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Newspaper for the Diocese of Leeds

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Oct 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

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Oct 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

CATHOLIC POST THE NEWSPAPER FOR THE DIOCESE OF LEEDS OCTOBER 2011 www.dioceseofleeds.org.uk www.catholicpost.org.uk CELEBRATING THE YEAR OF EDUCATION O ver the past twelve months the education department of the Diocese has been celebrating the Year of Education. So on Thursday, October 6th the Bishop celebrated Mass for all the Headteachers from across the Diocese to bring the Year to a fitting close. He chose to celebrate a votive Mass Of Blessed John Henry Newman, for as the Bishop explained at the opening of the Mass, Blessed John Henry Newman ‘,was a strikingly original theologian and a celebrated educational theorist`. He continued in his homily to explain in more depth, ‘,As many of you will know, he (Cardinal Newman) delivered a series of influential lectures which were gathered together in a book entitled ",The Idea of a University.", Two of the points which he made in this book are of particular relevance to us today. Firstly, he argued that reality is a single undivided whole and that the different disciplines in an educational institution need to be coordinated in order to reflect that fact. Secondly, theology needs to be taught in our schools and universities because religious truth ",bears upon", all truth................... The diverse subject areas which are taught in our schools have been developed in the way they have precisely because they correspond to the Catholic vision of education which Blessed John Henry Newman articulated so beautifully.` The Bishop concluded his homily by using a quote from the Leeds Mercury printed at the Time of The Cardinals death ‘,Few cultivated Englishmen will hear without emotion the news of Cardinal Newman`s death. In the fashion of his death, indeed, there is nothing to regret, he had outlived the storms of controversy, the clouds of misunderstanding, and he is called away in the peacefulness of an honoured old age. His countrymen will mourn for him with no bitterness, but in such wise as is fitting when the venerated figure of a man of conspicuous genius and goodness passes from the scene.` The Bishop added ‘,How truly marvellous it would be if the same could also be said of us not only for what we personally pursue in our Christian vocation, but for allowing what lies at its heart to shape us. Newman`s greatness came not from self pursuit but from Christ his Lord and his Teacher.` At the conclusion of the Mass the Bishop thanked all the Heads for the work they are doing and then joined them for coffee. FREE

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Oct 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

FROM JUST £,299 R.G.R. MEMORIALS COLOUR CATALOGUE QUALITY MEMORIALS AT AFFORDABLE PRICES IN GRANITE, MARBLE &, STONE ALL PRICES INCLUDE DELIVERY &, FIXING Ogee top memorial 2’,6”, high Fully polished Black Granite, Delivered and Fixed for £,399 inc VAT FREE Tel: 0113 282 3888 43 High Ridge Park, Rothwell, Leeds LS26 0NL Page 2 Leeds Catholic Post Cuts to school transport pose a threat to diocesan schools C hoice and diversity are firmly established features of education in this country and it’,s well known that Catholic schools add to both. They allow parents who wish their children to receive a Catholic education to do so and they are part of the mix of different schools that make up the education system –, along with other faith schools, community schools, academies, free schools and so on. But while national politicians continue to extol the virtues of choice and diversity, at the local level in this diocese and elsewhere there are some worrying developments that threaten these principles, especially where Catholic schools are concerned. To appreciate the significance of what’,s happening we need to go back nearly seventy years to the famous Education Act of 1944. This act recognised the fact that Catholic pupils attending Catholic schools, and particularly secondary schools, tended to travel longer distances than was the norm in other schools. Their schools were often located where they could serve several parishes spread over a wide area as this was the only way to generate the pupil numbers needed to make for a viable school. Then as now Catholic schools are rarely neighbourhood schools but exist to serve a dispersed Catholic population. Since 1944, therefore, local authorities have had the power to subsidise the cost of home to school transport for Catholics attending Catholic schools, and who live some distance away from the school. In places this has led to free transport while in others the fares have been cheaper than would otherwise be the case. Either way these arrangements have often been the key to enabling Catholic children to have a Catholic schooling. This is now under threat in a way not seen since 1944. The local authorities’, powers to subsidise school transport are for the most part discretionary –, they are not obliged in law to do this and faced with budget cuts some are saying that they will stop doing so in the very near future in order to make financial savings. While it is true that pupils eligible for free school meals or whose parents receive the maximum level of Working Tax Credit would continue to get help with transport costs, the majority of families would face much higher travel costs, possibly amounting to hundreds of pounds a year for each child attending a Catholic school. At this stage our concern must be that some Catholic parents in future will be faced with a dilemma and may well decide that they are unable to afford the cost of sending their children to a Catholic school. In short Catholic parents will still have choice in education but only if they have the money to pay for it. If this happens it would run counter to everything that governments of every persuasion since the 1940s have said about parents’, right to choose a denominational school and the value that government places on them. In one local authority in this diocese which is considering the withdrawal of subsidised transport nearly 800 Catholic pupils would be affected. This gives some indication of the potential scale of the challenge we are facing. No-one doubts the financial pressures that confront local authorities at the present time and for the foreseeable future but every decision has consequences and Catholics need to consider the detrimental effects of ending subsidised home to school transport and to alert their elected representatives to these. As citizens and taxpayers themselves they have every right to do so as these are political decisions about the use of public money. The more local authorities withdraw from subsidising school transport the more the long- standing principles of choice and diversity are undermined and in the long run the greater the risk becomes to the future viability of Catholic secondary schools in particular. They also go against the government’,s own legal guidance on home to school transport which attaches importance to the right of parents to be able to choose a school in accordance with their religion and states that wherever possible local authorities should ensure that transport arrangements support the preference that parents express. High transport costs may well prevent many Catholic parents from exercising this basic right. Since 1998 the European Convention on Human Rights has been incorporated into British law and this guarantees that the right to an education is to be secured without discrimination on religious grounds. While ending subsidised school transport across a local authority is not intentionally discriminatory, in effect it places Catholic pupils and their parents at a particular disadvantage and might well be deemed to discriminate against them. In due course this may be One of the fashionable ways of saving money for cash- strapped local authorities is to remove transport passes and subsidies for youngsters attending Catholic schools a distance from home. This mainly affects secondary schools which are more widely spread, but reports are coming in from many parts of the country, including, in this diocese, Wakefield, who have a plan out for consultation. There are arguments on both sides: savage cuts mean savage budgeting: many young people attending the schools are not Catholic, but seek a faith school: they do not qualify anyway, and some Catholics only practice their faith through their schools, a classic cart-before-the-horse. Listen, though, to one Cheshire councillor, clearly very frustrated: “,... that’,s why we have broken Britain, which I don’,t believe we do, but that’,s why we have moral bankruptcy and approaching secularisation and why young people value trainers and computers. It’,s because there’,s no guidance in their lives, nothing to aspire to –, it’,s poverty of aspiration.”, The ethos of Catholic Schools is a very precious thing, valued by many beyond the church, and we can see what the Councillor is driving at: making it harder for our pupils to attend will reduce the rolls and make it harder for the schools to flourish, or even survive as Catholic schools. A strange side-effect is that the cuts will encourage car-travel to school, with all the pollution and congestion that this entails. Many older people will tell stories of walking miles to church when they had no cars: if something is worth having, it is worth our investment, and it is to be hoped that if the cuts become general, then parents themselves and local authorities will co-operate on transport or set up hardship funds to keep the pupils coming. Surely, our schools deserve such support. The Post Says something that has to be tested in the courts. In the meantime, in our own part of the world subsidies in North Yorkshire are going to be withdrawn in the near future unless a legal challenge being mounted by the dioceses of Leeds and Middlesbrough proves successful. Wakefield council intends to do likewise from September 2013, and is carrying out a consultation on its proposals at the present time. This is where the role of the Catholic community is important. If you live in Wakefield it’,s going to be vital for Catholics to take part in this consultation and to contact their local councillors to express their views about the plans and their consequences for Catholic parents and schools in the area. It is more than likely that other local authorities will follow suit in the coming months and the Catholic Post will keep readers updated on any developments in Bradford, Calderdale, Kirklees, Leeds and elsewhere. Obviously our schools will also be monitoring the situation and will let their parents know of any moves by local authorities that would affect subsidised transport. But at the same time please keep an eye on the local media in your own area for any news of this kind, and get involved in the consultation process that any local authority has to set up before it can take a final decision on such proposals. For further information about the Wakefield proposals and the consultation process you can go to the council’,s website www.wakefield.gov.uk/ieListMeetings.as px?Cld=222&,Year=2011 or telephone 01924 305624.

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Oct 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Leeds Catholic Post Page 3 First For Bingley O n Thursday, 29th September, the children staff and governors of St Joseph’,s Catholic Primary School, Bingley were delighted to play host to Bishop Arthur Roche. This was the first visit of the New School Year that the Bishop had undertaken. The bishop was greeted by Niamh Durkin and Charles O`Connor from Year Six and their ‘,buddies’, Grace Mullaney and Alistair Gomersall from the Foundation Stage, who presented him with art work created by the children. The Chair of Governors, Mr John Shaw, as well as Foundation Governors Mr Christopher Brady, Mrs Jackie Kirton and Mrs Jane O’,Connor accompanied Bishop Arthur on his tour of the school, where he visited each classroom and answered questions put to him by the children. Much to the delight of the governors, the children asked a series of insightful questions, ranging from where he bought his vestments, “,because they knew it wasn’,t from ASDA”,, and what he would have liked to do if he had not become a priest. Bishop Arthur was pleased to pass on a message from His Holiness, Pope Benedict XVI to tell them that he loved them and prayed for them. Prayers were shared in each classroom and a gift to each class was delivered by the bishop on behalf of his Holiness. Headteacher, Mrs Mary McAndrew said, “,it was a privilege to meet with the bishop and to share with him some of the wonderful things taking place in Catholic education in Bradford”,. O n what might prove to be the last Sunny day of the late summer of 2011 Bishop Roche arrived at St Francis School in Bradford to pay them a visit. He was met at the door of the school by four very competent young people who were to be his hosts for the morning. Also waiting to greet him were the Head and Deputy Head of the School Mr Copley and Mrs Anne Rowan. The tone of the visit was set by the first class he went into Year 2 who were keen to show off their skill at spelling and quickly demonstrated that they could spell the words the Bishop asked them. They were just as keen as he was to ask questions and were soon wanting to know Why he wanted to be a Bishop where did he travel and did he have any other interests –, in fact it was some time before he could drag himself away from them –, but the only after they had given him a card –, in response to which he gave them a prayer card from the Pope and prayed with them. The Bishop then proceeded round the school enjoying the experience –, talking with the pupils and staff. Each class gave him a little gift that ranged from cards to a Sun flowers and even a model of a Church. All the way he was keen to take the children’,s questions and answer them as best he could. Towards the end of the of the visit he inspected the new amphitheatre that is being built and promised to try and find time to make a return visit to bless it when it is finished. The morning came to a close with a cup of coffee shared with the staff. BISHOP HAPPY TO ANSWER PUPILS QUESTIONS

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Oct 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 4 Leeds Catholic Post T his year is the 30th anniversary of the publication of Blessed John Paul II’,s apostolic exhortation Familiaris Consortio (on the Christian Family in the Modern World). To celebrate this important document every month we have a quote chosen by Laura, a student at Leeds Trinity University College: “,When they become parents, spouses receive from God the gift of a new responsibility. Their parental love is called to become for the children the visible sign of the very love of God, ",from whom every family in heaven and on earth is named.",(Ephesians 3:15)”, (FC 14) Parents’, Week Monday 17th –, Sunday 23rd October The theme for this year is “,Family Friendly …, what’,s the story?”, and the aim is to stimulate debate and discussion around what family friendly is: what constitutes a family friendly public service? what changes do families want to see? what is already on offer? and what is it that decision makers should know? The Catholic Church in England and Wales has been listening to families in a unique way. Listening 2004: My Family, My Church invited all Catholics to share your own experiences and thoughts, hopes and fears and joys of family life. Out of all that was heard three major themes were chosen as the best way to affirm, encourage and engage parents. Under the umbrella Celebrating Family: blessed, broken, living love the first theme, Everybody’,s Welcome, was launched. This was to encourage families to get involved with parish life and to encourage parishes to take account of the practical needs of parents that were so often a barrier to their participation. Resources to help parishes value their own ministry of welcome to families are available at www.everybodyswelcome.org.uk This was followed by Home is a Holy Place which was the Bishops’, invitation to focus on family spirituality in a way that helped families to recognise and celebrate the sacred in their ordinary daily family lives. An attractive, flexible and easy to use Home is a Holy Place DVD Resource Pack was created, one free for each parish. Call Angela on 0113 261 8050 or visit FLM, Hinsley Hall 62 Headingley Lane, Leeds LS6 2BX to collect yours. www.homeisaholyplace.org.uk The third theme was Passing on the Faith which parents and grandparents had expressed anxiety about in L2004. www.passingonthefaith.org.uk ‘,Only Connect’, (E.M.Forster) All the themes are interlinked and interdependent: A family with a sense of the sacred in their daily lives is one where parents will be more comfortable about sharing their faith with their children, and a parish that welcomes families and accommodates their particular needs is one that will be supported by families and one which will reinforce and support the family in their responsibilities of passing on the faith. FLM in the Diocese of Leeds The Celebrating Family Project in the Diocese of Leeds focused on the formation of parents in their leadership role within the family by launching the Parent Support Project. For Home School Parish relationships to thrive each of the partners in faith and education needs to feel valued, equipped and supported. It was clear that families can feel that what they are good at, what they have to offer is not recognised or valued for, love however mundane, is the essential ingredient that helps their children to flourish. The most commonly used phrase about the experience of becoming a parent is ‘,babies don’,t come with a manual’,. Parents do not have the professional or moral and theological standing of teachers and priests. They often live and parent in isolation and have no professional association, union or esteem in the wider community. Yet they can feel wholly inadequate and ill prepared for the enormous responsibilities of raising a child. Raising a child in faith can be even more daunting. Parent Support Project 2011 Eighteen volunteers have already started the accredited training to facilitate parenting course in schools and parishes in the Wakefield Deanery. This will equip them to run short courses for parents’, in small groups locally. Some call it ‘,community cohesion’, some the ‘,big society’,. Whatever label we put on it there is no doubt that parents are essential to community life. When they are given the opportunity to get to know one another through small groups on parenting courses, ‘,community’, becomes real and not just another empty word. Getting to know other parents and having a chance to consider some common issues in family life and child behaviour and development makes an enormous difference to parents’, confidence. Some have moved on to higher education, some have got work in their local school, some are just glad to know someone they can talk to at Mass on Sunday and at the school gates. Confidence in our own abilities and gifts helps us to respond willingly to the gifts of the Holy Spirit and make them a real and active force in our own lives wherever we are. Marriage Preparation Children need parents who can love them and parents who love each other are especially blessed. Marriage has often been call the gold standard of relationships because each promises fidelity and commitment for life. Marriage reflects, albeit in a unique and humanly imperfect way, the perfect love of the Father. Couples who are preparing for marriage need the support of the local church before and after the wedding day. Before, to explore honestly what marriage is and what it means and what it requires, after, to sustain marriage through difficult times or, when the couple face the brick wall of disillusion and disappointment. Training for Marriage Preparation Presenters will start on Monday 7th November and take four Monday evenings. If you feel called to this important ministry please talk to your parish priest and contact us. For more on Family Life Ministry in the Diocese of Leeds, contact Angela or Breda on 0113 261 8050 or admin@flm.org.uk or visit www.flm.org.uk October - Parents’, Week Familiaris Consortio 30 years LEEDS CATHOLIC FAMILY FORUM Since Listening 2004: My Family, My Church, we have been working hard both locally and nationally on the Celebrating Family: Blessed, Broken, Living Love projects Everybody’,s Welcome, Home is a Holy Place and Passing on the Faith.. Now is a great moment to get together again within our own diocese and share what we each do in our different ways and places for and with families. So, if you are involved, formally or informally, in any organisation or support for families and family people in the Diocese of Leeds you are invited to join our Leeds Catholic Family Forum. The Forum is your chance to share what you do, or what you would love to do, to support the pastoral care of families in our diocese. It is also a great chance to see who else is doing what, Details to be arranged. For your opportunity to participate and shape the Forum, or just to find out more, contact me, Breda, at flm.org.uk or 0113 261 8050 Who knows, you may get more support for your organisation or interest, or you may find a new calling. Waiting…,.. a day of prayer and reflection for Advent Saturday 19th November 2011, from 10.00 am - 4.00 pm The Briery Retreat Centre, Ilkley Led by Fr Joseph Smith &, Mrs Linda Pennington This retreat is open to anyone who would like the opportunity for a quiet day as Advent approaches. The day will include the invitation to celebrate the sacrament of reconciliation and will conclude with the celebration of the Vigil Mass for Christ the King. Cost: £,25. For more information please contact Janine Garnett on 0113 261 8040 or janine.garnett@dioceseofleeds.org.uk To purchase photographs from the Catholic Post please either go to www.catholicpost.org.uk/form.html or contact Patrick on 01977 556088 If your parish or school are having a special event at which you would like photo coverage in the Catholic Post please contact the Editor, John Grady on 0113 2618022 or john.grady@dioceseofleeds.org.uk You can view the current Catholic Post and previous editions plus all the photographs taken at events online at www.catholicpost.org.uk Catechist Forum Saturday 26th November 2011 All catechists in the Leeds Diocese are invited to meet at Wheeler Hall, St Anne’,s Cathedral from 10:30am –, 2.30pm (tea &, coffee will be available from 10:00am). There will be the op- portunity to meet with other catechists, to explore ideas and resources and to celebrate the lunchtime mass at the cathedral. Drinks are provided but please bring a packed lunch. There is no charge for the day but booking is es- sential. Please book with Mrs Janine Garnett at janine.garnett@diocese- ofleeds.org.uk or 0113 261 8040 The Annual Mass of remembrance will be said in the Cannon O’,Meara Lounge, at the Leeds Irish Centre, in memory of all deceased members and friends, On Tuesday 8th November 2011 at 8-00pm Dear Brothers and Sisters in Christ, You Are Cordially Invited To LEEDS CATHEDRAL CHURCH OF ST ANNE Great George Street Leeds LS2 8BE FOR African &, Caribbean Mass Date: Sunday 30 October 2011 Time: 1:00pm All Are invited Written prayer petitions are collected at start of mass. Refreshment and Music follow immediately after mass in the Cathedral Hall. For further enquiries please contact Rev. Dr. M.C. Mkpadi on 0113 2959718 or 07884197261 There will be Thanksgiving/Second collection at the end of the Mass. PLEASE SEND THIS INVITATION TO THOSE WHO MAY BE INTERESTED Foundations in Faith (CCRS) –, Specialist Modules At present twenty teachers and catechists from around the diocese are participating in the two year Foundations in Faith course. This includes the Catholic Certificate in Religious Studies and two days of reflection each year. In January to March 2012 this current group will be studying the specialist modules. The choices are in the table below. These specialist modules are being offered to anyone from the diocese either as ‘,stand-alone’, courses or as an introduction to Foundations in Faith (CCRS). Specialist Module 1 –, 2012 Specialist Module 2 –, 2012 Tuesdays at 7:15 –, 9:30pm Tuesdays at 7:15 –, 9:30pm Hinsley Hall Hinsley Hall January 10, 17, 24, 31 February 7 February 28, March 6, 13, 20, 27 Choose one of the following: Choose one of the following: Liturgy Catechesis Philosophy Catholic Schools and Religious Education Youth &, Family Life Ministries Catholic Social Teaching Interreligious Relations For further details of any of the specialist modules please contact Mrs Janine Garnett on 0113 261 8040 or janine.garnett@dioceseofleeds.org.uk Diocese of Leeds - Vicariate for Evangelisation PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION –, A CATHOLIC PERSPECTIVE The Vicariate for Evangelisation offers a five week introductory course covering the following: •, What can we know and how do we know it? •, An examination of the problems of speaking meaningfully about God. What does it mean to say that God is omnipotent, omniscient and eternal or everlasting? •, Introduction to the classic and contemporary arguments for and against the existence of God. •, Philosophical reflections on the problem of evil and suffering in the world The course runs from 7.15 –, 9.30 pm on the following dates in 2012: Tuesday 10th January, Tuesday 17th January, Tuesday 24th January, Tuesday 31st January, Tuesday 7th February This is one of the specialist modules for the Catholic Certificate of Religious Studies (CCRS) but can be taken as an individual course. All sessions take place at Hinsley Hall and will be led by Fr Steven Billington Cost £,50 For further information or to book please contact Janine Garnett on 0113 261 8040 or janine.garnett@dioceseofleeds.org.uk

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Oct 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Leeds Catholic Post Page 5 We have just celebrated 50 years of the BBC religious flagship, Songs of Praise. It still broadcasts- now Sunday afternoon, rather than evening, with a faithful team of presenters. At the outset, it was as if the cameras had dropped in for your evening service, and then the notion of “,testi- mony”, crept in, with selected interviews between the hymns: all well and good: but more lately, Songs of Praise seems to have crossed the line between liturgy and performance, between worship and entertainment: somewhere along the way the plot has been obscured in dry ice and pink lighting as celebrities- yes, even here- perform their songs and careful production numbers are staged. It is a trap we can all fall into, having choirs which turn up to perform the music rather than engage with the liturgy: they then become the celebs rather than a quiet presence leading our sung prayer. Some Anglican Cathedrals have “,choirs on tour”, to fill the choir-less spaces in the summer, which is good, but when does this move to booking a “,star”, choir to “,guest”, at any time? Prayer, liturgy is an organic thing, rising from the hearts of those gathered together in the name of Christ. It is not an instant fix. We should remember when the Songs of Praise celeb approaches in the vivid light of some stained glass, or the chorister of someone’,s year steps forward in a ruff: parish choirs and musicians should be a part of the gathered assembly, a par- ticipating part of the worshipping people of God- heard but not too much seen! The BBC has also been dabbling in the dubious waters of the politically correct by- it seems- replacing the usual terms BC and AD - “,Before Christ”, and “,Anno Domini- The Year of Our Lord”, with BCE and CE- the CE standing for “,Common Era”,, a method of covering up a Christian her- itage once favoured in the old Soviet Union. The Beeb spokesman looked for wriggle room when asked about this, with the origins of the idea apparently being its own Religious Department, which seems to one of those splendid outfits that is so keen not to upset anyone, that it up- sets everyone. And more goings-on in the Christian media: many people have heard of Zenit, a news agency which specialises in reporting from Rome with a mix of worthy stories such as “,Pope prepares return to Vatican”, which at first makes you wonder if you had missed some papal exile, until you re- alise that the Holy Father is returning from his summer break. Its spon- sorship or provenance has seemed a mystery, and some entertain suspicions of a right-wing emphasis. Now, the Founder-Editor has re- signed after, it is reported, resisting pressure to link more closely with his now revealed sponsors, the sometime scandal-troubled Legionaries of Christ. Benchmark Sidelines `Let us rejoice and exult and give him the glory` (Rev19:7) This month, I want to report on two parish musician afternoons, and tell you about a new book, and a day conference. First, the SSG`s Annual Conference will be held here in Leeds, at Wheeler Hall, Leeds Cathedral Pastoral Centre on Saturday, 12 November 2011, 12:00pm –, 5:00pm. The conference includes a lecture by Fr Daniel O`Leary on `The Human Heart of Liturgy`. He is an award-winning author of a dozen books, and a regular contributor to the Tablet and the Irish Furrow. Members and non-members alike are warmly invited - book at the email address below. Next, the parish musicians` events –, a small one and a bigger one! At the West Yorkshire Church Music network afternoon on 18th September, at English Martyrs, Wakefield, a dozen or so of us explored music with a `Glory` theme, including works by John Bell, Marty Haugen and Dan Schutte. On the WYCMN website there is a full list of what we sang and played. The following Sunday, upwards of fifty people took part in a Workshop for Parish Musicians in Wheeler Hall. There was a varied programme, including `Teaching your congregation new music`, `Vocal techniques for singers`, `Leading a congregation from the organ` and `Singing new musical settings of the new Missal texts`. The latter very helpfully had samples of the sheet music, and the website addresses, for five Masses in a variety of styles. I`ve posted the list on the WYCMN website, along with URLs of audio samples too. A number of these are posted on YouTube, so if you want to hear a setting, you can go to YouTube and use the search box to find the Mass you want. Finally, the book: it is `Glory to God: New Music for the Mass`, (Decani) a collection edited by Alan Smith and Peter Jones. The Forward gives the ` rejoice and exult` quotation, and the authors aim to `help and stimulate the active participation of the faithful in the celebration of the Mass`. There are six complete settings of the Mass, along with a number of eucharistic acclamations, plus Alleluias and Gospel Acclamations. It should prove very helpful to musicians searching for new music to play from Advent. Links: tim.devereux@ssg.org.uk Society of St Gregory: http://www.ssg.org.uk/ (There`s a big link to the Annual Conference page).To book a place at the SSG`s Annual Conference, please email: secretary@ssg.org.uk You Tube (for Mass Settings): http://www.youtube.com/ Decani Music on Line: http://www.decanimusic.co.uk/ West Yorkshire Pastoral Music Network: http://www.westyorkshirechurchmusic.org.uk/ National Network of Pastoral Musicians: http://nnpm.org/ Musical Notes by Tim Devereux T he evening mass at St Francis Church in Eccleshill on Friday 30th September was the occasion of the commissioning of the newly installed president of the Bradford District Council of the St Vincent de Paul Society. Leslie Cave, president of the conference of the parish of Our Lady Immaculate and St Francis, and newly installed Bradford President arranged for the mass to include the re-commissioning of all SVP members. Father Pat Wall celebrated the mass and led the commissioning service. He spoke of how St Vincent de Paul and Blessed Frederic Ozanam had given their lives to working for the poor and set a wonderful example to those following in their footsteps. Brian Rowe, a past president, handed over a lighted candle to Les to represent the light of Christ. Les promised to carry out his duties with diligence and imagination and to seek out new members for the society. Members from other conferences around Bradford were invited by Father Pat to join Les at the front of the altar to make their promises to devote themselves to the service of others. The mass was followed by refreshments where the spiritual experience became an opportunity for a social gathering. BRADFORD SVP GETS A NEW PRESIDENT RAISING FUNDS FOR CAFOD The Harrogate Circle of the Catenian Association raised £,1,205 last year for Cafod principally from their raffles during the year. Past President Michael Brennan presents the cheque to Leeds Cafod representative Margaret Siberry at the Cafod office at Hinsley Hall. Joe McNamara the current Circle President is present to ensure that the cheque is safely delivered.

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Oct 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 6 Leeds Catholic Post “,So you’,re a deacon…, what do you do at Mass?”, this question can come from lay ministers or even a priest, unfamiliar with the development of a deacon’,s ministry. The new translation of the missal and its companion “,General Instruction of the Roman Missal”, (the “,GIRM”,) invites us all to check our books and rubrics again. It’,s a sign of the times that “,Mass with a Deacon”, has its own section in the GIRM. It tells us that the deacon…,. -assists the priest and remains at his side -ministers at the altar with chalice and book -proclaims the Gospel and may preach: the proclamation of the Gospel is something reserved to the Deacon, if he is present, even if there are concelebrating priests. -“,guides the faithful by introduction and explanation”,- in other words makes appropriate announcements during the liturgy, and announces the intention of the Prayer of the Faithful: in other words it is for the deacon to announce the Intercessions or Bidding Prayers, after the Priest’,s introduction. -assists the priest in distributing Holy Communion and then purifies and arranges the sacred vessels, and…,. -fulfils the duties of other ministers not present- if there are no readers, for example. There are some other points, too: At the beginning of Mass, where appropriate the deacon should process the Book of the Gospels and lays it on the altar: he may on occasion introduce the Mass and lead some parts of the Penitential Rite. At the preparation of the gifts, the deacon helps prepare the altar, “,taking care of the sacred vessels himself”,. He prepares the chalices and assists the priest to receive the gifts. He then incenses both priest and people when incense in used, and may also incense host and chalice at the consecration when appropriate. The deacon then assists the priest at the Eucharistic Prayer and raises the chalice at the end, as the Priest elevates the paten with the hosts. The deacon also makes the end-of-Mass announcements unless “,the priest prefers to do this himself”,! Finally, he should prepare the people for a solemn blessing- and dismiss them in one of the new forms…,. Deacons Diary Inter Faith Week 20–,26 November Inter Faith Week will take place this year in England, Wales and Northern Ireland from Sunday 20 November until Saturday 26 November. This is the third such Week in these nations. The aims of Inter Faith Week are: •, Strengthening good inter faith relations at all levels •, Increasing awareness of the different and distinct faith communities in the UK, in particular celebrating and building on the contribution which their members make to their neighbourhoods and to wider society •, Increasing understanding between people of religious and non-religious beliefs An information packs are available to download from the Inter Faith Week website at www.interfaithweek.org.uk. If you would like to discuss your plans for the Week or to suggest additional resources interfaith@dioceseofleeds.org.uk. The illustrated report on Inter Faith Week 2010 in England is available to download from www.interfaithweek.org.uk. Hard copies can be ordered from the Inter Faith Network office. Book Collects Pope`s Thoughts On Dialogue T he Vatican has released a small anthology of texts by Benedict XVI on interreligious dialogue titled ",Pensieri sul Dialogo Interreligioso", (Thoughts on Interreligious Dialogue). The 64-page publication, edited by Lucio Coco, brings together some 60 texts of the Pope’,s teaching on the topic of dialogue. In an address on Oct. 21, 2007, Benedict XVI said ",we are all called to work for peace and to a concrete commitment to promote reconciliation between peoples.", ",This is the authentic `spirit of Assisi,` which is opposed to every form of violence and the abuse of religion as a pretext for violence,”, he added. In fact, the Holy Father continued, ",in the face of a world lacerated by conflicts, where at times violence is justified in the name of God, it is important to reaffirm that religions can never be vehicles of hatred, never, invoking the name of God, can evil and violence be justified.”, The Pontiff said ",religions can and must offer precious resources to build a peaceful humanity, because they speak of peace to the heart of man.", Details: www.itacalibri.it/it/catalogo/benedetto- xvi/pensieri-sul-dialogo- interreligioso.html?IDFolder=144&,IDOggetto= 39551&,LN=IT. Unfortunately the book is only available in Italian at present Oct 20th Birth of the Bab (Bahai ) Celebrates the birth of the precursor of the founder of the Baha`i faith. Oct 21st Simchat Torah (Jewish ) Simchat Torah means ",Rejoicing in the Torah.", This holiday marks the completion of the yearly cycle of weekly Torah readings. Oct 26th Diwali (Hindu ) Diwali, the festival of lights, is the most popular of all the festivals from South Asia. It is an occasion for celebrations by Hindus as well as Jains and Sikhs. Oct 26th Diwali (Jain ) Diwali, the festival of lights, is the most popular of all the festivals from South Asia. It is an occasion for celebrations by Jains Oct 26th Diwali (Sikh ) For Sikhs, Diwali is particularly important because it celebrates the release from prison of the sixth guru, Guru Hargobind, and 52 other princes with him, in 1619. Nov 6th Eid-Ul-Adha (Muslim ) Festival of Sacrifice marking the day after Arafat. The Day of Arafat is the most important day in the Hajj ritual. This is a four day holiday Nov 10th Birthday of Guru Nanak (Lunar Calendar) (Sikh ) Commemoration of the founder of the Sikh religion. Guru Nanak`s (1469-1539) religious ideas draw on both Hindu and Islamic thought, but are far more than just a synthesis. He was an original spiritual thinker and expressed his thoughts in extraordinary poetry that forms the basis of Sikh scripture. Nov 12th Birth of Baha`u`llah (Bahai ) Celebrates the birth in 1817 of the founder of the Baha`i faith. Nov 24th Martyrdom of Guru Tegh Bahadur (Nanakshahi calendar) (Sikh ) Guru Tegh Bahadur was the ninth Sikh Guru and is honoured as a champion of religious freedom. He was executed in 1675 for refusing to convert to Islam. Nov 26th Al-Hijira (Muslim ) Islamic New Year. Marks the migration of the Prophet Mohammad and his followers from Mecca to Medina October/November Festivals Holocaust Memorial Day 27 January 2012 It is not too early to be planning for Holocaust memorial Day next year. The theme for Holocaust Memorial Day 2012 is ‘,Speak Up, Speak Out’,. The Holocaust Memorial Day Trust are running a series of free workshops across the UK between September and November for anyone who is planning to mark HMD. To find a workshop near you, visit hmd.org.uk/about/our-work/hmd- workshops. To find out more information about Holocaust Memorial Day 2012 and order a free Campaign Pack, you can visit www.hmd.org.uk. Like films? Insight Film Festival Insight Film Festival, a biennial short film competition focusing on inter faith films which is run in association with Coexist Foundation, is preparing for its major annual event on 3 and 4 December. The date for submissions of films has now passed, but a number of young people have been working on advertisements to promote the event, and these can be found at www.insightfestival.co.uk/blog. Bishops call upon us to reinstate Fasting T he bishops of England &, Wales have called upon us to reinstate the custom of fasting from meat on Fridays. Fasting and control of desires generally is a feature of spiritual life in many traditions. The one that is most obvious is the Ramadan fast undertaken by our Muslim brothers &, sisters. The Ramadan fast lasts during the lunar month and the dates “,move forward”, by about ten days each year compared to the Western calendar. The exact dates depend on sighting the moon as it passes through its phases. It is a rigorous fast involving abstinence from food, drink, tobacco and sex from first light until sundown. About sunset families will gather to share a meal. Abdal Hakim Murad, Dean of the Cambridge Muslim College, writing recently for the Catholic Herald wrote: “,Ramadan reminds us to fear God. During the daylight hours one lives in a state of detachment from the world. The usual treats and temptations are out of reach, and towards the end of the day one’,s ego is wilting. As the sun moves lower, one recognises one’,s brokenness and absolute dependence on the Creator.”, The bishops called upon us to reinstate the community custom of meatless Fridays because we had nearly all forgotten that Fridays were supposed to be kept as penitential days. Other forms of penance are still open to us. Borrow the Muslim notion of strict fasting and do not eat or drink anything on Fridays until 3pm, the traditional time for remembering the death of the Lord. House of Lords Award Dr Indarjit Singh CBE, well-known broadcaster and key figure in interfaith work in England has been appointed to the House of Lords as a cross-bencher. Dr Singh is vice chair and founding member of the Inter Faith Network UK, a national body promoting inter faith understanding, and is Head of the Sikh Chaplaincy Service. He has served on the Home Secretary’,s Advisory Council on Race Relations, on the British Medical Association’,s Medical Ethics Committee, and was a member of a working group which advised the Chancellor of the Exchequer and the Secretary of State for International Development on issues of third world debt and poverty relief. University life –, conversations for the soul T he St Ethelburga’,s Centre and the National Union of Students are offering a one-day training programme with follow up support to chaplains, staff and students who would like to deliver ‘,Conversations for the Soul’,, an inter faith ‘,tandem dialogue’, programme, to their universities. The programme is designed to bring people of different faiths together to meet in pairs and discuss beliefs and practice in depth, allowing for a different quality of conversation that can be deeper and more satisfying than group dialogue. The training will take place on Tuesday 8 November at the National Union of Students HQ, 4th floor, 184 –, 192 Drummond Street, London NW1 3HP and costs £,50, which includes all training materials, lunch and refreshments on the day. For more information about the programme please contact Kat.Luckock@nus.org.uk, or for information about the training day itself visit http://stethelburgas.org/multifaith/projects (this also gives a link to book a place).

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Oct 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

O n the 22nd September, Catholic Care held its 2011 AGM at Wheeler Hall, About 40 people attended a very interesting and informative meeting where the main speaker was Bishop Tony Robinson, Anglican Bishop of Pontefract. Bishop Tony spoke on the theme of racial justice and gave a very inspiring and prayerful talk on the duties and responsibilities of everyone in building a cohesive society. One of Bishop Tony’,s key phrases was “,The Dignity of Difference”, and he emphasised that real justice between people needs communication. Justice and communication are two themes which must go hand in hand in order to build confidence, care and cohesion between different peoples. Another central part of the AGM was a series of five short presentations outlining the different areas of the work of Catholic Care. They included Marie, a volunteer from France who is working in the House of Light in Leeds, Jean from the Rainbows Project, who spoke movingly about bereavement, especially among children and learners, and she outlined the work of Rainbows in schools across the Diocese, Renee spoke about her work as a social worker and as a member of Catholic Care’,s Schools and Community Team. The highlight of the AGM was the presentation by Eileen about the new area of work called the Gianna Project which works with young girls and women who find themselves in a crisis pregnancy situation. The title of the Project is taken from St. Gianna Beretta Molla who was an Italian physician who refused both an abortion and a hysterectomy when she was pregnant with her fourth child. She was canonised by Pope John Paul II in May 2004. Eileen has set up the Project across the Diocese of Leeds and she was accompanied at the AGM by a young lady and her daughter who have benefited both from the work of the Gianna Project and the work of St. Monica’,s Housing who care for asylum seekers. The presentation on the Gianna Project was really the highlight of the meeting and emphasised the care which is available for young girls and women across the whole of the Diocese of Leeds. Bishop Arthur Roche opened the meeting with a prayer and closed the meeting by thanking everyone who attended as well as the staff and service users of Catholic Care for all they do across the Diocese of Leeds year in and year out. [If anyone would like further information on Catholic Care on any of its projects, please telephone 0113 3885000.] Leeds Catholic Post Page 7 “,Dignity of Difference”, - Catholic Care’,s AGM By Roddy Minogue Co-ordinator of Caring Services Catholic Care (Diocese of Leeds) A NEW FOUNDATION B ishop Roche found himself in St Wilfrid’,s School, Ripon, on the morning of Wednesday October 4th. He had been invited along by the school to officially open the New Foundation Buildings for the School. Up to this year the ‘,Early Years’, or Nursery part of the school had been housed in building near the Church. Now, as the Bishop saw for himself, they have been provided with a newest of classrooms –, new play area and a new entrance to the school. Once the Headteacher, Mr Burdekin, had greeted the Bishop –, the schools council arrived to officially welcome him and ask him to bless their new buildings. Once in the new area the Bishop first of all welcomed the children, parents, governors and friends, along with the Deputy Lord Mayor and her consort and Canon Moxon, the Parish Priest. He then blessed a Statue of Our Lady that use to be in the former nursery before going on to bless the new building and unveiling a plaque to mark the occasion. At the end of the ceremony the Bishop congratulated the orchestra for their playing and the children for their singing. On their part the children presented him with a card, a rose and some herb plants –, they had heard he was keen on gardening. He stayed on in the nursery to talk to the children before taking a walk round school to talk and pray with each class. The morning was rounded off with a cup of tea and a chat by the Bishop to the Parents who were there. “,DARE TO BELIEVE –, FIRM IN THE FAITH”, ‘,Revelation’,, is the monthly gathering for young people across the Diocese of Leeds in school years 9-13. It takes place in Wheeler Hall at Leeds Cathedral, on the following dates over the coming months: , Wednesday 19th October 2011, Wednesday 16th November 2011, Wednesday 14th December 2011, Wednesday 25th January 2012 (Look out for information about special LDYS events during Lent!) Wednesday 25th April 2012, Wednesday 23rd May 2012 &, Wednesday 20th June 2012. It is necessary to fill out LDYS Registration Form and to bring this with you to the first Revelation. They are available from www.leedsyouth.org.uk or from the Youth Office at Hinsley Hall. They are also available from your parish and schools. So why not ask your friends at church, at school or college, if they are interested in coming along with you? We hope to see you there! ",It takes place in Wheeler Hall at Leeds Cathedral, from 7pm-9pm, ....",

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Oct 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 8 Leeds Catholic Post D arren Stead was eager to take part in the Great North Run to raise funds for CAFOD. His two sons, Joe (left) and Matthew (right) wanted to follow dad’,s example by running in the Junior event the day before. Cousins Grace Wilkinson and Lucy Harrison also took part in the Junior run for the second year and wanted to raise funds to support the East Africa Appeal. Deacon David Arblaster, of St Aelred`s Harrogate writes, ‘,With my daughter Kathryn we cycled from Whitehaven to Tynemouth, which is 150 miles over some of the hilliest, but most beautiful and unspoilt countryside in England. Overall the weather was very kind to us however on the final day as we cycled through torrential downpours I couldn`t help thinking how the water that cascaded down on us would have brought such relief to the drought-torn people of East Africa. RUNNING, CYCLING, SWIMMING FOR CAFOD . . . H eavy monsoon rains have caused widespread flooding in Sindh Province, Pakistan, many parts of which are still recovering from the floods of 2010. More than five million people have been affected by this year’,s floods, and at least a million homes have been damaged or destroyed. Many people are in urgent need of food, clean water and shelter. CAFOD Programme Officer Monika Vrsanska is currently in Pakistan. She says: “,This is the sixth week that people in Badin District in Sindh Province have been trying to cope with the floods. There is water everywhere, many health units are flooded, and sanitation is appalling: mosquitoes are breeding in the standing water, and you can see kids swimming in water that animals are drinking from. It’,s only a question of time before disease breaks out. “,Driving through the countryside, I’,ve seen hundreds of families just sitting by the road with shawls as their only protection. There are lot of informal settlements. Many people don’,t even have plastic sheets to cover themselves with. “,The cotton crop has been almost completely destroyed. Seeing pictures of ripe, unpicked cotton fields turning black under floodwater is heartbreaking. This will have a big effect on poor women in the district, as cotton is their main source of income. “,People are asking for food, health services and shelter. The situation is likely to get worse before it gets better.”, We have already pledged £,400,000 towards emergency relief for people who have lost their homes, and we are continuing to monitor the situation. Monsoon rains have also caused widespread flooding in India, Nepal and Bangladesh. In Bangladesh we are providing emergency food aid as well as helping people to prepare for disasters in the longer term. Please keep all those affected in your thoughts and prayers. PAKISTAN: FLOODS AFFECT MORE THAN FIVE MILLION Please join us for our Annual Memorial Mass of Thanksgiving for all who have supported us and have now gone to their eternal rest. Friday 11th November 2011 Hinsley Hall Chapel Mass Starts at 6.30pm with refreshment afterwards Please let Margaret or Joanne know if you wish to attend. email leeds@cafod.org.uk or phone 0113 2759302 I t was an unexpected Friday phone call that offered me an experience that I will never forget. Margaret Siberry called me up giving me the chance to go out to Ethiopia to see the work that CAFOD is doing to help the people there. The journey I undertook was very inspirational. I saw many of the effects that the 18 month long drought has had on the land there. For example, many people have lost up to half of their livestock and in many instances much more, with their remaining livestock close to death. In the words of a local women, “,without cattle, there is no Borena.”, Borena is an area in the South of Ethiopia where the people live a pastoralist existence with their cattle and other livestock. CAFOD has been working in the area with their Partner agencies to help the people there cope better with the droughts that frequently occur there. Their work has helped many of the local people keep their cattle alive and has also helped them to adapt to the changes that are happening to the land around them. I met several people who have been directly affected by the work that CAFOD has done : one gentlemen’,s loss of cattle was halted by the creation of a watering hole near to his village, others are taking advantage of the alternative source of income created by the Aloe Vera Soap cooperative and large numbers have benefited from the Web Ella well that has been reclaimed using the donations from the people of Leeds. This project itself has enabled this single well to provide water for 3000 head of cattle a day, not counting other livestock and the people themselves. I hope that this harvest festival people consider the difficulties that others face and the simple steps they can take to help. Thank you for raising over £,190,000 for the East Africa Emergency Appeal and also for your support for our on-going programmes through Harvest Fast Day THE DROUGHT IN EAST AFRICA - WITNESSING CAFOD’,S WORK IN SOUTHERN ETHIOPIA PHILIP SOMERVILLE

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Oct 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Leeds Catholic Post Page 9 Tickets: £,22 Concessions £,20 Performances 7.15pm, Saturday 1pm and 5.30pm Tel: Anne Copley 017505 948909 Email: bcptickets@live.co.uk A fter the rigours of examinations, students from Notre Dame enjoyed a week of fantastic enhancement activities during the penultimate week of the summer term ranging from week long residentials to ‘,in house’, workshops. There were the, by now, traditional trips to New York, Barcelona and Prague, where students mixed cultural and artistic exploration with old fashioned sight seeing. The Barcelona enhancement took place over four days with 41 students and 6 staff participating. The itinerary included excursions to Figueres, a small town in the provinces in which the Salvador Dali experience is housed, and to Park Guell, a vast fantasy style park. Whilst at the latter the group encountered a terrific thunder storm, and was able to experience the dramatic effect of lightning breaking out across the hazy city below. The outdoors pursuits residential to the Lake District challenged students in a range of activities including rock climbing, canoeing and a visit to a hermit’,s cave. There was an Eco club trip to Foxglove Covert Local Nature Reserve (LNR) based within Catterick Garrison army base in North Yorkshire, the only nature reserve within an army base in the country. The trip involved plant identification and spotting some more unusual species such as ragged robin, northern marsh orchid and common spotted orchid. Students were able to bird watch and learnt some basic bird calls, followed by a demonstration in bird ringing, a process that identifies each bird as an individual. The myriad of activities in college included extremely competitive Badminton and Basketball Tournaments played in excellent spirit. The basketballers ran their legs off and were rewarded with a Notre Dame sweatshirt each, after an individual shooting competition. For the second year running, the Gaellic football team under the guidance of Gerard Rogers organised a tournament with schoolchildren from Catholic Primary schools. A group of walkers braved some unseasonal weather and tackled the Meanwood valley trail to Eccup reservoir and Golden Acre Park, and there was a day out on mountain bikes for the even more energetic. The Arts were not forgotten and events included a music improvisation workshop, using jazz, blues and swing as inspiration. The nine songs worked on throughout the session were performed at the end of the day. Students from the Theatre studies department took just five days to design and rehearse a production of Dario Fo’,s ‘,One Was Nude and One Wore Tails’,. They then gave three performances for High School pupils. There were literally dozens of other options for students to choose from during the week including conversational Spanish, French and Russian, Morris Dancing, Ice skating and a trip to Alton Towers. The organisation for enhancement week is coordinated by Clare O’,Hara [twice world squirtboard champion and gold medal winner at the 2011 International Canoe Federation freestyle Kayak World Championships],who together with Julie Kavanagh, also oversees the weekly enhancement activities taking place throughout the year. ‘,The week was a huge success.’, said Clare ‘,Both students and staff had a great time and gained a great deal from all the activities. The experiences and skills learnt in the week are also a great addition to students’, UCAS applications’, NOTRE DAME STUDENTS OUT AND ABOUT

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Oct 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 10 Leeds Catholic Post T he Upper Sixth students bid a fond farewell to Notre Dame in a day of celebration and reflection. Father McGillycuddy said Mass for staff and students in the morning and delivered a moving homily on the contribution our young people can make to society in the future. The choir sang lustily and each curriculum area offered up a symbol representing their work. Then it was time for the traditional release of balloons with students’, hopes and wishes for the future firmly attached, followed by a lunch and some tearful farewells. As always, students had made huge efforts with imaginative and collaborative costumes which helped to make the day a joyous occasion. We wish all of our students the best of luck in the future. And so we say goodbye…,.. Specialists in wedding photography 01977 556088 07716728109 Your wedding is a unique day which involves considerable thought, planning, time and effort. Once your special day is over you will be left with many lovely memories some of which will inevitably fade over time. Investing in good photography can ensure that the mood and emotion of your day is captured to form a permanent reminder to enable you to relive your memories for years to come.

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Oct 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Leeds Catholic Post Page 11 College says Farewell to Principal O n July 11th, the feast of St Benedict, staff gathered in the college chapel where Fr Stephen Webb celebrated Mass in thanksgiving for Dr Tony Adlard, Principal of Notre Dame, who is leaving at the end of this academic year. The order of service depicted a beautiful line drawing of the chapel , drawn by head of Art John Rogers, and Dr Adlards favourite hymns ‘,Dear Lord and Father of Mankind’, and ‘,All people that on earth do dwell’, were specially chosen. Tony was visablymoved by the occasion as he spoke about the beauty of the chapel and the support he felt from his colleagues. Dr Adlard started his teaching career in Massachusetts at Clark University where he was studying for an MA. After being involved in research for some time, he took up a post teaching English at Xavarian Catholic Sixth Form College in Manchester where he rose to the position of Assistant Principal and from where he moved to Notre Dame in 2004. He is proud of the achievements of the whole college which were recognised in the outstanding Ofsted report in 2008, and was also responsible with the Management Team for obtaining the sizeable grant which enabled the college to erect the Cuvilly building providing excellent accommodation for a range of subjects. Dr Adlard has many fond memories of his time at the college ‘,I am lucky’, he says ‘, to have worked with a fantastically committed staff who are all united in wanting the best for our students’,. His single most striking memory will be of the Leavers mass and final assembly which takes place every year. This is because he believes this is where everything comes together and where the ethos of the college is represented in the celebration and mutual support of staff and students. ‘,The open free spirit of the occasion is what is at the core of Notre Dame.’, He commented. He also shared some thoughts on the future for the College. ‘,I think there is much uncertainty and anxiety in the world at the moment and in Education specifically, but I believe Notre Dame has the strength drive and talent to maintain the outstanding qualities and achievements for which it has been renowned for many years. And I believe that the College will remain an embodiment of those values and achievements of which Catholic Education as a whole can be proud, the Diocese of Leeds can be proud, and the City of Leeds can be proud.’, Somewhat of a renaissance man, Dr Adlard plans to spend his leisure time on a range of activities including reading, painting, playing the piano, fly fishing and walking in the countryside. He is also hoping to become involved in voluntary work. We shall all miss him and wish him a long and happy retirement J uly 11th was Notre Dame’,s Ethos day. A time when staff gather together to reflect on their work with students and focus on the Catholic ethos of the College Firstly staff were treated to a morale boosting talk from Monsignor John Wilson who encouraged us to be ’,original, daring and unique’,. He reminded us that that Bishop Arthur was proud of us and the job that we are doing in the city of Leeds. His talk gave heart to all. After our coffee break, Fr Matthew Power spoke about seeing the good in each individual student and used video clips to show that God’,s will is in the midst of all that is going on. After lunch all staff broke into holistic workshops to discuss the morning’,s topics and think about how these ideas might influence our work in college. Notre Dame Ethos Day

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Oct 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

L eeds Trinity University College welcomed around 900 new undergraduates last month, and those embarking on business and history degrees join departments with an A* for student satisfaction. In the 2011 National Student Survey (NSS), which collates the views of final year students on their higher education experience, the business and history departments scored 100% for overall satisfaction with their courses. 2011 History graduate Carol Windmill (pictured) explains why she thinks the history department deserves full marks for the student experience. She said, “,I have loved the whole course and the way it is taught, with lots of group work involving role play, discussion and debate. There is plenty of scope for independent study with expert guidance, support and encouragement from the great team of tutors.”, Contributing to these glowing accolades are great strides made in students’, approval of the academic support they receive and their personal development - rating 100% in History and well above the national average institutionally. Continuing investment in learning resources has paid off too, with a rise of 6% in student satisfaction with learning resources and services in the latest NSS, making a total rise of 13% since 2009. Recent building work in the Learning Centre has provided study spaces for silent and group work, and created a new integrated helpdesk for library and IT users. New digital resources have been added, giving access to a total of 437,000 e-books and 25,000 journal titles, including specialist information databases for particular subject areas. Nick Goodfellow, Director of Library and Learning Resources, said, “,We are committed to continuous improvement in learning centre facilities to keep pace with rapid technological changes and in response to staff and student feedback. The NSS is a valuable barometer to show how our service is meeting students’, expectations.”, The NSS is conducted annually by Ipsos Mori and the results are published on the Unistats website. Business and history get full marks in National Student Survey Page 12 Leeds Catholic Post NEWS FROM LEEDS TRINITY UNIVERSITY COLLEGE Media training at Leeds Trinity helps Catholic Voices be heard L eeds Trinity has teamed up with the Catholic Voices project to offer media training to lay Catholics giving them the confidence to speak about their faith and issues of importance to the church. With an expert team of journalism and media specialists on the academic staff, and media facilities equipped to the latest industry standards, including a professional TV studio (pictured), Leeds Trinity is an ideal partner for Catholic Voices. Catholic Voices was originally set up ahead of the 2010 visit to the UK of Pope Benedict XVI with a view to providing informed spokespeople for media appearances, who became much in demand with over 100 appearances before and during the papal visit. Central to the programme’,s approach is the presentation of authoritative speakers, who without being official representatives of the church, can nonetheless articulate the Catholic case in interviews and debates. A new training programme for speakers begins this autumn, aimed at building a team of regional spokespeople to complement the existing London team. Leeds Trinity has been involved from the start by hosting the recruitment weekend at the end of September, and will provide the successful candidates with a weekend of intensive media training in December. Kathleen Griffin of Catholic Voices was on the selection panel with colleagues Jack Valero and Austen Ivereigh. She said “,I want to say an enormous ",thank you", to Leeds Trinity for their help in the selection process - it was like the best sort of outside broadcast, with everything flowing smoothly and a sense that the programme was going to get to air. We are delighted to have found fifteen very strong candidates for the Leeds training - they will be a great seedbed for Catholic Voices.”, Kathleen and Austen have written Catholic Voices: Putting the case for the Church in an Era of 24-hour News which addresses the church`s stance on contemporary issues and how to communicate this effectively. Find out more at www.catholicvoices.org.uk Vatican II 50 years on: The new evangelization M arking 50 years since the Second Vatican Council opened in October 1962, Leeds Trinity University College will next year host the first in a series of conferences celebrating Catholic higher education in the UK. The international Catholic theological conference Vatican II 50 years on: The new evangelization aims to reflect on the impact of council and deepen understanding of the new Evangelization. Speakers include high profile church leaders and theologians, among them Francis Cardinal George, Archbishop of Chicago, Archbishop Rino Fisichella, President of the Pontifical Council for New Evangelization, and Gavin D’,Costa, Professor of Catholic Theology at Bristol University (pictured). Kirsteen Kim, Professor of Theology and World Christianity at Leeds Trinity, said, “,The Second Vatican Council was a seminal event which had a profound impact on the Catholic Church, on her relations with other Christians, other faiths, and the wider world.”, “,This engagement with the modern world is today known as the New Evangelization, but does this represent the intent of the Council? What is its impact 50 years on? What is its significance in the long history of the Catholic Church?”, “,This conference will bring together prominent Church figures and leaders of the New Evangelization with other interpreters of Vatican II for debate on these and many other questions.”, The results will be published as part of wider reflection on the fiftieth anniversary of the Council and in time to contribute to preparation for the Synod on the New Evangelization later in 2012. Papers are invited relevant to the conference theme, to be submitted to Professor Kirsteen Kim on k.kim@leedstrinity.ac.uk by 30 November 2011. The conference will take place at Leeds Trinity’,s campus on Brownberrie Lane, Horsforth, between 26 and 29 June 2012, and is being organised in conjunction with the Centre for Catholic Studies at Durham University. For further information contact Kathy Stenton by email k.stenton@leedstrinity.ac.uk, call 0113 2837102, or visit www.leedstrinity.ac.uk

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Oct 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Leeds Catholic Post Page 13 Events at Leeds Trinity University College Please visit our website at www.leedstrinity.ac.uk for more details and a full events listing. Open day for prospective students Saturday 22 October Our Open Days are a great opportunity to find out about studying at Leeds Trinity as an undergraduate, postgraduate or foundation degree student. The events run from 11.00am to 3.00pm at our campus on Brownberrie Lane, Horsforth, LS18 5HD. Call 0113 2837150 or visit www.leedstrinity.ac.uk for information and to book. Tuesday 25 October 7.00pm Between ‘,Egypt’, and the ‘,Promised Land’,: Irish monastic voyages to Iceland in the early middle ages Seminar with Dr Jonathan Wooding, School of Theology, Religious Studies and Islamic Studies, University of Lampeter, Trinity St David’,s. For further details contact Julie Wadsworth on j.wadsworth@leedstrinity.ac.uk or call 0113 2837126. Let God’,s house be rebuilt in this place’, T uesday September 20th was chosen as the day to Officially recognises the new Parish of St Jeanne Jugan in Leeds and to bless the Statue of Saint Jeanne Jugan that the little Sisters of the Poor had donated to the Parish. The new Parish came about in the reordering of Parishes in Leeds City that saw St Urbans and Our Lady of Lourdes come together –, the Little Sisters of the Poor connection is the Fact That Jeanne Jugan founded the Order and the Convent and home is in the New Parish. Bishop Roche celebrated the Mass after first blessing the statue in the entrance to the Church. As he started the celebration he pointed out how this evening pointed to the coming together of the two Parishes, he thanked those that were present especially the Little Sisters and the Assistant Provincial –, the Sisters, he said were the Voice of the poor and the voice of Christ to the World today. In his homily the Bishop pointed out that this was the first Parish to be Named after Jeanne Jugan in the Country –, and it was right that it should be since it celebrated all the work the Little Sisters do in the Diocese reaching back as far as 1864 –, that being the time they arrived in this part of the world, which was before the Diocese of Leeds existed. Their work and the life of Jeanne Jugan highlighted the struggle between light and darkness, good and evil and presented the compassionate face of Christ. The Bishop also remarked that he was delighted that this same compassion was being demonstrated in the work –, the mission - the Parish was undertaking at Our Lady of Lourdes Church –, it is a matter of hearing the word and doing it –, he said. He went on to remark about the work being down in the area with the students making sure that…,. ‘,God’,s house is (be) rebuilt in this place’, Leeds Diocese pupils represent Great Britain D uring the first week of July, three boys from Leeds diocesan schools were in Portugal representing Great Britain Catholic Schools. The boys, Tom Malach and Alex McGurk (Cardinal Heenan) and Matthew Thompson (St. John Fisher, Dewsbury) were part of the squad selected to play in the Federation Internationale Sportive de l’,Enseignement Catholique (FISEC) Games. The journey for all three boys started in March when they attended trails at Leeds University along with approximately 90 others from catholic schools and colleges based all over the country, representatives from as far south as Brighton and as far north as Durham were playing for the opportunity to travel to Portugal as part of the GB squad of just 17. After selection all three boys were involved in the raising of funds to support their passage –, this year £,650 was required to take up the offer, which fortunately they were all able to do. All that was now required was patience prior to meeting up at Heathrow Airport on Tuesday 5th July. The GB squad in total comprises up to 52 students, taking part in football, athletics, swimming and girls’, volleyball. They are led and supported by 8 adults from various roles in either sport or education and one from the world of media. Tom, Alex and Matt met up with the other 14 members of the football squad and started to prepare for 4 matches that may lead to a gold medal from the FISEC Games. This year the boys would be involved in a ‘,round robin’, tournament against Holland, Spain, Italy and France. The pressure was very much on as in the previous two tournaments GB had taken the gold medal, but significantly this year they was no preparation time as the first games was scheduled for 9am Wednesday 6th July!! A team meeting on the evening of 5th July outlined the programme for the next 7 days and target was set of having at least a chance of gold entering the final game on Sunday 10th July against France. After discussion between management team Nick Forbes and Simon Wade, Tom Malach had the honour of being awarded the captaincy for the tournament. Game one saw Tom leading the side and both Matthew and Alex joining the fray from the bench. All boys contributed to a 2-0 victory against Holland which was more comfortable than the score suggests. Game two was an even better performance in defeating Spain 3-1, the Spanish goal being a somewhat debatable last minute penalty!! Tom and Alex both played the full 60 mins whilst Matthew again joined from the bench. Two wins from two was made three on Saturday with a victory against Italy. This time Matthew scored after coming on for a third time whilst Tom and Alex again played the full game. So to the decider against an also unbeaten French team, ‘,winner takes all’, as the gold medal would be decided on the result between the two teams with goals scored or conceded not in the equation as are the FISEC rules. Tom and Alex again started the game, whilst Matthew was a second half replacement for Alex who was struggling following a first half injury. Having been the better side and striking the cross bar late on, GB were disappointed as the game finished 0-0 - so to penalties!! Sadly, the great British tradition of falling short in shoot- outs returned to haunt the GB team and for the second time, the first being in Malta 2008, GB lost out on the gold losing 5-4 to the French team. Silver medal seems a huge disappointment, but it must be tempered by the fact that as is often the case, defeat came against a side that had been preparing for the FISEC tournament for as many as 4 weeks since the ‘,full’, French schools team was selected. The victories were excellent performances against sides that had had much more preparation time than that of GB. Every year the GB squad is selected, and then meets at a UK airport, at most having one day to prepare and plan in whichever country the games are in. The Dutch are usually from a ‘,club’, and the Maltese, when entered are the national side!! Tom, Alex and Matthew were first class representatives of GB CSSF, their schools and themselves. The diocese should be proud to have had three talented and mature boys representing it.

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Oct 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 14 Leeds Catholic Post Leeds Diocesan Youth Service ‘,All who are thirsty, come!’, (Rev 22:17) On the occasion of the 43rd Communications Day Pope Benedict encouraged young believers to bring the witness of our faith to the digital world. With this in mind, the Leeds Diocesan Youth Service have taken up Pope Benedict’,s call and are now on Twitter. Follow us atLeedsDYS. LIVE at Walsingham and the New REFRESH Youth2000 Prayer Group in Leeds O ver the August Bank Holiday weekend a convoy of cars travelled from Leeds to England’,s Nazareth for the annual Youth 2000 festival. The young adults from Leeds entered whole- heartedly into all that Youth 2000 entails from camping to Rosary, from talks and testimonies to cups of tea in the shrine café,, from Adoration of the Blessed Sacrament to laughing with new friends, there was even some time left over for a bit of sport! Many of our young people gave testimony over the weekend of how their faith had strengthened through the witness of others and how they had experienced God’,s love through the sacrament of reconciliation. Because of the clear success of this pilgrimage and all that the young people got from it we have decided here in the Youth Office that it is important to keep the spirit of Youth2000 alive and so have launched a weekly prayer group called Refresh at Leeds Cathedral. It will be a chance for young people to experience Adoration of the Blessed Sacrament, a bit of music, a reflection on some scripture, some silence, a bit of Rosary and there’,ll be some priests to hear Confessions - and there are always the delights of Leeds to feed them afterwards so they can spend some quality time with friends. This prayer group is for any young adult who wants something to help them to pray in the middle of a busy week. Refresh was launched on Wednesday the 28th September and will continue weekly at 6.30-7.30pm. Because we also run a monthly event, Revelation, at the Cathedral on a Wednesday night Refresh and Revelation will join once a month, see the calendar for details. To keep up to date with all that is going on with Refresh and Revelation check out the website, www.leedsyouth.org.uk or the Leeds Diocesan Youth Service facebook group. There maybe a change of venue for Refresh after the half term break so look out for more details. For more information about how to register for Leeds Diocesan Youth Service events, check out: www.leedsyouth.org.uk, contact Anna at the Youth Office: 0113 261 8058 / abcleedsdiocese@hotmail.com or join the “,Leeds Diocesan Youth Service”, Facebook group. Every Wednesday Refresh: Youth2000 Prayer Group 6.30-7.30pm Leeds Cathedral 3rd October Batley Torchlight Procession 7.30-10.30pm Batley 19th October REVELATION 7 –, 9pm Cathedral Hall, Leeds 6th November Youth Ministry Holy Hour 3-4pm Myddleton Grange For more information about how to register for Leeds Diocesan Youth Service events, check out: www.leedsyouth.org.uk, contact Anna at the Youth Office: 0113 261 8058 / abcleedsdiocese@hotmail.com or join the “,Leeds Diocesan Youth Service”, Facebook group. Leeds Diocesan Youth Service Calendar World Youth Day Reunion A s the sun shone over Leeds on Thursday 29th September a group of World Youth Day Pilgrims gathered at Hinsley Hall to reunite and shar e fond memories of their recent Pilgrimage to Madrid in August. Bishop Arthur greeted the 50 young people and discussed with them their experiences of the days with the Holy Father. The young people then spent some time in Adoration of the Blessed Sacrament and reflecting on what Pope Benedict XVI had said to them in Madrid. As Pope Benedict said, ‘,It is a good thing to open our hearts to Christ’,s call and to follow with courage and generosity the path he maps out for us,’, the young people shared with one another how they have responded to Christ since returning from World Youth Day, many have joined parish groups or counsels, some have become readers and others catechists, whilst others said they have started to prayer a little each day. After praying together the young people enjoyed a meal and watched video highlights of their time in Madrid. It was a great evening and a wonderful way to round off World Youth 2011, and now many of the pilgrims are excited, raring and ready to go for the preparation of the next World Youth Day in Rio 2013! English Schools success for St Clare’,s Parishioner J ames Abbott, from St Clare’,s Bradford was selected to compete at the English Schools Athletics in July at Gateshead International Stadium. James is 14 years old and an ex pupil of St Francis RC Primary in Bradford and now attends Immanuel College , Bradford. He is a 100m runner and his persoanl best is 11.6 seconds . He competed for West Yorkshire at Gateshead in the 100m , where he did very well in his heat , but did not qualify for the final and then the 4 x 100m relay team . The relay team were second in their heat and were 4th in the final out of 46 counties. James is also a great footballer and plays centre forward for Shipley Juniors ( U15).

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Oct 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Leeds Catholic Post Page 15 Classified Advertising LEEDS CATHOLIC MARRIAGE CARE Marriage isn’,t always easy —, Counselling can help For an appointment in confidence, with an understanding and experienced listener, please telephone: 0800 369 3801 A Relationship Counselling Service W. Lever Ltd BRADFORD 01274 547137 524 THORNTON ROAD, BRADFORD BD8 9NB FOR OVER 75 YEARS PROVIDING A COMPLETE PERSONAL &, CARING 24 HOUR FUNERAL SERVICE CHAPEL OF REST H UGHES F UNERAL S ERVICES (Catholic Funeral Directors) 180 YORK ROAD, LEEDS LS9 9NT. Tel 2480953/63 152 GREEN LANE, CROSSGATES. Tel 2326900 3 HOLLIN PARK PARADE, OAKWOOD ROUNDABOUT Tel 2499338 Web: wwww.hughesfuneralservices.co.uk Email: info@hughesfuneralservices.co.uk Family owned and managed. Fully Qualified in all aspects. 24 Hour Service Guaranteed Fixed Price Funeral Plans etc. “,At a time of bereavement we carry out our duties with dignity and respect”, In times of bereavement please contact: B. J. MELIA &, SONS (B. J. Melia Dip F.D.) F UNERAL D IRECTORS AND M ONUMENTAL M ASONS Private Chapel of Rest 64 GIBBET STREET, HALIFAX Telephone: 01422 354453 PRE-PAID FUNERAL SERVICE AVAILABLE DETAILS ON REQUEST Jennings Funeral Services (Catholic Funeral Directors) 13 Racca Green, Knottingley WF11 8AT Telephone: 01977 677715 •, Highest standards of care •, Family owned and managed •, Pre payment plans •, 24 hour service •, Personal attention of Barry and Elizabeth Jennings A Personal and Dignified Family Business that Cares S J F Sharing Success - School, Parish &, Diocese Outstanding A Level Results in the St John Fisher / ST Aidan’,s Associated Sixth Form in Harrogate were particularly pleasing this year when students needed to get their grades to obtain their University places. 62.5% of grades were at A/B with many outstanding subject performances. Amongst these successes, one student in particular shared his success with school, parish and Diocese. Francis Goodbum obtained an Organ Scholarship at St. John’,s College Oxford to read Mathematics and Computer Science. His A level results were 6A* and 2A, having achieved 14 A* subjects at GCSE. Francis was appointed School Organist at St John Fisher as early as Year 8. His musical studies included piano, organ and when asked to support the school orchestra he learned the bassoon and achieved Grade 5 in one year. His Parish life began early. He was a dedicated Altar server at St Edward’,s, Clifford, trained by the late and greatly loved Canon Hugh Barr. He moved from Altar to organ several years ago and in recent weeks introduced the changes to the music for the new Liturgy. He added his skills to these changes by writing a Mass setting for use by the Guitar players at St Edward’,s before his departure for Oxford. Francis, before achieving Grade 8 with distinction, was taught the organ by Ben Saunders, Director of Music for the Diocese. Two young parishioners at St Edward’,s, both pupils at St John Fisher, Harrogate, are currently being taught the organ by Thomas Leech of the Diocesan Music Department on the restored school organ. Both contribute to the Liturgical life of the school and are already playing at Mass in St Edward’,s. The inspiration and encouragement given to them by Francis, as well as the expert teaching they are receiving through school and Diocese will hopefully encourage the growth in the number of organists for the future. 50TH INTERNATIONAL EUCHARISTIC CONGRESS –, DUBLIN 10th-17th JUNE, 2012 N ext June Dublin will host the 50th International Eucharistic Congress, and a special invitation has been made to Catholics in Britain to support the event, as well as being given every opportunity to attend. Fr Peter Kravos has been appointed as the delegate for the Diocese of Leeds and writes: What is a Eucharistic Congress? A Eucharistic Congress is an international gathering of people which aims to: •, promote an awareness of the central place of the Eucharist in the life and mission of the Catholic Church •, improve our understanding and celebration of the liturgy •, draw attention to the social dimension of the Eucharist (i.e., the responsibility which we have to live in the spirit of communion and self-gift that we celebrate). The Congress normally takes place every four years. Obviously, the daily celebration of the Eucharist is at the very heart of the Congress, but there is a wide programme which includes other liturgical celebrations, cultural events, catechesis, testimonies, and workshops during the week of the Congress. History The work of International Eucharistic Congresses began in France in 1881 as a fruit of the Eucharistic apostolate of Saint Peter-Julian Eymard. The idea of the Eucharistic Congress (originally called Eucharistic pilgrimages) came from the insight and commitment of Miss É,milie-Marie Tamisier (1834-1910). In the aftermath of the Second Vatican Council, the Eucharistic Congresses, in addition to promoting a deeper understanding of and participation in the celebration of the Eucharist, sought to focus attention on the essential link between the Eucharist and the service of those who are poor and oppressed. The Synod of Bishops in 2005 expressed this responsibility as follows: “,Before the Lord of history and the future of the world, the suffering of the poor, the ever more numerous victims of injustice and all the forgotten people of the earth, cannot be alien to the celebration of the Eucharistic mystery, which commits baptised persons to work for justice and the transformation of the world in an active and conscious way.”, The most recent Congresses were held in Quebec (Canada) in 2008 and Guadalajara (Mexico) in 2004. Dublin last hosted the International Eucharistic Congress in 1932, and it is widely accepted that the 1932 Congress contributed significantly to the beginning of a healing process following the extremely divisive civil war. At a difficult and transforming time for the Church in Ireland, the 50th Eucharistic Congress comes to Dublin and Catholics in Britain have been invited to support the local Church in this significant way, as well as benefit from the graces of such a global event. Programme The Congress is actually a week long programme of events, linking faith and culture, with a particular focus on the gathering of people of every nation, language and way of life around the table of the Lord. The opening ceremony of the Congress will be celebrated in the afternoon of Sunday 10th June 2012 (The Solemnity of the Body and Blood of the Lord) at the Royal Dublin Society conference venue, where all the key events will take place until the final Mass (known as the Statio Orbis), which will take place in Croke Park Stadium on Sunday 17th June. The key events of the programme will include the daily sessions of catechesis given by bishops from different parts of the world, as well as testimonies offered by Christians who have a story of faith to share. There will be an Ecumenical Liturgy celebrating our common baptism, an evening Blessed Sacrament Procession, a Liturgy of Reconciliation, and Mass with Anointing of the Sick. The full programme is still being developed, and all news will be published on the official website: www.iec2012.ie. At the moment it not been confirmed whether Pope Benedict will preside at the final Mass in Croke Park, but this will be announced some time later this year. How to attend A joint group from the dioceses of Leeds, Hallam and Middlesbrough will travel together by coach for the whole week. Further details will be announced in next month’,s edition of the Catholic Post. It will be in the form of a package, whereby transport, accommodation, registration &, half-board will be included for a set fee. You can, however, register your interest now with Fr Peter Kravos, the diocesan delegate (see below). If you wish to attend alone and make your own accommodation arrangements you can do so online: www.iec2012.ie. All participants at the main Congress venue must be registered, but there are one- day, three-day, and full-week registration options. Fr Kravos will be able to help you to arrange this (see below). Please note that you must have registered for a minimum of three days if you wish to attend the concluding Mass at Croke Park. It will not be possible to attend the Mass at Croke Park if you have not registered as a delegate. Any additional tickets for this Mass are distributed around the Irish dioceses. To register your interest for the Eucharistic Congress, please contact Fr Peter Kravos by email peter.kravos@dioceseofleeds.org.uk or by post to: Leeds University Catholic Chaplaincy, 5 St Mark’,s Avenue, LEEDS LS2 9BN.

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Oct 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 16 Leeds Catholic Post FOOD BANKS AND DEACONS Not known for its welfare state safety nets, America has long resorted to charitable food banks to feed the destitute., those without sufficient income or money to but food for themselves and their families. In the last two years they have begun to appear in Britain sponsored by the Trussell Trust charity operated mainly in the south west of England. The food bank operates as a charitable system collecting and stockpiling parcels of food or getting food voucher arrangements with local supermarkets. Most are Church hall based. Parishioners collect and give food for parcels of funds for vouchers and volunteers distribute them to those they know to be in need locally. The main aim is to ensure families have the food basics and are not stigmatised by receiving. According to a recent research estimate 6% of the families of Britain regularly go seriously hungry thus damaging their physical and mental health. They simply do not have enough for themselves and their families to eat. Already there are now some 90 food banks operating in Britain and the Thrusell Trust estimated that by Christmas this year over 100,000 people will be receiving food bank assistance, sufficient food for three days. We ought to ask why food banks are needed at all but family financial crises, unexpected events crop up all the time. People lose jobs at a moments notice.Moreover access to social security emergency funds is no longer as easy as it used to be. Firstly it is now crisis loans, to be repaid (depending on your income and ability to repay) and secondly care is taken to assess real need which usually means it can be nowhere as immediately responsive as it needs to be. Many a time a young family relationship breakdown, a father literally storming out can leave a young mother on a Thursday night without any money to buy in food for her three children that weekend and without any immediate extended family support that family goes hungry or is tapped up by extortionate money lenders that will lock her into crippling levels of long term unmanageable debt and just to buy in a weekend groceries. Sadly in this day and age and what is still the fourth richest society in the world the real need is there. In his first Encyclical letter “,Deus Caritas Est”, Pope Benedict stressed that love of God and love of our neighbour must go together, spelling out that “,Anyone who needs me and whom I can help is my neighbour”, and “,despite being extended to all mankind, it is not reduced to a generic abstract and undemanding expression of love but calls for my own practical commitment, here and now”,. Moreover he pointedly reminds us that “,within the community of believers there can be no room for a poverty that denies what is needed for a dignified life”, He refers us back to the work of the early Church of the Acts of the Apostles and explains how a group of seven “,deacons”, was set up to organise the “,daily distribution”, to widows and those in need in the community..”,with the formation of this group of even ‘,diaconia’, the ministry of charity exercised in a communitarian ,orderly way became part of the fundamental structure of the Church”, he adds. This new structure of the “,service of charity “,was built in from then onwards “,towards the middle of the fourth century we see the development in Egypt of the ‘,diaconia’, the institution within each monastery responsible for all works of relief, that is to say for the service of charity. By the sixth century this institution had evolved into a corporation with full juridical standing which the civil authorities themselves entrusted with part of the grain for public distribution. In Egypt not only each monastery but each individual Diocese eventually had its own “,diaconia’, this institution then developed in both East and West”,. Pope Gregory referred to their work in Naples in the seventh century and there are regular references to the work of this Diaconia in Rome in the seventh and eighth centuries. In other words this work of charitable service on behalf of the poor was regarded as an essential work of the Church from the very beginning. What’,s more the role of the Deacon had a very specific remit in leading the parish in this respect though in later centuries it has been drawn into a more liturgical supporting role. Pope Benedict’,s encyclical could not be clearer, “,love of neighbour, grounded in the love of God is first and foremost a responsibility for each individual member of the faithful, but it is also a responsibility for the entire ecclesial community at every level, from the local community to the particular Church and to the Church universal in its entirety. As a community the Church must practice love. Love thus needs to be organised if it is to be an ordered service to the community”,. In the absence of Deacons in our parishes today as lay members of the Church perhaps more than ever we are called to “,organise love “, join up to the food bank scheme (perhaps do it ecumenically with our Christian neighbours) and ensure that noone in our midst actually goes to sleep desperate and hungry John Battle KSG Year seven CLIKS at Holy Family School and initiates new Taize Chapel T he Holy Family School has set aside a room which will be dedicated as an additional Chapel for counselling, encounter sessions and workshops. Tim Garthwaite, acting Lay Chaplain explained, Hazel our Lay Chaplain –, currently hors de combat after an operation –, will be starting to run the Spectrum bereavement counselling project soon. She sought a room, situated close to the general milieu that students could use as a drop-in at break and dinner-times. We also want to have a room that could be used freely for workshop- type activities while maintaining the specialness of the Blessed Sacrament and respecting the privilege of reserving the Sacrament in school. The room has been financed, cleaned out and refurbed by voluntary activity over the summer. It has been named the Taize Chapel to distinguish it from what we must now call the Blessed Sacrament Chapel. The incoming Year 7 were asked to launch the new room with prayer workshops Alison Way from CLIKS (Christian Links in Keighley Schools) led workshops with Year 7 students at The Holy Family School. Tim Garthwaite said, “,We are a praying community in school and it is important to expose students to as many forms of prayer as we can. While students are with us they will be making choices that will form their adult life that includes their spiritual life. Students were invited to explore five activities: Thinking about the power of God using a plasma ball, Comparing worries and anxieties to a heavy stone weighing them down, thinking about questions they would ask God if they had the opportunity, Reflections on family and friends, Reflections (quite literally, using a mirror) on themselves. Participants had the option of recording prayers and thoughts on stones, post-it notes and paper cut to the shape of a dove. Some were private between the students and the Lord, these were set aside and destroyed after the session to keep them private. Others, with consent, were laid up in the Blessed Sacrament Chapel MARY’,S MEALS L ocal representatives of the International Charity Mary’,s Meals attended a special presentation assembly at St John’,s School for the Deaf in Boston Spa recently to receive a cheque. Mary’,s Meals provides daily meals to chronically hungry children in their local school across the continents of Africa, Asia, Central/ South America and Eastern Europe. In this way hungry children are encouraged to attend school and, through education, gain a better future for themselves and their community Each class at St John’,s had been set the challenge of raising £,9 as this can feed a child in a country such as Malawi for a whole year. Speaking to the Wetherby News, teacher Mrs Mary McAleer who organised the fundraising at St John’,s said “,I’,m so proud of what our pupils have achieved. Each class thought of a different way to raise money so we had events such as a talent show, a hot dog sale, a soup kitchen and a sponsored walk and the total amount raised was a staggering £,738”, Residential pupils at St John’,s also supported the charity’,s Backpack Project which helps families affected by war, poverty and famine and who cannot afford to buy basic things like pencils and copy books, or even suitable clothes for their children to wear to school. A simple backpack with educational materials can be a lifeline to these children as studies show that an education is the best way a chronically poor child can escape poverty in later life.

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Page 17

Oct 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Leeds Catholic Post Page 17 OBITUARY Ken Hodgson KSG T he death occurred on Friday 23rd September of a former Director of the Leeds Diocesan Trustee, Ken Hodgson. He was sixty years of age and had been ill for some time, having been diagnosed with Alzheimer’,s disease. He was a successful businessman and for many years a member of the Holy Name parish in Leeds before moving to live at Elvington, near York. Throughout he always took an active part in the life of the diocese. In particular he was a prominent Catenian and twice served as President of the Leeds 3 Circle. He was a long-standing supporter of the annual Diocesan Pilgrimage to Lourdes and acted as a Brancardier assisting the sick until his own ill- health forced his retirement in 2008. He had also served as a Governor and later Trustee of Trinity and All Saints College in Leeds, the forerunner of Leeds Trinity University College. In the mid-1990s he was the Chairman of the ‘,Growing as a Diocese’, appeal launched by Bishop Konstant. Set an initial target of £,3 million the appeal went on to raise over £,5 million in total and amongst other projects enabled the development of a new Pastoral Centre at Hinsley Hall. Ken became a Trustee of the Diocese in 2001 and retired in 2008. For his services to the diocese he was appointed a Knight of the Pontifical Order of St Gregory the Great by Pope John Paul II in December 2002. Ken Hodgson is survived by his wife Judy and his two sons Tim and Nick, who is a member of the famous ‘,Kaiser Chiefs’, rock band. His funeral took place at St Mary and St Joseph’,s Church in Pocklington on 4th October and was attended by Bishop Roche along with a number of Leeds priests, current Trustees of the diocese, Papal Knights and Dames, and members of the Catenian Association along with many friends and colleagues from the Leeds diocese. May he rest in peace. One year on from Pope Benedict’,s State visit to the United Kingdom, Britain’,s new ambassador to the Vatican says the historic trip was an important milestone on the road to ever closer cooperation between his country and the Holy See…,…, Ambassador Nigel Baker arrived in Rome over the summer and presented his credentials to the Pope on September 9th, coinciding with his 45th birthday. “,I don’,t think one can celebrate a birthday in a better way than presenting one’,s credentials to His Holiness the Pope!”, he told me with a broad smile, following the formal presentation ceremony in the papal summer residence of Castel Gandolfo, as we sat down in a Vatican Radio studio to talk about the challenges of his new job. Born in Birmingham and raised in the south of England, Baker has spent most of his career in the Foreign Office, serving most recently as the British ambassador to Bolivia. “,There I was, several thousand miles away in La Paz, but Bolivian papers and television were covering the Pope’,s trip with interest every day,”, he said, noting the global impact of the papal visit to Scotland and England last September 16th to 19th. Since then, he said, the British government has been focused on continuing to develop a close relationship with Vatican officials and with the wider global Catholic network, especially in its commitment to development in the poorest parts of the world. The presence of the new nuncio to Great Britain, Archbishop Antonio Mennini, at the launch in London last June of a funding event, hosted by Prime Minister David Cameron, for the Global Alliance for Vaccines and Immunisation, is just one example of a tangible legacy of that visit. A recent trip to London to meet with CAFOD director, Chris Bain, as Baker recounts on his blog, is another. In his address to Pope Benedict, Baker spoke of the need to transform’,s the government’,s vision and verbal commitments into action on some of the most pressing issues such as tackling climate change, pushing for an arms trade treaty, promoting peace and dialogue or fighting poverty and disease. He is keen to stress David Cameron’,s firm commitment to maintaining the 0.7% target of national income spent on overseas development aid by 2013 “,despite difficult economic circumstances at home”,. But he is quick to stress that support for development in the poorest countries is both a responsibility of wealthier nations and “,a projection of our values overseas”,, but also “,helps us in the long run”, by creating an environment of stability for British exports and business. On the crucial question of cutting carbon emissions, Baker believes the British government must continue to “,lead by example”, but he’,s also convinced that the Holy See can have a huge moral impact in seeking international consensus on this and other global concerns. “,I think the role of Holy See and the international Catholic Church in helping to persuade governments that this needs to be a priority....can be extraordinarily powerful, so we look forward to ....hearing more loudly the voice of the Holy See on these issues”,. Closer to home, we talked about the riots and looting that plagued parts of London and other big cities for several days over the summer, suggesting a severe breakdown of the ‘,Big Society’, which Prime Minister Cameron is so keen to promote. While Baker believes it’,s dangerous to launch into a knee-jerk response to the problem without in-depth analysis and reflection on its “,complex causes”,, he is convinced that “,one of the problems is our own penal system,”, since nearly three quarters of all those over 18 who were arrested during the riots had already been in prison before. “,What is prison for?”, he asks: “,It is not just to punish, but you have to find ways to ensure that when young people ....come out of prison they can enter into society and play a positive role –, this clearly isn’,t happening.”, He is equally clear that another big part of the problem is a lack of those values which both he and Pope Benedict emphasised during their first meeting. “,As you pointed out in your speech,”, the Pope noted, “,your Government wishes to employ policies that are based on enduring values that cannot be simply expressed in legal terms. This is especially important in the light of events in England this summer. When policies do not presume or promote objective values, the resulting moral relativism, instead of leading to a society that is free, fair, just and compassionate, tends instead to produce frustration, despair, selfishness and a disregard for the life and liberty of others.”, Baker believes the Churches and other faith groups played a key role in trying to keep kids off the streets during the rioting. He says they continue to play a “,hugely important role”, in rebuilding communities and reminding politicians of their responsibilities in places where social cohesion is under threat. “,It’,s not for the government to run the way we live”,, he insisted, noting that values of compassion, tolerance and social cohesion “,have to come from below”, through the family, schools, civil society and voluntary or faith groups. Philippa M Hitchen Our Rome Correspondent Celebrating Catholic Education and Partnership Working S taff from across the Wakefield district and beyond gathered for their eighth annual partnership INSET day. It was hosted at Leeds Trinity to celebrate the Year of Catholic Education. It was an early start as teachers loaded cars, coaches and vans with their children’,s artwork following a joint themed week, celebrating the Year of Catholic Education, in the Summer term of 2011. The work was from Catholic Primary Schools across the district and beyond of the feeder schools to St Wilfrid’,s and St Thomas a Becket High schools. Art leaders from each school had co-ordinated the themed week, which culminated in a wonderful high quality display. The work was a credit to both staff and children who tried to recognise the power of their creative talents. The partnership had invited their secondary headteacher colleagues, clergy, governors and Diocesan officers to share the day. The day began with a very humorous and pertinent presentation by world- renowned education author and academic, Professor Gerald Grace, whose presentation ‘,Maintaining Integrity’, explored the fundamental principles of Catholic Education. Professor Grace is the Director of the Centre for Research and Development in Catholic Education at the Institute of Education, University of London. The Centre undertakes research on the distinctive history and culture of Catholic schooling and issues of ethos, curricula, leadership and `effectiveness` of Catholic education, nationally and internationally. Professor Grace joined all the staff for a wonderful spirited celebration of Eucharist in the University chapel followed by a shared meal together. Teachers from all the schools then took the opportunity to network and be inspired by each other’,s interpretations of the themed art displays. Staff then took these thoughts and ideas back to their classrooms to inspire their own pupils. The day finished with a short reflection focussing on the importance of joint partnership working and shared experiences. Bishop helps local charities T HE Bishop of Leeds has helped a local charity renowned for tackling poverty to celebrate the achievements of its volunteers. The Right Reverend Arthur Roche met staff and volunteers from the St Vincent Support Centre to hear personal tales of how the Centre has helped vulnerable adults gain skills and confidence through its free support services which include debt advice, counselling, adult education and supportive volunteering placements. Among those met by Bishop Arthur last Saturday, was Sarah Ellis, now the Centre’,s shop manager, but who entered St Vincent’,s several years ago unemployed and with emotional and physical health limitations. Sarah began in voluntary work and, with the support of the staff and other volunteers, developed the confidence to apply for and gain paid work. Last year the St Vincent’,s Centre, based on York Road in East Leeds, provided direct, face-to-face support to over 1,500 vulnerable adults through its support services. Following his visit, the Bishop said: “,I have to confess that I am immensely impressed at the level of work St Vincent’,s is involved in and the enormous difference it clearly makes to thousands of people across the city of Leeds. “,It’,s inventive, it’,s creative, it’,s full of generosity and it’,s very highly skilled. It’,s very supportive of people who need support but also who need their own autonomy to express themselves and be involved in the work itself. What a terrific project for our city to have.”, Amongst those welcoming the Bishop was the Rt Hon John Battle, former MP for West Leeds and a member of St Vincent’,s management committee. He said: “,The visit by the Bishop today is affirming the hard work that has been going on quietly and for so long in this city under really difficult circumstances. “,It’,s great to welcome the Bishop to St Vincent’,s. I think he was quite surprised at the breadth of work that is being done here and I think the city as a whole doesn’,t know what’,s going on and so hopefully this will help get the word out and maybe help us get more backing in the future. “,I have to say that the demand for St Vincent’,s services is greater than ever now and we need a lot more backing, a lot more volunteers and a lot more help and for people to be aware of what we do. This is an absolutely vital piece of work in this city and without it some people will not live.”, Charlotte Walton, St Vincent’,s Centre Manager, said that the staff and volunteers were delighted at the visit. “,Bishop Arthur’,s visit, comments and genuine enthusiasm has really raised spirits at a time when our funding and future is so uncertain.”, The Bishop’,s visit to the east Leeds centre coincided with Awareness Month, which is run by its parent charity the St Vincent de Paul Society. It is an opportunity for the charity to promote its work tackling poverty nationally, including community befriending work and specialist projects such as the St Vincent’,s Centre and St Jude’,s Furniture Store, which is also based in Leeds. To find our more about the work of St Vincent’,s or the SVP, to make a donation, or to donate furniture or clothing to its community shops or furniture store, please call 0113 2484126 or email charlotte.walton@stvincents- svp.org.uk

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Page 18

Oct 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 18 Leeds Catholic Post First Friday of the Month SINGLE CATHOLICS meet at 8.00pm for mass at our Lady of Lourdes, Leeds. We also a have a program of 4-8 events during the month, walks, meals, cinema and theatre trips, etc. Phone David Easterbrook Chairman LDSC on 0113 2289468 evenings between 6 and 7.30pm only. Membership is open to all single Catholics who are free to marry within the church. Leeds Cathedral 20-35 Group Young people (20-35 years old) who attend St. Anne`s Cathedral in Leeds meet regularly every Thursday for spiritual, social and charitable activities. For further details search Facebook for “,Leeds Cathedral 20-35 Group”,, phone 07816 891872 or 07759 591233 or email leedscathedral20-35@hotmail.co.uk Crusade Mass The crusade Mass and Rosary of Mary Immaculate is held at St Patrick`s Church, Bradford, on the first Saturday of the Month after 12.15pm Mass , Second Sunday of Month 2pm Meeting of Bradford Fraternity of the Secular Franciscan Order at St. Anthony`s Convent, Clayton, Bradford.` `Third Sunday of Month 2.30pm Meeting of Leeds Fraternity of the Secular Franciscan Order at the Cathedral. Ampleforth Renewal Community Ampleforth Abbey, meet 1st Sunday each month, at Ampleforth. 11 .30am Praise, Speaker, Sharing Groups, Reconciliation, Exposition, Finishing with Mass and Healing at 4.00pm. All enquiries: Seamus McEneaney 01429 426181 Monthly Vocations Mass Mount St Joseph’,s Chapel 11am First Wednesday of Month. Calix: An organisation for those recovering from addiction and working the 12 Step Programme of AA so that they can develop and deepen their relationship with Jesus as their Higher Power. Meets on the First Sunday of every month at Corpus Christi Church, Neville Rd. Osmondthorpe. Leeds. Mass at 4.30pm followed by meeting. Contact: Fr. Michael on 01977 510266 Helpers of Gods precious infants, prayer vigils, regular weekly prayer vigils at Marie Stopes Abortuary, 7 Barrack Road.LS7 4AB, next to Jaguar car showrooms. Fridays 12-30 to 1-30, and Saturdays 9am-l1am. Monthly all night vigil of reparation in St Marys Horsforth 12th of every month, 9-30pm to 6am . Other times variable. Further details Pat 0113 2582745 Rosary rally Sat Oct 9th 2010 12- 30pm Leeds cenotaph, outside art gallery, Headrow. Contact 07747698553/ or 0113 2582745 Leeds Schola Gregoriana The Schola meets on the 2nd Saturday of each month (except August), at 2.00 p.m., for rehearsal, followed by sung Latin (Vigil) Mass in the Ordinary Form, fulfilling the Sunday Obligation. An opportunity to learn and sing Gregorian Chant on a regular basis. Contact Michael Murphy (Director) on 07810 808 530, or Peter Lawley (01423 884274), or Rev. G.M. Parfitt (01756 793794). Diary A few moments for thought and prayer I arise today Through a mighty strength: God`s power to guide me, God`s might to uphold me, God`s eyes to watch over me, God`s ear to hear me, God`s word to give me speech, God`s hand to guard me, God`s way to lie before me, God`s shield to shelter me, God`s host to secure me. A Celtic Morning Prayer Be Still Deadline: For receipt of material for next edition: November 4th 2011 Parishes receive their copies: November 20th 2011 Send articles, reports &, pictures: Mr John Grady, Hinsley Hall, 62 Headingley Lane, Leeds LS6 2BX. Send text as word doc, pictures as jpeg, e-mail to: john.grady@dioceseofleeds.org.uk Tel: 0113 261 8022. Advertising Deadline November 4th Please note All paid-for advertising is dealt with by: Louise Ward Leeds Diocesan Curia, Hinsley Hall, 62 Headingley Lane, Leeds LS6 2BX Telephone: 0113 261 8028 Email: louise.ward@dioceseofleeds.org.uk Your Cath Post Saturday 1 October 6pm Confirmation, Leeds Cathedral Sunday 2 October 9.30am Visitation St Mary &, St Monica’,s, Cottingley 11am Visitation, Sacred Heart, Bingley Monday 3 October 7pm Batley Torchlight Procession, St Mary’,s, Batley Tuesday 4 October 10am Visitation, Our Lady &, St Francis Primary School, Bradford Wednesday 5 October 10.30am Opening of new Foundation Unit, St Wilfrid’,s School, Ripon Thursday 6 October 10am Mass, Diocesan Headteachers, Leeds Cathedral Sunday 9 October 9am Visitation Immaculate Conception, Bradford 11am Visitation, St Francis, Bradford Tuesday 11 October 10.30am The New Missal, Clergy Day, Little Sisters of the Poor, Headingley Wednesday 12 October 10.30am The New Missal, Schools’, Day, SS Peter &, Paul, Sandal Thursday 13 October 10am Visitation, St Cuthbert &, First Martyrs Primary School, Bradford. VGs’, Meeting Saturday 15 October 5.30pm Visitation, St Cuthbert’,s, Bradford Sunday 16 October 10.30am Visitation, First Martyrs, Bradford Tuesday 18 October 7pm The New Missal, Catholic Chaplaincy, Cardiff Wednesday 19 October 10.30am CBCEW Standing Committee Meeting, London Thursday 20 October 10am Visitation, St Joseph’,s Primary School, Bradford Saturday 22 October 12 noon Mass in Honour of Blessed John Paul II, Leeds Cathedral Thursday 27 October 10.30am VGs’, Meeting, Bishop’,s House Friday 28 October 10.30am Meeting with Diocesan Finance Board &, Trustee Directors, Hinsley Hall Sunday 30 October 10am Visitation, St Joseph’,s, Bradford Tuesday 1 November 12 Noon Mass, Leeds Trinity University College, Horsforth Wednesday 2 November 10am WYEC Meeting, Roundhay Methodist Church, Leeds Friday 4 November 11am Mass for Deceased Bishops and Clergy, Leeds Cathedral Monday 7 to Friday 11 November Junior Clergy Retreat, Oscott College Saturday 12 November 10.30am Ministry &, Outreach to Non-Church going Catholics, York Sunday 13 November 10.30am Remembrance Service, Victoria Gardens, Leeds Monday 14 to Thursday 17 November Bishops’, Conference Meeting, Hinsley Hall Friday 18 November 2pm VGs’, Meeting, Bishop’,s House Saturday 19 November Peru Presentation, Leeds Trinity University College, Horsforth Sunday 20 November 9.30am Visitation, St Mary’,s, Selby Tuesday 22 November 10am Visitation, St Mary’,s Primary School, Selby Wednesday 23 November 11am Presbyteral Council Meeting, Hinsley Hall Thursday 24 November 10.30am Meeting with Diocesan Finance Board &, Trustee Directors, Hinsley Hall Friday 25 November 10am Governors’, Meeting, Leeds Trinity University College, Horsforth Saturday 26 November Meeting with students for the Permanent Diaconate, Hinsley Hall Wednesday 30 November 10.30am Catholic Care Trustees’, Meeting, Hinsley Hall Bishops Engagements –, October/November Singing the new Missal! Leeds –, Regular Masses in the Extraordinary Form 1962 Missal Every Sunday 3.00 p.m. St. Joseph`s, Pontefract Road, Castleford. Every Saturday (Vigil) 6.00 p.m. St. Mary`s, Gibbet Street, Halifax. Every first Sunday 11.30 a.m. Sacred Heart, Broughton Hall, nr Skipton (Sung) 4.00p.m. Holy Spirit, Bath Road, Heckmondwike. Every second Sunday 3.00 p.m. St. Peter`s, Leeds Road, Laisterdyke, Bradford. (Sung) Every third Sunday 4.00p.m. Holy Spirit, Bath Road, Heckmondwike. 5.00p.m. St. Augustine`s, Harehills Road, Harehills, Leeds. Every Monday 9.30 a.m. Sacred Heart, Broughton Hall, nr Skipton Every Wednesday 9.30 a.m. Sacred Heart, Broughton, nr Skipton Every Friday 9.30 a.m. Sacred Heart, Broughton Hall, nr Skipton. Every Saturday 9.30 a.m. Sacred Heart, Broughton Hall, nr Skipton. Every first Saturday 11.30a.m. Holy Spirit, Bath Road, Heckmondwike Every fifth Saturday (Vigil) 4.00 p.m. Notre Dame, Leeds University Chaplaincy, St. Mark`s Avenue, Leeds For further information please see the Latin Mass Leeds Blogsite –, www.lmsleeds.blogspot.com T he Diocesan music department has been very busy over the last few months encouraging people from across the Diocese to grasp the opportunities offered by the new translation of the Roman Missal. The new Roman Missal contains more music than before –, encouraging us to ‘,sing THE mass’, and not just ‘,sing AT mass.’, Simple settings of the sung portions of the Mass are provided for every parish to sing, along with music for the priest for the preface, Eucharistic prayer etc. These settings of the ‘,Missal Tones’,, at the request of Bishop Arthur, are being used in parishes and schools across the Diocese between September and Advent so that we all have a common musical setting of the new texts. Parish musicians from across the Diocese came together at Leeds Cathedral at the beginning of June to find out what the new Missal would mean for those who lead music in parishes. The reasons for the new translation were discussed, as well as differences between the current texts and the new ones. Participants had the opportunity to learn the new Missal tones, and copies were given out for musicians to take back to their parishes. A session for priests was held at Hinsley Hall, where a number of priests came together to look at the presidential chants with Christopher McElroy (Assistant Diocesan Director of Music.) Changes in the musical formularies were examined, and each priest was given a CD and booklet of chants to take home and practice! In September diocesan Choral Directors began teaching 45 schools from across the Diocese the new Missal Tone settings of the Kyrie, Gloria, Holy Holy, Memorial Acclamation and Lamb of God. Several schools have begun using the missal tones at Mass, finding that the simplicity of the music helps the children to learn the new texts quickly and prayerfully. The end of September saw a follow up session for parish musicians at Leeds Cathedral. Musical settings of the new translation were sung and evaluated (for use after Advent as all parishes are asked to use the Missal Tones until then.) Workshops were then given on vocal techniques for those leading music in parishes, teaching congregations new music and accompanying the Missal Tones on the organ. The day finished with all the participants forming the choir to lead the singing at the Cathedrals 6pm Sunday evening Mass, at which they sang the Missal tones and all the responses at Mass celebrated by the Cathedral Dean, Mgr Moger. Resources for singing the new Missal (including sheet music, sound files, organ accompaniments etc) can be found on the music website: www.dioceseofleedsmusic.org.uk

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Page 19

Oct 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Leeds Catholic Post Page 19 O n Saturday 10 September, I organised ( with help from others ) a Pretty in Pink Night to raise funds for Ovarian Cancer and St Clares . The reason behind the night is that my mum died from Ovarian Cancer two years ago and loved pink, in fact she had 56 pink lipsticks. We loved to have cosmetic parties and get togethers , so I decided two years ago to hire St Clares and did the first fundraiser that raised £,500. This time after much discussion, as I am now a committee member, we changed a few things and added a pink quiz, which added to a raffle, name the pink dogs, tombola and donated fantastic pink prizes, raised a grand total of £,1,100. Everyone paid an entry fee which meant they were in a draw for a £,100 basket of Virgin Vie products . They all brought a pink prize and wore something pink ( see the photos) . It was a great night and I hope will be an annual event. It also helped to raise awareness of Ovarian Cancer as it is known as a ",silent killer", Pretty in Pink Night O ver the past five years St. Mary’,s Catholic School in Menston has developed a unique partnership with a school in one of South Africa’,s poorest rural areas. This summer, fourteen students and four members of staff visited Mnyakanya School in the Nkandla region of Kwa Zulu Natal to develop the collaborative work between the two schools and wider community which is referred to as the Bambisanani Partnership (Bambisanani being the Zulu word for ‘,working hand in hand’,). The visit was led by Assistant Headteacher and founder of the Bambisanani Partnership, David Geldart supported by Lucy Watson from St. Mary’,s, Peter Latham from Prince Henry’,s Grammar School, Otley and Mick Russell, HSBC Premier Manager. Fourteen Sixth Form students had prepared for eighteen months for the visit and included: George Brabin, Georgina Byrne, Jamie Carter, Jessica Connolly, Eleanor English, Torquil Hall, Freya Kew, Ciara Hanstock, Harry Minchella, Robert Neesam, Brogan O’,Connor, Gemma Pennock, Patrick Smith and Alessandra Valle-Metaxas. The Nkandla region is in the heart of Zululand and is extremely deprived with 90% unemployment, 60% adult illiteracy and one of the highest HIV/Aids rates in the world with one in three adults infected. The Bambisanani Partnership has a key focus of using sport as a catalyst to promote education, leadership, health and global understanding. On this year’,s visit the St. Mary’,s students mentored twenty Mnyakanya students to gain the Bambisanani Leadership Award. An aspect of the award was for students from both schools to jointly organise and deliver a Multi-Skill Sports Festival and a Literacy Festival for four local Primary Schools. The mentoring programme was a tremendous success as were both festivals. Students from St. Mary’,s and Mnyakanya taught reading and sports skills to over sixty children from Ntowane, Halambu, Khomo, Kwamanqondo Primary Schools on the final day of the visit. St. Mary’,s project breaks new ground in South Africa

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Page 20

Oct 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 20 Leeds Catholic Post RAIN HOLDS OFF M onday October 3rd was the day chosen to hold the Torchlight procession in Batley this year. As people from across the Diocese and beyond gathered outside the Town Hall it started to look as if all the good weather that everyone had enjoyed had come to an end and the rain was about to come down. Fortunately this did not happen though a few light showers blew through. As usual as well as the local people of Batley there were also buses from across the Diocese and even from Rochdale. They were joined by civic dignitaries, the local MP and Bishop Roche, who led the service. Fr John Berry, a local Batley boy himself, preached the homily, which he opened by telling everyone he had first been at the procession with his mother who was then pregnant with him. He went on to talk about the role of women as mothers and what a special place Mary played in the scheme of things as the Mother of Jesus. He reminded everyone that Fr Gallon had established the procession –, some 51 years ago to pray for peace and it was through Mary that those prayers for peace were directed. As the Bishop started the Rosary the congregation of at least 1,000moved out to make their way to St Mary’,s church. Not all of course could get into the church but those that didn’,t stood outside as the Bishop concluded the evening with Benediction.

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