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Leeds Catholic Post History

Newspaper for the Diocese of Leeds

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Apr 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

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Apr 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Whats inside Chrism Mass Page 9 Enter into the Bond of Love Page 10 CATHOLIC POST THE NEWSPAPER FOR THE DIOCESE OF LEEDS APRIL 2010 www.dioceseofleeds.org.uk www.catholicpost.org.uk A start to Holy Week T he traditional start to Holy Week, in Leeds, was held in ‘,The Courtyard at the Civic Hall’,, in the presence of The Lord Mayor Councillor Judith Elliott, The Lord Mayor’,s Consort, Mr Michael Terence Elliott and the congregations of the City Centre Churches. On an over cast and blustery day the Bishop and the Rector of Leeds warmly welcomed the Lord Mayor and her Consort in front of a good congregation that had gathered –, payers were said, the Palms were said and after the reading of the Gospel by the Rector of Leeds the procession formed up along with the Donkey to make its way back to the different Churches. The Cathedral was full for the Mass that followed, more so than in years past. All stood and joined in the clear proclamation of the Passion that set the tone for the services of the week to come. CATHOLIC CARE (Diocese of Leeds) - Taking the Caring Church into the community In his homily the Bishop reminded everyone how they were on a journey through life just as he ( Jesus ) had been on a journey during that week of his life leading up to his death. We had to loose our lives to find them –, we had to walk in Faith with the Lord. This is what Lent had been preparing for –, now we would be able to walk with him. As the Mass ended the Bishop thanked The Lord Mayor for honouring the Diocese with her presence at this traditional start to Holy Week. Rev Canon Tony Bundock, Rector of Leeds Parish Church

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Apr 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 2 SCHOOLS NEWS D ance Teacher Lucy Hutton has inspired the pupils of St Joseph`s Catholic Primary School in Halifax to make their special Lent collection for Mary`s Meals. Miss Hutton heard about the scheme which is an international movement set up to provide school meals in communities where poverty and hunger prevent children from gaining an education by providing daily meals in school for nearly 400,000 children in Africa, Asia, Latin America and Eastern Europe . By doing this it allows children to receive an education, enabling them to escape from poverty and to help bring prosperity to their communities. The children were absolutely stunned to hear that £,6.15p can feed a child for a year in the poorest communities in Malawi. That really made them think about their Lenten giving for 2010 and they suggested to Miss Hutton that they raise money for Mary`s Meals in a number of ways including raffles, non- uniform days and other fund raising activities. One of these was an initiative by Year 4 who, before Christmas had rehearsed and prepared a show called Musical Mishaps, the performance of which was somewhat curtailed by the appalling weather just before Christmas. However, the children suggested that this show be put on to raise money for Mary`s Meals in the run up to Easter, and as a result on Thursday 18 March Year 4 presented this extravagant performance, based on time travel through the musicals thanks to the offices of Doctor Who`s tardis, to parents and parishioners in St Bernard`s Church hall in Halifax. The production was superb. Year 4 excelled themselves with the superb, energetic dancing throughout. The show was choreographed by Lucy Hutton, who, in her time at the school has brought dancing to the forefront of the school`s extracurricular activities. The computer generated backdrop was compiled by another fantastic member of the school staff, Leanne Simpson assisted by yet another gifted member of staff Connie White. SUPPORT FOR MARY’,S MEAL B ishop Arthur has returned from El Salvador deeply moved by his experience of the Romero anniversary celebrations in late March. He was accompanied by Archbishop Bernard Longley of Birmingham and two CAFOD colleagues, Clare Dixon and Geoff O’,Donoghue. The group spent about a week in El Salvador, meeting people who had known Monseñ,or Romero personally and visiting the places where he lived and preached. The Romero anniversary celebrations culminated on the evening of Saturday 20 March with an open-air Eucharist Mass in front of San Salvador cathedral. Bishop Arthur and Archbishop Bernard were joined at the altar by church leaders from around the world and looked on as thousands of Salvadorans gathered to honour Romero´,s life and martyrdom. Hours earlier, worshippers walked through the streets of San Salvador, holding candles in a Pilgrimage of Light. They stopped along their journey at five Stations of the Cross, where they reflected on Romero’,s homilies. After Mass, many people stayed on in the cathedral square for an evening of Salvadoran music and an all-night vigil. Bishop Arthur and Archbishop Bernard took the opportunity of their stay in El Salvador to visit some of CAFOD´,s partner organisations and the communities with whom they work. They met with the staff of Tutela Legal, the Archdiocesan human rights office, which was set up by Monseñ,or Romero in the late 1970s. They also travelled west, past the Izalco volcano, to the village of Puentecitos where they enjoyed some delicious chicken soup with local farmers working with the Jesuit Development Service. Reflecting back on his visit, Bishop Arthur wrote, “,The impact of the journey is only now unravelling in my mind. I think one of the things that most impresses itself upon me and which was so clearly evident in all with whom we met was that precious gift which the Lord speaks of as ´,poverty of spirit´,. So many stories, so many challenges, so much hardship and yet, in the midst of it all, such beauty”,. Sarah Smith Pearse, CAFOD Latin America Team Bishop Arthur in El Salvador The General Election is looming: in so many of our constituencies the result- to a few thousand votes- may still seem a foregone conclusion and in only a few does any involvement seem at first likely to affect matters. It is this conclusion that tends to make us disinterested- in the real sense of the word, and apathy sets in. Some constituencies in our diocese seem to have no natural form, being the result of constant refilleting by the electoral commission, facing a task even more onerous than re-forming parishes: this hardly helps, either. Yet this could be a year of wider change: we could find no party has a clear majority whilst there are a number of very important issues facing us: not just the economy, whose fragile steps back from the abyss may yet give the government another term- but our other more fundamental issues like our participation in George W Bush’,s “,war on terrorism”,, the worrying attacks on religious freedom in the name of “,equality”, shown, for example, in the recent “,Catholic Care”, case, the widening gap between rich and poor - who masters the banks?... and the whole spectrum of the ethics of life, whether it be approaches to healthcare, the care of the elderly and dying or the treatment of the unborn. Overlaying it all is a certain public disapproval and suspicion, perhaps a catalyst for change. Even if we live in those northern constituencies where we still think votes are not counted but weighed one way or the other- “,safe seats”,- we can still make an impression through our questions: and this time even our votes- we can be surprised: we should let others be apathetic and make our own views count. If this does turn out to be a hung or inconclusive parliament, a few votes somewhere can make a difference. So ask your candidate for her/his stance on issues such as ours and they can leave the hustings or your doorstep understanding that people of care and conscience- like Thomas Becket or Thomas More- have a voice, and are prepared to use it. The Post Says …, HUMILITY AND JUSTICE Young Adults Pray with Scripture In response to Bishop Arthur’,s invitation, young adults from across the Diocese of Leeds gathered in the Cathedral to pray with scripture. Young musicians joined with the LDYS team to create a prayerful and peaceful ambiance, playing music from Taize as people arrived into the Cathedral. The two events focussed on the themes of Humility and Justice. Scriptures were read on these themes and Bishop Arthur encouraged everyone to engage personally with the Word of God. The scripture which encompasses both themes is, “,This is what the Lord asks of you: only this, to act justly, to love tenderly and to walk humbly with your God”, (Micah 6:8). During this time of Lent we are invited to focus our attention on God, and to reflect on and change those things that prevent us from following and fulfilling what the Lord asks of us. Each week, Bishop Arthur shared with us, his own thoughts on the scriptures and the themes, of the challenge each of us face in being humble and just in our own lives encouraging the young adults to ask of God what it is you need to move forward on their own journey. Times of silence allowed each person to reflect on what the Lord might be saying to them through His word. There was also the opportunity to go to the Sacrament of Reconciliation after the reflections. After the event refreshments were served in Wheeler Hall and it was a wonderful time of fellowship among the young adults present.

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Apr 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

YOUTH Page 3 Leeds Diocesan Youth Service ‘,All who are thirsty, come!’, (Rev 22:17) For more information about how to register for Leeds Diocesan Youth Service events, check out: www.leedsyouth.org.uk, contact Anna at the Youth Office: 0113 261 8058 / abcleedsdiocese@hotmail.com or join the “,Leeds Diocesan Youth Service”, Facebook group. Wednesday 21st April REVELATION For young people in Yrs 9 -13, 7-9pm, Cathedral Hall, Leeds Tuesday 28th April Diocesan Youth Ministry Coordinator Meeting 10.30-3.30pm Hinsley Hall Friday 7th May “,Handmaids”, Evening of prayer for young women aged 18-30ish, 7-9pm St. Joseph’,s Convent, Hunslet Saturday 15th May St. Pio Day 1-6pm, St. Pio Friary, Bradford Wednesday 19th May REVELATION For young people in Yrs 9 -13, 7-9pm, Cathedral Hall, Leeds Saturday 29th May Ceilidh World Youth Day Fundraiser Everyone Welcome! 7.30pm Immaculate Heart, Harrogate Road Leeds Diocesan Youth Service Calendar “,RSVP”, R SVP was the Leeds Diocesan Lent event for young people in Years 9 –, 13, held at Cathedral Hall over four weeks of Lent. Let Us Proclaim The Mystery Of Faith Each week of the event looked at a particular aspect of the Catholic faith and aimed to help young people understand and experience how it is relevant to them. “,Let Us Proclaim The Mystery Of Faith”, was the focus for Week One of RSVP. Hannah Zafar (Parish Youth Ministry Coordinator of St. Teresa’,s, Crossgates) spoke to us about God the Father. Many young people in their evaluation forms remembered how Hannah spoke of God’,s love as ‘,ridiculous love’,, ‘,ridiculously massive love’, and ‘,ridiculously eternal’,! Young parishioners from St. Teresa’,s, Crossgates, helped to lead the evening with music and drama. Christ Has Died In Week Two of RSVP, Fr. Christopher Angel (St. Robert’,s, Harrogate), helped us to understand a little bit more of what it means for us that Jesus died on the Cross. Many young people were encouraged and moved by Fr. Christopher’,s words and were convicted that the Sacrament of Reconciliation was the best way to respond to the message of ‘,limitless love’, they had just heard. Br. Benedict Joseph CFR gave his testimony on this night. One young person commented that hearing Br. Benedict Joseph was their personal highlight of the RSVP events. Hearing the faith journey of others is a key way in which young people are able to relate to the ‘,big truths’, of the faith. They realise that something which seems impossible can be made possible in and through the Lord in the lives of ordinary people. A feature of each week was a short film starring young people from across the diocese. Young parishioners of St. Robert’,s, Harrogate, featured in the Week Two film which introduced the week’,s theme and Christ Is Risen Everyone seems to remember Fr. Stephen Webb’,s (Diocesan Youth Chaplain) talk from Week Three, not only because he made them laugh the whole way through it. While focussing on living life in the power of the Holy Spirit, Fr. Stephen exhorted young people to think about the influences in their lives, the things that prompt them in a particular direction. During the usual small group times, everyone was given the chance to speak about the things that prevent them from living their life as active followers of Jesus. Young people from Our Lady and All Saints parish, Otley, helped to organise and lead everything in Week Three, from serving refreshments and working on the reception desk to leading people in a sign language reflection. Christ Will Come Again The final week of the RSVP events gave Josephine Stow (Coordinator for Evangelisation) the opportunity to speak passionately about the Second Coming of Jesus. It was surprising to learn that for many young people, this is a key aspect of the Christian faith that is forgotten about! The prayer time which Jo arranged for the end of her talk was powerful because it required everyone to respond to the message of the Resurrection and of the Coming Kingdom in a practical way. Jo explained that there are various ways to live out and pass on the Catholic faith, but each of us because of our Baptism have a duty to do ‘,something’,! RSVP Has Died BUT Revelation Will Come Again! The RSVP events came to a close on Wednesday 24th March, but this is not the end! The regular monthly event “,Revelation”, (for young people in Years 9 –, 13) will commence on Wednesday 16th April 2010, 7-9pm in Cathedral Hall, Leeds. “,What must I do …, ?”, I t is with great excitement that the young people of the Diocese of Leeds are awaiting the arrival of Pope Benedict XVI to the UK. The forthcoming visit is especially pertinent for those young people who are planning to travel to Madrid next summer for the 26th World Youth Day celebrations. Palm Sunday 2010 Palm Sunday this year marked the 25th WYD celebrations. That means it is twenty five years since Pope John Paul II invited young people from all over the world to meet with him to celebrate together the Catholic faith. World Youth Day 2010 in Leeds Leeds World Youth Day pilgrims met at Myddelton Grange on Palm Sunday to take some time out to pray and reflect on the letter that Pope Benedict XVI has written to the young people of the world on the occasion of the 25th World Youth Day. “,Good Teacher, what must I do to inherit eternal life?”, Pope Benedict has asked young people over the coming year to reflect on the themes from the story of the Rich Young Man from the Gospels, with a particular focus on the question, “,Good Teacher, what must I do to inherit eternal life?”, The Palm Sunday retreat at Myddelton Grange was, of course, a perfect opportunity for pilgrims to meet one another and to take a break from the fundraising preparations in order to begin to prepare spiritually for the pilgrimage to Madrid. The WYD Core Team from Leeds prepared a day focussed on the Scripture of the Rich Young Man and the Pope’,s letter. The day was a combination of energetic icebreaker activities, times of personal prayer and reflection including Stations of the Cross and a Holy Hour (with priests available for the Sacrament of Reconciliation) and an opportunity for pilgrims to be a little bit creative with some paints and candles! Equipping Pilgrims for the Journey A key aim of the retreat was to equip pilgrims for prayer for the times in between retreats with the whole group. Giving pilgrims tips on “,what they must do’, to strengthen their relationship with God ran throughout the whole day. The candle that pilgrims painted (on the theme of World Youth Day or the Rich Young Man) is to be used by them as they pray at home in preparation for the pilgrimage. Stations of the Cross booklets, the WYD Prayer and a resource to help pilgrims reflect on the Holy Father’,s letter were just some of the tools that were provided for pilgrims to help them in their prayer life. Good News for Pilgrims! At the Palm Sunday retreat, LDYS were happy to announce to pilgrims that after a bit of wheeling and dealing with the tour operator they will be able to bring the cost of the pilgrimage down by a couple of hundred pounds! A new, definite and final price will be announced in Eastertide. There are still a number of places left on the pilgrimage. For more information contact Anna Cowell or Fr. Stephen Webb at the Youth Office on 0113 2618058 / wydleeds@live.co.uk.

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Apr 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

C hange, like love, is all around. Buds are appearing on our fruit trees, tulips surprise with their presence, the sun shyly claims our attention as it returns strengthened from its winter sojourn in warmer climes. As Chaucer, in the prologue to the Canterbury Tales, described this time of new life, new hope: “,Whan that in aprill with his shoures soote The droghte of march hath perced to the roote, …, …,Thanne longen folk to goon on pilgrimages…,”, [When April with his showers sweet with fruit The drought of March has pierced unto the root…, …,Then do folk long to go on pilgrimage…,] Pilgrimage! We may no longer trek to Canterbury every year, but we are, still, a pilgrim people. In fact we seem hungrier than ever for transformative experiences and often use journeys, or holidays, to this end. All journeys, internal and external, have the potential to transform and now two very different spring journeys are about to begin and both have the potential to change lives. While not usually prone to pilgrimages with a purpose, my sisters and I are about to start a 3 part, 3 year pilgrimage which we are publicising in order to raise money for dementia. I doubt we will have half the fun of Chaucer’,s ‘,pilgrims’, but we hope we will make a difference for people with dementia and their families http://www.justgiving.com/SomethingMadForDad Before heading for the hills, I will be going on a very different journey with Linda Pennington, Diocesan Coordinator for Catechesis. We are about to tour the diocese with a brand new Home School Parish Workshop. Several years ago, over a period of about fifteen months, we met staff, governors, parents and parish priests from every primary school in the diocese on our first Home-School- Parish ‘,roadshow’,. Now, having discovered, rediscovered and adapted resources and ideas to enliven catechetical and family ministries where you are, we are on the road again. Our new workshop will refresh how you think about home school parish community. Over a period of 10 weeks starting after Easter we will visit various parishes and deliver the new workshop at 8 locations in the diocese. Each visit will be just 2 hours in the evening. If you work in a school or are a parish catechist, a parent or a family life minister, (or all of those!) and you would like to meet with others and see what’,s available, this might be just the thing! We all need occasional refreshing in the precious task of weaving good relationships and passing on the faith in our, homes, schools and parishes, and this workshop aims to do just that. ‘,Passing on the faith’, can sound so dry can’,t it? But children and families are actually at the heart of evangelisation. What we do at home will not look like what happens in church. Children learn best when they are in secure loving relationships. “,What you do in your families is vey important to the church and very close to the heart of God”, Bishop Arthur The foundation we already have in home-school-parish communities makes a big difference to our children’,s developing faith. At this new Home-School-Parish workshop we will be sharing of lots of ideas and good practice and there will be a resource pack for everyone who attends. The workshop will also be an opportunity for you to meet people with different roles and from other parishes. You may want to bring a few people from the different strands of your own home-school-parish community. The dates and venues are printed separately (see Home School Parish box). We look forward to welcoming you at one of our workshops! Every journey is different but there is only one goal. Booking Essential see box for venues and details, go to www.flm.org.uk or contact Angela Fieldhouse at admin@flm.org.uk Page 4 FAMILY LIFE / SIDELINES / MUSIC `Two tribes go to war` –, there, I`ve said it, the title of the hugely popular 1984 song which is buzzing around in my brain, perhaps the price to be paid for for watching a surfeit of `Best of the 80`s` TV programmes, or maybe it was mood music for some documentary about the Cold War, USA vs USSR, twitchy fingers on their nuclear buttons. Or could it be that, as Easter recedes, and Whit approaches, it is the 1960s bank holiday beach battles between Mods (and their horrid scooters) and Rockers (with their beautiful motorbikes) triggering the memory? Of course, it could be closer to home, last week, a fellow member of the WYCMN emailed to ask, “,Are you going to the NNPM Conference in July?”, I don`t know, I didn`t know about the conference until he told me. And anyway, there is an SSG Summer School in August! Dilemmas, dilemmas, and far too many unexplained acronyms..... Well, at least I can deal with them: WYCMN: West Yorkshire Church Music Network “,a self-help network of church musicians based in the Yorkshire region. The emphasis is on more contemporary repertoire and providing opportunities for people to share or ask for help with their church music activities.”, Declaration of vested interest: I send out the emails and (sometimes) update the website. NNPM: National Network of Pastoral Musicians “,an organisation consisting of people around the UK who are committed in some way to church music. It is totally ecumenical and open to all.”, Every couple of years, they put on a conference in the summer, and this year it is: `Pilgrims on a Journey` Chester University Friday 23rd July to Sunday 25th July 2010 You can expect to meet Bernadette Farrell, Chris Walker, Gary O` Neill, Andrew Maries, Richard Hubbard, Stephen Dean, Martin Foster and more. If you can’,t come for the whole weekend, Saturday 24th July is an open day of workshops, worship and song. SSG: Society of Saint Gregory: “,the national society for liturgy and music in the Roman Catholic Church in the British Isles. It was founded in 1929, continues to flourish and is delighted to welcome Christians of any denomination who seek to achieve similar aims through liturgy, music and the arts.”, The 2010 Summer School (`nearly full` 30/03/10) is Eucharistic Wonder`, Sneaton Castle, Whitby from 2nd to 6th August 2010 The school leaders are Fr Allen Morris and Catherine Christmas, and one of the keynote addresses will be by Bishop Arthur Roche. So which national tribe am I in? NNPM or SSG? Like a politician on `Today`, I will duck the question, though there are hints in my email address... But I think I may well venture across the Pennines (through the county Radio Leeds cheerfully terms `the dark side`) as being tribal is a choice one can make, or refuse to make- and if the options are join in community with others, or stick with a tribe, I`ll go with community –, even if that means I`ll have to be nice to scooter riders next time I`m on my motorbike! Tim Devereux tim.devereux@ssg.org.uk For information about past and future WYCMN events, visit www.westyorkshirechurchmusic.org.uk NNPM is at http://nnpm.org/ (yes, there really is no `www`!) SSG is at http://www.ssg.org.uk/ Musical Notes by Tim Devereux Eastertide Journeys with a Difference A year out experience with CAFOD and the Society for the Holy Child Jesus in partnership with St Mary’,s College and YMT (Youth Ministry Team) that takes you places the guidebooks don’,t. Take an adventure that will change you and those around you - your journey begins and ends in the UK, but takes you to one of the poorest countries in the world to meet amazing people and share their lives. You will then use those experiences when you return to lead young people to a better understanding of how their faith helps them take action for change. Step into the Gap offers a rounded experience, both overseas and in the UK, allowing you to explore and express your faith. It bridges the ",gap", between adventure and new experiences while offering something to a wider community. Find out more Contact youngleadership@cafod.org.uk if you need more details or help with the application forms Application deadline - April 23rd Interviews will take place towards the end of May. Residential preparation weekend before placement starts: 30th July to 2nd August. •, Criteria for candidates - you must be: •, Aged 18-30, open to new challenges, and prepared to step out of your comfort zone •, Committed to social justice, your faith or school community, and to sharing your faith and experiences •, Interested in global justice with a passionate desire to do something about it •, Self-motivated and willing to work with others - particularly young people. •, Prepared to fundraise for CAFOD with the help of CAFOD staff and Holy Child Sisters. The storm over the abuse crisis seems like a series of thunderstorms passing overhead. A time of calm is suddenly disturbed by more crashes and flashes, not here but near enough to disturb. As I write, we have the Archbishop of Canterbury’,s surprising intervention and the support for the Irish church from their Christian brothers and sisters in the Church of Ireland: we have Archbishop of Dublin Diarmuid Martin, too, a veritable Vince Cable, always worth listening to. Whatever the church says, it is in a lose-lose situation: any defensive stance is taken as an attempt to play down the original abuse, in danger of appearing to defend the indefensible: any past attempt at rehabilitation, now seen as misguided, is taken as an attempted cover-up. The Pope and the Archbishop of Canterbury are both men of formidable intellect with an academic’,s way of telling it how it is: it is the virtue of transparency and at the same time a bonus for any journalist looking for a good story. It makes us feel grateful for Lord Nolan and his farsighted report, although in the longer term we must beware of turning Safeguarding into that win-win catchall, the last refuge of the jobsworth, “,Health and Safety.”, By the time you read this, events will probably have twisted and turned again, more times than the Arcelor Mittal Orbit, that curious “,sculpture”, planned for the Olympic Stadium, which was announced by Mayor Boris just in time to make us wonder if it was really an April Fool. I have no idea what will happen next. Meanwhile, the perpetrators and the victims remain and must not be forgotten. I think our churches here remained as full over Easter, with the storms flashing overhead. The direction for all of us came loud and clear from the cross and the garden as it always does- humility and repentance, renewal and reform. *** In his letter to the Church in Ireland the Pope took on the role of a Jonah “,I ask you to offer up your (Lenten) fasting, your prayer, your reading of Scripture and your works of mercy in order to obtain the grace of healing and renewal for the Church in Ireland”,: an appeal to be a Nineveh, to put on modern-day coillective sackcloth. It was an appeal to that rather neglected concept, structural sin: if you go to confession and say that you feel guilt for the arms trade, or a war, or failure to share the world’,s resources, it certainly makes a change from the lists of personal sins and peccadillos, but may not feature in many people’,s examination of conscience: but sins they are. *** As the Holy Father seems to feature so much in this month’,s column, we should certainly end with an appeal to pray for him: and to venture some regret that England this time stops at Coventry (makes a change from Watford) on his September state visit, and this northern land of saints will only see him flying towards the Scotsmen. Benchmark Sidelines Step into the Gap

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Apr 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

COME AND SEE Page 5 COME AND SEE The Evangelised, go on to Evangelise O ur theme for this fifth year of Come &, See, is Mission and Evangelisation. Each month a quotation from a key document on Mission and Evangelisation will be included on this page, with a little information about the document it is taken from. Ten years after the closing of the second Vatican Council, and one year after the Third General Assembly of the Synod of Bishops, which was devoted to evangelisation, Pope Paul VI wrote Evangelii Nuntiandi. This is still a key document today, it built on from Vatican II and set the scene for Pope John Paul II’,s New Evangelisation for the new millennium. “,Those who sincerely accept the Good News, through the power of this acceptance and of shared faith therefore gather together in Jesus` name in order to seek together the kingdom, build it up and live it. They make up a community which is in its turn evangelizing. The command to the Twelve to go out and proclaim the Good News is also valid for all Christians, though in a different way(…,) “,The Church knows this. She has a vivid awareness of the fact that the Saviour`s words, ",I must proclaim the Good News of the kingdom of God,", apply in all truth to herself: She willingly adds with St. Paul: ",Not that I boast of preaching the gospel, since it is a duty that has been laid on me, I should be punished if I did not preach it", It is with joy and consolation that at the end of the great Assembly of 1974 we heard these illuminating words: ",We wish to confirm once more that the task of evangelizing all people constitutes the essential mission of the Church.", It is a task and mission which the vast and profound changes of present-day society make all the more urgent. Evangelizing is in fact the grace and vocation proper to the Church, her deepest identity. She exists in order to evangelize, that is to say, in order to preach and teach, to be the channel of the gift of grace, to reconcile sinners with God, and to perpetuate Christ`s sacrifice in the Mass, which is the memorial of His death and glorious resurrection. “,Anyone who rereads in the New Testament the origins of the Church, follows her history step by step and watches her live and act, sees that she is linked to evangelization in her most intimate being: - The Church is born of the evangelizing activity of Jesus and the Twelve. She is the normal, desired, most immediate and most visible fruit of this activity: ",Go, therefore, make disciples of all the nations.", Now, ",they accepted what he said and were baptized. That very day about three thousand were added to their number.... Day by day the Lord added to their community those destined to be saved.", - Having been born consequently out of being sent, the Church in her turn is sent by Jesus. The Church remains in the world when the Lord of glory returns to the Father. She remains as a sign - simultaneously obscure and luminous - of a new presence of Jesus, of His departure and of His permanent presence. Thus it is the whole Church that receives the mission to evangelize, and the work of each individual member is important for the whole. - The Church is an evangelizer, but she begins by being evangelized herself. She is the community of believers, the community of hope lived and communicated, the community of brotherly love, and she needs to listen unceasingly to what she must believe, to her reasons for hoping, to the new commandment of love. The Second Vatican Council recalled and the 1974 Synod vigorously took up again this theme of the Church which is evangelized by constant conversion and renewal, in order to evangelize the world with credibility. - The Church is the depositary of the Good News to be proclaimed. The promises of the New Alliance in Jesus Christ, the teaching of the Lord and the apostles, the Word of life, the sources of grace and of God`s loving kindness, the path of salvation - all these things have been entrusted to her. It is the content of the Gospel, and therefore of evangelization, that she preserves as a precious living heritage, not in order to keep it hidden but to communicate it. - Having been sent and evangelized, the Church herself sends out evangelizers. To preach not their own selves or their personal ideas, but a Gospel of which neither she nor they are the absolute masters and owners, to dispose of it as they wish, but a Gospel of which they are the ministers, in order to pass it on with complete fidelity.”, Taken from Evangelii Nuntiandi, paragraphs 13-15 Leeds Middlesbrough Hallam When Yorkshire Priests retire or fall sick they receive support from THE YORKSHIRE BRETHREN FUND Under the patronage of Blessed Nicholas Postgate (founded in 1660) A NYONE CAN HELP THEM BY BECOMING A BENEFACTOR Each Benefactor will have five Masses offered during life or after Death as requested, and share in over 400 monthly Masses offered by Priest Members. Apply to your Parish Priest or The Secretary: Fr Timothy Wiley, St Mary’,s Presbytery, Cross Bank Road, Batley, WF17 8PQ Contribute £,30.00 Registered Charity Number 511025 A date for your diary…, Corpus Christi Procession Sunday 20th June 2010 2.00 pm - 3.15 pm Followed by refreshments Starting at Mount St Joseph’,s Home (Little Sisters of the Poor) Shire Oak Road, Headingley, LS6 2DE And finishing at Hinsley Hall, 62 Headingley Lane, Leeds LS6 2BX All welcome For more information contact Mrs Janine Garnett on 0113 261 8040 or janine.garnett@dioceseofleeds.org.uk

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Page 6

Apr 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 6 DEACONS NEWS Deacons Diary On Thursday 25th March the students of Corpus Christi Catholic College along with pupils from Corpus Christi Catholic Primary School welcomed guests to a celebration evening of Dance, Drama, Singing and Gymnastics. During this academic year the students have had the chance to study Dance and Drama as part of the curriculum and to also enjoy extra-curricular activities at lunch time and after school clubs. The result of their commitment was clear to see during this celebration evening with many dance styles on show including, Contemporary, Irish and Street. There was also wonderful solo singing performances to enjoy, plus a mindblowing gymnastics demonstration. Well done to one and all –, we look forward to seeing Showtime ’,11. Drama Dance And Celebration The Interview The Interview is a thought provoking play depicting a singular account of the Holocaust. Phillip Carter, an enthusiastic reporter arranges an interview with a holocaust survivor, Ms Ruben. His enthusiasm and personal crusade to show the world why the holocaust happened, is demolished once he comes face to face with Ms Ruben. The reporter transitions almost immediately from interviewer, to interviewee. Ms Ruben’,s firsthand account of Life in the holocaust quickly exposes the common naivety the reporter shows, a characteristic shared by the majority of modern people to date. The play, through emotional flashbacks, cleverly stages the events of Ms Ruben’,s life. They demonstrate the happiness, loneliness, and the graphic violence endured by those people effected in Germany and the rest of Europe. The intelligent script explores the reality of human ignorance, and force the question around humanity’,s dark capabilities. The Play is sure to send you on a rollercoaster of emotions, and through its intellect will entice you to ask your own questions relevant to our world today. Uniquely bonding theatre, music, dance, and ground breaking performances on stage ensures a performance you are not likely to dismiss from your memory. A deacon is sometimes asked to assist over the source or status of various documents, beliefs, quotations and so on. I recently came across a hierarchy of these which is useful for getting your head in order. A clue to the order can be the number of citations or references to each in the Catechism of the Catholic Church. The sources of our belief are…, -Sacred Scripture: or simply the Bible! -Professions of Faith (including the Nicene and Apostles` Creeds) Then documents from: -Ecumenical or General Councils such as the Second Vatican Council (1964) -”,Particular”, Councils and Synods such as Carthage, Rome etc Then other documents…,. -Papal Documents such as encyclicals, other letters etc -Ecclesiastical Documents such as the present Catechism itself, and previous formal catechisms -The Code of Canon Law -Liturgy - as in the liturgical books -Ecclesiastical Writers (which includes church fathers, various doctors of the church, theologians and writers . Hope this helps. It is to be hoped, too that Deacons had a “,good”, Easter rewarded by the richness of our prayer and liturgy, not forgetting an Easter dismissal…,. Alleluia, Alleluia! Congratulations- Deacon Chris and Vicki Stevens celebrated their Silver Wedding with a Mass and Blessing in their parish on Easter Monday. Chris &, Vicki are the first deacon couple in our diocese to take up residence in a former Presbytery, at St Joseph’,s, Moorthorpe. They have three sons.

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Page 7

Apr 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

VOCATIONS Page 7 Classified Advertising NATURAL FAMILY PLANNING SERVICE (YORKSHIRE) For free, confidential tuition in the symptothermal method of natural family planning telephone: Leeds (0113) 260 0844 The N.F.P. Service is sponsored by the Diocese of Leeds LEEDS CATHOLIC MARRIAGE CARE Marriage isn’,t always easy —, Counselling can help For an appointment in confidence, with an understanding and experienced listener, please telephone: LEEDS 0113 261 8045 HUDDERSFIELD 01484 422523 A Relationship Counselling Service All Night Vigil of Reparation Walk For Life April 25th Meet outside York Minster For more information call Pat: 07747 698553 Vocations 1. Free transport to life-changing event Young men and women aged between 16 and 35 are being offered free transport to a ground-breaking vocations festival in July. The diocesan vocations service is laying on a minibus and, if necessary a coach, for “,Invocation”,, which will run between Friday 2nd and Sunday 4th July at St Mary’,s College, Oscott, Birmingham. Events at the festival, the first of its kind in living memory, will include a talk by Archbishop Vincent Nichols, the Archbishop of Westminster, entitled “,Respond generously to be the light of Christ,”, a Midnight Rosary and a wide variety of workshops. The festival is aimed at any young Catholic man or woman who wishes to grow in faith and who is open to the possibility of the priesthood or the religious life. Accommodation will be in local bed and breakfasts or in tents in the grounds of Oscott College. The cost of the weekend will be £,50, but grants are available for those who would not otherwise be able to afford to participate. Vocations Director, Fr Paul Grogan, said: “,Every young practising Catholic is called to make a radical commitment to Christ. Often this can be in Christian marriage or through a career. But it can also be as a priest or a religious brother or sister. This weekend is for open-minded young people who would like to know more. It will be truly inspiring and a lot of fun.”, To find out more, look at the website: www.invocation.org.uk . To book a place, please email Fr Grogan: dolvocs@aol.com . 2. Flesh and blood love The priesthood is Christ’,s gift to the Church, Mgr Peter Grant told members of the discernment group recently. Through this gift we are all able to experience the love of God “,in a very flesh and blood way,”, he said. He dismissed the feelings of unworthiness which those called to the priesthood frequently experience as being “,irrelevant.”, “,If any of you think you are unworthy of the priesthood then you are quite right, you are not worthy, but that will not prevent Our Lord knocking on your door,”, he said. In a talk entitled, The priesthood is the love of the heart of Jesus, a quotation from St John Mary Vianney, Mgr Grant said, “,The priesthood is the gift of Our Lord himself, given in the Sacrament of Order, to that his love can be incarnate in our lives in the ministerial priesthood and consequently become incarnate in the lives of others.”, He added: “,We do say that Our Lord is the love of God made visible. And by the gift of the priesthood, that love is channelled in very human ways both to the priest himself, and then to all those who are to be recipients of the exercise of that priesthood.”, Mgr Grant, who was formerly Private Secretary to the Papal Nuncio in Wimbledon, latterly parish priest of St Paul’,s Alwoodley and who is now retired, explored the contribution made to our understanding of the priesthood by the “,wonderful example”, of St John Mary Vianney, whose 150th anniversary we are celebrating this year. “,I remember reading an article about him and it said that there really wasn’,t such a person as St John Vianney. And then it went on to explain that puzzling remark. St John had become such a channel of Our Lord’,s love that in one sense he disappeared and we were left with the outpouring of the love of Our Lord, as though he had been swept aside in a tidal wave of God’,s love.”, He added: “,Love is the vital ingredient in what we might call your pilgrimage of discernment. We need a love that is ready to follow the promptings of Our Lord, a love that is generous, a love that is obedient and humble, a love that is worthy of the title of ‘,love.’,”, Christ should be our best friend, he said. ”,He has gifted us with the sacraments, the scriptures, the church and the witness of the saints. We need to avail of these gifts to deepen our friendship with Our Lord. And of course we must always seek to develop our personal prayer.”, The full text of Mgr Grant’,s talk is available on the vocations pages of the diocesan website. 3. Brutal honesty A unique insight into the innovative formation programme which is being offered to those beginning at seminary was provided by the former Spiritual Director of the English College in Valladolid recently. Fr Kevin McLoughlin, who stood down last year after six years in the post, said that seminarians have to be “,brutally honest”, with their spiritual director if they are to benefit from the human and spiritual formation which the College provides. The one-year course at the College, comprises thorough catechesis, induction into meditation, the Divine Office and other forms of prayer, a demanding pastoral work placement, Spanish lessons, regular spiritual direction, psychological counselling and visits to holy sites in Spain. After this “,propaedeutic”, or “,pre-seminary”, year, many students progress to seminary proper. Leeds Diocese currently has three students at Valladolid. Fr McLoughlin, who is a priest of the Diocese of Liverpool and who is pictured with Fr Vitalis Kondo msp and Fr Simon Winn, told a meeting of priests from this diocese at Hinsley Hall that he had felt well placed to help seminarians overcome their anxieties because he had experienced “,panic”, on first going to the Beda College in Rome at the age of 37. After leaving school at 15 he had had a very successful career in retail as a manager for Top Shop and had initially found it difficult to adjust to seminary life. As a prosperous layman he had been “,unnerved”, by the story of the rich young man. This had led him to understand that “,whatever God’,s call is, if we do not respond we will never actually find true happiness.”, 4. Personal testimony from Leeds seminarian Further light is shed on life at the English College in Valladolid in a video which has just been released which features an interview with Leeds seminarian Richard Joy, who is a second-year student at the Beda College in Rome and who has just received the ministry of acolyte. In an engaging interview, he describes how he was challenged by the programme and benefitted from it when he was at Valladolid two years ago. The video, which has been made by a team of Ushaw students which also produces a regular audio podcast, is accessible, as is the podcast, through the diocesan vocations website. 5. Interviewing local priests Film students at Leeds Trinity University College are making a DVD about the vocation to the priesthood as part of their course work. Second-year Catholic student Zoe Ryan is pictured with Fr Tom O’,Connor, the parish priest of All Saints’,, Otley, and fellow students Scott Liversidge and John Smith after an interview at his presbytery. They also interviewed Fr John Clarke, the vice-provincial of the Comboni Missionaries, who lives at their house in Horsforth. Clips from the DVD will be shown in high schools during vocations presentations in the summer term and will also be available on the diocesan website. 6. Ten-pin bowling fun Bowling alley legend, Fr Christopher Angel (pictured), the assistant priest at St Robert’,s, Harrogate, took on all comers at the recent fun half-day for the youth discernment group. Members of the group, which is open to all young men aged 13 to 18, attended Mass at Leeds Cathedral after the ten-pin bowling and then had a pleasant lunch nearby. The next event is an overnight pilgrimage to the shrine of Our Lady of Mount Grace in Osmotherley, North Yorkshire on Friday 14th and Saturday 15th May. Any young man who would like to join in is invited to contact Fr Grogan. 7. The beauty of confession There was a record turn-out of eleven prospective seminarians to hear Canon Joseph Smith (pictured), speak on “,This good Saviour seeks us everywhere.”, The beauty of Confession, at a recent meeting of the diocesan discernment group at Leeds Trinity University College recently. Fr Smith, who is the Parish Priest of SS John Fisher and Thomas More, Burley in Wharfedale, led the men in a reflection on two stories, the adulterous woman in Chapter 7 of St John’,s Gospel and the cure of the paralytic in Chapter 2 of St Mark’,s Gospel, in order to bring out the different dimensions of Jesus’, forgiveness. The next meeting of the group begins as usual at 7pm with a holy hour. Mgr Philip Holroyd will speak on “,The three evangelical counsels in the life of the diocesan priest.”, The evening will conclude with a meal and lifts home afterwards will be provided. All men who wish to explore whether the Lord may be calling them to the priesthood are warmly invited. 8. Vocations Preaching Mission 24th/25th April: St Columba’,s and St Peter’,s, Bradford 1st/2nd May: St Walburga’,s and St Aidan’,s, Bradford

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Page 8

Apr 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

PAGE 8 INTERFAITH “,Meeting God in Friend and Stranger”, Fostering Respect and mutual Understanding between the Religions T his “,Teaching Document of the Catholic Bishops of England and Wales on Dialogue with People of other Religions”, will be launched nationally at Westminster by Archbishop Kevin Nichols on April 23rd. and in our own diocese of Leeds on April 28th 2010 by Bishop Arthur Roche. It will be available as a CTS publication. The Diocesan Interreligious Relations Commission is offering an “,Open Evening”, to explore the teaching contained in the document on Tuesday May 18th at Hinsley Hall (7 for 7.30 until 9 pm) ALL WELCOME –, full details from David Jackson 01274 581094 or email: dandt55@btinternet.com HONESTY IN DIALOGUE. Interfaith dialogue avoids comparisons. True dialogue is based on mutual respect –, an equality of listening and speaking between equal partners. In this dialogue the aim is to understand the richness of each other’,s belief so that we can understand one another better. Comparisons are only made if they lead to insights which draw us all closer to the mystery of God who lies beyond all human understanding and who wishes us to share that mystery intimately. A Christian and a Muslim sharing their experience of prayer may involve comparing aspects for the purpose of reaching a fuller understanding. Each can discover depths in their own practice even as they explain it to someone else. We compare to enrich. It is a temptation to make “,odious”, comparisons for the purposes of proving the superiority of our own religion over the other. A worse temptation is to “,compare”, the best in our own religion with the worst in another –, to illustrate our superiority. This Lent has been full of reminders to avoid such temptations. Many Catholics, from Pope to pew-person, face up to deep faults in our Church with repentance, sorrow and a desire to change the structures which lead to abuse. Clerical abuse of children and allegations of cover-up with accusations that the Church has been more interested in preserving its own good name rather than offering care to the victims of abuse and justice for the perpetrators are widespread. We cannot simply point the finger at frenzies directed by an anti- Catholic media. Dialogue is unavoidable and now demands that we honestly admit to the institutional failings of our Church and how we have all, to some measure, colluded in them. Friends in other religions share our sorrow and will honour our honesty. A drift into authoritarian, male, hierarchical and “,clerical”, structures which often belie the intentions of founders and their principles are shared by most if not all religions. All decline from the grace of God. The jibe is that religions are too often run by old men with beards. It is rare that such structures lead to the level and nature of abuse we are witnessing in the Church. The history of religions is marked by attempts to return to the purity of founding truths. So hopefully it will be with us. Members of other religions, if they are true to their founding principles, do not rejoice at our failings but, as we strive to do when they are held accountable, stand with us as we work to overcome them. Accepting and honestly facing up to failure leads partners in dialogue to appreciate the way in which virtues like justice, compassion for victims and truthfulness, cut across religious divides. Solidarity in seeking and admitting the truth illustrates our shared humanity and the unity which is the basis for true dialogue. Anyone who has ever had the rare privilege of visiting a prison and talking with prisoners about matters of religious belief will know how liberating can be the telling of the story of failure and sin and the joy to be had from repentance and the seeking of the truth. Christians, Muslims and those of no particular religious belonging, can all be united through the telling of the story of sin and its forgiveness. We are all sinners under God –, or we lie. We are all in need of forgiveness. If we were ever tempted to indulge in odious comparisons between religions –, then we may now realise how destructive such comparisons can be. Now our friends of other religions expect us to show them the respect they deserve by owning up honestly to the failings of our Church. If we proclaim power and authority exercised as service, a Church where responsibility for governance is co-owned by clergy and people, male and female, where hierarchy is used to order service and not to dominate –, then they will be encouraged in their own search for healthy religious structures which do not harm the vulnerable. Dialogue does not ask us Christians to deny but to affirm our calling as Christians to be a sign / sacrament of the sort of human family God wills us to be. We fail to give that witness effectively if our Church structures deny it. Dialogue with others has become harder –, the result of all of us - clergy and laity - being complicit in structures which are no longer suffused with Christ’,s vision of service but which offered a minority ways of dominating and abusing power which led to child abuse. We all could do worse than imitate the joy available to prisoners who have achieved liberation by seeking forgiveness and who now seek to live in freedom. We need to share responsibility as priests and people for the common good of all in the Church. Interfaith dialogue depends on honest and truthful partners –,prepared to share the joys and sorrows of belief. At these times such dialogue is difficult but never as necessary. Otherwise some may doubt that repentance and forgiveness lie at the heart of the Christian understanding of God. It is after all the message of Easter. Contact David Jackson (01274 581094 and dandt55@btinternet.com) for information about the work of interfaith dialogue in the Diocese. Feasts and Festivals 21 April to 2 May: Ridvan (Baha’,i) 2 May: Birthday of Guru Arjan Dev (Sikh) the Fifth Guru (1563 –, 1606 SUNDAY APRIL 25TH 2010 YORK WALK FOR LIFE With Our Lady of Guadalupe and the English Martyrs. In reparation for the legalizing of abortion and praying for the healing of wounds caused by abortion NB there will be adoration of Blessed Sacrament in St Wilfred’,s next to Minster from 12 midday-1.15pm 1.15-1.30pm Procession assembles at West front precinct of York Minster. Process to Margaret Clitheroe Monument, Ousebridge, where 70 red and white flowers will be thrown into river, representing 7,000,000 aborted babies. Process to Bar Convent grounds. Veneration of relic of St Margaret Clitheroe Process to Knavesmire for prayers Process to Church of English Martyrs for Holy Mass. (approx 5pm) Further details re transport etc. Pat 0113 2582745. Mob 07747698553. Email patriciamary sammon@btinternet.com Total distance of walk, approx 2 miles(max) Both St Wilfred’,s Church, Peters gate and English Martyrs Church, Dalton Tce ,are open for prayer all day. Journey in Faith Exploring R.C.I.A. (The Rite of Christian Initiation of Adults) This is an introduction for anyone new to RCIA, or for parishes wishing to refresh their team. This is an opportunity to glimpse a vision of the richness the RCIA journey offers, not only to newcomers to the faith, but to the whole parish community. Saturday 15th May 2010 at The Holy Name Parish Centre, 52 Otley Old Road, Leeds, LS16 6HW Tea &, Coffee from 10am. Beginning at 10.30am –, until 3.45pm Please bring a packed lunch £,10.00 per person or £, 30.00 per parish group of up to 6 people For further details contact linda.pennington@dioceseofleeds.org.uk tel: 0113 261 8043 African &, Caribbean Chaplaincy Leeds and Bradford Communities Annual National Caribbean &, African Pilgrimage to Walsingham Sunday 27 June 2010 6:15am Coach depart from Alhambra Theatre Bd7 1AJ Bradford 7.00am Coach depart from St Anne’,s Cathedral Leeds 12 noon Coach Arrival &, Lunch Break at the Shrine 1 :00pm Coach take everyone down to the village 1 :45pm Assemble for Procession, Friday Market in the village 2:00pm Procession along the Holy Mile from the Village to the Shrine of Our Lady of Walsingham (pilgrims unable to walk the mile may be dropped off at the Church) 3:15pm Sung Mass: 5:00pm Coach depart Walsingham to return Please bring a Packed Lunch. All are welcome including children &, families Coach Price of £,12 per person should be paid in advance Please Contact Immediately Rev Michael on 0113 2959718 or mob. 07884197261 First Come First Served. Available seats and time limited!! Booking Form I /We wish to go on a pilgrimage to Walsingham on Sunday 27 June 2010 Name(s)…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,............... Address &, phone number …,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,................... …,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…, I enclose the sum £,12 per person. (Please make Cheques payable to LEEDS DIOCESE and send them together with the completed form to the chaplain: Rev Michael Mkpadi No. 1 Deanswood Gardens Leeds LS17 5JF )

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Page 9

Apr 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

I n a powerful Homily on the occasion of the Chrism Mass, Wednesday March 31st, Bishop Roche not only affirmed his priests in the work they were doing but also thanked them for…,. ‘,articulating a message that is always old yet ever new –, and greatly needed.’, In a Cathedral that was full to standing room , Priests, Deacons, and laity heard Bishop Roche outline the moving experience he had under gone in El Salvador where he was part of the Cafod delegation for the 30th anniversary of the assassination and martyrdom of Archbishop Oscar Romero. He outlined the Archbishop’,s sufferings and his struggles, his courage and his Faith –, how he fought for his people in the face of opposition –, sometimes even from his own fellow Bishops. However as Bishop Roche was told by an old lady .. ‘,He gave voice to those who had no voice, he gave hope to those who were sick with fear and living in despair’,. The Bishop went on to point to the reading they had all just listen to .’,It made me think,’, he said ‘,then as now of the great sermon that was preached by Jesus as he unrolled the scroll of the prophet and said, looking deeply into the eyes of all present in the synagogue, This text is being fulfilled today, even as you listen…,…,This is an important message for us in this special Year of the Priest as well as for our programme of diocesan renewal Go Make Disciples!’,…,..The context in which we exercise our ministry is changing rapidly, the world is changing and we need great imagination, courage and confidence to engage with the pastoral realities that present themselves today. But this time is our time, our opportunity. It is the right time for our ministry to enrich and strengthen the life of our Church. And this diocese is the place where we are called to do that.…,. And, today, as I look at you, my brothers and sisters, I recall that same sentiment: how good God is to have given you to this diocese at this time when the challenges are great and the labourers are few.’, As the Bishops final words were spoken ‘,Thank you’, applause rang out across the Cathedral. PAGE 9 Affirmation And Thanks

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Page 10

Apr 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 10 HOLY THURSDAY ‘,Enter Into The Bond Of Love’, A full Cathedral heard Bishop Roche call upon his people to understand that what they were celebrating in the Eucharist of Maundy Thursday was only really understood by …, ‘,go(ing) back in history …, The Nomadic Semites had a feast that they celebrated the night of the first full moon of spring, when they were about to lead their flocks to summer pastures…,.. The journey that was to take place the following morning was arduous, a very important occasion, and very dangerous and, for this, they needed sustenance.’, He explained the meaning and parts of the ancient ceremonies and pointed out how they had developed to what we do today. …,. ‘,In all of these elements, which history teaches us, we see not only the fulfilment of what is celebrated tonight in the Mass of the Last Supper, but what is to enacted in all the ceremonies of the Church which will now lead us to Easter - the point of final deliverance from all slavery and death.’, The Bishop explained …,…,…,…, ‘,The washing of the feet was not simply an act of caring service, but a ‘,revelation in action’,: this model of charity, which He also asks us to do for each other, was to show no bounds - even to the outpouring of His own life for them and for all of us.’, In conclusion he challenged those present…, ‘,Let us enter into this bond of love –, let us find the path this night that leads from slavery to freedom, from sin to eternal life’,

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Apr 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

GOOD FRIDAY Page 11 GUARANTEED WEEKLY PRIZES , 1st Prize £,2,000 , 2nd Prize £,200 , 3rd Prize £,50 , Plus 150 prizes of £,5 each WEEKLY PRIZES Entry only £,1 per week - Drawn every Friday INTERESTED? Please return the coupon below to: The Lottery Office, Wheatfields Hospice, Grove Road, Leeds, LS6 2AE. For more information telephone 0113 278 1500 NOW St Gemma’,s and Wheatfields Lottery If you want to help JOIN NOW Please make cheques payable to: ST GEMMA’,S &, WHEATFIELD LOTTERY Mr/Mrs/Miss/Ms/Other Name .................................................................... Address ...................................................................................................... .................................................................................................................... .................................................................................................................... Postcode:................................... Tel: ......................................................... PLEASE TICK PREFERRED PAYMENT METHOD AND RETURN TO THE LOTTERY OFFICE  CHEQUE –, Minimum £,10 (to be sent now)  STANDING ORDER  CASH COLLECTION Visa/Switch Telephone 0113 278 1500 CALL NOW! We can all be winners £,1 gives you the chance to win £,2,000 GIFT VOUCHERS NOW ON SALE Winners are automatically paid by post each week. All profits shared equally between St Gemma’,s &, Wheatfields Hospices. Registered with the Gambling Commission for Great Britain LOTTERY NEW MEMBERS’, FORM ‘,The Secret of the resurrection’, T he Cathedral Church of St Anne’,s, Leeds, was full for the Traditional Good Friday Service. So full that they were standing rows deep at the back and down the sides. The Service was led by Bishop Roche. In the Homily given by the Dean of the Cathedral, Very Rev Mgr Philip Moger, attention was drawn to the fact that ‘, Our Catholic liturgy is rich in symbol and movement: not just for the sake of activity, but to remind us that we worship God with all that we are, not just our mind, but with our heart and our body.’, He went on to point out ... So as we walk to the cross –, together, as Christ’,s body - a community, not just a random assortment of individuals –, let’,s remember that the greater journey we make is in our heart not with our feet, and it takes our whole life, for it’,s our life’,s pilgrimage to the Father. ’, He concluded ‘, As we try to live as Catholic Christians in difficult times, we might feel immersed more than is comfortable in the drama of Gethsemane and Calvary. Might this be a moment of profound conversion for us? The hour, the significant moment when, venerating the cross, we reach out confidently to take all that God wishes to give us, in the sure and certain hope that, come what may, he will not fail us. We shall have discovered that new life comes from the dying seed. We shall have discovered the secret of the resurrection.

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Page 12

Apr 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 12 EASTER VIGIL ‘,It is no longer I who live, but Christ who lives in me’, In a full Cathedral Church of St Anne’,s, Leeds, Bishop Roche celebrated the Easter Vigil...a vigil ‘,(in which) we have been taken back, by symbols and words, to the dawn of time and lead through the history of our salvation to the culminating moment of Christ’,s Resurrection as recounted for us in Saint Luke’,s Gospel.’, He sketched out the thread that runs through the ceremonies and its meaning for us in to days life. He pointed out how it connected with our baptism and how what we commemorated went back to the very garden of Eden... ‘,Everything which, at the dawn of creation, was turned on its head by the sinful pride of our first parents, is now created anew in this new birth of life that bursts apart the constraints of death and the grip of sin......... And that is why tonight, with great joy, we renew our baptismal promises and why those among us who are to be baptised and those among us who are completing their baptism and being received into the fullness of the Church are enfolded with us into Christ’,s life-giving embrace in the sacraments.’, Being baptised into the Church were four adults and with them four more Adults were received into full communion with the Church. He concluded his Homily with urging everyone ...(to live) in union with his love –, as those who are baptized and can now say, It is no longer I who live, but Christ who lives in me - let us go with him into the world in which we presently live, with our own lives speaking of the reality: that love is indeed stronger than hatred, that love is stronger than death or anything that is deadly.’,

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Page 13

Apr 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

POLISH NEWS 13 Funeral Services W. Lever Ltd BRADFORD 01274 547137 524 THORNTON ROAD, BRADFORD BD8 9NB FOR OVER 75 YEARS PROVIDING A COMPLETE PERSONAL &, CARING 24 HOUR FUNERAL SERVICE CHAPEL OF REST H UGHES F UNERAL S ERVICES (Catholic Funeral Directors) 180 YORK ROAD, LEEDS LS9 9NT. Tel 2480953/63 152 GREEN LANE, CROSSGATES. Tel 2326900 3 HOLLIN PARK PARADE, OAKWOOD ROUNDABOUT Tel 2499338 Web: wwww.hughesfuneralservices.co.uk Email: info@hughesfuneralservices.co.uk Family owned and managed. Fully Qualified in all aspects. 24 Hour Service Guaranteed Fixed Price Funeral Plans etc. “,At a time of bereavement we carry out our duties with dignity and respect”, In times of bereavement please contact: B. J. MELIA &, SONS (B. J. Melia Dip F.D.) F UNERAL D IRECTORS AND M ONUMENTAL M ASONS Private Chapel of Rest 64 GIBBET STREET, HALIFAX Telephone: 01422 354453 PRE-PAID FUNERAL SERVICE AVAILABLE DETAILS ON REQUEST Saint Stanislaw Szczepanowski P oland has its share of martyrs who died for the Catholic Faith. These include Saint Stanislaw Szczepanowski, who was a Bishop of Krakow was martyred by the Polish King Boleslaw II Smialy (the Bold). Stanislaw is venerated in the Roman Catholic Church as Saint Stanislaus the Martyr (as distinct from Saint Stanislaus Kostka) and his feast day is celebrated on the 11th of April, 7th or 8th of May. St Stanislaw Szczepanowski was born on the 26th of June, 1030 at Szczepanow, a village near the town of Bochnia in southern Poland, in the diocese of Krakow, Poland. He was the only son of noble parents, who had been childless for thirty years. His birth was an answer to their prayers and he was a child of great joy. His father, Wielislaw, was reputed to be of the Turzyna clan, and his mother, Bogna, of the Nowina clan. Stanislaw studied canon law and theology in Gniezno in 1030 and possibly Paris, France or in Liege in Belgium. Out of humility, he refused the degree of doctor and returned home. On the death of his parents, Stanislaw gave away his ample fortune, to the poor, and received the priesthood from the Bishop of Krakow, Lambert Sula. He was a parish priest in Czembocz. After the Bishop of Krakow’,s death in 1072, Stanislaw was elected his successor but accepted the office only at the explicit command of Pope Alexander II. Stanislaw was one of the earliest native Polish bishops. He also became a ducal advisor and had some influence on Polish politics. Stanislaw soon gained a reputation for his charity and his work as a reformer and preacher. Stanislaw`s major accomplishments included bringing papal legates to Poland, and reestablishment of a metropolitan see in Gniezno. The latter was a precondition for Duke Boleslaw`s coronation as king, which took place in 1076. Stanislaw then encouraged King Boleslaw to establish Benedictine monasteries to aid in the Christianisation of Poland. Stanislaw`s initial conflict with King BolesLaw was over a land dispute. The Bishop had purchased for the diocese a piece of land on the banks of the Vistula River near Lublin from a certain Piotr, but after Piotr`s death the land had been claimed by his family. The King ruled for the claimants, but –, according to legend –, Stanislaw resurrected Piotr so that he could confirm that he had sold the land to the Bishop. According to Augustin Calmet, an 18th- century Bible scholar, Stanislaw asked the King for three days to produce his witness, Piotr. The King and court were said to have laughed at the absurd request, but the King granted Stanislaw the three days. Stanislaw spent them in ceaseless prayer, then, dressed in full bishop`s regalia, went with a procession to the cemetery where Piotr had been buried three years earlier. He had Piotr`s grave dug up until his remains were discovered and with a multitude of witnesses, Stanislaw ordered Piotr to rise, and Piotr did so. Piotr then dressed in a cloak was brought before King Boleslaw to testify on the Bishop of Krakow`s behalf. The dumbfounded court heard Piotr reprimand his three sons and testify that Stanislaw had paid for the land. Unable to give any other verdict, the King dismissed the suit against the Bishop. Stanislaw asked Piotr whether he would remain alive but Piotr declined, and so was laid to rest once more in his grave and was reburied. A more substantial conflict with King Boleslaw arose after a prolonged war in Ruthenia, when weary warriors deserted home, alarmed at tidings that their overseers were taking over their estates and wives. According to Kadlubek, the King punished the soldiers` faithless wives very cruelly. He was condemned for it by Bishop Stanisł,aw. After his conflicts with King Boleslaw II of Poland for his pagan ways, Boleslaw is excommunicated by Pope Gregory VIII. Boleslaw`s anger brings a trial against Stanislaw. The royal court finds him guilty of plotting with Poland`s German neighbours to overthrow Boleslaw II. Stanislaw Szczepanowski is sentenced to the loss of his limbs for his crime of traitor, on April the 11th 1079. The king`s knights can not bring themselves to carry out this gruesome sentence. Boleslaw II storms into the Church of St. Michael, outside the gates of Krakow. It is here that Bishop Stanislaw is consecrating Holy Mass and Boleslaw II stabs the bishop with his own sword, as the horrified congregation looks on. Stanislaw slumps in pain and dies. According to Paweł, Jasienica: Polska Piastó,w, he was actually murdered in Wawel castle. The Bishop`s body was then hacked to pieces and thrown into a pool outside the church. According to the legend, his body miraculously reintegrated while the pool was guarded by four eagles. The murder stirred outrage through the land and led to the dethronement of King Bolesł,aw II Smialy. Boleslaw had to seek refuge in Hungary and was succeeded by his brother, Wladyslaw I Herman. The cult of Saint Stanislaw, the martyr began immediately upon his death. In 1245, his relics were moved to Krakow`s Wawel Cathedral. In the early 13th century, Bishop Iwo Odrowaz initiated preparations for Stanisł,aw`s canonisation. Wincenty of Kielce was comissioned to write the martyr`s biography. On September the 17th 1253, Stanislaw was canonized by Pope Innocent IV. Pope Pius V did not include the Saint`s feast day in the Tridentine Calendar for use throughout the Roman Catholic Church. Subsequently, Pope Clement VIII inserted it, setting it for May 7, but Krakow observes it on May the 8th –, the supposed date of the Saint`s death, having done so since May 8, 1254, when it was attended by many Polish bishops and princes. In 1969, the Roman Catholic Church moved the feast to the 11th of April –, this being considered to be the date of his death in 1079. Stanislaw is the national saint of Poland, and patron saint of the archbishops of Krakow. I n 1940, during the Second World War, there was a mass murder of thousands of Polish prisoners of war in one of the most disturbing massacres of Poles. Those murdered were primarily military officers, intellectuals, policeman and other public servants of the Soviet Union. It was based on a proposal from Lavrentiy Beria to execute all members of the Polish Officer Corps. The official document sated March the 5th 1940 was then signed by the entire Soviet Politburo including Joseph Stalin and Beria. There were an estimated 22,000 victims. The victims were murdered in the Katyn Forest in Russia, the Kalinin and Kharkov prisons and elsewhere. About 8,000 were officers imprisoned during the 1939 Soviet invasion of Poland. The rest of the victims had been arrested for allegedly being ",intelligence agents, gendarmes, saboteurs, landowners, factory owners, lawyers, priests, and officials.", The ",Katyn massacre", refers to the massacre at Katyn Forest, near the villages of Katyn and Gnezdovo (19 km west of Smolensk in Russia), of Polish military officers in the Kozelsk prisoner-of-war camp. Nazi Germany announced the discovery of mass graves in the Katyn Forest in 1943. The revelation led to the end of diplomatic relations between Moscow and the London-based Polish government- in-exile. The Soviet Union continued to deny the massacres until 1990, when it finally acknowledged the perpetration of the massacre. This massacre is such an important milestone in our history that every year thousands of Poles worldwide commemorate this atrocity and pray for those who were murdered. In Leeds, on the 18th of April, the Polish Community here in Leeds will be recalling the events of those fatal days in the Spring of 1940 by the laying of wreathes outside the Polish Catholic Church in Chapel Allerton where there is a commemorative plaque containing soil from Katyn. They will be joined by family members of those affected by the massacre and other distinguished guests including the Polish Consul from Manchester. It will be a time of reflection and remembrance for the fallen. In the words of Laurence Binyon, from the “,For the Fallen”,: They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old: Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn. At the going down of the sun and in the morning, We will remember them. Do this in memory of me Holy Week for every Catholic is a very special and important time of year as we reflect on the Passion of our Lord Jesus Christ. At St. Edward’,s School in Boston Spa, the headmistress and teachers are to be highly commended for the way in which they have prepared the pupils for this special time. Throughout Lent, each year group has worked hard to raise money as part of Lenten Activities for those less fortunate than ourselves and raised over a thousand pounds for a good cause which is to be decided by the School Council. The activities organised were varied and included, treasure hunts, maximum hops in a minute and a tombola. Each Thursday during Lent, the pupils were also allowed to dress in their own clothes based on a theme - a famous person, then in black and white, thirdly as a sport’,s personality and finally everyone forgot to get dressed for school and turned up in pyjamas. For Holy Week, the staff and pupils from Year prepared their own Easter Triduum. On Holy Tuesday, the whole school venerated the Holy Cross. A large wooden cross depicting the wood on which the Saviour of the World died was placed in the centre of the Hall surrounded by a few candles. The children full of hope and reflection entered the hall quietly and reverently. They sat and listened to the story of Good Friday. The pupils were reminded how the Jews urged Pilate to crucify Jesus Christ. For our sins he was nailed to the cross so that our sins may be forgiven. Each child, teacher and parent approached the cross and paid their respects to his great sacrifice with a touch, a kiss, a prayer or even with a simple “,Thank you”, or “,I love you”,. The atmosphere in the hall was calm and pensive whilst everyone focused on the most important symbol in the room –, the cross. It reminded me of the feeling of praying in front of the Blessed Sacrament when it is in the side altar of my local church on the evening of Maundy Thursday. Wednesday saw the school return to the School Hall to focus on the story of the Last Supper. The school was reminded that Jesus shared his final meal of bread and wine with his disciples before his death and asked them “,to do this in remembrance of me”,. Then, one of the pupils, dressed in white, depicting our Lord washed 12 sets of feet. The twelve individuals had been chosen from each year group, the teaching staff, parents and siblings. Finally, on Maundy Thursday, Year 6 performed their version of the Passion of Jesus Christ. The Passion Play was based on a collaboration of all 4 gospels, and was narrated by the headmistress, Miss Gilpin whilst the pupils mimed the story. It traced Jesus’, journey from the breaking of bread during the Last Supper, through Judas’, betrayal with a kiss to Jesus’, resurrection. Through the use of actions and expressions, the children were able to portray the emotions of those who shared Jesus’, journey such as his mother or Simon of Cyrene. The play was accompanied by moving music. During the crucification, Mrs Joyce, the music teacher sang a beautiful and reflective song and the whole school at the end of the Passion celebrated Jesus’, resurrection through the power of song. After the play, Father Ingwell reflected on the play drawing inspiration from the display of children’,s work in the hall entitled “,I’,m special –, I’,m me”, and asked the pupils who was the most important person in the room. The answer surprised everyone as they presumed it would be Jesus Christ but Father Ingwell staid that each individual (“,me”,) was the most important as Jesus loved each of us so much that he died for us on the cross. This was his incredible gift to us. Holy week for those involved with St. Edward’,s R.C. School in Boston Spa no doubt will remain in our memories and reinforces the importance of a catholic education for our children. Katyn 2010 Wanted for the Missions Large Statues (Even damaged ones), old vestments, pictures, church fittings, rosaries, prayer books, etc. Please ring Mr. B. Ferris KSC, 102 Moor St, Earlsdon, Coventry CV5 6EY Tel: 02476 676986 For Advertising contact CathCom on 020 7112 6710

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Page 14

Apr 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 14 LEEDS TRINITY UNIVERSITY COLLEGE FROM JUST £,299 R.G.R. MEMORIALS COLOUR CATALOGUE QUALITY MEMORIALS AT AFFORDABLE PRICES IN GRANITE, MARBLE &, STONE ALL PRICES INCLUDE DELIVERY &, FIXING Ogee top memorial 2’,6”, high Fully polished Black Granite, Delivered and Fixed for £,399 inc VAT FREE Tel: 0113 282 3888 43 High Ridge Park, Rothwell, Leeds LS26 0NL Student ambassador meets and tweets for Leeds Trinity H i, I’,m Tim from Derby, in the second year of a BA in Religious Studies at Leeds Trinity University College and I work for Leeds Trinity as a student ambassador. I took a gap year after A levels while deciding about higher education, volunteering as a Catholic Youth Worker at the youth centre for the Nottingham Diocese, The Briars in Crich. This work strengthened my faith and I chose Leeds Trinity as I was comfortable in the faith environment that it offers. In my first year when I was living on campus, I was especially appreciative of the ready welcome in the Chaplaincy, there was always someone around for a chat and a social space in which to relax. The Religious Studies course is for me because it gives me the opportunity to explore religions that I’,m unfamiliar with, and I’,m particularly enjoying the Philosophy and World Religions modules. As a student ambassador, I love representing Leeds Trinity by meeting and greeting visitors at Open Days and other events, and chatting to prospective students. This year the role has gained a new dimension - I was appointed as a “,Social Media Student Manager”, or Student Guru for short, along with fellow student Kerrie Heffernan. We make sure that Leeds Trinity has a lively student-friendly presence on the popular social media sites, especially Facebook and Twitter. It’,s a very interactive role –, we respond to comments and messages posted by students - and as the sites are used extensively by prospective students we are promoting Leeds Trinity and giving a flavour of what student life is like here. Find us on Twitter and Facebook by following the links on the homepage of our website www.leedstrinity.ac.uk Tim Brown Second year BA Religious Studies and Student Guru Leeds Trinity celebrates International Women’,s Day O n International Women’,s Day last month, staff and students at Leeds Trinity came together to celebrate the achievements of women and reflect on the challenges women face around the world. Dr Ann Marie Mealey, Associate Senior Lecturer in Theology, led the reflections in the chapel. A centrepiece of three rings of candles gave a symbolic focus to the meditation, representing the Order of the Cross and Passion (founders of Leeds Trinity), inspiring women, and the future for women. A group of Theology students delivered their own reflections that they had written, and Principal Professor Freda Bridge concluded the reflection by speaking about women who had inspired her in her career. International Women’,s Day is a global annual event celebrating the economic, political and social achievements of women past, present and future, and encourages women to fight against racism, discrimination, exploitation or injustice of any kind. Ann Marie said, “,We have a personal motivation for celebrating International Women’,s Day here at Leeds Trinity. Part of our mission is to empower individuals through facilitating the acquisition of knowledge and promoting engagement with communities.”, “,In short, this special day should enable us to see that respect and care for people should take precedence over financial or individualistic concerns that break down the bonds of community. The day should bring about a healing in our community such that we feel cleansed and enabled to ‘,drink from our own wells’,”,. Ann Marie expressed her gratitude to all those who helped to make the event a success and raise awareness of the issues, especially Theology students Erica Fogg, Laura Holmes, Hannah Brown, Lauren Jackson and Andrew Gardner. Wednesday 21 April 9.00am to 2.30pm Sixth Form Revision Day –, Religious Studies For more information and to book contact Dr Ann Marie Mealey on 0113 283 7100 ext 539 or email a.mealey@leedstrinity.ac.uk Wednesday 28 April 7.00pm Inaugural Trinity Lecture by Dr John McDade SJ, entitled “,The death of God? The Trinity and human suffering.”, Preceded by Evening Prayer at 6.40pm in the Chapel. For more information contact Dominica Richmond on 0113 283 7100 x 393 or email d.richmond@leedstrinity.ac.uk Friday 28 May 9.30am to 4.00pm Catholic Partnership Day “,Praying with young people”, with keynote speaker Rev Fr John Wilson. Open to teachers from primary and secondary schools in the Catholic sector. For more information contact Anne Trotter on 0113 283 7177 or email a.trotter@leedstrinity.ac.uk Wednesday 30 June 10.00am to 3.00pm Open Day for prospective students Find out more about studying for a foundation, undergraduate or postgraduate degree at Leeds Trinity University College. To book visit www.leedstrinity.ac.uk, call 0113 283 7150 or email opendays@leedstrinity.ac.uk Events at Leeds Trinity University College Leeds Trinity hosts leading Catholic speakers T he Chaplaincy Open Lecture series at Leeds Trinity gives people in our area the opportunity to listen to leading Catholic thinkers, with top international Catholic theologian Professor Thomas Norris the latest to visit. Professor Norris delivered an engaging lecture on the theology of the cross in the works of Cardinal John Henry Newman, whom Pope Benedict will beatify during his visit to Britain in September. Fr Norris, a member of the International Theological Commission, the elite group which advises the Holy See’,s Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith, said that for Newman the cross was the “,measuring rod”, of the world. It reveals “,love par excellence”, and teaches us what we should desire and for what we should hope. Fr Norris, who lectures at Maynooth College, Co Kildare, Ireland, said that Newman held that what was important was not that we should know more about God’,s revelation in Christ but that we should “,live better.”, Fr Norris said, “,Christ reveals us to ourselves. The cross of Christ is ‘,to be lived upon’,.”, In his sermons Newman advised his hearers to name particular sufferings that they were enduring, to “,rename”, them in terms of “,a particular face of the Lord”,, to say “,yes”, to the Lord and then to go on to the next moment. Fr Norris is pictured with two members of the Focolare Community in Leeds Marite Min and Veronica Bishop and theology student Jemma Smith, theology lecturer Dr Ann Marie Mealey and Students’, Union President, John Joe Mulherin. This year’,s lecture series culminates with the inaugural Trinity Lecture, which has been established to mark Leeds Trinity’,s new status as a Catholic university college. Renowned Jesuit theologian Fr John McDade, the Principal of Heythrop College, London, will speak on “,The Death of God? The Trinity and Human Suffering”, on Thursday 28 April. See events listing for further details.

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Page 15

Apr 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 15 B ishop Roche had the pleasure on Saturday March 27th of ordaining two candidates as Deacons. In a full Cathedral, surrounded by their family and friends, Joseph Cortis and Peter Rudd were welcomed by the Bishop and congratulated on having dedicated five years of their lives in training for the reception of the Sacrament of Orders. In his homily the Bishop pointed out that they were both dressed in simple albs –, reminding everyone of the baptismal state of grace. The order they were ordained to was one of service, he said. They were to reflect the face of Christ to his people –, they were to serve rather than be served. It is a wonderful ministry in which they were to be men of prayer and bring the people they work with to God in their prayers. The music for the Mass was provided by the Bradford Boy’,s Choir conducted by Christopher John’,s and the Organist was Christopher McElroy. Two New Deacons Latin Mass Venues - Extraordinary Form -1962 Missal HALIFAX: St Marie’,s, Gibbett Street. Vigil Mass every Saturday. 6.00pm. CASTLEFORD: St Joseph’,s, Pontefract Road. Every Sunday, 3.00pm. BROUGHTON: Sacred Heart, Broughton Hall near Skipton, every Monday, Wednesday, Friday and Saturday, 9.30am. BATLEY: St Mary of the Angels, Cross Bank Rd. Batley. Every First Friday of the month, preceded by confessions, 7.30pm and every fourth Saturday of the month (Vigil) at 3.00pm and as announced. LEEDS: 1.Our Lady of Lourdes, Cardigan Road, Leeds, every last Sunday of the month, 3.00pm 2. Our Lady of Good Counsel, Kentmere Avenue, Leeds every Friday 9.15am. HECKMONDWIKE: Holy Spirit , Bath Road, Every First Sunday of the month, 2.30pm. and every 2nd, 3rd, 4th and 5th Saturday of the month at 11.30am. BRADFORD: St Peter’,s, Leeds Road, every second Sunday of the month, 3.00pm. lmsleeds.blogspot.com for further details. Ordinary Form –, 1969 Missal First Sunday of the Month Cathedral 11am Second Saturday of Month 4pm (Schola Gregoriana) FORTHCOMING EVENTS at The Briery Retreat Centre 38 Victoria Avenue, Ilkley LS29 9BW Tel, 01943 607287 Email: srscs@aol.com Website:http://www.briery.org.uk 12-9th June and 2-9th July 6 Day Individual Guided Retreats: The Briery Team 7th-14th July Preached Retreat Fr. John Fuellenbach, SVD “,The God image of Jesus and our call to follow him today”,. Jesus was sent to reveal to us who God really is and who He wants to be for us. He summarized his message in two words or phrases. The first one contains his God experience expressed in the word Abba (his human expression of his innermost experience of God). The second one is the phrase Kingdom of God, God’,s dream for the whole of creation. He called disciples whom he sent out to carry out his own mission. 20th-24th September Mon-Friday Retreat for Priests Fr. Tom Lane, C.M. “, I will show you the way to Heaven”, The Curé, de’, Ars, John Mary Vianney, is the patron of all priests in pastoral ministry. When he asked a young boy the way to Ars, the boy obliged. To express his gratitude the Curé, spoke the lovely words that are the theme of the retreat. 6th -8th November Sacred Circle Dance weekend Sylvia Williment Weekend Advent Preached Retreat “,Christmas is for Adults Too!”, A time to reflect on the astonishing and life-changing meaning of the Incarnation –, and maybe for the first time. There are beautiful secrets they never told us about. 10th –, 12th December Parish Group Retreats Fr. Daniel O’,Leary Weekend Small parish groups or individuals are invited to join our Parish group weekend or day retreats The Briery Team Various dates, please ring to check availability RETREAT AT L’,ARCHE There will be a retreat in English at La Ferme near Paris where l’,Arche (founded by Jean Vanier) began. Entitled “,The spirit of l’,Arche and my daily Life’, it will be given by Fr David Wilson, a priest of the Westminster Diocese who has lived in l’,Arche in France for over 20 years. It begins on the 28 June and ends on the 3 July. Those interested may contact for further details: La Ferme de Trosly Service Accueil BP 21 23 rue d’,Orleans 60350 Trosly-Breuil France Accueil@lafermedetrosly. corn www.lafermedetrosly.com Left to right Rev Joseph Cortis Bishop Arthur Rev Peter Rudd. The Good Friday Walk of Witness has taken place around Wakefield City Centre for many years, and involves most of the City`s churches. After a united service which fills the Cathedral, walkers reassemble outside for the final words of The Passion, silence, and a hymn.

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Page 16

Apr 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 16 BATTLE John Battle KCSG I spent some of the last six months personally meeting Government Ministers –, and officials, putting questions in the Commons and pressing hard for a new Government policy of a cap –, a fixed limit on the amount of interest charged by money lenders (legally registered and illegal) in the doorstep ‘,sub prime’, money lending markets. For years now there has been a campaign to tackle illegal ‘,loan sharks’, –, and with some success with the introduction of the Consumer Credit Act in 2003. Since that time a beefed-up Financial Services Authority has set up an investigative ‘,trading standards’, unit to chase up and prosecute illegal lenders and grossly overcharging practices. Some individual loan sharks have been prosecuted and imprisoned. A loan shark confidential help hotline has been introduced along with local community “,financial advisers’, to help people get out of their snares and avoid huge indebtedness to doorstep lenders. Yet despite all these efforts those most vulnerable, without bank accounts and in desperate need for a pram for a new baby, a replacement cooker or fridge, new clothes for children are still taking up doorstep offers –, and paying back increasingly rising rates of interest. One Government Minister answered under pressure that his Department of Business had registered high interest rates of 500% - that’,s effectively paying back £,500 if you borrow £,100 to get a replacement fridge. But on the ground people in debt to one lender and being persuaded to sell that debt on to another –, and compound interest to a series of lenders builds and builds to some levels of over 1000%. As I argued in the debates at the time on the Consumer Credit Act the time has come to follow the lead of several European countries, American States and Canada and put a cap –, a fixed rate –, on the amount of interest lenders are allowed to charge. The Office of Fair Trading have been ‘,looking into this’, for five years, claiming the support of consumer bodies such as Citizens Advice Bureau for holding to a free market position. But local CABs are increasingly aware of the problem. They are being besieged by poor people drowning in debt to doorstep lenders. Ironically while ‘,sub prime’, lending debts for those unable to access ordinary banking build up –, internationally in poor countries, access to microfinance for those without banking facilities –, or capital –, is being heralded as the way forward. Yet a close examination of the world of microfinance which is attempting to help empower poor women in Bangladesh set up a food stall, or start to grow a plot of vegetables reveals a similar situation of compounding debt to that here in Britain. In India for example more that 15 million borrowers now owe back $2.3 billion to microfinance banks –, and effectively loan sharks ‘,sub prime lenders’, have moved in on the poor –, backed by major private equity firms –, overwhelming them with attractive initial offers and locking them into huge long term unsustainable debts. One newspaper reported poor Indian traders being ‘,carpet bombed’, with loans intended to set up businesses but being spent on televisions and fridges. Again multiple debts build up as the poor try to shift the debt from one lender to another in an attempt to get from under it. Despite the fact that little more than a year ago the huge American lenders Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac collapsed microfinance lenders in India are moving into home loans ‘,microfinance mortgages’, in cash to borrowers with no income, papers or bank accounts. A sub prime bubble is about to burst. One positive answer is to displace the doorstep lenders with local Credit Unions –, local community banking with much lower rates of interest charged (12.5% to 20%) and there is a strong tradition in the church or parish based Credit Unions –, such as Bramley Credit Union in my own parish of Christ the King –, built up over the years. But I suspect that rather like the successful Jubilee Debt Campaign to cancel third world country debts we need a moral the theological base from which to re-establish moral lending. There was an old Christian tradition based on the moral principle of outlawing usury (charging any interest at all). Even when that was undermined by Luther and Calvin –, they still insisted on a ceiling of interest charges. We could start to get back to that. When in the UK base interest rates are at 0.5% general lending rates are at 17.5% it is outrageous that lenders go beyond 20%. In Canada 20% of total lending charges has been fixed as the limit –, we should pass a law in Britain to follow suit and let there be a moral debate on the rights and wrongs of lending –, especially to the poor and those least able to pay and charging and overcharging interest. Limiting Debts A day in Carmelite Monastery L eeds Cathedral 20-35 Group visited the Carmelite Monastery located at Wetherby at the start of spring (20th February 2010) for a day of retreat and fun. The day started with a sharing from Sister Carmel about the monastic life in our own Carmel at Wood Hall. The Carmelite Nuns follow a timetable of prayer, contemplation, meditation and spiritual reading. Their typical day also includes recreation and work, the majority of which is carried out in silence, solitude and simplicity. In the afternoon, the group enjoyed a shared meal followed by a walk in the beautiful surroundings and ancient woodland in the lower part of the Wharfe valley. A member, Martin Stevens, decided to walk barefoot as a Lenten sacrifice. The rest enjoyed the walk following his footprints along the trail. The day finished with adoration, reflection, reconciliation and Mass, presided by Monsignor Philip Moger. Special thanks to Kathleen Massarella for organizing the group activity at Carmelite Monastery. Carmelite Monastery is located in Trip Lane, Linton, Wetherby, West Yorkshire LS22 4HZ. Leeds Cathedral 20-35 Group meets regularly for spiritual, social and charitable activities. If you would like to join, seach for “,Leeds Cathedral 20-35 Group”, on Facebook, phone 07816891872 / 07759591233 or email leedscathedral20-35@hotmail.co.uk. See Cathedral notice board, Google and Facebook for a list of upcoming activities. CWL - CENTENARY O n 5 June 2010, the Leeds Branch of the Catholic Women’,s League (originally called the West Riding branch) will celebrate its centenary. The Branch covers not only the same area as the Diocese of Leeds, but also includes the areas of South Yorkshire that form part of the Diocese of Hallam. It was founded by Margaret Fletcher, at a Catholic rally held at Leeds Town Hall in June 1910. One attendee at the rally was Cardinal Bourne, who was at that time Archbishop of Westminster. The Catholic Women’,s League (or CWL), came into existence as an organisation in 1906. It rapidly attracted new members to share in serving the Catholic Church with charity, work and loyalty (the organisation’,s motto) at parish, diocesan, national and international levels. Then, as now, its members worked with generosity of spirit and unending effort. Since 2006, both Salford and Clifton Branches have held centenary celebrations, Birmingham will do so later this year, as will Hexham &, Newcastle next year. Over the next few years centenary celebrations will also be celebrated internationally, including Australia and Canada, in addition to other branches in this country. The celebrations for the Leeds Branch will begin with a special Mass at 11am on Saturday 5 June. The main celebrant will be Bishop Roche. Alongside him will be Bishop Doyle of Northampton, who is the CWL’,s National Ecclesiastical Advisor. Mass will be followed by lunch and the Branch AGM, which will be held at the Queen’,s Hotel, Leeds. In the evening a Reception and Gala Dinner, with entertainment, will round off the day’,s celebrations. Current, as well as past members, who wish to share in this celebration, would be most welcome. To book, please contact Joan Cheetham, either at joan.cheetham@ukonline.co.uk or on 01484 518537. Alternatively, you can contact the Branch Treasurer, Margaret Cox, on 01937 583553. The Branch would also be grateful to see any items of memorabilia, such as photographs, papers, newspaper cuttings that people may have about the CWL. The Branch is keen to develop an exhibition of suitable items for display on the day. If you have anything you believe may be of interest please contact the Secretary as per above. F or the tenth year running St. Wilfrid’,s Catholic High School in Featherstone was proud to play host to around 200 students and teachers from across the globe. This year our guests came from fourteen countries, including Bulgaria, China, Slovakia, Sweden, Turkey and Vietnam. The corridors and classrooms of St Wilfrid’,s were filled with vibrancy, enthusiasm and a range of languages as students were eager to take part in this annual cultural extravaganza. Activities also included splitting into multi-national groups for an International Project called “,Sense It”,, creating a giant graffiti wall where students depicted their own countries, visits to York and Beamish Open Air Museum, plus enjoying a traditional English pie and peas supper. This also included enjoying workshops featuring everything from Japanese calligraphy to Spanish tapas cookery to Bollywood dancing to Brazilian capoeira. Head of the International Dimension Ian Storey explained: “,This is our tenth anniversary event and every year it just gets better and better. The atmosphere across the whole school is tremendous and both our students and visitors learn such a lot about each other’,s cultures and way of life. St Wilfrid’,s is a specialist language College so it makes sense not only to teach our pupils to speak different languages but to enable them to experience an additional dimension –, and it’,s great fun!”, One of the highlights was the World of Events Morning on Wednesday 17th March when we hosted the Primary International Extravaganza of Talents. Around 450 pupils from local primary schools joined together to perform songs from around the world. During the day the day students enjoyed a World Sports Gala but it was in the evening that the highlight of the week was to take place, the much acclaimed International Festival of Talents, which attracted an audience of around 900 people, saw fantastic performances by students from St Wilfrid’,s and around the globe. This year’,s Eurovision- style contest was won by a talented student from Bulgaria. Many tears were shed when our international guests departed but we are sure that they will return for our 11th International Week next March! International Week 2010 at St Wilfrid’,s Catholic High School

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Page 17

Apr 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

ROME Page 17 School of Prayer Two School of Prayer days were held recently at Leeds Trinity University College. Friday the 19th March was for school staff while Saturday 20th March was for catechists and others involved in parish ministries. The college chaplaincy provided a wonderful and peaceful venue for these two days of prayer and learning about prayer. The participants were able to explore different aspects of prayer in a number of workshops: The Carmelite Charism led by Ann Mills, Prayer Forms led by Fr Paul Grogan, The Rosary led by Jo Stow and Icons led by Fr John Wilson. Around the chapel were five prayer stations created by Ann Hemsworth &, Carol Daley which were based on the Come and See Day of October 2009 led by Fr Robert Barron. People were invited to visit each prayer station and engage with the images, readings and activities which they found there. The feedback from the participants was very positive and there are plans for future Schools of Prayer: One participant had enjoyed ",the opportunities to experience prayer in a variety of ways, the peace and gentleness of the day and a time to be.", Another concluded that ",It would be good to have more", Humility. Simplicity. Authenticity. Over the past month I’,ve talked to many people about the legacy of the assassinated archbishop of San Salvador, Oscar Arnulfo Romero, trying to find out why he is revered as a saint in so many countries and seen as a model for Church leaders today.. Invariably, their answers come back to those three character traits to describe the man who was shot with a bullet to the heart on March 24th 1980, as he celebrated Mass in the small chapel of the Carmelite sisters’, cancer hospital where he lived - an iconic martyrdom at the altar, like that of Thomas à, Beckett eight centuries earlier. Yet when he was chosen to head the archdiocese in 1977, Romero was hardly renowned as a man who would defy the ruling political, military or Church leadership in El Salvador, a nation that was spiralling into a cycle of popular protest, government repression and guerrilla warfare. Rather, after a decade as secretary general of the national bishops’, conference, he’,d built a reputation as a somewhat pedantic and aloof bureaucrat, on his way up the ecclesiastical career ladder and resistant to the modernising trends introduced by Vatican II. Ordained a priest in Rome in 1942, he had also worked for many years as a parish priest however, developing skills as an accomplished preacher, an excellent communicator and a pastor who learnt how to listen to the voice of the poor. And it was these strengths that he rediscovered within a few weeks of taking over in the capital city, as the nation edged closer to full blown civil war and he found himself faced with a stark choice: to stand on the side of the poor, who were increasingly being terrorised and killed to silence the protests, or to turn a blind eye and thus continue colluding with the perpetrators of such blatant human rights abuses? Those who worked with Archbishop Romero during the three years leading up to his murder have no doubt it was his deep spirituality and devotion to the Gospel principles of justice, truth and human dignity that helped him find the courage to speak out and lead the Church at this time of persecution against anyone suspected of supporting the leftwing rebels (“,Be a patriot, kill a priest”, was a popular slogan of the paramilitary groups). When a Jesuit friend, Fr Rutilio Grande was gunned down together with two companions, just weeks after he took office, Romero buried the three bodies without government permission (a criminal offence), excommunicated the murderers and cancelled all services the following Sunday except for an outdoor memorial Mass in front of the Cathedral. Around a hundred thousand people turned out, putting the archbishop firmly in the firing line of the country’,s increasingly powerful military leaders. On two separate occasions he urged the president to investigate the killings, even as he became convinced the government was colluding with the so-called ‘,fourteen families’, who funded increasingly violent efforts to stop the erosion of their power and influence. Romero also notified the president that he and other archdiocesan representatives would no longer appear at any public ceremonies until the persecution stopped. Outside of El Salvador, international recognition of Romero’,s leadership mounted, even as the U.S. government continued to provide military aid to fight what it saw as the communist threat to the region. In 1978, over a hundred members of the British Parliament nominated the unassuming archbishop for the Nobel Peace Prize, while the prestigious Belgian University of Louvain awarded him an honorary doctorate. Increasingly aware that his days were numbered, Romero kept up his public condemnation of human rights abuses, documented by an archdiocesan commission and broadcast nationwide through weekly radio homilies. When he visited the Vatican in 1979, he presented Pope Paul VI with detailed reports of the killings, kidnappings and torture that were taking place throughout the country. The Pope reportedly encouraged and supported his work, unlike most of his fellow bishops who were increasingly distancing themselves from his uncompromising stance. On March 23rd 1980, Romero made his most direct appeal to Salvadoran soldiers to disobey their superiors and stop killing their fellow countrymen and women. “,No soldier is obliged to obey an order that is contrary to the will of God....in the name of God, in the name of this suffering people, I ask you, I beg you.. I command you in the name of God: stop the repression!”, The following day, after delivering a powerful homily on the parable of the grain of wheat that must die before it can bear fruit, Romero was shot and killed by a hired assassin. It was not until the beginning of this year, three decades later, that the new leftwing president, Mauricio Funes publicly apologised for the government’,s role in the killing and named March 24th a national holiday. Thousands of church leaders and ordinary people from around the world travelled to San Salvador to mark the 30th anniversary of his death, while memorial Masses and ecumenical events were held in towns and cities around the UK, the U.S. and many other countries. Bishop Arthur Roche, who was in the Salvadoran capital, together with Birmingham Archbishop Bernard Longley, visiting CAFOD projects during the anniversary week, told me he was moved to see so many young people attending a candlelit rally for the man they call ‘,Saint Romero of the Americas’,. Among the people he spoke to during those days was a woman who had emigrated to Canada after all her children were kidnapped and ‘,disappeared’, under the military repression. Thirty years later, she too wanted to be among the crowds honouring the man known simply as‘,Monsenor’, by the people for whom he gave his life. The chair of the British based Romero Trust, Julian Filochowski, who worked with the Archbishop and recently promoted restoration work on the rooms where he lived, describes him as a thoroughly modern “,martyr to the Magisterium of the Church”,, an ideal patron saint for justice and peace organisations and “,one of the most credible witnesses to the Resurrection in our post-modernist age”,. At a service in Westminster Abbey, where a statue of Romero was placed among the modern martyrs over the great West doors in 1998, Archbishop Rowan Williams also reflected on Romero’,s unflinching service to the suffering Body of Christ and his quest for truth which enabled him to ‘,sentir con la Iglesia’, or ‘,feel with the Church’, and its people. Romero’,s challenge, he said, is addressed to all of us today: “,the whole Church has to be a community where truth is told about the abuses of power and the cries of the vulnerable. Once again, if we are serious about sentir con la Iglesia, we ask not only who we are speaking for, but whose voice still needs to be heard, in the Church and in society at large.”, Philippa M Hitchen Our Rome Correspondent Romero a Rome Perspective WHY SING AT MASS? S inging at Mass is a normative experience for us each Sunday –, but have we thought about why we sing? What contribution to our worship does singing make? This short article will give an insight into why liturgical singing is so important in our worship. Liturgical singing performs a service to the liturgy, and to the congregation gathered together in celebration. Vatican II describes singing as having a ‘,ministerial function,’, making it an integral part of our worship. Liturgical singing is seen as expressing this ministerial function in three ways –, firstly, by adding delight to our prayer: singing together is often more beautiful than speaking together, and have you ever noticed how much easier it is to remember text by heart when you sing them? By singing a text we join together with the heavenly choir –, as the preface of the Mass often puts it: ‘,we join together with all the Angels and Saints as we sing...’, Secondly, liturgical singing fosters a ‘,unity of minds.’, This function has both visible and underlying aspects. Visibly, we see the unity of God’,s church singing together. Whether we speak the same language, employ the same gestures, most cultures employ singing in worship –, a unifying act. Similarly, singing helps to unify the undisputable link between Father, Son and Holy Spirit: just as they are three they are one: just as we are many, so we are one in the body of Christ. Thirdly, the liturgical singing confers greater solemnity on our worship. Singing is a more solemn act than speech. In days gone by it is believed that the whole Mass was sung with very little speech (as can be seen in many Eastern churches today.) This solemnity also enshrines beauty within our worship –, the same beauty which is the divine glorification of God by his people. As you can see, the church teaches that liturgical singing is a vital part of worship, adding to our prayer, and allowing us to join together with others in praising God’,s name. Future articles in this series will go a step further and look at other important questions relating to liturgical singing such as When should we sing? What should we sing? and Who should sing? A new Klais for Leeds T his year has seen the completion of the organ at Leeds Cathedral. The Cathedral is well known chorally as home to the largest outreach programme in England, with some 1300 children in singing on a weekly basis, and is one of only three English Catholic Cathedrals to maintain daily sung services of Vespers and Mass. A central situation coupled with wonderful acoustics makes the Cathedral a dramatic liturgical setting and also an attractive concert venue within the city. The original organ was manufactured by Norman and Beard, and was built specifically for the Cathedral in 1904. Following a period of silence of around 30 years, Johannes Klais Orgelbau were chosen to reconstruct and enlarge the instrument to serve the requirements of the restored Cathedral and new position of the choir at the East End. The organ was built in the workshops of Klais in Bonn, and transported to Leeds in July 2009, completing the work in situ over a seven month period under the supervision of Benjamin Saunders and David Sanger. The tonal style is English Edwardian, and so all the historic 1904 pipework has been carefully restored on its original chests. The organ now has seven divisions, controlled from a four manual console with 78 stops, and features a unique new system of allocating manual departments to keyboards. The instrument was used to broadcast Midnight Mass on BBC Radio 4 in December and featured again in Choral Vespers on BBC Radio 3 in February. The first concert will be given on Sunday 16th May 2010 at 3.00pm by Benjamin Saunders with subsequent concerts in the inaugural series by David Sanger, Simon Lindley and Kevin Bower on 20th June, 12th September and 10th October at 3.30pm. These are free of charge. A CD of the Organ will also be launched on 16th May. Further details regarding the organ specification and inaugural concerts can be found at www.dioceseofleedsmusic.org.uk

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Page 18

Apr 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 18 BE STILL/DIARY/ENGAGEMENTS First Friday of the Month SINGLE CATHOLICS meet at 8.00pm for mass at our Lady of Lourdes, Leeds. We also a have a program of 4-8 events during the month, walks, meals, cinema and theatre trips, etc. Phone David Easterbrook Chairman LDSC on 0113 2289468 evenings between 6 and 7.30pm only. Membership is open to all single Catholics who are free to marry within the church. Crusade Mass: The crusade Mass and Rosary of Mary Immaculate is held at St Patrick`s Church, Bradford, on the first Saturday of the Month after 12.15pm Mass Second Sunday of Month 2pm Meeting of Bradford Fraternity of the Secular Franciscan Order at St. Anthony`s Convent, Clayton, Bradford.` `Third Sunday of Month 2.30pm Meeting of Leeds Fraternity of the Secular Franciscan Order at the Cathedral. Ampleforth Renewal Community: Ampleforth Abbey, meet 1st Sunday each month, at Ampleforth. 11.30am Praise, Speaker, Sharing Groups, Reconciliation, Exposition, Finishing with Mass and Healing at 4.00pm. All enquiries: Seamus McEneaney 01429 426181 Monthly Vocations Mass : Mount St Joseph’,s Chapel 11am First Wednesday of the Month. Calix: An organisation for those recovering from addiction and working the 12 Step Programme of AA so that they can develop and deepen their relationship with Jesus as their Higher Power. Meets on the First Sunday of every month at Corpus Christi Church, Neville Rd. Osmondthorpe. Leeds. Mass at 4.30pm followed by meeting. Contact: Fr. Michael on 01977 510266 Helpers of Gods precious infants, prayer vigils, regular weekly prayer vigils at Marie Stopes Abortuary, 7 Barrack Road.LS7 4AB, next to Nissan car showrooms. Fridays 12-30 to 1-30, and Saturdays 9am-l1am. Other times variable. Further details Pat 0113 2582745 Diary Be Still a few moments for thought and prayer O Blessed Virgin Mary, Mother of God and our most gentle Queen and Mother: look down in mercy upon England, your dowry, and upon us all who greatly hope and trust in you. By you it was that Jesus, our Saviour and our hope was given to the world, and He has given you to us that we might hope still more. Plead for us your children, whom you did receive and accept at the foot of the cross, O Sorrowful Mother. Intercede for election candidates that they might be guided by the Word of God and by the virtues, seeking only the common good. Pray for us all, dear Mother, that by faith, fruitful in good works we all may all deserve to see and praise God, together with you in our heavenly home. With grateful acknowledgment to Cardinal Wiseman Bishops Engagements - April/May Deadline For receipt of material for next edition: April 30th 2010 Parishes receive their copies: May 16th 2010 Send letters, articles, reports &, pictures: Mr John Grady, Leeds Diocesan Curia, Hinsley Hall, 62 Headingley Lane, Leeds LS6 2BX. Send text as word doc, pictures as jpeg, e-mail to: john.grady@dioceseofleeds.org.uk Tel: 0113 261 8022. Advertising Deadline Please note All paid-for advertising is dealt with by: CathCom, L4 Blois Meadow Business Centre, Steeple Bumpstead, Haverhill, Suffolk, CB9 7BN. To advertise call 020 7112 6710 or email: ads@cathcom.org Your Catholic Post Tuesday 20 to Friday 23 April CBCEW, Spring Meeting, Hinsley Hall Saturday 24 April 2pm Mass, 350th Anniversaries of St Vincent de Paul &, St Louise de Marillac, Liverpool Cathedral Sunday 25 April 10am Visitation, St Joseph’,s, Barnoldswick Tuesday 27 April 10.30am Diocesan Trustees’, Training Day with the Dioceses of Hallam, Leeds &, Middlesbrough, Hinsley Hall Wednesday 28 April 10am Launch of “,Meeting God in Friend and Stranger”,, Hinsley Hall, 2pm Good Shepherd Service, Leeds Cathedral 7pm Inaugural Trinity Lecture, Leeds Trinity University College, Horsforth, Leeds Thursday 29 April 11am VGs’, Meeting, Bishop’,s House, 6.30pm Confirmation, Leeds Cathedral Friday 30 April 6.30pm Confirmation, St Mary’,s, Selby Sunday 2 May 11.30am Founders’, Day Mass, Venerable English College, Rome Wednesday 5 May 6.30pm Confirmation, St Augustine’,s, Leeds Thursday 6 May 10am The Gift of Years Conference, Oxford Place Centre, Leeds Friday 7 May 11am VGs’, Meeting, Bishop’,s House 6.30pm Confirmation, Holy Name, Leeds Saturday 8 May 12 noon Lourdes Mass, Leeds Cathedral Tuesday 11-15 Saturday May Visitation English College, Valladolid Sunday 16 May 3pm Blessing of the Organ, Leeds Cathedral Tuesday 18 May 11am VGs’, Meeting, Bishop’,s House. Wednesday 19 May 11am Presbyteral Council Meeting, Hinsley Hall Thursday 20 May 10.30am Meeting with Diocesan Finance Board &, Trustee Directors, Hinsley Hall, 6pm Confirmation, St John’,s, Normanton, 7.30pm Confirmation, SS Peter &, Paul, Sandal Friday 21 May 11am Chapter Meeting, Leeds Cathedral Saturday 22 May 6pm Mass for those received into the Catholic Church at Easter, Leeds Cathedral The Spirit of Lent E ach year as part of their Lenten preparation children from St John the Evangelist Catholic Primary School Bradford present the Easter Story on Palm Sunday to families, friends and relatives. This year at the start of Holy Week, on Sunday 28th March, children from years 3 and 4, supported by children from throughout the school, presented the story of Easter to their families and parishioners in St John the Evangelist Catholic Church Bradford. The children told the story using the Stations of the Cross, using words, mime and music. The children had worked extremely hard and the result was very moving and reflective and helped everyone understand that Jesus’, suffering as he journeyed to the cross led to the hope of His resurrection. During Lent the children in the school had been engaged in a number of activities in preparation for the celebration of Easter, enabling them to fulfil the Lenten expectations of almsgiving, fasting and prayer. The fundraising in the school during Lent had been to raise funds for several diocesan charities, Catholic Care, Mission Together and Cafod in addition to Marie Curie Cancer Care. Activities included staff and children dressing as characters from storybooks on World Book day, a giant Easter Egg Raffle, Mad Hair Day and a Family raffle. Through the outstanding and generous support of the children, parents, families and friends of the school over £,800.00 was raised. H ow we could turn a crisis for the banks into an opportunity for the world. Join the campaign for a new global tax that will create huge change for the world’,s poor. Just a tiny tax on bankers will raise billions to tackle poverty and climate change. We are only asking for 0.05 percent traded by banks –, 50p for every £,1,000. And yet this could raise around $400 billion per year to help fight poverty and help developing countries combat climate change. We are also calling for governments in favour of these taxes to implement a tax on trade in currencies now, to show it can be done, and to raise much-needed cash. A Robin Hood Tax will also ensure banks pay their share of the costs of the global crisis they helped to generate and also discourage risky and short-term speculation. The financial sector urgently needs reforming and this will help. What next? The Robin Hood Tax campaign was launched in February 2010. UK anti-poverty organisations, environmental groups and development NGO’,s are joining forces to urge the UK government to: •, Agree a plan to implement a global financial transaction tax within the G20 at their first meeting in South Korea at the end of the year. •, To implement a tax on sterling now to demonstrate commitment to and feasibility of FTT’,s and to start raising much-needed revenue. A video about the Robin Hood Tax, plus more information on the campaign and ideas about how you can act, can be found at www.cafod.org.uk/robinhoodtax Have you heard of the Robin Hood Tax? Financial Transaction Taxes The proposal for a Financial Transaction Tax that recently hit the headlines is a broad levy applied to various categories of financial transactions including: stocks, bonds and currency. Its motivation is to both regulate the market and produce revenue. The proposed rate is 0.05%. Crucially, it would require universal participation in order to work. And its protected revenue has been estimated to be US$600-700 billion a year if implemented on a global basis. The most important this to say about Financial Transaction Taxes is that they are commonplace. They exist on stocks, corporate bonds, government bonds and futures. In Argentina for instance, they have been applied on all of the above since 2000 at 0.6%, and they already exist in the US where they are used to pat the operating costs of the Securities and Exchange Commission. The taxing of share transactions is particularly widespread. They exist in Countries such as Austria, Belgium, India and the UK. In the latter case the rate is 0.5%, generating a revenue of almost £,10 billion in 2005. The Tobin tax historically refers to a levy on currency transactions.

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Page 19

Apr 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

CAFOD Page 19 For Advertising contact CathCom on 020 7112 6710 Arranged for Leeds Catholic Post Buy now to start April, May, June or July and mention this advert and get a £,20 discount off any annual policy C AFOD’,s Senior Emergency Response Officer, just back from Haiti says, “,It will take years to recover.”, Two months have passed since the massive earthquake struck Haiti leaving over 230,000 people dead. Over one million people need emergency shelter and care. The Haitian people lost their homes, livelihoods and essential services such as hospitals and clinics. Many either lost family members or were separated from them in the panic. There has been an outpouring of generosity from CAFOD supporters in Leeds and across England and Wales in response to the appeal launched in February. So far an incredible £,4.8 million has been raised. £,216,000 has been raised in Leeds diocese alone. This money will be spent rebuilding the shattered lives of the Haitian people. CAFOD is working as part of Caritas International in Haiti, a group of Catholic aid agencies, distributing food, shelter materials and basic toiletries to families who have lost everything on January 12th. CAFOD’,s Senior Emergency Response Officer Robert Cruickshank has recently returned from the devastated country where he has been working for the last six weeks. Robert said: “,When I first crossed from the Dominican Republic into Haiti on 22 January the devastation mounted gradually with each house I passed. Buildings tilted at surreal angles, bent corrugated plastic and familiar household items lay scattered in the streets. It was truly shocking.”, As the Emergency Response Officer for Asia and the Middle East at CAFOD, Robert knew what to expect. When the earthquake hit Pakistan in 2005 he saw the devastation first hand, bringing many years of emergency response experience but Haiti still proved to be overwhelming. “,There was a real sense of chaos in the air when I arrived. People made Haiti Two Months Later homeless were moving into the camps and the atmosphere was thick with tension. Some people didn’,t know where family members were. “,People had to decide if their homes were safe to stay in, whether they could camp in the garden or abandon their house and move into one of the many camps that had appeared nearby.”, Robert explained, “,At first I assessed the needs of the homeless and the enormity of what happened hit me. Many people were very traumatised, openly telling me they had lost loved ones. “,I visited a hospital where the patients were recovering in tented wards. There were only two functioning latrines but I was told not to dig more in case I disturbed the dead.”, However, within days of Robert being in Haiti, it was clear that aid was getting into the country. Robert said: “,After a week we had made progress. Our partners and I had managed to get four water bladders into camps to contain 10,000 litres each. This was able to provide over 30,000 people with safe water. A modest success.”, “,Despite reports of violence and looting in the media, our partners have experienced very little unrest while distributing vital supplies. “,The US marines were there, unloading the trucks, but they didn’,t have guns,”, said Robert. “,The relief and joy when people got their food was evident. There was laughter, and sometimes even shouts of happiness. “,The food distributions were so well organised. People were given tickets in advance and waited patiently in line until they were told by our volunteers to go and pick up their food.”, It is not simply a case of Haitians standing back and being helped however. They are determined to be a part of the rebuilding and with this they feel they are doing something that gives them dignity. A man we met named Faubert lost his house in the earthquake. He lives on a piece of land at the back of a factory made available for the homeless. A landfill sight bound by a sewer. There is nowhere else to go. Robert said: “,Faubert arrived one day at the CAFOD base in Delmas, a district of the capital that was badly hit by the earthquake and offered his help as a volunteer. We went to the camp where he lives and just began digging.”, A draughtsman by trade, Faubert had more to offer than his hard labour. Robert said, “,We talked about how to build the latrines and the next day he showed me a full set of technical drawings, sketched by torch light in his makeshift shelter. “,By the time I left, the land Faubert lives on looked like a real camp. We had managed to set-up a regular water supply and built 5 latrines and the work of course will continue. The rebuilding of Haiti will take many years.”, It will take a long time to help people get their lives back in Haiti. But thanks to the money raised by CAFOD supporters, a difference has been made already. More than 200,000 people like Faubert, have received food to their camp since the earthquake struck. Tents and materials for shelters have been given to thousands of people so families have a more secure place to live. We are also installing water pumps to ensure that people like Faubert can access clean water and latrines are being built to improve sanitation. Haiti is a place in need but people are living and working together as best they can. CAFOD will stand alongside the people of Haiti for years to come, helping them to build a better life after this terrible earthquake. CAFOD: Leading for a Change - young people inspiring each other O n Friday 19th March 7 Notre Dame students left for Oxford on a CAFOD ‘,Leading for a change’, 6th Form conference. The Dominican Friars were the hosts and CAFOD were trying to galvanise the young people of Catholic schools and colleges to take the lead in social justice and climate change. The students were given a warm welcome from Bishop Kenney (Birmingham) and then Professor Julie Clague (Glasgow University) talked passionately about Catholic Social Teaching and saints who ‘,stood up to be counted’, for their own generation. Notre Dame students enjoyed going into small groups with other young people around England and Wales to learn how they were taking a lead in bringing about change. Everyone came away in positive mode, buoyed up for the summer term and the new academic year ahead and ready to think what they could do in their own situation to make a difference. Becca Julier (leader of Notre Dame Social Justice group) said ‘,It was energising and inspiring to be in the company of other young people who shared the same values as me.’, Andrew Sullivan

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Page 20

Apr 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 20 EASTER SUNDAY Designed and produced by CathCom, L4 Blois Meadow Business Centre, Steeple Bumpstead, Haverhill, Suffolk, CB9 7BN. To advertise call 020 7112 6710 or email: ads@cathcom.org Full to Overflowing I t was with difficulty that the procession made its way to the altar on Easter Sunday. The Cathedral Church was full with only room to stand at the back and down the sides. All the services since the chrism Mass on the Wednesday of Holy Week had been well attended –, but Easter Day proved to be the one were everyone turned out. The Cathedral shone in all its beauty and the choir which had as usual lived up to its own high standard, through out the Week, contributed a fitting climax to the liturgical music. Easter Sunday was indeed the climax of the celebration –, the Lord Had Truly Risen.

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