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Leeds Catholic Post History

Newspaper for the Diocese of Leeds

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Sep 2009 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 1

Sep 2009 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Whats inside Lourdes Pilgrimage 2009 Page 10 Fr Kelly blesses race start Page 16 CATHOLIC POST THE NEWSPAPER FOR THE DIOCESE OF LEEDS SEPTEMBER 2009 www.dioceseofleeds.org.uk www.catholicpost.org.uk A new university community is welcomed into the Leeds diocese this September as Leeds Trinity University College comes into being in time for the new academic year. Formerly Leeds Trinity &, All Saints, the Horsforth based institution gains its new status following the award in July of Taught Degree Awarding Powers by the Privy Council. Currently the University of Leeds awards degrees to Leeds Trinity graduates under the terms of an accreditation agreement. As a university college Leeds Trinity will in future design and approve its own degree programmes and award its own degrees. This is a significant development for the institution, founded in 1966 as a Catholic teacher training college, with a first intake of just over 100 students. One of only three Catholic university colleges nationwide, Leeds Trinity has seen great expansion since those early days, now offering a wide range of degree programmes to around 3000 students. The new name Leeds Trinity University College has been chosen to make the status of the institution clear in the UK and internationally, and reflect both its Catholic heritage and proud association with the city of Leeds. Ed Anderson, Chair of Leeds Trinity’,s Board of Governors, said, “,The award of University College status is a major achievement for Leeds Trinity and is a credit to Principal Professor Freda Bridge and all the staff who have been involved with the project. The College is now entering a very exciting phase in its development as it improves its offer to students with its new status together with a major investment in new facilities.”, The new institutional title is the only immediate change, as students currently studying at Leeds Trinity will still have their degrees awarded by the University of Leeds. The first students to enrol for Leeds Trinity University College degrees will be postgraduates arriving in September 2010 and undergraduates arriving in September 2011. A programme of events to celebrate the launch of Leeds Trinity University College is planned, to include a civic reception and a number of keynote speeches during the coming academic year. Photo: Leeds Trinity 2009 graduates celebrate their achievements Leeds Trinity University College takes Catholic education to a new level BG Motors family firm established in 1979 personal service and attention to detail full vehicle sourcing service available after care necessary for trouble free motoring member of the GoodGarageScheme.co.uk free collection and delivery from home or work 11 Cowper Road, Leeds tel - (0113) 248 4441 view our cars at www.bgmotors.co.uk CATHOLIC CARE (Diocese of Leeds) - Taking the Caring Church into the community

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Page 2

Sep 2009 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 2 COME AND SEE COME AND SEE Echoing the Person of Christ D uring Come and See Year 4 we have been thinking about Passing on the Faith. How do we, as adults, learn more about our faith so we can pass it on to others? At the heart of catechesis we find, in essence, a Person, the Person of Jesus of Nazareth, the only Son from the Father…, who suffered and died for us and who now, after rising, is living with us forever.”, Catechism of the Catholic Church 426 During the past three years a number of parishes and deaneries around the diocese have been involved in the Echoes course which is devised by Maryvale Institute. Echoes is a “,parish-based training course for handing on faith”,. It can be run in a parish setting by a parish group. It is designed especially for catechists working with either children or adults and provides a rounded formation in the central aspects of the Catholic faith and how to transmit this to others in different contexts. It is a course that is suitable for complete beginners, but it is also helpful for those already involved in catechesis. Echoes consists of a leader’,s guide and a participants’, pack containing texts and discussion material. There are eleven sessions, each one lasting about two hours, run by a leader or leaders. The sessions can be held weekly or monthly or however the parish or deanery group wishes to organise them. The material is designed to be easily accessible and flexible. After an initial training weekend run by Maryvale at Hinsley Hall in 2006 Echoes courses have been held in Dewsbury, Wakefield, Leeds and Huddersfield. The response has been very positive: “,I was worried that I would not be able to understand it (Echoes), let alone be able to pass it on to others! But I was welcomed unquestioningly and met some wonderful people who have gone on to become great friends.”, Terry Bell, Chickenley “,It was a privilege to share with some a new excitement regarding the resources available to help them in their own journey, thus empowering and enabling them to Echo Christ to others.”, Mary Gaughan, Normanton Members of the Echoes team “,have grown in confidence in handing on faith and they have been able to develop their own personal qualities, knowledge and understanding of the Catholic faith.”, Jennifer Roche, Batley For further information about Echoes and forming a parish team to lead the sessions contact Linda Pennington at the Vicariate for Evangelisation, 0113 261 8043 or linda.pennington@dioceseofleeds.org. uk See also www.maryvale.ac.uk The Echoes resource packs can be purchased fro St Paul’,s Bookshops in Leeds and at Hinsley Hall and are published by the Catholic Truth Society. Go Make Disciples LAUNCHING COME &, SEE YEAR 5 A s Year 4 of Come &, See draws to a close, we look forward to our fifth and final year of the diocesan process for renewal. The launch of Come &, See Year 5 will take place on Saturday 31st October at the Cedar Court Hotel, Bradford. Bishop Roche has invited Fr Robert Barron as the guest speaker. He is an internationally renowned Catholic Evangelist and theologian, and will give three presentations on the day. Parishes, Schools and University Chaplaincies are invited to send representatives. Booking forms and information will be sent to parish priests. If you would like to attend, please see your priest, or alternatively, visit the Come &, See website (Year 5 - events) www.comeandsee.org.uk S t. Patrick`s Church, Sedgefield Terrace, Bradford re-opened its doors on Tuesday 1st September and begin its new role as a City Centre Mission. Following the retirement of Fr. Jeremiah Murphy on 9th August the parish of St. Patrick`s was amalgamated with that of St. Joseph and designated a City Centre Mission Church. Following the review of Catholic structures in Bradford during 2005-06 the Bishop announced that he would like to establish a mission in the very heart of Bradford. Until such a time as a city centre location can be secured this mission would be centred on St. Patrick`s, Sedgefield Terrace. This plan is now being put in place and each weekday the Church will be open for Exposition of the Blessed Sacrament and Confessions from 11am –, 12 noon. The Angelus will follow and Mass will be celebrated at 12.15pm. The Vicar General Mgr McQuinn said “,In time it is hoped that people will be as supportive of this Church at the centre of Bradford as they are of the Cathedral at the heart of Leeds.”, New beginnings for St Patrick’,s Diocese of Leeds Vicariate for Evangelisation A SHORT COURSE FOR CATECHISTS Catechesis: General Practice &, Principles The Vicariate for Evangelisation offers a five week introductory course for catechists covering the following: What Is Catechesis? Faith Growth: A Biblical Model for Catechesis The Rite of Christian Initiation of Adults (RCIA) : Model for Catechesis Working with Adults Evangelisation, Catechesis and Religious Education The course runs from 7.15-9.30pm on the following dates in 2010: Tuesday 12th January Tuesday 19th January Tuesday 26th January Tuesday 2nd February Tuesday 9th February This is one of the specialist modules for the Catholic Certificate of Religious Studies (CCRS) but can be taken as an individual course. All sessions take place at Hinsley Hall and will be led by Linda Pennington Cost £,35 For further information or to book please contact Janine Garnett on 0113 261 8040 or janine.garnett@dioceseofleeds.org.uk You Are Cordially Invited To LEEDS CATHEDRAL CHURCH OF ST ANNE Great George Street for African &, Caribbean Mass Date: Sunday 25th October 09 Time: 1:00pm All Are invited Written prayer petitions are collected at start of mass Please allow for second collection at the end of the mass and dry food donation for the needy Light refreshment and Music follow immediately after mass in the Cathedral Hall of St Anne Great George Street Leeds LS2 8BE

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Page 3

Sep 2009 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

YOUTH Page 3 Leeds Diocesan Youth Service ‘,All who are thirsty, come!’, (Rev 22:17) For more information about how to register for Leeds Diocesan Youth Service events, check out: www.leedsyouth.org.uk, contact Anna at the Youth Office: 0113 261 8058 / abcleedsdiocese@hotmail.com or join the “,Leeds Diocesan Youth Service”, Facebook group. Saturday 19th September St. Pio Day, 1-6pm, St. Pio Friary, Bradford Wednesday 23rd September “,Revelation”,, 7 - 9pm, Cathedral Hall, Leeds Saturday 26th September Diocesan Walsingham Pilgrimage, Walsingham Wednesday 30th September Holy Hour: Praying for the Young People we work with, 2-3pm, Hinsley Hall Saturday 3rd October Overnight Youth Vigil with St. Thé,rè,se Booking Necessary! 10pm-6am, Leeds Cathedral Saturday 17th October Leeds Oasis Prayer Group, 1-6pm, Leeds University Chaplaincy Wednesday 21st October “,Revelation”,, 7-9pm, Cathedral Hall, Leeds Leeds Diocesan Youth Service Calendar Inter-Diocesan Football Tournament W hat started out as a suggestion put to Father Philip Conner, the Diocesan Youth Chaplain in the Diocese of Lancaster, that we ought to have a game of football against another diocese, was soon being acted on as Father Philip contacted Youth Officers from the north of England who thought this an excellent idea and were keen to be involved with and against other young people in a friendly sports competition. The Day Began With Mass On 13th June 2009, Corpus Christi High School in Preston hosted the first inter-diocesan 7-a-side football tournament, which included teams from the Diocese of Lancaster, Leeds and Liverpool. The day started with Mass in the chapel at the Little Sisters of the Poor, prior to the afternoon of sun, football and a good dose of screaming supporters! Having never played as a team before, the eight lads from Leeds did us proud! It was a thoroughly exhausting afternoon of back to back games. Throughout the game there were several injuries from all the teams and the physiotherapist, Rosie O’,Donnell, was kept very busy as the heat and fatigue was energy sapping, but the tournament was proving great fun. Leeds Make It To The Final Much to the surprise of the newly formed Leeds team, the lads made it to the final against one of the teams from Lancaster! At 4.15pm the final started. Both teams had worked so hard to get there and it showed as players were now feeling the affects of the previous games. After 5 minutes of the first half Lancaster won a corner and it was crossed in and a header scored into the bottom left hand corner of the net put Lancaster ahead. Leeds pushed searching for an equaliser against a strong defence but Lancaster appeared to be on their way to success. Fortunately, it was in the final minutes of the game that Leeds scored an equaliser and that was enough to secure the game into penalties. By this time the tension was incredible, as the whole of the ground came to a complete silence. Both teams scored and missed during the penalty shoot out, but That meant Lancaster had won the first Inter- diocesan Football Tournament, 2-1 on penalties. Celebrations and cheers from all round the pitch started and the presentation was made to the winning team. Meanwhile, the moment of disappointment amongst the Leeds team was short-lived as they planned on how they could be bigger and better for next year’,s tournament! The gang from Leeds, after a sleepy journey back on the mini bus, ended the day with a lovely meal in Leeds. Many thanks to Father Phillip Conner for organising this extremely enjoyable competition and to Sean McMahon and Father O’,Keefe for refereeing the matches. Back2School Holy Hour W ith the new term looming, young people from across the Diocese of Leeds came to Hinsley Hall on the afternoon of Wednesday 2nd September to pray in the presence of the Blessed Sacrament for the coming year. After the Holy Hour, the young Catholics relaxed and chatted over tea and cakes of the joys and sorrows of their summer holidays and pilgrimages. Many of the young people who attended will be key in leading the youth events surrounding the Visit of the Relics of St. Thé,rè,se of Lisieux. Now Recruiting: 11-13 year Old ‘,Detectives’, H ow many times is cheese mentioned in the Bible? Who was shipwrecked and imprisoned repeatedly? How many loaves and fish fed three thousand people? These are just some of the questions being posed as part of a new Catholic Bible Detectives’, resource for tweenagers. The monthly Bible Detectives’, Quiz is one of the many downloads available on the www.yfaith.co.uk website. The aim of the Detectives’, resource is to further 11-13 year olds learning about Jesus and to encourage them to read the Scriptures. Emily Davis, Yfaith Project Co-ordinator, said: ‘,Engaging young people with the Bible can be a real challenge. Youth ministry is often about finding fun ways to explore faith, and that’,s what we’,re trying to do with the Bible Detectives’, Quiz. It’,s really rewarding to see this age group grow in confidence in using their Bibles as they find out fun facts as well as key truths about their faith. The quiz is an ideal tool for evangelisation.’, Each month the children who complete the quiz are invited to enter a prize draw to win a Bible, a Yfaith t- shirt and pen. Gemma Wildsmith, a secondary School Chaplain, said: ‘,It’,s really helpful to have an exciting way of getting the pupils into reading their Bibles - I’,m looking forward to the possibility of my school becoming the first Bible Detectives’, School.’, www.yfaith.co.uk is a site designed to enable 11-13 year old Catholics to engage with, explore and express their faith. It is also a vehicle for supporting catechists, youth workers, parents, grandparents and chaplains, by providing downloadable resources for use with this age-group. Schools and youth groups are invited to become ‘,Bible Detective Schools’,, or ‘,Bible Detective Youth Groups’,, whilst families of this age group could do the quiz together. Also available on the Yfaith website are weekly commentaries on the Sunday Gospel, monthly discussion starters, magazine style articles and quizzes, and downloadable prayers for those who want to join the ‘,virtual prayer group’,. The website is an initiative of the Catholic Agency to Support Evangelisation (CASE). For more information email: yfaith@caseresources.org.uk or call 020 7901 4863 GUARANTEED WEEKLY PRIZES , 1st Prize £,2,000 , 2nd Prize £,200 , 3rd Prize £,50 , Plus 150 prizes of £,5 each WEEKLY PRIZES Entry only £,1 per week - Drawn every Friday INTERESTED? Please return the coupon below to: The Lottery Office, Wheatfields Hospice, Grove Road, Leeds, LS6 2AE. For more information telephone 0113 278 1500 NOW St Gemma’,s and Wheatfields Lottery If you want to help JOIN NOW Please make cheques payable to: ST GEMMA’,S &, WHEATFIELD LOTTERY Mr/Mrs/Miss/Ms/Other Name .................................................................... Address ...................................................................................................... .................................................................................................................... .................................................................................................................... Postcode:................................... Tel: ......................................................... PLEASE TICK PREFERRED PAYMENT METHOD AND RETURN TO THE LOTTERY OFFICE ❏, CHEQUE –, Minimum £,10 (to be sent now) ❏, STANDING ORDER ❏, CASH COLLECTION Visa/Switch Telephone 0113 278 1500 CALL NOW! We can all be winners £,1 gives you the chance to win £,2,000 GIFT VOUCHERS NOW ON SALE Winners are automatically paid by post each week. All profits shared equally between St Gemma’,s &, Wheatfields Hospices. Registered with the Gambling Commission for Great Britain LOTTERY NEW MEMBERS’, FORM

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Page 4

Sep 2009 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 4 FAMILY LIFE / SIDELINES / MUSIC Sidelines I n the news business, we have just had the traditional holiday “,silly season”,…,. I find it difficult to come to terms with “,Barring and Vetting”,, probably because it has such a silly name. I couldn’,t agree more with the overall intention, but there is a danger in setting up a whole industry based primarily on criminal records: if you have escaped or evaded a criminal record, then your employer can be lured into a sense of false security. If you enlarge the scope of these “,records”, you are in danger of convicting people without trial. Interviews and references are now so obsessed with politically correct equal opportunities that they can protect the abuser- or anyone- from probing questions and enquiries, so the whole thing becomes unbalanced- and so again we rely too heavily on a criminal records check. Not only this, but B&,V costs- it carries a tax of £,64 on each use, used to pay costs and subsidise the costs of volunteers, who do not pay. The risk is that the costs and value of this scheme will expand out of proportion to its value. If you live in Leeds, when you read this, your wastebin may be disappearing under a pile of black bags- or worse. The extraordinary thing about this dispute is that- if they are not being horribly misrepresented- the Council is really suggesting that any of its employees are going to take a significant pay cut with no corresponding benefit. In the executive suites of some Councils, this may not be too much to ask- the Mayor of Doncaster recently got himself elected on the platform of a reduction in his pay- but are you really serious about the people who empty your bin? You can bargain over pay- an annual pay rise conditional upon, say, putting bins back where you found them- but imposing paycuts will surely never work. The government has tangled up equal opportunities dogma with Victorian labour relations- and it looks silly. I don’,t have Sky TV: I never see anything much in its normal schedules and I object to paying to watch the sport that used to come bundled with my TV licence fee. I was however puzzled by Sky’,s James Murdoch who attacked the Beeb in a recent lecture. I could certainly criticise the BBC- for sidelining &, dumbing down Christianity, for messing with the musical Proms and failing to put them all on TV, for exposing me to Robert Peston: but each of these grumbles has a compensation. The Channels that brought us Wallander- for a start- cannot be all bad. James Murdoch attacks the BBC for charging a fee which means that at least ten minutes of every hour is not advertisements, and being able to fund a first class free internet service. The argument seems to be that charging for internet through the licence stops him charging for his own Newspapers’, online services- so we stop people looking at the Beeb so they can pay for The Times or the Sun online- or am I being silly? Benchmark Music Past: In August, four members of Leeds Diocese attended a music and liturgy Summer School in Norfolk. One hundred and eight participants, including clergy, religious and laity from all over the country- and as far away as Denmark- converged on St Gabriel’,s Conference Centre in Ditchingham for the five-day course organised by the Society of Saint Gregory (www.ssg.org.uk). The theme for the week was “,As we wait in joyful hope”, and keynote addresses on the theme of Christian hope were given by Bishop Michael Evans of East Anglia, his Vicar General, Mgr Tony Rogers, and Ann Blackett, from the Diocese of Nottingham Liturgy Commission. The usual sociable atmosphere was maintained: workshops included sessions on composition led by internationally renowned composer Christopher Walker, on planning liturgies, proclaiming the Word, and sight reading music. There were also seminars on liturgy and devotion, diversity of liturgical practice and musical repertoire. Music Present: The first Sunday in September saw tanned and holidayed members of the Music Group at St Joseph`s, Pudsey play together again. We sang one of my favourites, `Sing of the Lord’,s Goodness`: Not many hymns are in 5/4 time - if you`re wondering how the tune goes, think Dave Brubeck`s `Take Five`! Music Future: Autumn is around the corner, and before you know it, it`ll be Advent. Musicians, prepare yourselves! There is a Repertoire Sharing afternoon, `Music for Advent` on Sunday, 18th October, from 2.45 pm to 4.45pm at St Benedict`s, Garforth organised by the West Yorkshire Church Music Network, (www.westyorkshirechurchmusic.org.uk) If past events are anything to go by, it will be an excellent opportunity for swapping ideas, and learning from each other. Musical Notes by Tim Devereux Marriage Preparation Training M arriage is a primary vocation and yet it is easy to get the impression that it is quite undervalued in our socie- ty. Lots of attention is given to wedding paraphernalia and hardly any to what mar- riage means. Every engaged couple is dif- ferent and if we cherish marriage and the blessings it bestows on the couple, their families, our church and the whole of our society we should give what support we can. Couples benefit from taking time out before their wedding day, time to think about what marriage means and also how to best prepare themselves to enter into it with as clear a view as possible of their own expectations, gifts (and shortcom- ings!). Our Diocesan Marriage Preparation Programme is designed to give couples the opportunity to do this in short sessions over a period of weeks. The Programme is packed with effective getting to know yourself (and each other) exercises as well as skills practice (yes, couples can and must learn to how to listen and how to handle conflict well!). Each year we provide training in the use of the Diocesan Marriage Preparation Programme for people who want to offer this wonderful opportunity to engaged couples in the comfort of their own parishes. Training is held over four evenings (7pm for 7.30pm until .9.30pm) This years dates: November Monday 9th Monday 16th Monday 23rd Monday 30th At Wheeler Hall, Great George Street, Leeds LS2 8BE Space is limited and we only have a few places left so if you think you might be called to this, or are a parish priest who wants this lay ministry developed for your parish, then contact Breda Theakston at Family Life Ministry, Hinsley Hall, 62 Headingley Lane, Leeds LS6 2BX or email flm@flm.org.uk or call 0113 261 8050. ‘,Home is a Holy Place’, Workshops Newly available: a 2 hour workshop on this exciting new DVD Resource Pack. What is it? •, A new resource from the Catholic Bishops’, Celebrating Family Project •, A moving and inspiring DVD that has the potential to change forever both how you see your own family life and how you understand and experience God •, A beautifully produced, easy to use, accessible and flexible resource for homes, schools parishes and other church groups •, It features ordinary family people (some from our diocese!) in different fam- ily situations speaking simply about their experience of God in their homes and families •, It complements our ‘,Come and See’, year of ‘,Catechesis &, Commitment - Passing on the Faith’, Who is this for? Anyone interested in family life or who works with family people: mothers, fathers, husbands, wives, children, grand- parents. How can it be used? •, to support sacramental preparation with parents before or after Baptism, First Holy Communion and Reconciliation, Confirmation •, To support vocations events which include marriage and family life •, At schools’, parents events and for 6th form students. •, As part of marriage preparation and enrichment •, With parent &, toddler groups This is not ‘,instead of’, existing catech- esis, it is one fruit of Listening 2004 and offers families a lovely chance to see God at work in our homes and in all our little daily activities. To book your free workshop: contact Linda Pennington linda.pennington@ dio- ceseofleeds.org.uk / 0113 261 8043 or Breda Theakston flm@flm.org.uk/0113 261 8050 or to arrange details. What have people said in other dioceses about this resource: “,wow! where’,s this been? Why have we not had this message before?”, “,the title Home is a Holy Place is off- putting…,they don’,t believe it’,s true”, “,our people are too poor for this it’,s too middle class”, “,it has broadened my view of holiness”, I f you are a parent or grandparent who has ever wished for something extra to help you we might have the very thing! To find out where you can join our fun and informative events for mums, dads and grandparents, go to our website at www.flm.org.uk/parenting to see if one of our cur- rent season of positive parenting programmes is planned at a school or parish near you. Or call Anne Ruane, Parenting Support Worker, on 0113 261 8050 [If you are a Head Teacher or Parish Priest and would like to get someone trained to run parents support sessions where you are then contact us too!] Help! - Especially for Parents From this …, …, to this A s we prepare for the visit of St Therese’,s relics in October let’,s think for a moment about her spirituality and it’,s rele- vance for families today. Michael Quinn, Director of the Family Caring Trust, has identified five main character- istics of St Therese’,s spirituali- ty and shown their relevance to family life today. 1) Positive Thinking: Therese countered a prevailing negativism by insisting on God’,s compassion, arguing that God, who knew all our circumstances, was the best kind of loving judge 2) The frustration of being family: Family is the first community we belong to and we can all too easily rub each other up the wrong way. Therese suffered this as much as anyone but made huge efforts to be especially kind to those who irritated her most. 3) The prayer of daily life: St Therese’,s ‘,little way’, shows how the Carmelites’, offering of their daily routines to God liberates families to see our ‘,little ways’, at home as prayer. 4) Focus on the bigger pic- ture: All our little actions can have big consequences and Therese dedicated all her daily thoughts, actions and prayers for others’, good through Jesus and in communion with all the saints. Even though enclosed in a Carmelite convent she saw herself as a missionary and was quite confident that she would spend her heaven doing good upon earth. (Her relics have even circled the earth in a space ship!) 5) Being imperfect helps! St Therese felt her smallness and weakness keenly yet realised that God loves to work through our failings - all we have to do is be open to him. Some people struggle with Therese’,s longing for suffer- ing. In families we usually have the suffering (without the longing!) as we discover that it is an unavoidable aspect of love. However, Therese came to realise that she had overem- phasised this and before she died she discovered the impor- tance of accepting the consola- tions life offers. We must learn do this in family life too, to accept God’,s refreshing gifts of friendship, laughter and sharing. For Michael Quinn’,s full article see www.flm.org.uk. To visit the relics: 3rd –, 5th October 2009 (http://saintthereserelicsleeds. webeden.co.uk.) Families are welcome at any time but on the Sunday afternoon from 1pm to 5pm we will have tea and activities including family Rosary workshop in Wheeler Hall. Why not pack a picnic lunch and turn your visit into a family pilgrimage - Everybody’,s Welcome! St Therese: A spirituality for families?

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Page 5

Sep 2009 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 5 Diocese of Leeds Vicariate for Evangelisation YOUTH &, FAMILY LIFE MINISTRIES The Diocesan Youth Service &, Family Life Ministry offer a five week introductory course covering the following: •, Context: The realities of life for families and young people today. How can, or does, the church respond to their needs? •, Message: What does the Church have to proclaim to families and to young people? •, Impact: What does this mean for the way young people and families live their mission and make choices? •, Practice: Youth and Family Life Ministries aim to equip families and young people to live their mission •, Pulling it all together: How do we talk about Youth and Family Life Ministries? How do we embark upon those ministries ourselves? The course runs from 7.15 –, 9.30 pm on the following dates in 2010: Tuesday 12th January Tuesday 19th January Tuesday 26th January Tuesday 2nd February Tuesday 9th February This is one of the specialist modules for the Catholic Certificate of Religious Studies (CCRS) but can be taken as an individual course. All sessions take place at Hinsley Hall and will be led by Anna Cowell &, Breda Theakston Cost £,35 For further information or to book please contact Janine Garnett on 0113 261 8040 or janine.garnett@dioceseofleeds.org.uk Working Together B etween them, the two univer- sities in Leeds –, the University of Leeds and Leeds Metropolitan University - serve around 65,000 students and employ many thousands of staff. The work of the Church in such a huge, but clearly defined, setting calls for unique structures. Chaplains from different traditions serve the liturgical and spiritual needs of their own people –, hence the very active ministry of the Catholic Chaplaincy. Much of the wider Church’,s ministry is carried out by an ecumenical team of chap- lains from many Christian tradi- tions. In fact, the Chaplaincy Team come from no fewer than eight Christian backgrounds: Anglican, Baptist, Catholic, Lutheran, Methodist, Quaker, Salvation Army and United Reformed Church. It is the largest ecumenical partnership in West Yorkshire. It is a long established partner- ship, going back some twenty years, and endorsed by the then leaders of the churches in the sign- ing an Ecumenical Agreement in 1994. This year an updated Universities in Leeds Chaplaincy Trust has been established, giving legal, charitable status to the enter- prise. In an historic celebration of the work of the united Chaplaincy, today’,s Church leaders, including Bishop Arthur, gathered to sign their own updated Ecumenical Agreement, promising to work together in matters that affect the common life of the Chaplaincy. Senior representatives of the two universities witnessed the signing. It was a happy and impressive occasion, making one wonder what could be achieved in parishes and other settings if churches worked more closely with Christians from other traditions. In January –, March 2010 a choice of specialist modules will be offered at Hinsley Hall: Specialist Module 1 - 2010 Specialist Module 2 - 2010 Tuesdays at 7:15 –, 9:30pm Tuesdays at 7:15 –, 9:30pm January 12, 19, 26, Feb 2, 9 February 23, March 2, 9, 16, 23 Catechesis 1 –, General Principles Catechesis 2 –, Sacramental &, Practice &, Liturgical Catechesis Catholic Schools and Religious Catholic Schools and Religious Education 1 Education 2 Philosophy Catholic Social Teaching Youth &, Family Life Ministries Interreligious Relations Liturgy Forthcoming Events Friday 25 September, 7pm A Discernment evening for men who wish to explore the possibility of priesthood will take place at Leeds Trinity University College, Brownberrie Lane, Horsforth, Leeds. Holy Hour. Talk: Why the liturgy is important (Part Two of the Catechism), by Rev Matthew Habron. Wednesday 30th September, 7pm A lecture entitled Thé,rè,se of Lisieux: a sure guide for today, will be given at Leeds Trinity &, All Saints University College, Horsforth, Leeds by Rev Christopher O’,Donnell, Associate Professor of Spirituality at the Pontifical Milltown Institute, Dublin. The lecture is to mark the visit of the relics of St Té,rè,se of Lisieux to Leeds Cathedral. Friday 2nd October, 9.30am A Vocations Presentations will be given by Fr Paul Grogan, Vocations Director and Sr Anne Hammersley cp at St Joseph’,s Catholic High School, Bradford Saturday 3rd October Vocations stall at Wheeler Hall, Leeds for the overnight youth event during the visit of the relics of St Thé,rè,se of Lisieux to Leeds Cathedral (3-5 October 2009) Friday 9th October, 9am Vocations presentation at St Bede’,s Catholic High School, Bradford. Sunday 11th October Discernment weekend at St Cuthbert’,s College, Ushaw, for men who wish to explore the possibility of the priesthood. Saturday 17th October Youth Discernment Group (for boys aged between 13 and 18 who wish to find out more about the priesthood): 10-pin bowling. Meet at Hinsley Hall, Leeds at 2pm.

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Page 6

Sep 2009 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 6 DEACONS NEWS The Visit of St Thé,rè,se O n Sunday 4th October 2009 Disability Sunday will be celebrated by churches throughout the United Kingdom. Churches are encouraged to celebrate Disability Sunday for the following reasons: •, To demonstrate that God responds to and uses disability in many different ways •, To show disabled people that God cares about them and their needs •, To raise awareness of disability and the needs of disabled people •, To give people affected by disability a voice Resources are available to help parishes and schools to raise awareness of and to celebrate disability from www.disabilitysunday.org.uk and www.throughtheroof.org . The resources can be easily downloaded from these websites. In the Leeds Diocese Disability Sunday coincides with the visit of the relics of St Thé,rè,se. The team at St Anne’,s Cathedral is committed to especially welcoming people with disabilities during the visit of St Thé,rè,se. Access to the Cathedral for people with disabilities is situated to the left-hand side when facing the west doors (at the corner of Great George Street and Cookridge Street). This will enable anyone who is frail or disabled to gain priority access to the queue to the relics in the Cathedral. The larger confessional box is accessible for wheelchair users and will be used at all confession times. Accessible toilet facilities are available in Wheeler Hall behind the Cathedral. For further information contact Linda Pennington on 0113 261 8043 or linda.pennington@dioceseofleeds.org.uk Foundations in Faith I n September 2009 a group of 30 participants began the new Diocesan Foundations in Faith course at Hinsley Hall. Foundations in Faith incorporates the Catholic Certificate of Religious Studies (CCRS) but also includes an introductory session on studying theology and Advent and Lent retreat days at The Briery in Ilkley. After the Lent retreat one participant responded that they “,enjoyed the retreat day and especially the opportunity it gave me to get to know other people who are on the course, the social aspect. It was a good chance to relax, focus and pray in a beautiful setting surrounded by people I wanted to get to know outside of a Tuesday night.”, In the first year the group has covered modules on Old Testament, New Testament, Jesus Christ and The Church. This autumn there are modules on The Sacraments and Morality. The group have enjoyed studying, praying &, socialising together and are looking forward to the second year of the course. These modules are also being offered to anyone from the diocese either as ‘,stand- alone’, courses or as an introduction to Foundations in Faith (CCRS). Please see individual advertisements below or contact Janine Garnett at Hinsley Hall for further information janine.garnett@dioceseofleeds.org.uk or 0113 261 8040 A man may be ordained deacon if he is married, but a deacon may not marry. If you are still with this important order of things, you will realise that many - but certainly not all- deacons are married- mirroring the world. Deacons’, wives are a remarkable group: no longer able to sit with their husbands at Mass and other liturgies and often having to fill the gaps created at home by his ministry, they are often, too, spiritual powerhouses for the diaconate. Although often very much involved in parish life and work, they have to keep a low profile for fear of seeming to claim a privileged position. In the selection process, they are not examined on their scone-making- that’,s an old Anglican myth, but they can be sometimes regarded in the same way. Some “,FAQS”,* -No married deacon may be ordained without the freely given, written consent of his wife. -She is expected or encouraged to participate in his formation programme as far as possible, so that both grow in discipleship. -It is important for a deacon’,s wife to follow her own path in the church- or continue to do so, flowing not from his ordination, but her baptism. -If a married man, a deacon is still, by his ordination, always a deacon. He must strive to be a sign of Christ the servant to the secular world in his job- and his marriage. This is something he shares with our few married priests, a new departure and model for the church of recent centuries. Most of the Deacons of our diocese met with Bishop Arthur recently and the fruits of the meeting will be seen in coming months. Dcn David Arblaster will be sending a summary of the meeting to deacons shortly. Deacons also met on 18th September at St Walburgas Shipley- more next time. *With help from 101 Questions &, Answers on Deacons by Dcn Bill Ditewig: Paulist Press Deacons Diary I t has been a busy Summer term for Catholic school children in Bradford with a celebratory gala concert, an international tour and national competition success! In June the Bradford Boys’, choir travelled to the Archdiocese of Mainz in Germany as the guest choir participating in the international choral festival ‘,festivocal’, with singers and choirs from across the world. The boys’, performed at concerts and liturgies in addition to taking part in a variety of social and sporting activities. Closer to home, the boys choir sing twice monthly as St Josephs church in Bradford where they are choir in residence. The 35 strong choir are drawn from catholic primary schools and St Bedes Catholic Grammar school. The Bradford Youth Choir programme this year celebrated 5 years since its inception. With 22 schools taking part in Bradford and Keighley, it is the largest single part of the Diocese of Leeds singing programme. On 20th May a packed St Georges Hall gathered to enjoy a concert performed by representatives of the 22 participating schools. The concert was a great success, many of the children performing never having been into St Georges Hall, Bradford’,s premier venue for music and the arts. In addressing the audience and performers the Lord Mayor of Bradford, Councillor John D Godward said: ", The schools and parents of these fantastically high-achieving Bradford and Keighley schoolchildren should be proud of their success and proud of themselves for their help and support.", To cap off what was already a very busy Summer term, the Bradford Girls’, choir took part in two competitions in July. In Birmingham they took part in the National Festival of Music for Youth, performing on the stage of Birmingham Town Hall. Singing alongside 20 of the country`s best youth choirs, the Bradford Girls` Choir were awarded the Music for Youth Senior choirs` award for their ‘,outstanding musicianship.` The following day in Wales, the girls competed in the Llangollen International Eisteddfod, home of the famous ‘,Choir of the World Competition.` Here they competed against choirs from all over the world, including Canada, South Africa, Czech Republic and Slovakia. In the event, the choir was place 5th (out of 16) , a remarkable result, only 5 marks behind the winning choir from the Czech Republic, and the highest placed UK choir. Bradford meets the world! S inging is a big thing today! Everywhere we look people are singing –, one looks at the ‘,X factor’,, the BBC documentary series ‘,The choir’, and the governments recently launched national singing programme ‘,Sing up’, which aims to have every primary school age child in the country singing. Singing is also a big thing here in the diocese of Leeds. In fact, the Diocese hosts the largest catholic schools singing programme in the country! Each week choral directors from the Diocese of Leeds music department visit over 30 schools throughout the Diocese, leading singing sessions with over 1000 children each week! Children are taught foundational singing techniques and repertoire both sacred and secular. Particular importance is placed on liturgical music, establishing a core repertoire of music that can be sung at Mass and other liturgies. In addition to singing in schools, the Diocese also runs ‘,elite’, choirs for those children who want to take their singing to another level. These choirs operate in Leeds Cathedral, Bradford, Huddersfield and Harrogate. A particularly exciting new development in the singing programme, is that St Patricks church in Huddersfield and St Josephs Church in Bradford now have one of the Diocesan choirs ‘,in residence’, at their church. This means on a Sunday morning high quality choral music can be heard not just in the Cathedral, but in other churches around the Diocese. Media interest in the Dioceses singing programme has been considerable. Children have broadcast on BBC Radio and Television (including a Songs of Praise programme to over 3 million viewers) and articles have appeared in national magazines, newspapers and journals. Choirs have competed in, and won prizes and awards in local and national competitions, and several choirs have represented the Diocese on an international stage with choir tours to France and Germany. Diocese of Leeds singing programme

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Page 7

Sep 2009 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

VOCATIONS Page 7 Vocation to Carmelite Life I think the call to Carmel began when I was in my mid thirties although I didn’,t recognise it as such at the time. It manifested itself in a growing sense of restlessness and emptiness. I had just come out of a relationship that was probably dysfunctional in some ways but not all bad - my boyfriend’,s definition of fanaticism was going to Mass on a Sunday! We were poles apart really. Corresponding with this restlessness was a gradual sense of being drawn to prayer and although it was somewhat erratic and casual, it felt as though something deep inside me was being awakened. After some vacillating, I decided to take a year out from my job and join a Christian Volunteer Programme, working with homeless people and living in a small Christian community. It was a life changing experience for me, in terms of a real deepening of faith. I shall always be grateful to the Daughters of Charity and the Vincentians who communicated the compassion of Jesus in their lives and in their ministry with the poor - I wanted to be like that. The need and desire to spend time in silent prayer became more persistent and I began to experience what I can only describe as a profound sense of mystery and aloneness. This wasn’,t negative at all, in fact it was charged with a mysterious potential. I didn’,t understand it - I only knew that I was drawn to it and that the Lord was in it somehow. A process of discernment, confusion, joy and terror ensued! Entering Carmel was the happy outcome of all this and I’,ve been here for 8 years now. If I were asked to choose a passage from Scripture which for me summarised my Carmelite vocation, it would be Mark 1: ‘,In the morning, long before dawn, Jesus got up, left the house and went off to a lonely place and prayed there. Simon and his companions set out in search of him and when they found him they said, “,Everybody is searching for you”,.’, I always find these words very moving - the link between the vast overwhelming need of humanity for God and Jesus’, withdrawal into this mysterious intimacy with his beloved Abba, is a beautiful image, I think of our Carmelite charism in the Church and the world. Although to some it may seem a life wasted, of ‘,holy idleness’, (as one of my friends describes it!), it is in fact an entirely apostolic vocation. The ‘,lonely place’, where we pray is not just a quiet, separate geographical location (although this is necessary to nurture and sustain our life of prayer) but more importantly it is a place of hidden encounter with Jesus in the very depths of our being. This is going on in the life of every Christian, of course, our function as Carmelites is to give witness to this reality in our lives. In this ongoing hidden encounter, Jesus helps us to uncover our fragility and wounds, sins and fears in solidarity with the rest of our broken, suffering world, effecting we believe its healing and transformation. This is not always easy, of course. It requires deep reserves of faith and trust and courage. However, lived within the context of a loving, supportive and vibrant community I see it increasingly as an immensely privileges participation in the saving work of Jesus. With St Thé,rè,se (whose relics will soon be with us) we Carmelites have begun to sing here what we shall sing eternally with ALL humanity: ‘,The mercies of the Lord’,. Sister Carmel of Jesus, Wood Hall Carmel, Wetherby Evangelisation involves helping the vulnerable M ark Wiggin, Chief Executive of Catholic Care, outlined his plans to increase awareness of the agency’,s activities in a presentation to seminarians during their annual summer meeting with the Bishop. He wished the charity to become as well-known as CAFOD locally, he said. He added that he aimed to engage more with lay people in parishes and provide them with opportunities for engaging in charitable works. In a wide-ranging presentation at Hinsley Hall, Mr Wiggin looked at the history of the agency and examined its current work which includes an adoption service, residential children’,s homes, a school social work programme, and services to help those with mental health issues, learning disabilities, the elderly and those who are vulnerable in the wider community. Situating his comments within recent Church social teaching, including the recent Papal encyclicals Deus Caritas Est and Caritas in Veritate, he said, “,We evangelise through what we do.”, He entitled the presentation “,I am Caritas,”, explaining that each member of the Church has a vocation, namely to share in the Church’,s mission of bringing God’,s love to the world. For the Church’,s service of the poor to be effective, he said, it is necessary that she have members who are, to quote Deus Caritas Est, “,professionally competent,”, and it is here that Catholic Care makes its irreplaceable contribution. Mr Wiggin also noted some of the challenges facing Catholic Care and in particular its ongoing struggle to find a way of continuing to provide an adoption service, despite a court ruling that its policy of refusing to place children with couples in same-sex relationships falls foul of recently enacted equality legislation. The agency found adoptive families for ten children last year. Earlier Bishop Roche celebrated Mass with the fifteen seminarians and prospective seminarians and interviewed the former. After lunch, the group, led by Vocations Director Fr Paul Grogan, went on a three-mile walk along the beginning of the Dales Way in Headingley. Classified Advertising NATURAL FAMILY PLANNING SERVICE (YORKSHIRE) For free, confidential tuition in the symptothermal method of natural family planning telephone: Leeds (0113) 260 0844 The N.F.P. Service is sponsored by the Diocese of Leeds C A HOLIC C ARE DIOCESE OF LEEDS Taking the Caring Church into the Community YOUR LEGACY WILL HELP US TO HELP THEM Catholic Care is working on behalf of the Diocese of Leeds. Since 1863 the Society has been helping and supporting local people. The needs of the children and families we serve are as pressing as ever. Please help us to help them by including Catholic Care in your Will. For more details about our work and how you can help, please contact: Catholic Care (Diocese of Leeds) 11 North Grange Road, Headingley, Leeds LS6 2BR Tel: 0113 3885 400 Fax 0113 3885 401 W eb S ite: www.catholic-care.org.uk Registered Charity: 513063 Wanted for the Missions Large Statues (Even damaged ones), old vestments, pictures, church fittings, rosaries, prayer books, etc. Please ring Mr. B. Ferris KSC, 102 Moor St, Earlsdon, Coventry CV5 6EY Tel: 02476 676986 LEEDS CATHOLIC MARRIAGE CARE Marriage isn’,t always easy —, Counselling can help For an appointment in confidence, with an understanding and experienced listener, please telephone: LEEDS 0113 261 8045 HUDDERSFIELD 01484 422523 A Relationship Counselling Service For Advertising contact CathCom on 020 7112 6710

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Page 8

Sep 2009 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

PAGE 8 CAFOD A Different Start to the New School Term for Bradford Students K atie Dearden, Megan Crowley, Isabella Ricordo and Kimi Omolokun with Bishop Arthur at the garden party organised by the Lord Lieutenant of Yorkshire for Young Achievers. The students from St. Joseph’,s Catholic College in Bradford will spend the first week of term visiting mums and babies in the primary health care clinic in Ankpa, Kogi State, Nigeria. They will witness the positive impact for mums and babies of CAFOD’,s health care programmes that their fundraising has supported. Whilst in Jos, Plateau State, the girls will meet students from St. Louis College to share with them the story of their mums and babies packs and how people in Leeds Diocese have supported them. Bishop Arthur has given the girls a special letter of greeting to hand to Archbishop Ignatius Kaigama of Jos, who is delighted to welcome the girls to his diocese. Read a full report of the girls’, visit in October’,s Catholic Post CAFOD Harvest Fast day, Friday October 2nd - one billion people living with hunger T his Harvest, one billion people will be living with hunger. CAFOD knows that the global financial crisis is pushing over the edge people who are already poverty-stricken. As Harvest 2009 approaches, we want to thank parishes and schools around the Diocese, many of whom will be holding special events and collections to mark our annual Harvest Fast Day on 2nd October to help CAFOD continue to meet the growing need of our sisters and brothers in Africa, Asia and Latin America. Harvest is usually a time to celebrate the food we enjoy, gifts of the land, gifts from God. Above all else this season reminds us of the abundance and fruitfulness of God’,s creation. However, for many living in some of the poorest parts of the world, there is simply no food. The global financial crisis, massive hikes in food prices and climate change have all intensified the problems for those living in poverty. For them, the effects of the financial crisis are now a matter of life or death. CAFOD partners in Nairobi, Kenya, told us the story of Margaret. She lives with her seven children in Mathare slum. Two years ago Margaret had a decent job and home. Her family had enough to eat, not a lot, but enough. Then the factory she worked at shut down. The family now sleep side by side in one room. Margaret goes hungry so her children can eat. Her story is repeated time and time again throughout the world. Margaret said: “,In 2007 prices were controlled, we could afford to buy food, it was not this madness of rising prices everyday. Since 2008 prices have been going up uncontrollably. The maize flour is the worst. It was 50 shillings (43 pence) in 2007. Last year it was 75 shillings (65p) and now it’,s 95 shillings (82p) for a 2 kilogram packet. “,When you can’,t provide for your family you become useless. I’,ll walk any length of time to a cheaper market just to get something for my kids. I may get a small extra job like cooking at the Church or tutoring kids. When there’,s no job and no food you’,ll find me in the Church where I volunteer. It gives me peace and somewhere to go so my kids don’,t see me sad.”, Pope Benedict XVI’,s in his social Encyclical –, ‘,Caritas in Veritate’, published last month, said that it is an ethical imperative to ‘,feed the hungry’,. Across its programmes, CAFOD partners are responding to this growing crisis by ensuring that the poorest and the most vulnerable are reached with life saving food. CAFOD is able to respond where the greatest needs lie through the generosity of Catholics in parishes and schools in our Diocese. Despite the complexities of our supporters’, lives and the demands on their incomes, it’,s humbling to know that people are still willing to give their time and money. Harvest is about sharing with those less fortunate and now people in the developing world need our support more than ever. The support from Leeds Diocese this harvest will make a huge difference. This year’,s Harvest Fast Day is on Friday 2nd October. CAFOD raised nearly £,1,300,000 last year through Harvest Fast Day fundraising activities the people of Leeds Diocese alone raised £,39,039 CAFOD is also involved in lobbying world leaders, asking that leaders of rich countries to act now to ensure that people like Margaret are given more support to help them cope with a crisis they did nothing to create. CAFOD raised nearly £,1,300,000 last year through Harvest Fast Day fundraising activities. The people of Leeds Diocese alone raised £,39,039. Let’,s hope we can show our gratitude for all God’,s gifts by sharing generously this Harvest Fast Day too Bread of life Merciful God, hear the cries of your people. Hungry for bread and starved of justice, craving sustenance, they dream of fullness and days of plenty. Jesus, bread of life, fill all who hunger with the taste of freedom from oppression and the succulent aroma of hope. Help us as we strive for justice and try to balance the scales so long tipped in our favour. God of hope, nourish and inspire us. Feed us and work through us, so that all people can delight in the richness of your banquet and share in the bounty you intended for all. Amen ©, Catherine Gorman/CAFOD Calling all over 55’,s in Huddersfield –, Who said you can’,t get ‘,owt for nowt’, these days! C AFOD is working with other charities to offer our friends the chance to make a will and make a difference –, for free! Did you know? One in every seven people CAFOD helped last year was helped thanks to gifts left in our supporters’, wills. Some of these gifts were included by our friends in their wills more than 20 years ago. Through their legacies, they are now providing food, water, healthcare and support to communities all around the world. If you live or work in the Huddersfield area and are thinking about making or updating your will, why not take advantage of Free Wills Month? Free Wills Month offers UK resident members of the public aged 55 and over the opportunity to have their will written for free by participating local solicitors. This offer is limited and will run throughout October in select towns and cities, including Huddersfield. There’,s no obligation to remember any of the charities but we hope our friends will take a moment to consider the real and lasting difference they can make by leaving a legacy to CAFOD. One in every seven of the people we helped last year was helped thanks to the gifts left to us in our supporters’, wills. Through their legacies, they are now providing food, water, healthcare and support to communities all around the world. For more information about participating solicitors and terms and conditions of the scheme visit www.freewillsmonth.org.uk, call 0845 020 4309 or email info@freewillsmonth.org.uk CAFOD’,s booklet, “,Sowing seeds of hope”,, explains how to make or update a will and contains a handy form to get organised. For a free copy, readers can call Beth or Susanna in our legacy team on 020 7095 5525 or email legacy@cafod.org.uk. CAFOD Leeds volunteering opportunities T he team at CAFOD Leeds would like to thank all our volunteers –, parish contacts, campaigners, deanery coordinators, office, spirituality and schools volunteers, people who have trained to speak for CAFOD at mass and the diocesan planning team –, all of whom play a vital role in support of CAFOD’,s mission. We are grateful for the energy, gifts and passion that our volunteers bring and above all for the time that give so generously. We are always glad to welcome people as volunteers and there are a variety of ways in which you can be involved. Although we have a strong team of schools volunteers, we still need more people in order to offer support to all the schools in the diocese. Full training and support is offered and you will find this a really enjoyable way to support CAFOD. Schools Volunteer Cecilia Hyland with children at Corpus Christi Primary School Leeds. Our schools’, volunteers tell us that their work is satisfying and enjoyable. Together, the schools volunteers are a team that is helping to shape the future of those who can change the world! If you have time and would enjoy being part of the schools volunteers team, or would like to volunteer in any other way, please get in touch with Margaret or Joanne 0113 275 9302 or email leeds@cafod.org.uk.

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Page 9

Sep 2009 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

INTERFAITH Page 9 RECREATION AS RE-CREATION A pre-holiday prayer runs: “,Our Father, may this holiday (when we may not be thinking of you much!) be truly a time of re-creation so that when we return home you may have re-created, in the secret of our hearts, through your Holy Spirit, a new vision of ourselves and of all those loving relationships with your world, your peoples and with You, to which we are called in Christ . Amen. I s it possible for sins to be committed out of necessity? ? It is evident that air travel with its attendant carbon emissions is increasingly a threat to the health and even future existence of the planet but sometimes we have to submit to its ordeals to attend far-flung weddings or other important family events. Anyway that aside, such holidays this summer brought tangential beneficial experiences which when reflected on back home brought a “,re-created”, realisation of the nature of our faith and our Church. Travel can bring us an experience of theory we too quickly acknowledge. So we know that there are many different cultures and faiths in our world –, but where can we experience this diversity “,up close and uncomfortable”,? People of every continent and from many different countries are now able (due partially to air travel!) to mingle in peaceful crowds attracted by “,world heritage sites”, from Saltaire to Niagara. So, opting for a time out of Saltaire, wreathed in the soft warm summer mist of those same Niagara Falls, sauntering along the Canadian shore, we joined whole rafts of folk, families, couples wafted along the walkways, united in the peaceful and excited contemplation of one of the wonders of the world this summer as every summer. Here crowds of folk, taking a trillion pixels of digital photos of themselves and the Falls, consuming as many cubic metres of liquid as boil over the brink, representing every creed, colour and culture of the world –, were united by one of the world’,s most spectacular sights. Shaded by trees along the way, ignoring the considerable “,tackiness”, of what has become a tourist attraction and the towering casinos and hotels, watching this great confluence of peoples, families of Muslims, Jews, Christians, Hindus, Sikhs, Buddhists, the truth of our common humanity could be tangibly felt rather than imagined or theorised. Here was the human race brought together in awe by one of the marvels of creation. Their faces, particularly the faces of the children, reflected something beyond the need for words, argument or debate –, the common celebration of “,Wow”,! Then we come to the celebration of the festival of St Marti in the little town of El Mercadal, on the island of Menorca in July. If the Catholic churches of Canada from Toronto (meaning in Ojibwa –, “,the Place of Meetings”,), to Ottawa (the Cathedral of Our Lady) and of Bergamo in Italy (St Alexander the Martyr and its connection with Pope John XXIII) did not speak of the universality and catholicity of our own Church, then this festival offered an interesting sidelight. St Marti gives the town an opportunity to display horsemanship of high daring. Crowds of people throng the narrow town streets on this Saturday evening. The Parish Priest had explained to us that Mass on the Sunday of the feast would not be at 11 am as usual but “,about 4 p.m. –, whenever the festival of the horses is over”, –, a flexible approach. The band settles to its seats on a platform in the tiny main square. Excitement mounts. Down the streets leading to the square, riders in ancient costume, two by two on magnificently bedecked and groomed horses, prance closer. The crowds part just enough to let the horses past. Each rider approaches the dais to share hands with the band conductor who may well be doubling up as the town Mayor before, tightly surrounded by crowds of agile townsfolk, they rein back their mounts. The horses rear up, hooves inches from the heads of the people at the front of the crowd. Clearly the idea is to get as close to, if not under, the horse’,s raised hooves as they prance around. Great cheers greet the riders who spur their mounts on to prance higher and higher. Daring young men dance under the flashing hooves and touch the flanks of the horses. This was not Bingley show. Then we realise that the Parish Priest is one of the more accomplished horsemen. He clearly does not regard his station as any bar to being one with his mounted congregation. As the night wears on, the streets remain packed with people. The fairground is doing a roaring trade and every bar, shop and stall are supplying food and drink. We know about and believe in the communion and celebration of the Saints –, but it is worth experiencing how people celebrate this in a truly rich diversity. One of the prerequisites of the task we have of relating to members of other religions successfully is to be solidly and confidently grounded in our own faith and practice. The more we can experience the multi-cultural nature of our own Church, the more receptive we can be to the multi-cultural nature of our world and its religions. For this, we have no need to travel far. Our diocesan local Church has been challenged to welcome and celebrate Catholics of many different cultures and traditions from the Irish of the 19th century to the Poles and Italians of the 20th to the more recent arrivals from Eastern Europe, Africa and the Philippines. We are, as a Church marked by catholicity and universality, made up of every culture and nation under the sun. This fact, if we are open to it, should equip us to turn outwards in friendship to members of other religions. Someone once said rightly that: “,The person who only England knows, knows not England”,. We can adapt this to be able to say: “,We who know the Church, can know the whole world.”, Lastly, a holiday blessed by the re- creative Holy Spirit can not only convince us of the diversity of our world and of our Church, but can re-create in us a new appreciation of the great hierarchy of truths that familiarity breeds in us, if not contempt, then a certain lack of that factor displayed by the children when first seeing the mighty Niagara Falls –, namely “,Wow”,! Someone has compared our new life with God in Christ as if being hit by a huge meteorite. But too often we do not display this “,post-cataclysmic”, life too enthusiastically or so anyone would necessarily notice. We reduce it to the most unthinking and boring repetitions of worship and routine living. We are, after all, only human. If we can, on returning from holiday, regard our Catholic faith and belonging, our parish church and our parish community, our families and friends with a “,Wow”,! then our holiday prayer will have been answered. OTHER FAITHS –, FEASTS AND FESTIVALS 28 September. Yom Kippur Day of Atonement. Jewish. Day of Atonement and fasting. Final day of repentance. Holiest day in the Jewish calendar. Marked by a total 25 hour fast. Common greeting –, G’,mar Chatimah Tovah - “,May you finally be sealed for good”,. 28 September. Dussera. Hindu. Celebrates Lord Rama’,s victory over the evil demon Ravana. 3 to 9 October Sukkot. Jewish. Harvest festival to commemorate the 40 years spent in the wilderness. Booths (sukkah) are built to eat and socialize in. The roof is open and covered with branches and decorated with fruit. (Leviticus 23:33-43) 9 October. Birthday of Guru Ram Das (“,Servant of God”,) Sikh. Born in 1534 in Lahore he so skilfully presented the truths of Sihkism before the Emperor Akbar that all charges brought by jealous Hindus that Sikhism maligned both Islam and Hinduism were dropped. He went on to found the Golden temple at Amritsar. 11 October. Simchat Torah. Jewish. The day marking the completion of the annual cycle of the reading of the Torah. As the reading from Deuteronomy ends, the first verse of Genesis starts. The Torah scrolls are paraded round the synagogue, with children dancing and singing. 17 October Divali / Deepavali. Hindu. The great new Year festival lasting for 5 days –, beginning of the financial year. Associated with Lakshmi, Goddess of wealth and prosperity. Also celebrates the victorious return of Rama and Sita to the kingdom of Ayodhya after their exile. Time for fireworks and lamps to mark the triumph of good over evil.

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Sep 2009 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 10 Lourdes Pilgrimage 2009 P ilgrimage is sometimes described as a journey and pilgrims undertake a pilgrimage for a wide variety of reasons. The French term ‘, malade’, encompasses far more readily the variety of needs our pilgrims take with them to Lourdes. Some pilgrims undertake the pilgrimage in thanksgiving for blessings received, while others simply love Lourdes and all its stands for. Preparations for the Pilgrimage are continuous throughout the year. July 3, 2009, was the day of departure for most pilgrims this year. Some left by air from Leeds/ Bradford airport at 9.05am, some from Doncaster airport later in the day, and a smaller number by train or road. The Youth section left on Thursday, 2 July by coach from their respective schools, travelling through the night in order to be in Lourdes by Friday, the 3rd. For several years now, the first day of the Pilgrimage has been set aside for travel, finding and settling in to accommodation, and generally finding where everything else is. SATURDAY, 4 JULY. The Opening Mass, with the Blessing of Hands in the St Bernadette Church was a wonderful start to the focus for the year 2009 –, the Pathway of Bernadette. In the homily we were reminded that in receiving Our Lord in Holy Communion we also received the inspiration and strength to carry out the messages given by St Bernadette over one hundred and fifty years ago. The Diocesan family were following a pathway together led by our Bishop and the Priests of the Diocese who were able to be there. What a delight to have Canon Barr with us, especially as he had celebrated his eightieth birthday on the 21st June. SUNDAY, 5 JULY. The International Mass at 9.30am in the vast underground Basilica of Pope Pius X is always powerful. Amongst other things, it serves to remind pilgrims of the wonderful privilege of belonging to the world-wide Catholic Church as so many pilgrims gather together with others from many parts of the world. MONDAY, 6 JULY The Penitential Service with opportunities for individual confession was the main part of the morning programme. Such was the number of penitents waiting for an available Priest, that time over-ran and some Priest confessors went without lunch! Great will be their reward! The Afternoon Mass with the Anointing of the Sick is always a very special part of the Pilgrimage. This year was no exception as a number of terminally ill pilgrims were anointed. The quiet prayerfulness of the Mass and the Anointing of diverse ‘,malades’, made very real to everyone the wondrous power of the Sacraments. WEDNESDAY, 8 JULY The sun shone! It was a wonderful sunny morning for the Mass at the Grotto. This year, the Grotto Mass was not shared with another Diocese, so the space and orderliness made the organisation of wheelchairs and available seating much easier. This Mass is always significant since it takes place at the very spot where Bernadette met with Our Lady in 1858 and where the important messages which eventually led to Pilgrimages were both given and received. THURSDAY, 9 JULY. Time had flown! The Mass at 10.30am was the final Mass of the Pilgrimage. Many reflected on the blessings received, others pondered on the journey ahead, but undoubtedly all recognised the wonder which is to be found in Lourdes. The procession to the burners with the Diocesan Candle drew to a close another significant year in the life of the Leeds Diocese, a year in which many difficulties had been faced, and the knowledge that the return home would bring further challenges for everyone. United in Faith, the candle represented the prayers and petitions of those present and those at home who had asked for prayers and petitions to be presented on their behalf. The candle was left to burn for many hours. Please note –, the current dates for the 2010 Pilgrimage are Friday 2 July to Friday 9 July. Further details will be published in the Catholic Post during the year.

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Sep 2009 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

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Sep 2009 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 12 POLISH NEWS POLISH PILGRIMAGE TO HOLYWELL AND PANTASAPH O n the 26th of July, despite the rain, St. Winifrede’,s Well and the Church of St. David in Pantasaph in North Wales were the sites of a large polish pilgrimage. This pilgrimage has been a tradition for the Poles in Northern England for over 50 years. According to tradition and legend, St. Winifred’,s Well first erupted at the spot, where her would-be rapist Caradog cut off her head with his sword. Her life was howevever restored by the prayers of her uncle St Beuno. She subsequently lived as a nun until her second death some 22 years later. It is therefore not surprising that St. Winifred’,s Well has been a place of pilgrimage for over 13 centuries and is reportedly the only place in Britain with such a long and continuous history of public pilgrimage. St. David’,s Church in Pantasaph is located 3 miles from Holywell making it a good setting for further reflection and pilgrimage. The church was opened on the 13th of October 1852. The name Pantasaph is believed to stem from the 7th century saint, St. Asaph, who ministered in the region and the name literally means “,St. Asaph’,s Hollow”,. The polish pilgrimage began in the church above St. Winifred’,s Well, with prayers to Our Lady of Czestochowa. This was followed by a procession to St. Winifred’,s Well with an image of Our Lady of Czestochowa. At the well, the holy rosary was recited and pilgrims had the possibility of drinking water from the holy well. After a break for lunch to allow people to explore either the Well or St. David’,s Church, there was a chance to reflect on the Stations of the Cross either within St. David’,s Church or for those brave enough to manage the inclement weather –, the Stations of the Cross in the grounds of the Retreat Centre. The pilgrimage came to a close after Holy Mass celebrated by Father Jan Zareba, the Dean (Dziekan) of the Northern Polish Diaconate and Polish Parish Priest in Leeds. The service was enlightened by the singing of the Polish Choir from Rochdale and Oldham. New term begins T he new term of the Polish Catholic Saturday School starts on the 12th of September, and coincides with the feast day of the patron saint of polish youth and of the Polish Parish in Leeds, St Stanislaw Kostka. St. Stanislaw Kostka was a Polish novice of the Society of Jesus and was born on the 28th of October 1550 in Rostkowo, near Przasnysz, Poland. His father, Jan Kostka, was a senator of the Kingdom of Poland and Lord of Zakroczym. His mother was Ma_gorzata Kryska from Drobni, the sister and niece of the Dukes Palatine of Masovia and the aunt of the celebrated Chancellor of Poland, Felix Kryski. He was the second of seven children. During their youth, he was taught firmly and became pious, modest and submissive. In 1564, Stanislaw went to Vienna with his tutor to attend the Jesuit college that had been opened four years before. Stanislaw was renown amongst his classmates for his amiability, cheerfulness of expression, and his growing religious fervour and piety. Whilst in Vienna, he thought of joining the Society of Jesus, but his superiors of the Society of Jesus hesitated to receive him, fearing the repercussions that his father may raise against the Society. Stanislaw quickly understanding the situation, decided to journey to Rome on foot. He fled from Vienna and was subsequently chased by his tutor and his elder brother, Pawel. It is reported that they suffered a number of setbacks on their pursuit so they failed to reach him. These included their exhausted horses refusing to go any further, or a wheel of their carriage would break, or, as the tutor frankly declared, they had mistaken the route, having left the city on an alternate road to the one which Stanislaw had taken. Stanislaw arrived in Rome on the 25th of October 1567. He was however not permitted by the General of the Order, Francis Borgia, to enter the novitiate of St. Andrew for several days due to the level of his exhaustion. During his final ten months, the Master of Novices, Father Giulio Fazio stated “,he was a model and mirror of religious perfection”,. He reportedly had recurrent burning fevers on his chest which required the application of cold compresses. On the eve of St. Lawrence’,s feast day, Stanislaw spiked a high fever and felt a mortal weakness. He foretold his own death and thus wrote a letter to the Blessed Virgin begging her to call him to heaven to celebrate with her the glorious anniversary of her Assumption. On the morning of the 15th of August, just before four in the morning, whilst in prayer he went to meet his maker. The entire city proclaimed him a saint and people hastened from all parts to venerate his remains and to obtain, if possible, some relics. He was beatified in 1605 in the presence of his older brother Pawel and was canonised in 1726. St. Stanislaw is a popular saint of Poland and many religious institutions have chosen him as the protector of their novitiates. Within art, he is sometimes painted receiving the Eucharist from the hands of angels, or being given the Infant Jesus from the hands of Mary. CO SIE U NAS DZIEJE W PARAFII W LEEDS? WHAT’,S ON IN THE LEEDS POLISH PARISH? Wrzesien/ September: 26ego/ 26th Fredreum –, obchody 40-to lecia istnienia Czesc 1 Fredreum –, 40th Anniversary Celebrations –, Part 1 Pazdziernik/ October: 3ego/ 3rd Parafialna Zabawa Dozynkowa Harvest Festival Ball –, Organised by the Parish Council 11ego/ 11th Msza _w. i Walne Zebranie Polskiej Sekcji Royal British Legion Holy Mass and Annual General Meeting of the Polish Section of the Royal British Legion 26ego/ 26th Fredreum –, obchody 40-to lecia istnienia Czesc 2 Fredreum –, 40th Anniversary Celebrations –, Part 2 31ego/ 31st Zaduszki - Procesja na cmentarzu Lawnswood Procession at Lawnswood Cemetery as part of the All Souls Day Commemorations Listopad/ November: 1ego/ 1st Zaduszki - Procesja na cmentarzu Killingbeck Procession at Lawnswood Cemetery as part of the All Souls Day Commemorations 7ego/ 7th Bonfire Night 16ego/ 16th Msza _w. i Akademia Niepodleg_o_ciowa organizowane przez Zjednoczenie Polskie Holy Mass and Show commemorating the gaining of Poland’,s Independence - Organised by the Federation of Poles 28ego/ 28th Zabawa Andrzejkowa St. Andrew’,s Day Ball J ohn Bell of the Iona Community recently came here to give a lecture. He talked about the topical issue of money- something which Christians often feel they must leave to others. Instead of doing this, he urged us to remember that the Bible - and Jesus - do often talk about money. We must not indebt the future he said - God does not stop us falling into self-made traps: he spoke of our demand for cheap clothing which puts off into the future the time when people making it will be paid properly. We expect cheap food at the expense of the planet, swallowing land in far off countries to grow out of season food for us. Christians are reluctant to engage with matters of finance, he said, but they should stop demonising money, which is morally neutral: the problem is the way it is used. We should stop demonising taxation, which often brings justice. Be open and accountable with money- the Iona community share with each other about their own income and spending. This should apply to everyone, individually and corporately. Such openness is liberating. President Obama has at least promised people in the US that there will be transparency: earlier this year he told them that they suffered a “,deficit of trust”, and would restore “,honesty and accountability to the US budget “,and for the first time, that includes the full cost of fighting in Iraq and Afghanistan. For seven years, we have been a nation at war. No longer will we hide its price.”, Whoever we are, no longer should we “,hide the price”, of what we do with our money- or where. Transparency and trust must be the way out of financial crisis, and Christians can lead the way by daring to talk about…, money. The Post Says …,

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Sep 2009 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

TRINITY NEWS Page 13 Vice Principal looks to the future of Leeds Trinity University College H aving taken up my post at Leeds Trinity in January, I joined the institution at a very exciting time as we were on the verge of realising our goal of becoming a university college with the power to award our own degrees. I am proud to be part of the new Leeds Trinity University College that came into being on 1 September. As Vice Principal (Academic) I am responsible for directing the academic work of the institution, taking a lead on course development, course management and research. Before joining Leeds Trinity, I had worked at Newman University College in Birmingham, where I taught history, and for the last seven years held the post of Head of School, Social Sciences and Humanities. Newman had become a university college just two years before I left, and on joining Leeds Trinity in the crucial last stages of the assessment procedure for this status, I felt every confidence that this institution too was ready for this major step forward. Gaining this new status is incredibly important for Leeds Trinity, both in terms of how we are perceived in the wider community and on a practical level. The term “,university”, has great resonance and provides a kitemark guaranteeing the quality of what we do, while on a practical level we can now forge our own future and can create working partnerships of our choosing. With this new autonomy comes a great responsibility, to determine our own direction in an ever more challenging higher education environment. Leeds Trinity has a great tradition of vocational degrees, and our new status provides us with a good platform from which to build course provision that is relevant to the needs of employers and our wider society. Although it was a wrench to leave Birmingham after 14 years, I feel at home in Yorkshire, having been brought up in York from a young age. I am enjoying becoming reacquainted with people and places, getting to know a new part of the county, and enjoying a fulfilling working life in a dynamic institution that we hope will one day be a new university for Yorkshire. Dr Stephen Bulman Vice Principal (Academic) Special award puts teachers in a class of their own L eeds Trinity has recognised the achievements of two teachers who have spent their whole careers working in Catholic Schools in the Leeds diocese with special awards for their Outstanding Contribution to Catholic Education. The two teachers honoured on their retirements this summer were Peter Fusco from Corpus Christi Catholic College and Kevin Albrow from St Mary’,s Menston. Both teachers were trained at Leeds Trinity, spent their teaching careers at the same Catholic school, and have supported trainee teachers from Leeds Trinity. Professor Freda Bridge, Leeds Trinity’,s Principal and Chief Executive, presented the awards. She said, “,I am delighted that Leeds Trinity can acknowledge the tremendous contribution made to Catholic education by these two marvellous teachers who are our alumni. They have been role models in supporting our trainee teachers so their influence will be continued in many other schools.”, The head teachers of both schools submitted glowing testimonies in support of their teachers. Mike Woods, head of Corpus Christi, said of Peter Fusco, who had taught at Corpus Christi for 37 years, “,His contribution has been truly magnificent - he is a key ingredient of the school’,s success and a cornerstone of the school’,s outstanding pastoral care. He also embodies and is a prime example of the major contribution that Leeds Trinity has made to the success of Catholic education in the diocese.”, Kevin Albrow, who has taught at St Mary’,s for 36 years, has happy memories of his time as a trainee teacher. He said, “,In September 1969, I started at Trinity and All Saints College as it was then, on the BEd course in History. I met up with a group of fantastic students and was immediately immersed in history studies with brilliant lecturers, who taught me many tricks of the trade, which have held me in good stead over the last three and a half decades of teaching.”, “,I have always taken great pride in maintaining the links between Leeds Trinity and St. Mary’,s, and on being presented with the award at the school’,s Feast Day mass in July I felt overwhelmed that I should be chosen for such an honour.”, Family success Leeds Trinity graduates T here was a real family feel to Leeds Trinity’,s graduation celebrations when the graduation ceremonies were held at Leeds University’,s Great Hall this summer. A number of the parents present to share their sons and daughters’, big day were themselves Leeds Trinity alumni, and enjoyed some nostalgic reflections on student life. Anita and Shaun Dudgeon, from Bradford, parents of Tom who was graduating with a degree in Sport Development and PE, both qualified as PE teachers in the 1980s. Anita’,s sister and two cousins also studied at Leeds Trinity as did Shaun’,s sister. Recalling her student days, Anita said, “,I loved my time at Leeds Trinity, it was very small and community-based. Lots of students were from the local area, and unlike today’,s students who enter fully into Leeds student life, we hardly ever went off campus. The campus is so different now, for example there used to be just one lecture theatre and the sports facilities consisted of a sports hall and two squash courts.”, Michael Sheary from Yeadon, (pictured with mum Rosemary) was graduating with a 2:i in Media, with his proud mum Rosemary looking on. Rosemary said, “,I did my BA in Primary Education with English at Leeds Trinity from 1991 to 1995. It was a very happy time, and I’,m looking forward to making my first visit to campus in years for today’,s graduation celebrations.”, Michael said, “,It’,s great to follow in my mother’,s footsteps, although I chose Leeds Trinity on its own merits. It offered me the best of both worlds –, a great course in a good location as well as the chance to enjoy Leeds student life to the full.”, Funeral Services W. Lever Ltd BRADFORD 01274 547137 524 THORNTON ROAD, BRADFORD BD8 9NB FOR OVER 75 YEARS PROVIDING A COMPLETE PERSONAL &, CARING 24 HOUR FUNERAL SERVICE CHAPEL OF REST E.M.D. PARKINSON LTD Funeral Director For a Caring Service We Assure You Of Our Best Attention Any Time Day Or Night. FOR COMPLET PEACE OF MIND THE WHITEHOUSE 37 LOWER YORK STREET, WAKEFIELD WF1 3LH Pre-paid Funeral Plan Telephone: (01924) 373191 H UGHES F UNERAL S ERVICES (Catholic Funeral Directors) 180 YORK ROAD, LEEDS LS9 9NT. Tel 2480953/63 152 GREEN LANE, CROSSGATES. Tel 2326900 3 HOLLIN PARK PARADE, OAKWOOD ROUNDABOUT Tel 2499338 Web: wwww.hughesfuneralservices.co.uk Email: info@hughesfuneralservices.co.uk Family owned and managed. Fully Qualified in all aspects. 24 Hour Service Guaranteed Fixed Price Funeral Plans etc. “,At a time of bereavement we carry out our duties with dignity and respect”, In times of bereavement please contact: B. J. MELIA &, SONS (B. J. Melia Dip F.D.) F UNERAL D IRECTORS AND M ONUMENTAL M ASONS Private Chapel of Rest 64 GIBBET STREET, HALIFAX Telephone: 01422 354453 PRE-PAID FUNERAL SERVICE AVAILABLE DETAILS ON REQUEST

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Page 14

Sep 2009 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 14 HOME NEWS Giant leaps and small steps- a new way of seeing the world A s the world commemorates the 40th anniversary of the moon landings, we at Myddelton Grange are celebrating the fact that the Grange is now considered “,…,the foremost centre for environmental justice education in England and Wales”,. This is stated in a recent submission for United Nations World Youth Report 2009: Youth and Climate Change (a full copy of the submission can be found at http://www.un.org/esa/socdev/unyin/ wyr09.htm). This is an accolade that all of the young people of the diocese who have visited us in recent years should take great pride in, as it represents the culmination of their efforts and those of the staff of Myddelton in promoting, discovering and enabling environmental justice education. The first astronauts were the first people ever to be truly aware of the holistic nature of all that connects the earth, its people, eco systems, oceans and atmosphere. They spoke of its true beauty describing it as being as valuable as a “,holy relic”, (Aleksei Leonov, Soviet Union), and “,That beautiful, warm, living object looked so fragile, so delicate, that if you touched it with a finger it would crumble and fall apart. Seeing this has to change a man, has to make man appreciate the creation of God and the love of God.”, (James Irwin, USA). This image of the earth as valuable and fragile is one of the many images that the Grange promotes to all those who visit us. We encourage all retreatants, during their time with us and when returning home, to see God’,s love in everything around them (in peoples outside of their usual groups, in the trees, the air, the created order) and to give thanks for all the great gifts which God desires for all his children. As part of our membership of the livesimply network over the last two years more than 2500 young people staying at the Grange have made sincere pledges to lessen the impact they are having on the Earth’,s resources and to neutralise the effect that they and their families are having on climate change. This could be regarded as thanksgiving in practice, thanksgiving which is more than words. Also while on retreat, a good number of them have been invited to make a direct, practical contribution to reversing climate change. The young people have been tutored in the need for good stewardship of the earth’,s resources and have then become good stewards of creation themselves by planting 4000 native hardwood deciduous trees, a figure that will rise to 6000 by 2010. We at the Grange are also developing links and sharing best practice with institutions, agencies and groups, locally, nationally and internationally to allow other young people the chance to plant and to realise the impact that all of us have on the changes which our home, the Earth, is going through. We also are working in partnership with the Justice and Peace Commission and have recently received funding to create a walk of creation through some of Myddelton Grange’,s land. We are continually looking for ways to encourage all committed Catholics and other people of faith and none to be aware of our need to be faithful stewards of God’,s creation. As a part of this and of our commitment to livesimply, the Grange, in conjunction with Tools For Self Reliance, has become the hub of a scheme to recycle tools. The scheme challenges young people in a myriad of communities across England and Wales to collect and refurbish tools for projects in Africa communities. The tools enable African communities to adapt to the developments that climate change is bringing about, and ensure that they are able to provide for themselves, their communities and the future of their continent. Furthermore it provides young people with another opportunity to challenge the injustice that is manifested in climate change. The view of the Earth as seen from space highlights how fragile our home is and it further expresses the need for us as a Church to demonstrate our connection to and stewardship for the beauty of God’,s great gift. Safe Motherhood O n Sunday 24.05.09 a picture was presented to Fr Eamonn Hegarty and the Parishioners of St Cuthbert’,s and First Martyrs Parish in Bradford. This was a gift sent from Ile, Ife Nigeria to say thank you for the support the Parish had given for a Safe Motherhood project which has been running for the last three years. It was presented to representatives of the Parish by Shona Featherstone a local midwife and parish member who works on the project in Nigeria. In some parts of Nigeria and indeed the rest of the developing world thousands of women die as a result of complications in pregnancy and childbirth. This is where the Living Hope Hospital, Ile Ife, Nigeria comes in. It is a hospital which provides sustainable and often free health care to the local population. It has also been involved in financing training for Doctors, Midwives and in particular the traditional birth attendants who provide the majority of the care for the women. This is a really unique and “,God “,driven project in that there is no corporate funding, no grants, but it is sustained by the faith and generosity of individuals. So the people of Ife sent to the people of St Cuthbert’,s and first Martyrs a visual image to primarily say thanks but to serve as a reminder of the great impact they have made in supporting the health of women in this part of the world Diocesan Medals For Goole Ladies P enelope (Penny) Holmes and Julia Oldridge received the Diocesan Medal and Scroll from their Parish Priest, Fr. Neville Atkinson, on Sunday 12th July 2009. They were applauded for their devoted work in the Church of St. Joseph`s, Goole.School in Leeds. Penny Holmes is a convert to the Catholic faith and has been active in the parish of St. Joseph`s for many years. She is a Minister of the Eucharist and is busy taking communion to the housebound. She also has taken on a rigorous round of many sick and disabled people in many aspects of their social and health well- being. She is involved in nursing and shopping for those in wheelchairs even nursing those to the point of death, all this without any professional aspect or payment. Penny is forever smiling and has deep faith in God. Julia Oldridge is also a Minister of the Eucharist and is to be found each Sunday without fail providing refreshments following Mass. Together with Penny, she has been instrumental in organising parish social functions and outings that help provide wholesome parish cohesion in times of considerable change. Over many years she has been the back-bone for catering facilities in the parish without any financial benefit. Her support and Christian goodwill is given without hesitation to anyone in or outside the parish, helping also the many Polish and Eastern European Catholics that have come to reside in Goole, all this through times when she has nursed her ailing husband whose long-term ill- health recently resulted in his death. These two ladies have been a fine example of what being a parishioner means, to give your all for the benefit of others. More Marks for Mount St Mary`s F ollowing a validation visit by a team from Education Leeds, Mount St Mary`s High School in Richmond Hill has achieved the Leeds Inclusion Chartermark recognising the inclusive nature of the school: “,One in which the teaching and learning, achievements, attitudes and well-being of every young person matters.”, Inspectors praised the inclusive vision of the school which they said is lived by all members of the community: “,It is very apparent that this is an environment in which care and mutual respect is clearly evident.”, “,Opportunity and achievement for all is at the heart of the work of the school. Respect and quality relationships are at the heart of the ethos that has been built.”, Inspectors interviewed many students during their visit who were “,respectful and keen to learn”,: “,Students spoke very highly of their school and all were pleased to be attending there. They said that they always felt safe and that the school valued them.”, “,There is an active student council which has a voice within the school. Pupils have been fully involved in the Building Schools for the Future project, developing the designs for sports and cafeteria facilities.”, Relationships and partnerships with parents “,are a significant strength of the school.”, Parents feel well supported and part of the school. One described the school as being “,100% behind parents as well as the children.”, They commented positively about the fact that teachers are friendly and caring and respond quickly to parental concerns. One parent said: “,Everything they do is spot on.”, Inspectors praised the well- maintained environment of the school, transition arrangements, communication systems and the strength of the links and partnerships that have been established with employers, external agencies and other providers which “,offer high- quality provision for its students.”, The Inclusion Chartermark is the second award to go to Mount St Mary`s recently. The school has also achieved the Stephen Lawrence Education Award which is presented to schools for promoting racial harmony and celebrating cultural diversity. Headteacher, Bernadette King said: “,Our aim at Mount St Mary`s is that every single pupil is safe and happy, receives good teaching and reaches their full potential and we are therefore delighted and proud to have achieved both these prestigious awards and I congratulate all the pupils and their parents and the whole school community.”,

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Sep 2009 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

SCHOOL NEWS Page 15 It’,s another record breaking year at All Saints! Y ear 11 pupils at All Saints’, Catholic College are celebrating after achieving another record- breaking year for GCSE results. Anita Bodurka, Head Teacher, described the results as “,A fantastic achievement for the pupils and their teachers”,. She said, “,All the students have worked really hard and I am thrilled to see they have done so well. These results demonstrate the significant and continuing improvement across all aspects of the school, and the professionalism and dedication of the staff. The College’,s aim remains to build on its good practice and these results, in order to continue providing our students with a dynamic, personalised and high quality Catholic education.”, There was an increase in the number passing the benchmark standard of five A* - C passes to a very impressive 71%. Testimony to the commitment of the staff is the commendable improvement in the percentage of students achieving at least 5 A*-C grades including Maths and English to 50%, a 25% improvement on last year. Anita Bodurka went on to say “,I would like to thank John Fowler, who was Executive Head this last academic year, all the governors and the staff of the college who have worked so hard in helping the students and have continued to deliver improvements.”, Father Ian Smith, Chair of Governors said “,I am also really pleased for the students’, families. They have supported us extremely well over the last five years and should be very proud of these results.”, There were many success stories, including Matthew Todd and Harriet Peel who achieved 11 A*and A grades, Stephen O’,Hara who achieved 9 A* and A grades and Dominic O’,Brien who achieved 8 A* and A grades. In addition, many of our students left with in excess of 13 GCSEs. Furthermore, we are delighted with the huge improvement the majority of our students have made from Year 6. In particular Reece McInerney, Toya Gaye, Frances Peel, Olivia Hodges and Conor St John-Sykes who significantly exceeded national expectations in all areas. Anita Bodurka concluded by saying “,The last two years has shown a sustained improvement in our results. We will continue to work hard to meet the needs of all our students and help them on their journey to a successful future.”, FROM JUST £,299 R.G.R. MEMORIALS COLOUR CATALOGUE QUALITY MEMORIALS AT AFFORDABLE PRICES IN GRANITE, MARBLE &, STONE ALL PRICES INCLUDE DELIVERY &, FIXING Ogee top memorial 2’,6”, high Fully polished Black Granite, Delivered and Fixed for £,399 inc VAT FREE Tel: 0113 282 3888 43 High Ridge Park, Rothwell, Leeds LS26 0NL

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Sep 2009 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 16 BATTLE John Battle KCSG I n Medieval times, three pilgrimages to Bardsey Island just off the north Wales Llyn Peninsula equalled one to Rome. Pilgrims in the tenth, eleventh and twelfth centuries would journey down from the north of England, stopping on the way at the many little churches set up by the Celtic saints in the fifth and sixth centuries, to get to Aberdaron and then take boats across the short but treacherous Bardsey Sound to the tiny Bardsey Island. This was a monastic retreat believed to be at the edge of the world and the burial place of over 20.000 saints. Medieval pilgrims from Yorkshire, which for years shared the Celtic language of the Welsh believed the saints in heaven to be in an in between, transitory state –,awaiting the Last Judgement. Only when all the members of the Mystical Body are gathered together can the whole Body of Christ rise again. In other words as the theologian Hans Urs von Balthasar explained “,Not until the last of the awaited brethren enters into the Kingdom can the heavenly throng cease to bend over the earth with care”,. He is anxious to emphasis that “,even this transitory state before the Last Judgement is really and truly heaven”, but the key issue is that the saints who have died are not hanging around there, inactive. They spend their time there actively helping to save those who have not yet died and joined them. This medieval understanding of social activity of the saints in heaven, rooted in the early patristic conceptions of heaven made sense of pilgrimages. The saints having arrived in Heaven didn’,t merely petition God, interceding when they got there on behalf of those they left behind. They were believed to continue to actively interfere in the daily life journeys of those still remaining in the world. They had a transitional job to do, helping to save them. That’,s why pilgrimages, which are journeys to the resting places of saints and the respect for the relics (in particular their preserved bones) was so important as a vital point of physical contact. Far from ghoulish superstition medieval Christians believed that even the slightest contact with a real saint’,s bones could help them renew their lives and steer a new course of Christian practice towards the goal of salvation. Interestingly, it is Therese of Lisieux, the Nineteenth century contemplative, canonised and made a Doctor of the Church on the 19 October 1997 who as she was dying of T B declared on 17 July 1897 “,I feel I’,m about to enter into rest. But I feel above all that my mission is about to begin, my mission of making God loved as I love Him, of giving my little ways to souls. If God Grants my desires, my Heaven will be spent on earth until the end of the world. Yes I want to spend Heaven doing good on earth …,..I don’,t want to rest as long as there are souls to save”,. Only when the Angel declares “,Time is no more”, at the end of time will, she says, she rest and be able to enjoy herself, “,because the number of the elect will be complete and all will have entered into joy and into rest”,. What St Therese of Lisieux and Medieval pilgrims understood was a fluid continuum between the saints who have died and the living. It is not a case therefore of the dead having gone off and we are left behind disconnected. Prayer as part of the communion of saints, can therefore be for but also “,with “,the dead joined together in the intercession. In other words we believe the saints, the dead where gone before us can make a real difference. Praying for our deceased relatives, our own family saints, those who have lived for others, suffered and died is therefore a two- way process. Going to see the relics of St Therese is solidly in the tradition of the medieval Yorkshire pilgrims. But for those who can’,t or want to know more about St Therese of Lisieux as well as her famous autobiography “, Story of a Soul “, setting out her little way and her letters and conversations, St Therese like other great teachers, Doctors of the Church, such as St Thomas Aquinas, St Therese wrote poems. The Collected poems of St Therese of Lisieux translated by Alan Bancroft (Gracewing in 2001) are intense prayer poems, reflections focussed on Christ, on receiving Holy Communion and of praying before the Blessed Sacrament. They feature an account of daily life in the convent, (getting up, eating sewing vestments) celebrating feast days of her sister Carmelites and St Joan of Arc) . But two images dominate them all, a heart that is burning, on fire with love of God and a focus on the small, the “,little”, things, picking up a pin, a daisy, a rose petal, “,a little host each day”,. Describing herself as a “,little atom”, she insists “,enchanting you (i.e. God) means staying small”,. Her contemplative words move us closer to union with God, but at the same time insists that “,the road to Heaven is daily little things”,. Declaring “, My joy comes from my staying small”, ,despite the false image that her assumed name “, the little flower”, may conjure up St Therese of Lisieux is not a quietist, she is “,fighting for God –, and souls with her battle sword”, like Joan of Arc. Never referring to her own illness and suffering in her poems, she declares “,I came to Carmel –, why? To people Heaven”, The more I feel your flame the more I’,ve got to do to slake the burning. How? In giving souls to You”,. “, Make”, she asked in her devotion to the Blessed Sacrament, “,A living Monstrance of me”,. Her poems therefore are a challenge to become “,living monstrances”,as we go about the small things of daily life. Her poems may be less well known than her relics or autobiography but are a helpful way in. St Therese’,s Bones and Poems Thursday, 1 October 10am VG’,s Meeting, Bishop’,s House, 7.30pm Ecumenical Service of Prayer for Christian Unity in the presence of the relics of St Thé,rè,se of Lisieux, York Minster Friday, 2 October 7pm Mass to mark 50th Anniversary of St Columba’,s, Bradford Saturday, 3 October 2.30pm Opening Liturgy for the arrival of the relics of St Thé,rè,se of Lisieux, Leeds Cathedral Sunday, 4 October 11am Mass followed by the Veneration of the relics of St Thé,rè,se of Lisieux, Leeds Cathedral, 8.30pm –, 10pm Vigil and Veneration of the relics of St Thé,rè,se of Lisieux, for Clergy and Religious, Leeds Cathedral Monday, 5 October 9.30am Closing Liturgy of the visit of the relics of St Thé,rè,se of Lisieux, Leeds Cathedral, 7pm Batley Torchlight Procession, Batley Thursday, 8 October 7pm Leeds Consultation Meeting, Notre Dame 6th Form College, Leeds Sunday, 11 October Canonisation of the Foundress of the Little Sisters of the Poor, Blessed Jeanne Jugan, Saint Peter’,s, Rome Monday, 12-16 October Clergy In-Service and Retreat, Valladolid Sunday, 18 October Official Re-Opening of the Church of the Most Holy Trinity and St Thomas the Martyr, English College, Rome Monday, 19 October 10.30am Standing Committee Meeting, London Tuesday, 20-21 October 12 noon Ushaw Governors’, Meeting, Ushaw Thursday, 22 October 10am VGs’, Meeting, Bishop’,s House Tuesday, 27 October 10am Meeting with Diocesan Finance Board &, Trustee Directors, Hinsley Hall Thursday, 29 October 10.30am Clergy Study Day, Little Sisters of the Poor, Headingley, Leeds Friday, 30 October 11am Mass, Leeds Trinity &, All Saints’,, Horsforth, Leeds Saturday, 31 October 10am Launch of the 5th Year of Come and See, “, Mission &, Evangelisation”,, Cedar Court Hotel, Bradford Bishops Engagements - October Diocese of Leeds Vicariate for Evangelisation PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION –, A CATHOLIC PERSPECTIVE The Vicariate for Evangelisation offers a five week introductory course covering the following: , What can we know and how do we know it? , An examination of the problems of speaking meaningfully about God. What does it mean to say that God is omnipotent, omniscient and eternal or everlasting? , Introduction to the classic and contemporary arguments for and against the existence of God. , Philosophical reflections on the problem of evil and suffering in the world The course runs from 7.15 –, 9.30 pm on the following dates in 2010: Tuesday 12th January Tuesday 19th January Tuesday 26th January Tuesday 2nd February Tuesday 9th February This is one of the specialist modules for the Catholic Certificate of Religious Studies (CCRS) but can be taken as an individual course. All sessions take place at Hinsley Hall and will be led by Fr Steven Billington Cost £,35 For further information or to book please contact Janine Garnett on 0113 261 8040 or janine.garnett@dioceseofleeds.org.uk Fr Kelly blesses the race start F r Colum Kelly, the Apostleship of the Sea’,s chaplain to the Port of Immingham, led an ecumenical service for participants in the Clipper Round the World Yacht Race last Sunday, the 6th September. This multi faith service was attended by the crews and by invited guests. It was an opportunity for everyone to focus on the enormous challenges that lie ahead, the need to rely on each other and to find strength during the difficult times. The readings will be given by a member of each faith represented and everyone joined in a hearty rendition of “,Eternal Father Strong to Save”,. The Clipper 09/10 race is a ten month event during which the fleet of ten identical racing yachts will cross all the world’,s major oceans and visit ports on six continents during this 35,000 mile race around the planet. Twice as many people have climbed Everest as have circumnavigated the world, so this is not something to be taken lightly. Originally set up by sailing legend, Sir Robin Knox-Johnston, this race is gruelling and demands high levels of physical skill and mental discipline. Fr Colum said “,It is a pleasure and a privilege to be part of this wonderful adventure. For me, it makes a change to my usual schedule of ship visiting in Immingham and on the Humber. There, the vessels I board are usually cargo ships with crew from as far afield as The Philippines, India and Russia. Their daily lives in the shipping lanes of the world’,s oceans make different demands on both physical and mental courage, so although their challenges are different from the Clipper participants, they have the same need for courage and determination in the face of harsh weather and strong seas”,. A WORD OF THANKS The Leeds Peru Walking Group would like to thank all those who sponsored them for the July walk. A special Thanks You to Bishop Arthur and the priests who spon- sored the walkers. The Total raised for the Peru Fund came to £,1,700 Thank you to all On 2 October, there will be a Mass to mark the 50th anniversary of the consecration of St Columba’,s church, Tong Street, Bradford. All are very welcome to attend. We would especially like to welcome former parishioners and those who have been baptised or married in the church. Mass, celebrated by Bishop Roche, will be at 7.30pm in the church, followed by refreshments in the school afterwards. 5Oth Anniversary

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Page 17

Sep 2009 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

ROME Page 17 ‘, A giant figure of a man, upon whose shoulders the Church still stands today’,. That’,s how German Cardinal Walter Kasper, head of the Vatican’,s Council for Christian Unity, describes the first president of the Council, Cardinal Johannes Willebrands who died in August 2006. At the time of his death he was the oldest living member of the College of Cardinals. When I spoke to Cardinal Kasper, he was just heading off to Utrecht to take part in a four day conference marking the centenary of Willebrands’, birth on September 4th 1909. The Dutch cardinal served as archbishop of Utrecht and primate of the Church in the Netherlands from 1975 to 1983. While he was largely unsuccessful in his attempts to reconcile the conservative and liberal trends that were already dividing the Church in his home country, he is widely revered as a courageous pioneer of the ecumenical movement. Known affectionately by many as the ‘,flying Dutchman’,, because of his frequent travels to meet with Orthodox patriarchs or Protestant pastors, as well as his own Catholic confreres, Willebrands became one of the most influential figures in the years immediately following the second Vatican council, steering the church on a new course towards constructive engagement with those outside the Catholic world. But his vocation and ecumenical vision began two decades earlier, as he saw Christians across the bitterly divided denominations coming together to help each other following the devastation of the Second World War. In 1952 he set up the first Catholic conference on ecumenical questions which was in contact with the newly founded World Council of Churches –, a move that drew sharp criticism from many within the Catholic Church. Around that time he also began corresponding with his bishop, stressing a desire to leave his post as rector of the seminary in Warmond, and set up a community of priests, religious and lay men and women dedicated to the cause of reconciliation among Christians. Many of these details about his prophetic vision have just recently come to light in a diary, written in Dutch but translated into English, which Willebrands kept between 1958 and 1961. Both the diary and a journal, detailing his pivotal role in bringing bishops on board this ecumenical agenda during the Second Vatican Council, were published for the first time at the Utrecht conference. One of the organisers of the meeting, Dr Adalbert Denaux, Dean of the Catholic theology faculty at the university of Tilburg in Holland, told me the main aim of this work is to provoke new interest among younger students to try and somehow recapture the pioneering spirit that Willebrands embodied. A skilled diplomat, fluent in some six languages, a modest man with a sense of humour and a taste for fine cigars, Willebrands had a powerful ally in the figure of Paul VI, who had also developed a strong interest in the possibility of renewing relationships with both the Eastern world and the Churches of the Reformation, as well as promoting healing between Christians and Jews. In 1960 Willebrands had already been named by Pope John XXIII as secretary of the newly established Secretariat for Promoting Christian Unity, under the presidency of German biblical scholar, Cardinal Augustin Bea, a former confessor of Pope Pius XII. In 1969, following Cardinal Bea’,s death, Pope Paul appointed Willebrands the new president of the secretariat, a post he held for two decades until his retirement in 1989. But it was during the Council that the results of his patient diplomacy were most evident, as he was sent off on a series of secret missions to persuade fellow bishops of the importance of signing up to the proposed declarations on ecumenism (the decree Unitatis Redintegratio passed with only 11 opposition votes), interfaith relations, divine revelation and religious freedom. Cardinal Kasper talks about a real conversion of the Catholic Church in those years to a more inclusive vision, of which Bea and Willebrands were two key architects, alongside other visionaries such as Dominican Yves Congar. In December 1965, Mgr Willebrands read out the historic declaration with which the Catholic and Orthodox Churches ‘,cancelled out of the memory of men’, their mutual ex-communication following the great schism of 1054. Later, as John Paul II quickly took up the reins of the ecumenical endeavour, Cardinal Willebrands continued to work tirelessly behind the scenes with like- minded theologians within the Protestant and Orthodox world. He also tried, unsuccessfully, to maintain a greater freedom for his Council, as it came increasingly under scrutiny from the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith. In 1974 he oversaw the setting up of the Commission for Religious Relations with Jews and which led, some 12 years later, to the historic visit of the Pope to the Roman synagogue. Rabbi David Rosen of the American Jewish Committee paid tribute to Willebrands as ‘,the captain of the Catholic- Jewish ship (who) steered its significant voyage in the transition from Paul VI to the remarkable pontificate of John Paul II’,. Significantly, Willebrands’, retirement in 1989 coincided with the fall of the Berlin wall and the opening of a new era in ecumenical relations, as the Pope travelled to many of the former communist countries to develop friendships that had been unthinkable during the cold war years. Before coming to Rome in 1999, Walter Kasper went to visit the elderly Dutch cardinal, whose short term memory was beginning to falter. But his long term memory was as sharp as ever, as he spoke of the tremendous upheavals of the Church during those earlier decades. ‘,He taught me many things’,, recalls Cardinal Kasper, ‘,and it is up to us to keep that hope, that pioneering vision alive in new ways to suit these new times’,. Philippa M Hitchen Our Rome Correspondent Deadline For receipt of material for next edition: October 3rd 2009. Parishes receive their copies: October 18th 2009. Send letters, articles, reports &, pictures: Mr John Grady, Leeds Diocesan Curia, Hinsley Hall, 62 Headingley Lane, Leeds LS6 2BX. If at all possible, send words by e-mail to: john.grady@dioceseofleeds.org.uk, or, failing that, on a floppy disc in Word. Tel: 0113 261 8022. Advertising Deadline Please note All paid-for advertising is dealt with by: CathCom, L4 Blois Meadow Business Centre, Steeple Bumpstead, Haverhill, Suffolk, CB9 7BN. To advertise call 020 7112 6710 or email: ads@cathcom.org Your Catholic Post THE MAN WHO MADE UNITY A REALITY T he weekend 14-16 August over a hundred delegates gathered at Leeds Trinity and All Saints to learn about Rachel’,s Vineyard Ministries and to reflect on how this work can be developed in the UK. Rachel’,s Vineyard runs weekend retreats for those who are suffering from the effects of abortion. The retreats provide a supportive and non-judgmental environment where women and men can acknowledge, perhaps for the first time, the grief and pain they are suffering as a result of abortion, and where the process of healing and renewal can begin. The delegates were mainly from the UK and Ireland, but some had travelled from Holland, Italy and the US. The first day of the conference was aimed at clergy, and over 20 priests, deacons and seminarians were present. The main presentations were given by the founders of Rachel’,s Vineyard, Dr Theresa Burke and her husband Kevin Burke LSW. They explained how their ministry started as a “,mom and pop”, operation in the mid 1990s, and now offers 600 retreats each year worldwide. Dr Burke described how, because of the emotional numbness and secrecy that often surrounds an abortion experience, “,conflicting emotions both during and after the event may remain unresolved. These buried feelings can surface later and may be symptoms of post-abortion trauma”,. Society finds it hard to admit that an abortion can have any harmful effects on those involved, and it is very difficult for people to express any grief or regret and find the help they need. But emerging research confirms what many have experienced –, that many emotional, psychological and spiritual difficulties in people’,s lives are in fact the hidden effects of an abortion. Married couples, mothers, fathers, grandparents and siblings of aborted children, as well as persons who have been involved in the abortion industry have come to Rachel`s Vineyard retreats in search of peace and inner healing. The weekend is an intense and demanding experience, but it has borne great fruit for thousands of participants. One retreat participant has written: “,I attended a Rachel`s Vineyard retreat this year and the healing I have experienced as a result has changed me deeply and fundamentally. I not only found God`s forgiveness but He made it possible for me to forgive myself. Healing is possible. There is hope. A part of me died when I had my abortion and God`s healing is restoring me.”, And another writes: “,For 12 years after my abortion I suffered in silence, grieving the loss of my child. My life became a living hell, and I didn`t care if I lived or died. In October of 1997 all that changed. I attended a Rachel`s Vineyard Retreat and began my journey of healing. Not only did God remove my fear, He has also allowed me to have tremendous love and support from my family and friends. I am now able to carry the message of hope and healing to others who have suffered after abortion.”, For more information about the work of Rachel’,s Vineyard, and about weekend retreats in the UK and Ireland, please visit www.rachelsvineyard.org or read Forbidden Grief: The Unspoken Pain of Abortion, by Theresa Burke with David C. Reardon (Acorn Books). Rachel’,s Vineyard Retreat

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Sep 2009 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Opportunities at Maryvale M y name is Stephen Johnson, I am married with two grown up sons. I am a parishioner of Our Lady of Victories parish, Keighley, and over the years have been involved in Folk Groups and liturgy and prayer groups, and I have been a Confirmation catechist for many years. Because of my parish activities I felt I wanted to learn more about my faith, so that I could pass it on to others more effectively, especially in these difficult times that the Church is experiencing. So last year I started a BA Honours degree in Applied Theology (Catechesis) at Maryvale Institute, Birmingham, which is a part- time, distance learning course. The Maryvale advert in the Catholic press had caught my eye and after further enquiries I realised that this is what I needed. The course involves studying at home, working in my own time, and it includes three residential weekends each year at Maryvale, and an annual exam. I have a full-time job so have to allocate time for the study in the mornings, evenings and at weekends. I have just completed my first year and found all six modules to be inspiring, as they have helped me to understand more deeply many areas of my faith. There have been many times when my heart burned within me as the contents of my faith were being revealed to me as I studied the material, in a similar way to the disciples on the road to Emmaus when Jesus explained the Scriptures to them, as St. Luke recalls in chapter 24 of his Gospel. I particularly chose the applied theology course as it teaches not only the theory but also how to apply ‘,passing on the Faith’, in various situations that we meet in our everyday lives, especially in catechetical sessions. Maryvale offers a wide range of courses in Catholic theology, including certificate and diploma programmes at various levels for Parish catechists and in fact for anyone who is interested in theology or Catholic studies, a number of Maryvale students are not Catholic but enrol to understand the Catholic faith more deeply. Students come from many different countries and backgrounds, most of them, like me, are in full-time work, so the residential weekends are so valuable, not only for the lectures and meeting with the tutors but also for getting to know the other students and sharing our experiences and insights of how the course is having such an impact on our lives. I can honestly say that the course has changed me, as a person and as a Catholic. I recently changed my career to move from a successful position in the commercial sector to a new challenge in the charity sector in a new attempt to serve Jesus Christ and His Church. For more information about what Maryvale has to offer go to their website, http,//www.maryvale.ac.uk Page 18 Invitation to Celebrate! I n July 2010, Yorkshire Martyrs Catholic College at Westgate Hill in Bradford will close its doors for the last time as Catholic education provision moves across the city to the St Joseph’,s College and St Bede’,s school sites. The school first opened on the current site in 1964 as Blessed Margaret Clitherow and Cardinal Hinsley Grammar schools. They amalgamated in 1981 to form Yorkshire Martyrs, and its catchment has included much of Bradford, South Leeds and parts of Kirklees. A group of staff and pupils from across the school’,s life are planning to organise a series of events to mark the contribution made by the school. Notable former pupils of the schools include Gerry Sutcliffe, MP for South Bradford, TV Journalist Gloria DePiero, Shameless actor Nicky Evans, fashion designer Colin Wolfenden, Bradford City’,s Chris Brandon and current Yorkshire cricket captain, Anthony McGrath. There are many less publicly well known people who have had a successful start to their lives as a result of their time at the school. The first event is a reunion, to be held at the school on Saturday September 26th, at the College. More details can be found on the Celebration facebook group, or by contacting Andrew Mullaney or Christian Oldcorn at the school. It is hoped that as many former pupils and staff as possible can attend. The year of celebration will build towards a Mass next July , where the principal celebrant will be Right Reverend Arthur Roche, Roman Catholic Bishop of Leeds, which will be followed by a formal Gala dinner. Former pupils, staff and friends of the school who would like to be kept informed of forthcoming events and how they can get involved, are invited to join the facebook group “,Yorkshire Martyrs Official Celebration”,, or send their contact details, and years they attended Margaret Clitherow, Cardinal Hinsley or Yorkshire Martyrs, to: Christian Oldcorn –, Head of RE and Chaplaincy Yorkshire Martyrs Catholic College, Westgate Hill Street Bradford BD4 6NR Tel 01274 681262 Or by email to: c.oldcorn@ymcc.ngfl.ac.uk. Or a.walker@ymcc.ngfl.ac.uk Communion prayer.) What is the Wave? On Saturday 5 December 2009, ahead of the crucial UN climate summit in Copenhagen, tens of thousands of people from all walks of life will flow through the streets of London to demonstrate their support for a safe climate future for all. The Wave is organised by the Stop Climate Chaos Coalition. How do I get there? The best way of getting to there is by taking The Wave Express! The Wave Express is a 500 seat charter train organised by CAFOD, Christian Aid, Leeds Justice and Peace Commission, Stop Climate Chaos and TIDAL. It will be travelling from Bradford, Leeds and Doncaster to London King`s Cross. Unfortunately, due to Network Rail`s scheduling system we don`t know exact timings yet, but will leave Bradford at roughly 7am and London at roughly 6pm. Tickets cost £,30 full fare and £,20 for the unwaged and people on low incomes. Under 5s travel free (there are a limited number of places so please phone 0113 3917917 or email thewaveexpress@leedscopnet.info to book a place). How can I get a ticket? There are two ways of booking your tickets, either by post or online. For online bookings please go to our secure payment facility at www.leedscopnet.info For postal bookings please send a booking form, a cheque made payable to TIDAL and a Stamped Addressed Envelope to. The Wave Express, Leeds TIDAL, 20 New Market Street, Leeds, LS1 6DG Please note:- •, The tickets will be allocated strictly on a first come, first served basis. Reservations will not be accepted without cheques or online payment. •, If all the seats are taken, we will close the online booking facility. Any cheques received after this date will be placed on a reserve list. We will let you know the status of your booking so that you can make alternative arrangements or not. We strongly urge you to book early. •, You will receive your tickets around 2 weeks before 5 December. •, We will not be allocating specific seats. •, There will be no catering facilities on the train. Please bring your food and drink, no alcohol please.. •, You are responsible for your transport to and from the stations. •, Under 16s must be accompanied by a responsible adult. Under 18s must have written permission of a parent/guardian. •, The closing date for bookings is 28th October. The train is likely to be very popular so please book early to avoid disappointment. Unique Sabbatical for Catholic Headteachers: O ver eighty Catholic headteachers from the four north-eastern dioceses of Hallam, Hexham&, Newcastle, Leeds and Middlesbrough have now experienced their very own tailor made sabbatical –, and every headteacher, over an eight year period has reported sabbatical to be an outstanding, transformational experience, quite unlike any other course or conference attended. One of the highlights of this years experience has been a pilgrimage to Holy Island and in particular, evening prayer on the beach. Now in its eighth year, the sabbatical programme is so popular that headteachers are requesting to return for a second time. Frank McDermott, former Director of Schools and now Sabbatical Director for the four dioceses, is delighted with the response from participants. “,It is an immense privilege to lead this unique experience and I am delighted that more and more headteachers and governing bodies are seeing the programme as an essential aspect of the conditions of service for leaders of church schools. This is Catholic education at its best - offering a prophetic vision for the future and there is now a wealth of evidence to ensure that sabbatical should be a requirement for all headteachers and an entitlement every five or six years. Without doubt the experience has a massive impact on headteachers of Church schools and helps deepen a school’,s capacity to nurture human wholeness, serve the common good and contribute to social cohesion.”, John Hutchinson, headteacher of St Theresa’,s in Leeds and 12 years a head in 2 schools: “,This experience has been completely unique and I will treasure my memories of our time together forever. I would recommend sabbatical to anyone working in school but would see it as essential CPD for a faith school head, it should be built into head’,s contracts for renewal every 5 –, 7 years.”, (Diocese of Leeds)

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Sep 2009 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 19 First Friday of the Month SINGLE CATHOLICS meet at 8.00pm for mass at our Lady of Lourdes, Leeds. We also a have a program of 4-8 events during the month, walks, meals, cinema and theatre trips, etc. Phone Malcolm McLean chairman ASC.on 01274 610817. Membership is open to all single Catholics who are free to marry within the church. Crusade Mass The crusade Mass and Rosary of Mary Immaculate is held at St Patrick`s Church, Bradford, on the first Saturday of the Month after 12.15pm Mass Second Sunday of Month 2pm Meeting of Bradford Fraternity of the Secular Franciscan Order at St. Anthony`s Convent, Clayton, Bradford.` `Third Sunday of Month 2.30pm Meeting of Leeds Fraternity of the Secular Franciscan Order at the Cathedral. Ampleforth Renewal Community Ampleforth Abbey, meet 1st Sunday each month, at Ampleforth. 11 .30am Praise, Speaker, Sharing Groups, Reconciliation, Exposition, Finishing with Mass and Healing at 4.00pm. All enquiries: Seamus McEneaney 01429 426181 Charismatic Renewal A charismatic prayer group meets at Trinity and All saints College Chapel, Brownberrie Lane, Horsforth on the first and third Wednesday each month (please note change of date) at 7.30 P.M, Groups also meet at Harrogate, Huddersfield, Halifax and Wakefield. For further information contact Pat, 01924371559 or Tony, 01274824203 Monthly Vocations Mass Mount St Joseph’,s Chapel 7.30pm First Friday of the Month. Helpers of Gods precious infants, prayer vigils Regular weekly prayer vigils at Marie Stopes Abortuary, 7 Barrack Road.LS7 4AB, next to Nissan car showrooms. Fridays 12-30 to 1-30, and Saturdays 9am- l1am. Other times variable. Further details Pat 0113 2582745 Diary - October Be Still a few moments for thought and prayer Miss no single opportunity of making some small sacrifice, here by a smiling look, there by a kindly word, always doing the smallest right and doing it all for love. St Therese of Lisieux Lourdes 2010 2nd to 9th July Pilgrimage Leader Rt Rev Arthur Roche Contact Mrs Sheila Ambler 01937 845835 T he weather was glorious on 26th June 2009 as businessmen from around the city gathered with their colleagues to form teams at Sandmoor Golf Club for the second charity Golf Day. Everyone was in high spirits and in spite of the current economic climate the generosity of the golfers throughout the day was incredible! After an enjoyable day of golf and the opportunity to meet some of the Leeds Diocesan Youth Service staff and young people who travelled on the World Youth Day pilgrimage in 2008, the golfers then settled down to watch a brilliant film of photographs and footage from WYD 2008 in Australia. As a little added extra we showed some footage of some of the golfing blunders of the day! A superb meal followed, not forgetting the chance for the golfers to part with some of their hard earned cash in place of some unique auction prizes! Bishop Roche joined us for the evening’,s festivities and in his speech after dinner he thanked the businessmen for their support of the work of LDYS. The evening was full of banter and amidst the laughter plenty of funds were raised to enable the continuing success of the work of LDYS. Golfers Raise Money for LDYS Leeds Middlesbrough Hallam When Yorkshire Priests retire or fall sick they receive support from THE YORKSHIRE BRETHREN FUND Under the patronage of Blessed Nicholas Postgate (founded in 1660) A NYONE CAN HELP THEM BY BECOMING A BENEFACTOR Each Benefactor will have five Masses offered during life or after Death as requested, and share in over 400 monthly Masses offered by Priest Members. Apply to your Parish Priest or The Secretary: Fr Timothy Wiley, St Mary’,s Presbytery, Cross Bank Road, Batley, WF17 8PQ Contribute £,30.00 Registered Charity Number 511025

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Page 20

Sep 2009 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 20 Designed and produced by CathCom, L4 Blois Meadow Business Centre, Steeple Bumpstead, Haverhill, Suffolk, CB9 7BN. To advertise call 020 7112 6710 or email: ads@cathcom.org A Golden Celebration T wenty-one priests, many former curates, congregated on Sunday 19th July at St Mary’,s, Halifax to con-celebrate a special Mass of Thanksgiving for the Golden Jubilee to the Priesthood of Father Lawrence Lister. On the fiftieth anniversary of the date he was ordained Fr Lister was also joined by several hundred people to celebrate Mass in the presence of the Bishop Emeritus, Right Reverend David Konstant. Father Lister welcomed everyone and said that the occasion was made all the more special for him by seeing so many of those present who had been part of his life during the last 50 years, priests, parishioners, friends. He offered particular welcome to, Millie, his housekeeper of 37 years for all the care and attention she had bestowed on not only him but also all the priests who had lived and worked with him, to Bishop David and to Father Smith for helping to ensure that his retirement is good. He also thanked the ladies of St Mary’,s parish for all the preparation and work that had gone in to making the occasion special. During the homily Father Paul Fisher said that 10 years ago Fr Lister had asked him to preach at his Ruby Jubilee just before he left St Joseph’,s, Pontefract for Bradford. Now ten years later Fr Lister was living in ‘,retirement’, at St Alban’,s, continuing to help the work of the Church in the parish of St Mary’,s. Fr Fisher said that his own first appointment had been with Fr Lister in Pontefract and that he soon realised that Fr Lister had great generosity of the heart together with a wealth of experience, common sense and a love of God –, a friend of Christ in every way. At the end of Mass Fr Smith said that Fr Lister’,s first appointment had been as a curate at St Mary’,s and that the parish was once again enjoying having him in their presence. He thanked Fr Lister for all the work he undertakes and presented him with a cheque from the people of the parish. Bishop Konstant added his personal tribute and offered Fr Lister his congratulations before presenting him with an Apostolic Blessing from Pope Benedict XVI. O n 2nd October, there will be a Mass to mark the 50th anniversary of the consecration of St Columba’,s church, Tong Street, Bradford. All are very welcome to attend. We would especially like to welcome former parishioners and those who have been baptised or married in the church. Mass, celebrated by Bishop Roche, will be at 7.30pm in the church, followed by refreshments in the school afterwards. St Columba’,s church in the parish of St Mary, Bradford –, 50th anniversary T his is now the third year since the reinstatement of the Procession, and we are hoping that the numbers will be even greater this year. To quote Bishop Arthur Roche, we would like everyone to bring along at least one friend. The evening commences 19.30 in the Market Square in Batley with a Welcome by Bishop Roche followed by a brief Homily. Everyone then processes through the streets, carrying Torches, to the Church of St. Mary of the Angels, where Bishop Roche will celebrate Benediction. This is followed by a Pie &, Pea Supper in St. Mary’,s Social Club across the road. We are lucky again to have attendance from the Mayor of Kirklees and her Consort, our local MP Mike Wood, and local Councillor Peter O’,Neill, who is a member of St. Mary’,s Parish. We look forward to welcoming everyone to Batley. ‘,Bring Along A Friend…,’,

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