreme wisdom and compassion of Enlightenment. 23rd May Birthday of Guru Amar Das (Sikh) Guru Amar Das (1479-1574) is the third of the Sikh Gurus

Read in full

Page 7

Apr 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

L eeds Trinity University College’,s annual Catholic Partnership Day for Catholic Schools will take place on Friday 25 May. The Catholic Partnership Day offers the opportunity for CPD for teachers in our partnership Catholic Schools, to recognise the invaluable contribution that they make in helping to train Leeds Trinity students. Established in 2007, the day is for both Primary and Secondary Schools. The 2012 Catholic Partnership Day will be focussing on `Going for Gold`, an Olympic theme. CAFOD`s education team from London will lead Primary and Secondary workshops during the day. There will also be contributions from Simon Clifford who introduced Brazilian soccer schools to the UK and James Parker from ‘,More than Gold’,. The aim of the day is that participants will be inspired and will take away practical ideas and resources which can be used in schools in the lead up to the Olympics and beyond. Anne Trotter, the Leeds Trinity Schools Partnership Manager, said ",The day is an invaluable opportunity to further strengthen links with our Catholic Partnership Schools and also emphasise our Catholic Identity. The feedback received from previous days has always been very positive and we anticipate that the day planned for 2012 will be equally successful.", For more information contact Liz Cairns on 0113 283 7216 or email cpd@leedstrinity.ac.uk NEWS FROM LEEDS TRINITY UNIVERSITY COLLEGE Leeds Catholic Post Page 7 Catholic Partnership Day is Going for Gold Events at Leeds Trinity University College 15 May at 6.30pm Professor Maureen Meikle on ‘,Spirited ladies? A reappraisal of women from northern England and the Anglo-Scottish borders 1580 to 1700’, For more information contact Maddie Addinall on m.addinall@leedstrinity.ac.uk or 0113 283 7102 Catholic Partnership Day –, see article above. For more information contact Liz Cairns on 0113 283 7216 or email cpd@leedstrinity.ac.uk 28 May at 7.00pm The Leeds Centre for Victorian Studies Public Lecture titled `Faust Comes to Leeds: Creative Destruction in the Victorian City` will be delivered by Peter Mandler, Professor of Modern Cultural History, University of Cambridge, on Monday 28 May. For more information contact Heather Jones on 0113 283 7100 or email h.jones@leedstrinity.ac.uk 26 –, 29 June ‘,Vatican II –, 50 Years on: The New Evangelization’,. For more information on this major theological conference to be hosted by Leeds Trinity, contact Kathy Stenton on 0113 283 7102. Please visit our website at www.leedstrinity.ac.uk for more details and a full events listing. Leeds Sport Awards Success F inal year Sports Development and PE students, John Agar and Dean Bettle, have won prestigious awards at this year’,s Leeds Sports Awards. John won the Senior Achiever Award for Student Sport and was nominated alongside Dean, demonstrating Leeds Trinity’,s commitment to sports volunteering. Both John and Dean have made a huge contribution to the variety of sports clubs and activity venues they are voluntarily involved with. Julie Brunton, Head of the Sport, Health and Nutrition, said: “,The Leeds Sports Awards was a fantastic night for Leeds Trinity to be part of, not only to continue the work we do with the many sporting partners and organisations in Yorkshire, but to reward the hard work and successes of our own students. For them to be there with top athletes and sports teams from the Leeds area was great to see and is a well-deserved reward for all their hard work and efforts.”, Leeds Trinity is one of the sponsors of the Leeds Sports Awards and Professor Bridge was there on the night to present some of the awards. She said “,Leeds Trinity is delighted to be able to support this fantastic event. As a provider of sports education we aim to encourage young sportsmen and women to participate in sport which is demonstrated by our partnerships with numerous community and youth organisations across the region.”, Writers get creative for annual festival! M arch 28 saw Leeds Trinity hold its eighth annual Writers’, Festival Day. Students, staff and members of the local community came together to explore the range of possibilities opened up by working with professional writers. Workshops in poetry, dramatic writing, building plots and characters, short stories, and firing your imagination were offered by experienced writers in their fields including Susan Barker, Bob Beagrie, Pat Borthwick, Julia Deakin, Ray French, Anita Ganeri, Neil Hanson and Alison Taft. Professor Paul Hardwick, Programme Leader for English and Writing, says “,For me, this is always one of the highlights of the year, when members of Leeds Trinity and the local community get the chance to really stretch themselves creatively.”, Leeds Trinity Principal announces retirement P rofessor Freda Bridge has recently announced her retirement as Principal and Chief Executive of Leeds Trinity University College as of 31 December 2012. Professor Bridge joined Leeds Trinity as Principal in 2006 and has seen many new developments in that time, including the conferment of Taught Degree Awarding Powers in 2009 which resulted in the change of name to Leeds Trinity University College. The campus has also changed dramatically in the past six years with new developments such as All Saints Court, Trinity Fitness and the new Atrium area all happening since Professor Bridge’,s arrival. Professor Bridge said: “,I will leave with many pleasant memories of my time here which I am sure will stay with me for ever. However, I know that the changes that Leeds Trinity has undergone in the last few years will enable it to move forward with confidence in the ever changing world of Higher Education.”, Professor Bridge leaves the institution in a strong position which is emphasised by the new Strategic Plan that has just been approved by Academic Board and the Board of Governors. The new plan has been prepared with extensive consultation with staff, students and governors which shows the high level of ownership from the Leeds Trinity community. This will provide a sound basis on which Leeds Trinity can move forward effectively and will help to ensure continuity of development over the transition period of a change in Principal and Chief Executive. Dean Bettle Paul Hardwick Freda Bridge

Read in full

Page 8

Apr 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 8 Leeds Catholic Post Yorkshire &, Humberside Regional Sportshall Champions…,.without a sports hall!!! F or the Year 7 pupils at Mount St Mary’,s High School Leeds it appeared to be a ‘,mission impossible’, scenario. Back in October, Head of P.E. Yvonne Pearson entered the boys’, athletics team for the Aviva Sportshall UK Championships, a national competition with qualifying events at local, county and regional levels. The problem for all concerned however was the lack of a sports hall to train in! Both the original school sports hall and gym were being changed into a dining room and ICT classrooms in a £,14 million development as part of the Building Schools for the Future programme. So with the team ‘,all dressed up and nowhere to go’,, the boys had to train outside and walk up to the Richmond Hill Sports Centre which is almost a mile from the school. With sprints, jumps and throws to practice it was going to be a busy time but such was their enthusiasm the lack of facilities had a minimal effect on performance. Indeed, the team had a runaway success in the Leeds qualifying round at Prince Henry’,s, Otley, before winning the Leeds event by a country mile! This put them in the County Final which was held in Halifax. “,I told the boys to rest over the weekend before the event, and not get injured”, said Yvonne “,but was distraught to find out that one of my stars, Connor Amps, had hurt himself in a match and was absent from school on the day of the finals.”, Unperturbed the boys set off in high spirits accompanied by Yvonne and staff member Richard Pullan who had been working with the boys to improve their fitness. They faced eight other winning schools which was a daunting task, but one that the team seemed to relish. Unbelievably they won the event and were crowned West Yorkshire Sports Hall Champions 2012! This win automatically put them through to the ‘,Yorkshire &, Humberside Regional Final’, and his took place on 26th March. The team were at full strength and whilst confident in their own abilities, they knew that this would be their sternest test. Honley HS soon stood out as the nearest challengers and it was nip- and-tuck as to who was leading the event throughout the afternoon. There was a nail- biting climax to the proceedings and it wasn’,t until the announcement of which school were runners-up that we knew who had won. We’,d done it…,. by an uncomfortably slim margin of just five points! Who’,d have thought it…,Mount St. Mary’,s, Regional Champions! Head teacher Mark Cooper said “,We’,re proud of what the boys have achieved and this reflects the attitude of all Mount St Mary’,s pupils who have continued to work hard during what has been a very busy time for the Pictured: Back: (L to R) Connor Amps, Solomon Akhigbe, Kadeem Ferguson, Michael Hamill, Daniel Kamga, Elton Musabaeka. Front: Marvin Boakye, Kiedan Hartley (Captain), Thomas Moore school. Our brand new state-of-the-art sports hall and fitness rooms will be ready for use after Easter and the pupils are eagerly awaiting the opportunity to use these superb facilities.”, Two members of the team deserve a special mention: Captain Kiedan Hartley and Daniel Kamga. Daniel was the top athlete in each of the finals and what’,s more, he speaks hardly any English having moved to this country last year. As well as encouraging his team mates Kiedan had been walking French- speaking Daniel through the events to ensure he ran the correct number of laps in each race! God is Good - All The Time! St Bede’,s Catholic High School in Bradford were extremely lucky to be able to welcome a team of Franciscan Friars and Sisters of the Renewal to be with us to deliver a School Mission during Lent. They came to help us to deepen our understanding of our Catholic Faith and to help draw us closer to Jesus. The testimonies, the faith and the joy of the Mission team had an enormous impact on everyone at both Schools best summed up in the words of the students: ‘,The Brothers and Sisters made the mission personal –, it enlightened me.’, ‘,Thank you for teaching us about God and what he can do for us. I have taken it to heart and will try my best to follow it through.’, ‘,Powerful, uplifting and healing.’, ‘,I liked listening to the stories best, they made me think about things more deeply in my own life.’, ‘,I liked the joyful spirit!’, Thanks to the Friars the words ‘,God is Good’, are guaranteed to be greeted with the cry –, ‘,all the time!’, and no doubt this will continue for many years to come. St Bede’,s, Bradford students with the Franciscans St Joseph’,s, Bradford students with the Franciscans

Read in full

Page 9

Apr 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Leeds Catholic Post Page 9 Bishop Arthur drops in to Thank Children There was an air of excitement at Sacred Heart School in Kirkstall, Leeds when pupils were told of a surprise visitor. The children gave a warm welcome to Bishop Arthur when he visited the school on the morning of Monday 19 March. On arrival, the Bishop joined staff for refreshments before four enthusiastic and knowledgeable pupils hosted a guided tour of the school. In one classroom, Bishop Arthur presented a maths quiz on the interactive whiteboard, and then helped year 3 with their newspaper reports. Every class was eager to tell the Bishop about their successful fundraising for both the Good Shepherd collection and CAFOD including bun sales and filling plastic water bottles with loose change donated from friends and relatives. Bishop Arthur thanked the children for their efforts in supporting charities that are so important to the Church. On The March In Featherstone F rom Monday 26th March St Wilfrid’,s Catholic High School in Featherstone played host to around 200 students and teachers from ten countries for its twelfth annual International Week. International visitors that attended events are made up of some of the school’,s many European and non-European partners including those from Bulgaria, China, Italy, Macedonia and Turkey. Most of those in attendance lived with families from the St Wilfrid’,s community so that they could experience local hospitality and ways of life. The theme for this year’,s week was Share the Moment for which a packed programme of activities was been planned. As well as working in multi-national groups on innovative teambuilding and problem-solving tasks, groups also were given the opportunity to engage in sport, music and expressive arts. An excursion to the wonderfully historic city of York was also scheduled. The biggest undertaking of the week took place on Wednesday 28th March when the school will held a Carnival of Nations under the tagline Celebrating Diversity –, Welcoming Unity. At 12:30 around 2500 people, incorporating students and staff from St Wilfrid’,s, international visitors, local primary school pupils and residents from the local community assembled on the school field and set off on an hour-long parade through the streets and housing estates surrounding the school. The principal objective of the carnival parade was to represent all nations participating in the forthcoming London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games. Groups had been allocated countries to research prior to the event so that they could prepare materials and costumes that accentuated their rich culture, customs and diversity. Ian Storey, Head of the International Dimension at St Wilfrid’,s Catholic High School, is responsible for the overall organisation and coordination of the week and said “,International Week provides an excellent platform for young people from around the globe to collaborate in a broad range of exciting activities that allow for dialogue on issues facing our respective societies as well sharing and celebrating diverse cultures. The Carnival of Nations really will broaden students’, outlook and understanding of other cultures and forge links that can promote community cohesion”,. Picture Fr Kelly and Fr Krychiwskyj with Bishop Roche meet some of the staff and pupils.

Read in full

Page 10

Apr 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 10 Leeds Catholic Post CHRISM MASS MASS OF CHRISM 2012 A s the Wednesday of Holy Week dawned spring had turned back to winter with many parts of the diocese covered in snow. As ever, inclement weather would not stand in the way of a large congregation gathering at the Cathedral for the annual Chrism Mass. They come each year at this time to be part of the local Church made visible: laypeople, religious, deacons and priests gathered in unity with their Bishop. They do so during the most important week in Church’,s year when she celebrates the mysteries of salvation accomplished by Our Lord in the last days of His life on earth. Over the space of seven days we retrace His steps from the messianic entry into Jerusalem, through to the Last Supper, the Passion and the ultimate glory of Resurrection. And so they came to Leeds Cathedral from across the diocese, representatives of parish and school communities of other organisations and of the many and varied ministries that make up the life of the Church. When the time came for Mass to start and the choir and clergy had processed Into the Cathedral the clouds parted and the nave was bathed in early evening sunshine streaming in through the great west window. In his opening words of welcome Bishop Roche expressed his own joy at being with his priests and people for this special occasion. In his homily the Bishop reflected further on the special nature of the Chrism Mass. It is the occasion when the clergy together renew their priestly promises, when the blessing of the Holy Oils takes place and in this way it is when the whole sacramental life of the Church is celebrated. In particular he highlighted the fact that later this year the Oil of Chrism will be used in the ordination of a new priest for the diocese, the first such event since 2007. It was fitting that among many others on the sanctuary as he spoke were Mgr John Murphy who will celebrate the 65th anniversary of his ordination in June, together with a number of our seminarians who were acting as altar servers. The Bishop went on to ask the people to pray for the priests of the diocese and their renewed dedication to service. But he concluded with a lesson for everyone when he reminded the congregation of the Gospel reading for the Mass which recounts Jesus speaking in the synagogue in Nazareth when “,all the eyes in the synagogue were fixed on him”,. The Bishop said that should be the case for us today, our eyes fixed on Him who is the cause of our hope in the present and for the future. At the Offertory Procession the Oils of Baptism, Chrism and of the Sick were brought forward to the sanctuary to be received by the Bishop. The solemn blessing of the Oils took place after Communion and as Mass ended they were taken to a side chapel in readiness for distribution to the deaneries of the diocese where they will be used to give comfort, healing and strength to those who receive the sacraments in the coming year.

Read in full

Page 11

Apr 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

GOOD FRIDAY A TIME OF DECISION W ell before the afternoon liturgy was to start Leeds Cathedral was full. As usual Good Friday had drawn the people in for the celebration of the remembrance of the Death of The Lord. The Bishop with a small number of his priests processed in silence into the Cathedral to start the Liturgy which is strange to the people but which commemorates the most important events of the Holy week celebrations. As usual the Passion was read by the clergy with the people called upon to play the crowd scenes. In his Homily Fr Martin Kelly, secretary to the Bishop took up the famous line from the Gospel, uttered by Pilate ‘,What is Truth’, and went on to tease out how we as follows of Christ must decided if we were for or against what Truth was all about. The truth he was speaking about was the truth that Christ brought, and bought with his death on the Cross- the Truth that Pilate saw but would not let himself believe in –, His cross is the sign of Hope. Leeds Catholic Post Page 11 DO THIS IN MEMORY OF ME A t the Cathedral as elsewhere in the diocese the great Easter Triduum begins with the evening Mass of the Lord’,s Supper on Maundy Thursday. At this celebration in particular the Church repeats the words and gestures used by Our Lord on the evening of His last Passover meal, which he shared with the twelve Apostles. For two thousand years the Church’,s liturgical tradition has followed the model of Jesus’, prayer on that evening when He consecrated bread and wine for his followers and instituted the Eucharist. Ever since the Church has followed His command to “,Do this in memory of me.”, As is usual at the Cathedral during Holy Week a large congregation assembled for the Mass of the Lord’,s Supper, which was celebrated by the Dean of the Cathedral, Mgr Philip Moger. In his homily the Dean reflected on the connection between this celebration and the memorials of the Passion and Resurrection that would follow in the next two days. Our Lord had commanded the Apostles to “,love one another as I have loved you”, and His death on the Cross and Resurrection were to be the supreme example of His love, as it marked a new Passover –, a passing over from death to new life, not just for Christ himself but for all peoples for all time. To the strains of Durufle’,s Ibi Caritas sung by the Cathedral Choirs, Mgr Moger proceeded to the Washing of the Feet. On this occasion the twelve people whose feet were to be washed in an echo of the events long ago in the Upper Room in Jerusalem included six young children from the parish. This was followed by the Liturgy of the Eucharist, which began with the traditional presentation of Lenten Alms Boxes as part of the Offertory Procession. Mgr Moger was at the entrance of the sanctuary to receive the boxes from members of the congregation along with the bread and wine for consecration. The Mass ended with the Blessed Sacrament being taken in procession from the sanctuary to the Lady Chapel where Pugin’,s magnificent high altar from the old cathedral served as the Altar of Repose. Silent adoration was then kept until late into the evening and the time came for the Night Prayer of the Church to be said. MAUNDY THURSDAY Specialists in wedding photography 01977 556088 07716728109 Your wedding is a unique day which involves considerable thought, planning, time and effort. Once your special day is over you will be left with many lovely memories some of which will inevitably fade over time. Investing in good photography can ensure that the mood and emotion of your day is captured to form a permanent reminder to enable you to relive your memories for years to come.

Read in full

Page 12

Apr 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 12 Leeds Catholic Post Leeds Cathedral Celebrates a Vigil Night W ith only the light of the Fire to light and warm the Cathedral –, the Bishop opened the celebrations of the Easter Vigil to a full and expectant congregation. The liturgy of this night is by far the best for explaining the significance and meaning of what is happening as it goes along and also is of course the most dramatic in its use of light and darkness. The Dean of the Cathedral Mgr Moger sang the Exsultet –, the Hymn of Easter Praise to start what was a very full and moving service. During the course of the night two new members were Baptised and ten new members were received into full communion with the Church. It was to these people first of all that the Bishop addressed his remarks in his Homily bringing to their minds that we were not just celebrating some event of the past –, but that we were celebrating that the |Lord is Risen Now. He has brought a new Order –, A New Dimension –, A New World –, that now emerges. Those reborn in Baptism he told them were transformed in to a New Creation –, it is not I but Christ who lives in me –, Resurrection is not an event of the past But the Present. At the end of the Vigil The Bishop welcomed all the New entrants as well as all the people who had helped to prepare them , the Cathedral and the Liturgy over the Holy Week Period. THE VIGIL

Read in full

Page 13

Apr 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Leeds Catholic Post Page 13 What was ‘,The Ark’,? ‘,The Ark’, was the LDYS 2012 Lenten event and consisted of four weeks of fun, faith and friendship. Through music, prayer, talks, small group discussion and fun games. 4 WEEKS OF FAITH The Promise ‘,The Ark’, journey unravelled over a 4 week period. The first week, ‘,The Promise’,, focused upon the Father’,s Love. The speaker for this week was Anna Cowell who talked about God as Father through her own experiences. Young people explored who God is and what promises God makes to us. This encouraged young people to look into their own lives and explore the promises that have been made to them, and how sometimes promises can be broken or incomplete, we then reflected on God’,s promises and how God’,s promises made in love throughout scripture are never failing. The Rain The Second week, ‘,The Rain’,, which focused upon the reality of Jesus in our lives. The speaker for this week was Leanne Jones who talked about the relationship between humanity and God, and although, at times as sinners we may stumble and fall, we are lifted up in Christ and forgiven our sins. This led us on to looking at Confession and what this means for us, after a brave testimony by George Poulter who talked about confession setting him free from the burden of sin and allowing him to enter more deeply into God’,s love, the young people were given the opportunity to celebrate the Sacrament of Reconciliation. The Dove The Third week, ‘,The Dove’,, focused upon the gift of the Holy Spirit to us. The speaker for this week was Rick Slatter who gave us a whirlwind tour of the Holy Spirit in the Scriptures. The Rainbow The fourth week, ‘,The Rainbow’,, reminded us of the hope we can have in God’,s promises. An inspirational talk was given by Sr Veronica who spoke about the meaning of God’,s covenant in the sign of the Rainbow and the reality of God’,s presence in our lives bringing the restoration of hope for all people. The leaders of the Ark then gave a powerful, creative presentation of their testimonies to the young people. This enabled the young people to reflect on God working in their lives, giving them the opportunity to write their prayer petitions to God, which when added all together created a rainbow reminding us of God’,s promises. 4 WEEKS OF FUN and FRIENDSHIP We didn’,t have any real life animals on board our Ark at Cathedral Hall, but at times it did seem like feeding time at the zoo, especially in week 4 as we tucked into our FroYo treats from MOO (Headingley –, www.welovemoo.co.uk). New friendships were formed and old ones were strengthened especially through the group games, even though at times there was an added competitive edge to win the great prizes which were donated by restaurants and stores from The Light, Leeds. Special thanks to The Body Shop, HannahLee Salon, Nandos, Appy Feet and Ark Clothing! WHAT’,S NEXT? If you missed out on ‘,The Ark’, then fear not, REVELATION is just around the corner (25th April), so come and join us for some more faith-filled adventures at the Cathedral. For more information check out the “,Leeds Diocesan Youth Service”, Facebook group or call the Youth Office on 0113 2618058. Leeds Diocesan Youth Service ‘,All who are thirsty, come!’, (Rev 22:17) Follow us atLeedsDYS. For more information about how to register for Leeds Diocesan Youth Service events, check out: www.leedsyouth.org.uk, contact Anna at the Youth Office: 0113 261 8058 / abcleedsdiocese@hotmail.com or join the “,Leeds Diocesan Youth Service”, Facebook group. Every Tuesday (The prayer group will break after 27th March &, will start again on 17th April) Refresh: Youth 2000 Prayer Group 6.30-7.30pm Leeds Cathedral Thursday 19th April Youth Ministry Holy Hour 2.30 –, 3.30pm Hinsley Hall Wednesday 25th April REVELATION 7 –, 9pm Cathedral Hall, Leeds Tuesday 1st May Lourdes School Staff Meeting 4.30pm St. Augustine’,s, Harehills Saturday 5th May YES : Faith Walks 2012 9am –, 7.30pm Osmotherley Wednesday 23rd May REVELATION 7 –, 9pmCathedral Hall, Leeds Saturday 26th May Handmaids Prayer Group for Women 7pm St. Clare’,s Convent, Leeds Leeds Diocesan Youth Service Calendar “,ALL ABOARD THE ARK!”,

Read in full

Page 14

Apr 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 14 Leeds Catholic Post O n Saturday 24th March CAFOD supporters enjoyed an afternoon conference celebrating fifty years of commitment by the Catholic community in England and Wales to overseas aid and development. The speakers explored the spirituality and vision and that have inspired people to be part of CAFOD’,s journey. During the opening reflection, Grace aged 13 and Lucy aged 11, shared how they had taken part in the Junior Great North Run for the last two years because they had been inspired to help children who didn’,t have access to all that they took for granted. Elaine Barker, a former teacher from St Joseph’,s Catholic College, spoke of the inspiration of four young students, Kimi, Katie, Izzie and Megan who had won the first ‘,Solutions for the Planet’, competition with their virtual pack to help mums and babies which has now raised almost £,165,000. Peter Johnson, a long- standing volunteer with CAFOD shred how a deepening understanding of Catholic Social Teaching had made him think more deeply about putting faith into action. Dr. Ann-Marie Mealey, Senior Lecturer in Ethics at Leeds Trinity University, explored the nature of spirituality, focussing on the spirituality that is at the heart of CAFOD. If our spirituality is not inviting us to ask the moral questions of our time or if it is not motivating us to engage with issues of justice then we are only giving expression to the vertical axis of the Cross and the horizontal is missing. John Battle, a long-time Justice and Peace activist and former MP for West Leeds considered what sustains us when establishing justice often seems challenging and overwhelming. For John, joining with others and tackling bit by bit that which we can do is a way forward. He highlighted that for most of us it is the people we look up to who inspire and motivate us. John shared his admiration for the life and witness of Archbishop Romero, ending with readings from the Archbishop’,s Holy Week homilies. Chris Bain, Director of CAFOD, then shared powerful stories of people in CAFOD communities who had inspired him. CAFOD isn’,t about giving a ‘,hand-out’, but aims to support and enable people and communities to flourish recognising and celebrating each person’,s innate dignity and potential. He then outlined some of the challenges facing us all but especially an agency like CAFOD, because of the external global context –, financial crisis, climate change, the erroneous belief in a ‘,growth at all costs’, culture. The challenge for CAFOD, for us all is to live by CAFOD 50th Anniversary Celebration Remembers Archbishop Romero B ishop Arthur joined students from Leeds High schools as they began CAFOD’,s ‘,Walk for Water’, on World Water Day, Thursday 22nd March. Gathered in the sunshine at Granary Wharf, the Bishop prayed with the students and blessed them as they set off. He encouraged them by reminding them that in walking as an act of solidarity, they were doing something very important. Just as important was to mark the event by starting in prayer and reminding ourselves of how precious God’,s gift of water is. The Walk for Water took place as part CAFOD’,s ‘,Give it Up’, Lenten Appeal, and covered 6 km along the canal bank from Granary Wharf to Kirkstall Abbey. The students took turns to carry nine litres of water in solidarity with many young people their age, mostly girls who have to carry heavy loads of water every day. Almost a billion people worldwide do not have access to clean water. The schools that took part were Cardinal Heenan High School, St Mary’,s, Menston, All Saints Huddersfield, Holy Family Carlton, Holy Family Keighley, St. Thomas a Becket Wakefield, St Joseph’,s College, Bradford . Accompanying the students was Katy Harris from CAFOD’,s Campaigns team. Katy had visited CAFOD communities in Zimbabwe and Zambia where water programmes are transforming lives. When the students arrived at Kirkstall Abbey they took part in a prayer service during which Katy shared stories about the people she met and stressed the urgent need to provide safe water and sanitation. The students then wrote their own messages and prayers of hope as part of our ‘,Thirst for Change campaign. Recognising the strong track record the UK has in supporting international development, CAFOD is now asking David Cameron to call on world leaders at the G8 summit in May to turn the tide on water poverty. Meanwhile across Leeds Diocese, many of our primary schools were joining in by ‘,walking for water’, in their own grounds and by holding an assembly thanking God for the gift of water. Many also came up with creative ides to help children understand the impact the lack of clean water and sanitation has. Andrew Mitchell, Secretary of State for International Development, said: ",CAFOD is working to improve water access, sanitation and hygiene for some of the world`s most vulnerable and neglected people, including those affected by war, climate change and disease. It is potentially life saving work, tackling cholera, helping girls attend school rather than having to fetch water and ensuring that children know about hygiene and waterborne diseases. ",By matching pound for pound all public donations, the UK Government will help CAFOD double its impact, ensuring tens of thousands more families have access to clean water and sanitation and are provided with everything from water purification kits and soap to training in how to fix a broken borehole.”, Leeds Diocese ‘,Gives it Up’, for water this Lent Margaret Siberry introduces the panel for the day Left to right: Bishop John Chris Bains Dr Annemarie Mealy John Battle our deepest values and learn to live more simply, sustainably and in solidarity with those who are poor. Bishop John Rawsthorne, recently retired Chair of CAFOD, rounded off the afternoon with a powerful personal witness of his own journey sharing how his ministry has been shaped by involvement with CAFOD. He described travelling in El Salvador shortly after Archbishop Romero’,s murder and the shocking and unbelievable violence of the country during that civil war period. He continued this theme in the homily during the mass in the Cathedral that followed. Archbishop Romero’,s deep faith enabled him to speak truth on the part of his people who were suffering violence and oppression, even though he knew well the consequences. His life has inspired people all over the world but he lives on within the El Salvador people. Bishop John thank everyone for being CAFOD, for enabling the last fifty years to happen and encouraged us all to look forward to the next fifty years. As a token of thanks from CAFOD Leeds, Bishop John was presented with a chalice specially made in El Salvador. ALMOST THERE! CAFOD would like to say a big thank-you for your heartfelt gen- erosity this Lent. We still have until 17th May for our Lent dona- tions to receive matched funding from the UK government and as of April 12th the total so far is an amazing £,4,369,373! Look out for the final total in May`s paper.

Read in full

Page 15

Apr 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Leeds Catholic Post Page 15 Classified Advertising MARRIAGE CARE Marriage isn’,t always easy —, Counselling can help For an appointment in confidence, with an understanding and experienced listener, please telephone: 0800 389 3801 A Relationship Counselling Service W. Lever Ltd BRADFORD 01274 547137 524 THORNTON ROAD, BRADFORD BD8 9NB FOR OVER 75 YEARS PROVIDING A COMPLETE PERSONAL &, CARING 24 HOUR FUNERAL SERVICE CHAPEL OF REST H UGHES F UNERAL S ERVICES (Catholic Funeral Directors) 180 YORK ROAD, LEEDS LS9 9NT. Tel 2480953/63 152 GREEN LANE, CROSSGATES. Tel 2326900 3 HOLLIN PARK PARADE, OAKWOOD ROUNDABOUT Tel 2499338 Web: wwww.hughesfuneralservices.co.uk Email: info@hughesfuneralservices.co.uk Family owned and managed. Fully Qualified in all aspects. 24 Hour Service Guaranteed Fixed Price Funeral Plans etc. “,At a time of bereavement we carry out our duties with dignity and respect”, In times of bereavement please contact: B. J. MELIA &, SONS (B. J. Melia Dip F.D.) F UNERAL D IRECTORS AND M ONUMENTAL M ASONS Private Chapel of Rest 64 GIBBET STREET, HALIFAX Telephone: 01422 354453 PRE-PAID FUNERAL SERVICE AVAILABLE DETAILS ON REQUEST Seven chicks symbolise Easter theme C HILDREN at St. Joseph’,s Catholic Primary School, Halifax were delighted after the arrival of seven adorable, fluffy chicks. Eggs were delivered to St. Joseph’,s School in Halifax, seven of which hatched. The result was a healthy and lively brood of chicks, chirping away and playing an integral part in the school’,s Easter activities. Pupils could actually witness the stages of a chick hatching: the egg ‘,pipping’,, chick starting to peck its way out, being able to hear it cheeping inside the egg, chick pecking and pushing its way out! After all its hard work, the chick is tired and wet. Reception class pupils named them Butterfly, Perry, Honey Pie, Star, Floppy, Tickle and Sweetie. The arrival of the chicks symbolised the new life that Jesus Christ gave to all mankind with His Death on the Cross followed by His Resurrection at Easter. Connie White, a support staff member, commented: “,The pupils and staff alike have been enthralled by this experience, eager every morning and at any other possible time during the day to see the chicks. They ask me endless questions about them and what I do to look after them. We’,ll make sure that the chicks will go to an appropriate home after having begun their life at our school.”, St. Joseph’,s School is working alongside the parish of The Sacred Heart &, St. Bernard, Range Lane, Halifax to raise money during Lent for CAFOD, the Catholic Agency For Overseas Development in the effort to provide clean water and sanitation for the world’,s poorest families. The chicks’, stay at St. Joseph’,s proved to be a superb means of fundraising. Photos of children holding a chick were sold, presented in Easter cards, with proceeds going to the charity. Moreover, every class organised a fundraising event such as ‘,A Bad Hair and Pyjama Day’, towards the same cause. This year, there is an additional incentive for fundraising as the government has pledged to match, £, for £,, all donations given to CAFOD during the Lenten period. Community Cooking Pupils from St Matthew’,s Catholic Primary School in Allerton, Bradford, made fruit smoothies and exotic fruit salad for the Lord Mayor of Bradford. Councillor Naveeda Ikram, together with Junior Mayor for the day, Ravi Mistry, presented the Year 5 pupils with certificates to celebrate the completion of a six week Cook and Eat project. The project has successfully run for the past three years, spear-headed by Sr Maria, who is based in Allerton, along with Suzanne and Roy Howarth, parishioners of St Matthew’,s Church. Parents joined their children to learn culinary skills such as chopping ingredients, washing and drying up, and cooking hot and cold healthy meals from start to finish before eating their completed dishes. Margaret Ogunkoya, a Year 5 pupil said, ‘,Cook and Eat was a great way to learn about different responsibilities. It was a joyful moment to meet the Lord Mayor and everyone loved to welcome her. She seemed really delighted to meet us.’, The close links developed through the project between pupils, parents and parishioners is just one example of how the community of St Matthew’,s works together. Holy Week Pupils and staff at St John’,s School for the Deaf, Boston Spa came together each morning during the last week of term to contemplate the events of Holy Week in their new performing arts centre. Through, drama, reflection and beautiful singing from Daniel Conway from SLP Musical Theatre College, the last days of Jesus’, life were marked.

Read in full

Page 16

Apr 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 16 Leeds Catholic Post HAVING A COMMON KITTY Within 24 hours of the Chancellor’,s budget statement in the House of Commons the corporate accountants had their avoidance strategies up and running.High earners immediately set their tax advisors on to strategies to pay up as little as possible while just staying on the right side of the new tax threshold laws. The tax policy director of the Chartered Institute of Taxation reported that “,the introduction of new thresholds is encouraging people to do more tax planning…,when faced with the option of paying more tax or organising their finances, individuals are opting to take a closed look at planning measures”,. Clients are then advised how to make more pension contributions which, if you have enough regular cash to spare, attract pension tax relief ,or alternatively to make a “,salary sacrifice arrangement”, withyour employer to get benefits “,in kind”, such as extra holiday entitlements or childcare vouchers in lieu of pay. Delaying entitlement to salary or bonuses is another avoidance strategy again for those who do not depend on their regular income to pay the ordinary household bills. None of these strategies are illegal and we are regularly told that there is a difference between tax avoidance and tax evasion which is illegal. However as the cases of those who shift their liabilities abroad to tax havens demonstrates there is often a fine line between tax avoidance and tax evasion. Moreover it could be argued that there is little moral difference between avoidance and evasion, as both aim to ensure that an individual or business minimises their contribution. At root is a basic loss of faith in the tax system itself which started out as the King’,s levy to raise an army for the defence of the realm.Taxation was originally introduced to fund a common defence system. By the late nineteenth century in Britain this had developed into the idea of a “,welfare state”, to protect the people from sickness, and want and provide basic education. Interestingly one of the greatest side effects of Henry VIII’,s dissolution of the monasteries, including Fountains, Rievault, and Kirkstall in our area was the dismantling of the monastic education, health care and provisions for addressing poverty and worklessness. The original welfare system was the monastery which provided for the poor, the sick, children and the elderly in the neighbouring society. By the early twentieth century the national state had stepped in with welfare provision for pensioners, for the sick, for the unemployed and for educating children. Schools and hospitals and pensions were to be provided by the state and paid for by a national insurance stamp contribution paid by all adult citizens and deducted from their wages. Thus taxes were raised and public spending provided schools and hospitals and pensions. The perennial political row has been over the size of the individual contribution and at the same time the need for increased public provision of infrastructures and services. Tax and spending has crystallised our politics for three decades now. As demands on spending have increased , not least to replace and renew Victorian built schools and hospitals and to provide pensions and other welfare benefits for the sick and unemployed, even the recipients of that spending have come under scrutiny. The ‘,poor”, are challenged now as “,deserving”, or “,undeserving”,, those with disabilities are queried as to the seriousness of their illnesses,and the unemployed are told they must find work at any price. The rising aging population has put the bulk of welfare spending which is on state pensions under extreme pressure. But some are even questioning what they personally get for their taxes. Why should those with no children contribute to the schools budget or the presently fit and well contribute to the healthcare budget paying for others? What is fast disappearing is any understanding of taxation as a “,common kitty”, to which all citizens contribute to provide essential services and back up for the good of all according to their needs. An individual taxpayer may not have children of his or her own but over time through generations the education budget ensures an educated workforce including those who provide vital back up services such as training and healthcare. It would seem incredibly short sighted to argue that because you don’,t presently need any healthcare you should be exempted from contributing. If you have an accident and need emergency services we can’,t start building the accident and emergency unit then! In other words contributing to a common kitty is on the assumption that though you may not need a particular publicly provided service at the moment .you still contribute on the grounds that you may call upon it in the future or at the very least your own friends and relations may do. A person refusing to contribute to the provision of a public highway on the grounds that he personally does not drive is not in a strong position to complain if a fire engine or ambulance has no road to get through to him when he has to call them out. In other words our needs and interests are interlocked together and they reach through the generations from children to parents and grandparents. A caring society that resists radical individual atomisation needs a common kitty, a fund built up which is shared by the community. We need to remember that paying taxes is for our own good because it is for the good of society as a whole. Of course there should be arguments about current priorities and how accountably and well the state spends what is collected but we need to ensure the basic principle of taxation as a good is protected. As the Catholic Bishops pointed out a few years ago paying taxes is not itself a moral evil. It is a social responsibility and evasion and avoidance undermine it. John Battle KSG Blogs and websites What do priests do all day? A new blog written by vocations director Mgr Paul Grogan seeks to give an insight into what priests do all day! It began in January and describes a range of activities, including youth walks, parties in the Chaplaincy at Leeds Trinity, being kind to atheists and students knocking on the Chaplain’,s door at 11pm. It is hoped that the blog, entitled “,A priest’,s life”, will have a wide appeal –, it is currently averaging about 50 hits a day –, and that it will be especially helpful to young men who are considering the priesthood. If you would like to view it, please go to: http://priestslife.blogspot.co.uk/ The picture shows some students from the Chaplaincy on the sands at Whitby recently Book review Celibacy: sacrifice and joy When God Asks for an Undivided Heart: Choosing Celibacy in Love and Freedom, Andrew Apostoli, CFR, (Basilica Press, 2007) People in our society seem to be both fascinated and strangely hostile to the celibacy which priests and religious men and women freely embrace. When I was a younger priest parishioners would quite often sympathise with my presumed “,plight,”, averring that it could only be a matter of time before the whole awful business of “,compulsory celibacy”, had been abolished. “,Of course, some men might choose celibacy, but they should be able to do so freely,”, they said. I politely pointed out that that was precisely what I had done. Now people almost routinely, and insultingly, say that priestly celibacy was the cause of the child abuse scandal within the Church. To wilfully deny oneself sexual pleasure is viewed as being simply absurd and perhaps dangerous. And yet there is simultaneously a widespread unease about the seemingly unstoppable sexualisation of our society. Is there not more to life than hyper-stimulation? This excellent book by Fr Apostoli answers this question very forthrightly: “,yes!”, It is the best and most accessible work about the beauty of the gift of celibacy that I have come across. Fr Apostoli’,s vast experience as a spiritual director shines through the whole book. His treatment is sensitive and realistic: he says that celibacy requires “,constant effort and sacrifice”, but that the Holy Spirit “,bestows joy”, on those who embrace if freely and with love. He is unsurprised and unshocked by compulsive behaviour, marvelling at the far greater power of the Holy Spirit to free us. A couple of points struck me especially. Firstly, Fr Apostoli, who is a member of the Franciscan Friars of the Renewal which has the St Pio Friary in Bradford, writes that those like me who are already committed to celibacy “,must continue to grow in their awareness and appreciation of this precious yet mysterious gift from God.”, Otherwise, we can begin to view what we once regarded in positive terms simply as a burden. Secondly, lay people have a responsibility to affirm priests and religious in their celibacy, in that way maintaining unity within the Church. Moreover, there is a “,co-relation”, between marriage and celibacy in terms of love, dedication and generosity, he writes. It is a timely book that reminds us that the celibacy of priests and religious is an important source of encouragement for all believers and a precious resource for the new evangelisation of our country. Mgr Paul Grogan Picture of the month Final profession Sister Margaret Atkins with members of her family after her final profession as a Canoness of St Augustine of the Mercy of Jesus at Boarbank Hall, Cumbria, in the presence of Bishop Michael Campbell of Lancaster. Sister Margaret lectured in the theology department at Leeds Trinity University College for about ten years before joining the order. Looking forward Thursday 3rd May: Scripture scholar Mgr Kieran Heskin, VG, will speak about the Vatican II document Dei verbum, the Dogmatic Constitution on Divine Revelation, to the Men’,s Discernment Group, which begins at 6.30pm with a Holy Hour. The group meets in the Chaplaincy at Leeds Trinity. Saturday 5th May: Faith Walk to Osmotherley for young men and women aged 15 and over. Depart Leeds Cathedral at 9am. Sunday 1st July: Faith Walk to Egton Bridge near Whitby for the Postgate Rally. Depart Leeds Cathedral at 9am. Friday 6th –, Sunday 8th July: Invocation 2012, a national discernment festival for young adults at Oscott College, Birmingham. A minibus will leave Leeds on the Friday afternoon. Reflection Discipleship begins with silence and listening. When we listen to someone, we think we are silent because we do not speak, but our minds continue to work, our emotions react, our will responds for or against what we hear, we may even go further than this, with thoughts and feelings buzzing in our heads which are quite unrelated to what is being said. This is not silence as it is implied in discipleship. The real silence towards which we must aim as a starting point is a complete repose of mind and heart and will, the complete silence of all there is in us, including our body, so that we may be completely aware of the word we are receiving, completely alert and yet in complete repose. Metropolitan Anthony of Sourozh Creative Prayer: Daily Readings with Metropolitan Anthony (Darton, Longman and Todd, 2004)

Read in full

Page 17

Apr 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Leeds Catholic Post Page 17 Philippa Hitchen travelled on the papal plane to Mexico and Cuba at the end of March as Pope Benedict set out on a six day journey to reinvigorate the faith in these two nations with a tumultuous history of church-state tensions…, Maintaining a tradition of his predecessor, Pope Benedict gives a brief press conference on the plane as he sets off on all his foreign trips, but unlike Pope John Paul II, he makes sure all the questions have been carefully selected beforehand. While that may make for less spontaneity, it also provides a clearer picture of the priorities he’,ll be tackling in his speeches and homilies when he touches down. So asked about drug violence in Mexico that has claimed some 50.000 lives in the past 5 years, Pope Benedict stressed the great responsibility of the Church to educate people and to overcome what he called “,a kind of schizophrenia”, between private and public morality. In other words, a direct challenge to those who claim to be good Church-going Catholics but who, in their public lives, don’,t take a stand against the corruption, injustice and poverty that plagues so much of Mexican society and allows the drug cartels to flourish. Questioned about the political situation in communist Cuba, Pope Benedict recalled the historic visit of his predecessor in 1998 and his appeal that ‘,Cuba may open up to the world and the world may open up to Cuba’,. Those words, he said, are as relevant today as they were 14 years ago. Stressing that Marxism no longer responds to the reality of peoples’, lives, the Pope said there is a great need for patience but also determination to build a more just and fraternal society. Just a few hours later, as he stepped off the plane in Guanajuato, the geographical centre and Catholic heartland of Mexico, the Pope told his enthusiastic audience that “,believers in Christ must act as a leaven in society, contributing to a respectful and peaceful coexistence based on the dignity of every human being.”, This dignity, he insisted, is expressed “,in the fundamental right to freedom of religion in its full meaning and integrity”, –, a poignant message to his hosts in the Mexican government, currently debating legislation on religious liberty that would lift the last vestiges of the violent Church persecution of past decades. In a country torn between creeping secularism and a deep rooted devotion to Our Lady of Guadalupe, between an ingrained clerical culture and the steady advance of the new Evangelical Churches, the Pope urged Catholics to deepen their faith and trust in God’,s power to overcome even the most desperate and difficult situations. Speaking in a giant park marking the bicentennial of Mexico’,s independence from Spain, the Pope pointed to a 60 foot high statue of Christ the King set on a hill top overlooking the whole region, a potent symbol for the Mexican Church as it struggled to rebuild after the ‘,Cristero’, civil war of the early 20th century. Similarly, in the nearby Cathedral of Leon, where he celebrated Vespers with bishops from across Latin America, Pope Benedict used the icon of Our Lady of Light –, an ancient painting hanging above the main altar there –, to illustrate the power of God’,s love to provide hope to all who suffer. In the past, the much venerated painting has been credited with saving the city from epidemics, storms and plagues, not to mention making it a place of refuge during the many invasions and revolutions that have devastated other parts of the country. In Cuba the Pope’,s pilgrimage was focused on another image of Mary, a small statue of Our Lady of Charity, celebrating 400 years since ‘,La Mambisa’,, as the wooden statue is known locally, was found floating in the sea off the northern coast of the island by three fisherman. For the past year this precious icon, a symbol of the struggle for independence and freedom from oppression, has been travelling around the towns and villages of Cuba, drawing unexpectedly large crowds and reinforcing the public face of the Church in the formerly atheist state. Of course the meeting the secular media had been focused on all along was Pope Benedict’,s encounter with the father of the revolution and founder of that communist state, Fidel Castro, whose face is plastered on posters, billboards and building facades around the island. In a strikingly personal encounter, the two elderly leaders apparently joked about their age and then discussed the way that religion can offer solutions to questions that science and technology have been unable to answer. While El Comandante, as he was popularly called, may have more time to reflect on the deeper meaning of life, his brother - President Raul Castro –, continues to maintain tight control over the country and its people, with potential protesters rounded up and ‘,detained’, ahead of the papal visit to avoid any signs of dissent. Speaking at a Mass in the central Revolution Square in Havana, the Pope stressed that in order to carry out her mission in pursuit of the truth, the Church must be able to “,enjoy more freedom to proclaim and celebrate the faith in public”,, as well as to promote reconciliation through education, communications and social services to support the poor and needy. Recognising improvements in the climate of trust and cooperation that has developed since John Paul II’,s historic visit, Pope Benedict described the half century old American trade embargo as “,a burden”, for the Cuban people, but also insisted that religious and political authorities must work together to forge “,a more open and inclusive society”, for all Cubans ‘,wherever they may be’, –, a clear reference to the exile community in the United States that voiced opposition to his visit. By the time the papal plane arrived back in Rome, the Castro regime had agreed to one particular request the Pope made during his visit –, to allow Good Friday to be celebrated as a national holiday, just as John Paul had asked for Christmas Day to be observed as a public celebration. Small but significant signs of hope for a Church and for the majority of the Cuban people, isolated, unable to travel and in need of all the outside support and solidarity Philippa M Hitchen Our Rome Correspondent T his term has certainly been a busy one at The Holy Family High School in Carlton. From Family Masses in local parishes, to Justice and Mercy cross curricular days and Fundraise Fridays, there have been endless opportunities to reflect on the meaning of Lent whilst raising money and awareness for those in need of clean drinking water and sanitation. The term culminated in a very moving and emotive drama, entitled ‘,Lights Will Guide You Home,’, conveying in a dramatic, yet simple way the story of Christ’,s passion on Good Friday and Resurrection on Easter Sunday. The production was co-written by the school’,s music teacher, Mr Coombes and Head of RE, Mrs Evans and enabled students to really display their talents in acting, singing and even, ballet. On Thursday 29 March, Year 6 students from St Joseph’,s primary in Goole were invited to watch the dress rehearsal. Prior to this, the primary students also took part in a Cafod workshop, led by Year 10 members of the Genesis group at Holy Family. Mrs Evans, Head of RE said, “,The day has been an extremely positive one and although this term has been incredibly busy with lots of rehearsals, the effort has certainly paid off! It is truly fantastic to celebrate the talent of our students whilst also providing moving and thought-provoking worship experiences.’, Parents were invited to watch the performance and the rest of the school’,s students will be viewing ‘,Fix You’, on the last day of term in what promises to be a very moving and spellbinding liturgy. Using Lent For Justice D avid Geldart, Assistant Headteacher at St. Mary’,s Catholic Comprehensive School in Menston received an Exceptional Achievement Award for his Outstanding Service to Sport at this year’,s Leeds Sports Awards held at the Leeds United’,s Centenary Pavilion. The prestigious event, to honour the City’,s sporting talented, was hosted by the BBC’,s Tanya Arnold and held at Leeds United’,s Centenary Pavilion. David Geldart’,s contribution to Physical Education and Sport at local, national and international level was described as exceptional and unique. A passionate advocate of the power of sport and tireless campaigner for high quality physical education, David has gained widespread acclaim for his practical and strategic work. He has spoken at Conferences throughout the world and held a wide variety of key public appointments, developing and shaping national policy and strategy within Government Departments, Sport England, the Qualifications and Curriculum Authority and the Big Lottery Over the past five years he has established the Bambisanani Partnership between St. Mary`s and Mnyakanya School in one of South Africa’,s poorest communities using sport as a catalyst to promote international understanding, education, health and leadership. The initiative has been described as inspirational and has gained international acclaim including praise from the President of South Africa, the British Council, Youth Sport Trust, Diana Award Trust and UNICEF. David has recently completed a fascinating book on the partnership entitled Bambisanani: The First Five Years. Under David’,s leadership St. Mary’,s, Menston has become one of the most successful Sports Colleges in the country gaining international recognition for its work in physical education and sport. The school has been at the forefront of innovation and led the first School Sport Partnership in the country. The schools work in the wider community has been recognised as outstanding by Baroness Tanni Grey Thompson, Sir Trevor Brooking, Baroness Sue Campbell and a variety of Government Ministers. David has been responsible for bringing over £,4 million of revenue funding to the Sports College and partner schools over the past twelve years and over £,1 million in capital funding for community sports facilities to the school, most recently a state of the art 3G floodlit football pitch. David is a UEFA ‘,A` Licence coach and has been involved in a variety of work with the Football Association at regional and national level. His school-based mentoring scheme for potential professional footballers has gained praised from a number of professional clubs including Manchester United, Manchester City, Chelsea and Leeds United. He has been a visiting lecturer at both Leeds Met and Loughborough Universities and has provided professional development courses throughout the country. In 1995 David became was elected as a Fellow of the Physical Education Association for his outstanding contribution to Physical Education and Sport. In 2009 he gained Honoured Member status of the Association of Physical Education in recognition of his work. Speaking at the David said “,It is a great privilege to be invited to this fantastic event and a tremendous honour to receive such an award for something that I love doing.”, Exceptional Achievement Award for St. Mary’,s Assistant Headteacher By Angela Kennedy O n March 19th the former congregation from St. Joseph’,s Crofton were invited to St. Wilfrid’,s High School Featherstone to celebrate the Feast of St. Joseph. Following the closure of their Chapel of Ease the Altar, the Ambo, the Celebrants chair, and Credence table were donated to St. Wilfrid’,s to refurbish the school chapel. In history these items were lovingly made by Mr Frank Jankowiak a parishioner R.I.P. using and incorporating the former altar rails. The Mass was concelebrated by Fr Nigel Polland our Parish Priest and Fr. Michael Powell who in retirement had said Mass for us regularly at St Joseph’,s. In his Homily Fr. Michael recalled the sadness we felt at the closure of St. Joseph’,s, the memories we shared, our journey of faith which we had made together as a community. He said “,the greatest thing of all- the greatest tribute you have shown to St. Joseph is the way in which you have blended with the community at St. Peter &, St. Paul’,s.”, We were reminded that these visible signs should re-assure us that the life of St. Joseph’,s is changed not ended. Fr. Nigel thanked every one for the contribution which they made to the life of the Parish, and expressed our thanks for tonight’,s invitation. There was a sense of closure, a final handing over, a knowledge that the Spirit of St. Joseph’,s lives on. St. Wilfrid’,s gave everyone a prayer card in remembrance of our visit, we were around forty in number and appreciated the refreshments that the school had provided for us. The Spirit Lives On Fr Powell and Fr Polland

Read in full

Page 18

Apr 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 18 Leeds Catholic Post First Friday of the Month SINGLE CATHOLICS (appeals mostly to over 35s) meet for mass at 7.30pm at Our Lady of Lourdes church, 130 Cardigan Rd, Headingley, Leeds LS6 3BJ, and a social afterwards. Events held during the month include walks, meals, cinema, theatre etc. For further details tel Sean (Chair) 07811 468939. Leeds Cathedral 20-35 Group Young people (20-35 years old) who attend St. Anne`s Cathedral in Leeds meet regularly every Thursday for spiritual, social and charitable activities. For further details search Facebook for “,Leeds Cathedral 20-35 Group”,, phone 07816 891872 or 07759 591233 or email leedscathedral20-35@hotmail.co.uk Crusade Mass The crusade Mass and Rosary of Mary Immaculate is held at St Patrick`s Church, Bradford, on the first Saturday of the Month after 12.15pm Mass , Second Sunday of Month 2pm Meeting of Bradford Fraternity of the Secular Franciscan Order at St. Anthony`s Convent, Clayton, Bradford.` `Third Sunday of Month 2.30pm Meeting of Leeds Fraternity of the Secular Franciscan Order at the Cathedral. Ampleforth Renewal Community Ampleforth Abbey, meet 1st Sunday each month, at Ampleforth. 11 .30am Praise, Speaker, Sharing Groups, Reconciliation, Exposition, Finishing with Mass and Healing at 4.00pm. All enquiries: Seamus McEneaney 01429 426181 Monthly Vocations Mass Mount St Joseph’,s Chapel 11am First Wednesday of Month. Calix: An organisation for those recovering from addiction and working the 12 Step Programme of AA so that they can develop and deepen their relationship with Jesus as their Higher Power. Meets on the First Sunday of every month at Corpus Christi Church, Neville Rd. Osmondthorpe. Leeds. Mass at 4.30pm followed by meeting. Contact: Fr. Michael on 01977 510266 Helpers of Gods precious infants, prayer vigils, regular weekly prayer vigils at Marie Stopes Abortuary, 7 Barrack Road.LS7 4AB, next to Jaguar car showrooms. Fridays 12-30 to 1- 30, and Saturdays 9am-l1am. Monthly all night vigil of reparation in St Marys Horsforth 12th of every month, 9-30pm to 6am . Other times variable. Further details Pat 0113 2582745 Rosary rally Sat Oct 9th 2010 12-30pm Leeds cenotaph, outside art gallery, Headrow. Contact 07747698553/ or 0113 2582745 Leeds Schola Gregoriana The Schola meets on the 2nd Saturday of each month (except August), at 2.00 p.m., for rehearsal, followed by sung Latin (Vigil) Mass in the Ordinary Form, fulfilling the Sunday Obligation. An opportunity to learn and sing Gregorian Chant on a regular basis. Contact Michael Murphy (Director) on 07810 808 530, or Peter Lawley (01423 884274), or Rev. G.M. Parfitt (01756 793794). Days Of Renewal St. Wilfid`s Deanery Day of Renewal led by Fr. Stephen Wright OSB. Second Saturday of the month beginning Sat. March 10th from 12 noon to 4pm. Venue St. Aelred`s Church hall, Woodlands Drive, Harrogate. Please bring a contribution for a shared table lunch. For more information ring Dolores Omand 01423870789 or visit the Diocesan web site www.ccrleeds.org Diary A few moments for thought and prayer May the light of Jesus shine continually to drive away all darkness. May Christ, the Morning Star who knows no setting, find his light ever burning in our hearts—,he who gives his light to all creation, and who lives and reigns for ever and ever. Amen. Be Still Deadline: For receipt of material for next edition: April 27th 2012 Parishes receive their copies: May 20th 2012 Send articles, reports &, pictures: Mr John Grady, Hinsley Hall, 62 Headingley Lane, Leeds LS6 2BX. Send text as word doc, pictures as jpeg, e-mail to: john.grady@dioceseofleeds.org.uk Tel: 0113 261 8022. Advertising Deadline April 16th Please note All paid-for advertising is dealt with by: Louise Ward Hinsley Hall, 62 Headingley Lane, Leeds LS6 2BX Telephone: 0113 261 8028 Email: louise.ward@dioceseofleeds.org.uk Your Cath Post Thursday 3 May 10.30am VGs’, Meeting, Bishop’,s House Friday 4 May 10am Good Shepherd Service, Leeds Cathedral, 6.30pm Confirmation, Leeds Trinity University College, Horsforth Tuesday 8 May 6pm Confirmation, St Mary’,s Horsforth, 7.30pm Confirmation, Immaculate Heart of Mary, Leeds Wednesday 9 to Monday 14 May Visitation, English College, Valladolid Tuesday 15 May 10.30am VGs’, Meeting, Bishop’,s House, 6.30pm Confirmation, St Anthony’,s, Beeston Wednesday 16 May 11am Presbyteral Council Meeting, Hinsley Hall Thursday 17 May 10.30am Meeting with Diocesan Finance Board &, Trustee Directors, Hinsley Hall, 6.30pm Confirmation, St Patrick’,s, Birstall Friday 18 May 6.30pm Confirmation, St Patrick’,s, Huddersfield Wednesday 23 May 10.30am VGs’, Meeting, Bishop’,s House, 6.30pm Confirmation, St Anne’,s, Keighley Thursday 24 May 11 am Meeting of Northern Bishops, Hinsley Hall, 6.30pm Confirmation, St Mary’,s Halifax Friday 25 May 6pm Confirmation, St John’,s, Normanton, 7.30pm Confirmation, SS Peter &, Paul, Wakefield Saturday 26 May 6pm Mass for those received into the Catholic Church at Easter, Leeds Cathedral Tuesday 29 May 6.30pm Confirmation, Corpus Christ, Leeds Wednesday 30 May 10am St Bede’,s Trustees’, Meeting, St Bede’,s School, Bradford, 6pm Confirmation, St Winefride’,s, Bradford, 7.30pm Confirmation, St Winefride’,s, Bradford Thursday 31 May 10.30am VGs’, Meeting, Bishop’,s House, 6.30pm Confirmation, St Mary’,s, Selby Bishops Engagements –, May 2012 Father Hugh Curristan T he Diocese of Middlesbrough is sad to announce that Father Hugh Curristan was called to the Lord on Tuesday, 27 March 2012 in Letterkenny. Hugh was born on 20 May 1925 in Donegal. He studied for the priesthood at All Hallows, Dublin, and was ordained for the Diocese of Leeds on 17 June 1951. He began his priestly ministry as curate at Christ the King, Bramley. In the 50s Pope John XXIII made an urgent appeal to the developed countries for help for Latin America because of the great shortage of priests there. Father Hugh, along with priests from Leeds and Middlesbrough, volunteered and went to work in the shanty towns of Lima and Peru. Much of his time was spent fighting for the lives of his people. He also set about building a church and establishing a new parish. The parish and the church were dedicated to the Most Holy Redeemer. Hugh returned to England in 1970 where he spent a year rehabilitating himself to the English mission in St Columba’,s, Halifax, remaining there for just 12 months before moving to English Martyrs, York, in 1971 until his retirement in 2001. As many of us will know, Father Hugh was an accomplished musician and entertainer, and combined his time giving his talents for a number of charitable causes. In particular, he was nationally known among those priests who raised money for CAFOD, through the ‘,Holy Road Show’,. Many parishes in our diocese benefitted from his generous gifts in our fundraising activities. Father Hugh was a chaplain and requested to serve four Lord Mayors of York during their terms of office, hence he took part in many celebrations at York Minster, as well as days of remembrance at the cenotaph. It was only last year that Bishop Terry, accompanied by the Episcopal Vicar for Clergy, visited Hugh in St Eunan’,s Nursing Home. The diocese owes a debt of gratitude for his service among us and thanks his parents and family for sharing him with us. We all express our prayerful sympathy to his family and friends. Father Hugh’,s mortal remains will be taken to St Agatha’,s church, Clar, where Requiem Mass will be celebrated by Bishop Terry at 12 noon on Friday, 29 March. Where’,s the Nearest Tap! F illing their drinking water bottles took on a much deeper meaning on World Water Day for pupils at St Benedict’,s Garforth. Pupils at St Benedict’,s Primary School Garforth challenged themselves to try and understand some of the difficulties associated with collecting drinking water in developing countries. Each class decided to split into groups and see which group could transport a container of water for a full day at school. The children used pedometers to measure the distance the water had travelled over the day. Each group had to keep the water travelling all day during the challenge. Children then calculated the distance they had carried the water in their group and compare that to a child in Africa carrying fresh water to their school each day. RE co-ordinator, Catherine Caunce, said: ‘,During Lent the children have continued to explore the work of CAFOD in partnership with parishioners from St Benedict’,s to make promises and prayers for a better world linked to the Millennium Development Goals. The children have really latched onto this project and it was great to see the children walking round the dining hall, the playgrounds and classrooms to keep the water moving.’, A group of Year 6 pupil commented on how they had decided to design carriers for the containers to make the job a little easier. School council decided that the older children should have to carry 2 litres and the younger children 500ml to make the challenge a little fairer. A cross the Diocese of Leeds today, parishes and families are becoming more aware of issues surrounding the increase in the number of people with dementia. More and more families are becoming all too aware of their own relatives who are either in the early stages of dementia or who have had dementia for a number of years. The needs of parishioners who fall in to these groups are becoming more and more complex and different solutions and approaches to the challenges of dementia are required. Carers know only too well how important it is to obtain the appropriate care for relatives with dementia and also how much of a challenge this may be when a Carer is trying to manage their own lives and support the needs of loved ones who have dementia. The Department of Health in 2010 suggested that the number of people with dementia will double over the next 10 years. This increase in the number of people with dementia also brings new challenges and questions for parishes, in particular how the spiritual and religious needs of those with dementia are met. Very often, for those with dementia, it is the short term memory which can diminish and be lost first and long term memories remain. For those who have been brought up Catholics and who have dementia, long term memories of prayers, hymns and religious ceremonies can remain very vivid. Very often rekindling those memories can be a source of strength and support to people with dementia and they can often bring a new found level of peace and calm. It is, therefore, important to remember in planning for the care needs for those who have dementia to also consider their spiritual and faith needs as well. Catholic Care, which works across the Diocese of Leeds and the Agency will celebrate its 150th Anniversary in 2013, is very much aware of the increasing needs of parishioners and others who have dementia and of the needs of their Carers. In order to address these challenges, the Trustees of Catholic Care have authorised a 6 month Pilot Project which will focus on trying to better understand the needs of those with dementia and their Carers with a view to considering further services and, particularly, the spiritual needs of those who have dementia. Another aim of the Pilot will be to produce a leaflet outlining all the services, with contact details, that are available in the Local Authority areas which are covered by the Diocese of Leeds. These information leaflets will, hopefully, be available to all parishes and deaneries by the end of this year. Recruiting for this part-time post is currently in progress and if you are interested in the post and understand the challenges of dementia and Carers’, needs, please contact Roddy Minogue, Co-ordinator of Caring Services, at Catholic Care on 0113 3885400 for more information. Dementia and Carers Roddy Minogue

Read in full

Page 19

Apr 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Leeds Catholic Post Page 19 S t Wilfrids, Featherstone Year 8 boys rugby have had an extremely successful year thus far culminating in them being crowed Yorkshire Champions. Throughout the competition St Wilfrids have come across some notable opposition claiming victories over last year’,s national cup winners Brooksbank and ever present local rivals Castleford in the final to a score line of 42-10 in front of a big crowd. The lads have been ever so impressive throughout the competition representing both themselves and the school impeccably. Consistent performances have resulted in this achievement and from 9 fixtures in the competition, St Wilfrids have scored in total 346 points and have conceded only 56. Tries from Zach Freer, Jamie Longstaff, Rhys Matysiak and Will Dagger in the final ensured St Wilfrids were deservedly crowned Yorkshire Champions under the lights at Lock Lane ARLFC. Every member of the squad has done themselves and the school proud this year and rightly so deserves their own individual accolades. The lads now turn their attention to the national stage where they will compete for the right to be named the best team in Great Britain in the Carnegie Champion Schools. The squad would like to thank both the staff at St Wilfrids and the parents for their fantastic support so far this year. Year 8 Boys Rugby Yorkshire Champions Squad 2011-2012 Matthew Burrows, Evan Rowley, Liam Taylor, Joe Angell, Archie Coffield, James Booth, Elliot Jones, Rhys Matysiak, Jack Greensmith, Jamie Longstaff, Ben Kilner, Zach Freer, Will Dagger, Will Kelly, Alex Proctor, Tom Mynett, Eddie Cole, Aaron Slimane, Eli Vezina, Connor Morewood, Lewis Bates, Joe Crabtree, Kyle Nix, Joe Trigg The Notre Dame Law department have been working closely with Leeds Law firms to create an exciting new apprenticeship scheme intended to help students enter into a Law career. Staff from the department have spent 18 months consulting with Plexus Law about the form such a scheme might take. The traditional model of the legal profession consisting of a law degree leading to qualification as a solicitor or barrister is entering a rapid period of change. The Apprenticeship scheme aims to develop new career structures and routes into law. In February Plexus law invited Notre Dame Students and parents to their offices in Leeds for a consultation evening about the Apprenticeship Scheme. The scheme will launch as a pilot in September 2012 and aims to broaden the entry routes in to legal careers with six placements being offered to students. Mr Nigel Briggs, head of the Law department commented, “,Partnerships with local and national firms such as Plexus Law are vital to us.”, They allow us to offer students an insight into the diversity of career paths available in law. It is no longer the case that everyone will simply want to qualify through the traditional route. Plexus are ahead of the game in offering these new schemes and we are delighted to be partnering them. “, A spokesman for Plexus said ",Plexus Law has worked in partnership with Notre Dame for several years through an internship programme and we were impressed with the high calibre of the students that came to us. When we decided to create a new way for students to begin a legal career, it made perfect sense to do this in conjunction with Notre Dame. We look forward to building on our relationship with the college and being able to provide new and exciting opportunities for their students.", In addition to this exciting scheme, two members of the Notre Dame Law Academy have been offered placements with global Law firm Pinsent Masons at their Leeds offices prior to taking up Law degrees. Sarah Baldwin and Connor Langan [pictured] have both been offered paid placements from September 2012 until April 2013. “,This is a national scheme, and is fiercely competitive”, Said Mr Briggs “,They did exceptionally well to get through the rigorous selection process.”, Connor is interested in corporate and international Law and after some time travelling, hopes to attend the LSE. Sarah is aiming to go to UCL and is hoping her time with Pinsent Mason will help her decide which area of the law she wants to specialise in. She is currently interested in the area of human rights. Notre Dame Law department launch apprenticeship scheme St Wilfrids Year 8 Boys Rugby League Yorkshire Champions T he Leeds Sports Awards ceremony held at Centenary Pavilion, Elland Road, in March was hosted by BBC sports presenter Tanya Arnold and brought recognition for two members of the Notre Dame community. College Enhancement officer Claire O’, Hara won the Leeds Sports Woman of the Year Award and L6 student Ashpal Bhogal received a Highly Commended award in the Junior Sports Woman of the Year. Asphal is currently an U18 England International Hockey player and has been selected for the UK games to be held in London this summer. She is also proud to be the first Asian woman to win this award. ``I am very honoured to receive this award highlighting my sporting achievements.”, She said “,The calibre of entrance was very high and I’,ve done exceptionally well to get into the top two. I put my success down to the hard work put in by not only me but my coaching team behind me. For aspiring athletes my motto would be `never lose, never fear overcome all and persevere. Inspire, believe, achieve’, `` Claire O’,Hara currently holds both the world champion Squirtboard and Freestyle Kayak titles and is on the British team for both events. Success for Notre Dame Sportswomen

Read in full

Page 20

Apr 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 20 BE GREAT FOR GOD ! O n a very sunny morning in Moorthorpe with the children of St Joseph’,s school all in their best attire Bishop Roche gathered with them to celebrate a very special day of celebration. It was 100 years since the school had been opened an event well worth celebrating. One advantage of having the school and church so close together is that not only the children but also lots of their parents grandparents and relatives could take part in the celebration as well –, this being the case the church was full with all ages even those who had not as yet started school so proving the school had done well and would be needed well past its first hundred years. In his homily Bishop Roche outlined the history of the school tracing the rise of the village –, its industrial history in coal –, its social history with the influx of the Irish people looking for work and the way the needs were recognised by the then Bishop, Joseph Cowgill –, who was known as the children’,s Bishop because of all the good work he did in setting up schools and setting up homes for those whose parents had died. History is a very good teacher he told them –, but we need the school to be able to learn it. He suggested that the name St Joseph could well have been chosen for the school –, because not only was it the name of the Bishop, but also it was St Joseph who headed and looked after the Holy Family –, he was great he told the children they too were to be great –, and he left them with the slogan Be great like St Joseph –, Be great for God! At the end of Mass Fr Fenton, the Parish Priest thanked the school –, staff and pupils along with all the people for all the work they had done for the celebrations –, He also thanked the Bishop for his time. Bishop Roche replied and thanked the Staff for the work they do and especially the Head Teacher who was retiring that very day. Fr Fenton guides the young people to the Bishop

Read in full

Find your local Catholic Historical Church newspaper. Scroll to find yours.
Contact Us
Current Catholic Papers
Church Advertising
www.CatholicDirectory.org
© CathCom 1997 - 2021