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Leeds Catholic Post History

Newspaper for the Diocese of Leeds

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Dec 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 1

Dec 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

CATHOLIC POST THE NEWSPAPER FOR THE DIOCESE OF LEEDS DECEMBER 2010 www.dioceseofleeds.org.uk www.catholicpost.org.uk PARISHES THANKED FOR RESPONSE TO “,PLEA”, C lergy and representatives from the majority of parishes throughout the Diocese attended meetings recently with the Diocesan Directors’, Finance Sub-Committee (FSC) in Bradford, Wakefield and Leeds. During the course of these meetings, the Annual Financial Report was presented and discussed. A report on the success of the Plea for Realistic Giving was provided and opportunity was given to question the Directors about their efforts to strike a more satisfactory balance between regular income and expenditure. Mgr Kieran Heskin, Vicar General and Chairman of the FSC, took the opportunity to thank parishes for their tremendous response to the “,Plea for Realistic Giving”,, which took place earlier in the year. On the evidence of the questionnaires returned by parishes, average weekly giving has increased by 17%. If this figure is sustained then the annual income to the parishes could bring in an additional £,750,000 per year. Most parish representatives said that they thought the increase is being sustained but it was acknowledged that the church’,s need for sacrificial giving on the part of parishioners is a need that should regularly be put before the parishioners’, minds. Giving through Gift Aid has also shown an increase of 10% as a consequence of the Plea. Another very positive result of the Plea is the number of parishioners who have decided to give their Offertory contributions by standing order. This is not only the easiest method of giving: it is also the most reliable and consistent way of giving to our parishes especially for those who have commitments away from home at weekends. The point was also made that paying by standing order is cheaper for the Church: cash handling and paying into the banks is becoming increasingly more expensive. Terry Forbes, a Director of the Diocese, outlined the work of the Trustee over the previous twelve months and gave examples of the various committees and other meetings which he and others attend in their capacity as Directors. Looking at his own diary over the year this had amounted to sixty three separate commitments. Peter Lomas, a Director of the Diocese, gave an outline of the statutory report and accounts for the financial year 2009/10. These had recently been audited and approved by the Directors. A summary is reproduced on the back page of this newspaper and copies of the full report can be obtained via the Diocese of Leeds web site. The meetings were told that the overall financial position of the Diocese has improved in the financial year 2009/10. The combination of increased parish offertories, reductions in central costs and continuing restrictions on development projects will produce further improvements. Mr Lomas reported that at March 2009 the Trust had a loan of £,6 million with AIB Bank due to be repaid by December 2010. The Directors have used £,2.5m of the gains on the stock market investments to help repay this short term loan with Allied Irish Bank some nine months early. The remaining £,3.5m was financed by drawing down against an existing 5 year loan facility with AIB. David Herd, Director of Finance, presented a schedule showing the level of expenditure for non-parish costs compared to the Budget for the 6 month period to 30th September. He drew particular attention to the various cost centres which make up this area of diocesan expenditure. The difficulty of budgeting in our complex organisation is shown by the example of the fourteen students for the priesthood currently studying in seminaries. Whilst this shows a very welcome increase in the number of vocations, it is more than was anticipated and costs are correspondingly higher than expected. Parish attendees were encouraged to take up the suggestion of electronic banking which Mr Herd explained would reduce bank charges. David Damant, Diocesan Property Manager, gave an update on various property related matters since the corresponding meetings in 2009. The Directors have continued their policy of approving expenditure on only the most urgent repair projects and of deferring building improvement schemes many of which are anxiously awaited in our parishes. He referred to the issue of surplus buildings and to some of the difficulties encountered in trying to sell property in the current economic climate. Whilst eventual sale of properties will repay most of our current capital debt, it is increased offertories that must fund the new parish building improvement schemes. The update also included reference to the likely parish liability on school building projects in the forthcoming years. All of the meetings concluded with interesting and helpful question and comment sessions. It was generally agreed that much has been achieved over the last twelve months and that we must maintain this progress. Whats inside Shared Liturgy in Bradford Pages 10 Bishop drops in for a Cuppa Page 11 2005-55 Audi A3 Sport TDi 5 Door 44088 Miles £,8950 2008-08 Renault Clio Extreme 5 Door 15707 Miles £,4750 2002-52 Renault Clio Expression 3 Door 45019 Miles £,2450 2000-W Nissan Micra Profile 3 Door 53480 Miles £,1695 2005-05 Daihatsu Charade 1 owner 5 Door 23483 Miles £,2650 2000-W Ford Ka 1 owner 54235 Miles £,1595 2000-Y Vauxhall Astra Auto 5 Door 75893 Miles £,1975 2002-02 Vauxhall Corsa SXi 5 Door 35534 Miles £,2850 Mgr K Heskin, Mr Terry Forbes (Director), Peter Lomas (Director)

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Dec 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 2 SCHOOLS NEWS The Holy Father had the pundits puzzled. What did he mean in that interview in the book? That there was to be a dramatic change in the church’,s teaching? Suddenly, the commentators polarised, as if an electro-magnet had been switched on. Statement followed statement. Then, many realised that we are so conditioned by the techniques of spin and stage-managed leak that we could not cope when the Pope merely expresses or shares his thoughts- even his dilemmas. Those looking for nuances of meaning were disappointed. As we found when he visited us here in England and Scotland, he does not speak in sound-bites or try out policies on the press lobby. Has it become the case that we can no longer handle transparency? It is something that the Pope seems to share with someone else with whom he seemed so comfortable in September- the Archbishop of Canterbury. We are mature enough to hear what is in their minds, not just to be told what some just want us to know, or perhaps would like us to think. Whatever the morality or advisability of those thousands of Wikileaks which have found their way into the press, it has shown us- if we were unaware- that in international diplomacy, some people really do not always say what they think or mean what they say. It has also taught us that a culture of concealment, rather than the real necessities of secrecy, need not be the best way to manage our affairs. If the Pope and religious leaders stand apart from political methods, then it can only be a good thing. The church is not a political body or a power- broker. We need to share our dilemmas, to put forward our thoughts and ideas without fear of ridicule or condemnation. Our Lord was never short of people in the Gospels to ask him questions, to share their concerns: and he knew who was genuine and who were a “,brood of vipers”,. “,If you continue in my word, you are truly my disciples, will know the truth, and the truth will make you free.”, The Post Says …, Victoria Yusuf a student at Notre Dame Catholic Sixth Form College has won a national songwriting competition. The ‘,Make it or Break it’, awards sponsored by Yamaha and EMI are open to 14 -18 year olds and were held this year at the Liverpool Academy for the Performing Arts. The winning song ‘,Have I lost my tongue’, was based on a poem by Sujatta Bhatt and is about lost culture and heritage. Victoria, was helped in her performance by Mirabel Ukpabio who is also a student at the college. The prize is £,500 worth of Yamaha vouchers which Victoria plans on spending on recording equipment for the college Music department. The competition was part of a four day event which included vocal lessons, workshops with professional songwriters and the opportunity to practice with the house band There were also question and answer sessions with music producers who gave helpful advice on how to move forward in the industry. ‘,It was an unforgettable experience’, said a delighted Victoria. ‘,I was a runner up last year so was really pleased to win first prize this year’, Victoria plans to study Entertainment Law at university but hopes to keep up with her songwriting skills. Songwriting Success for Notre Dame Student Sacrament of anointing at Holy Family, Keighley S ince 1983, the year of the great jubilee, The Holy Family Catholic School has hosted an annual celebration of the sacrament of anointing the sick for the members of it its partner parishes. This year’,s celebration was delayed from its usual time adjacent to St Luke’,s (patron of medics) feast day in October until the first Sunday of Advent as most of the parish priests in Keighley changed over the summer. Unfortunately the afternoon as hit by the snowy weather and numbers were down this year. Very few of the genuinely house-bound ventured out whereas normally this Mass would be the one Mass in the year that some parishioners can manage. Fr Mike Walsh the new chaplain presided assisted by Canon McCreadie and Frs Cummins, O’,Keeffe and Kennedy. The students who are preparing for the Lourdes pilgrimage in May attended, wearing their bright yellow Lourdes uniforms for the first time. They assisted with the liturgy and served the tea afterwards. This is an enduring example of the muscular sense of mission that our young people have. We may look slightly askance at their record of regular attendance on a Sunday morning, for instance, but ask them to respond by giving up a whole day of their weekend for a good cause and they are there in droves Fancy Coming to Madrid to See Pope Benedict XVI? Leeds Diocesan Youth Service have a limited number of places avail- able on the World Youth Day pilgrimage to Madrid in August 2011. The pilgrimage is open to young adults aged 16 –, 30. For more information or a registration pack please email –, wydleeds@live.co.uk.

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Dec 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

YOUTH Page 3 Leeds Diocesan Youth Service ‘,All who are thirsty, come!’, (Rev 22:17) For more information about how to register for Leeds Diocesan Youth Service events, check out: www.leedsyouth.org.uk, contact Anna at the Youth Office: 0113 261 8058 / abcleedsdiocese@hotmail.com or join the “,Leeds Diocesan Youth Service”, Facebook group. Wed 8th December REVELATION For young people in Yrs 9 -13 7 –, 9pm Cathedral Hall, Leeds Friday 17th December “,Handmaids”, Evening of prayer for young women aged 18 –, 30ish 7 –, 9pm St. Joseph’,s Convent, Hunslet Wed 19th January REVELATION For young people in Yrs 9 -13 7 –, 9pm Cathedral Hall, Leeds Saturday 22nd January St. Pio Day 1 - 6pm St. Pio Friary, Bradford Friday 23rd January CINDERELLA The LDYS Pantomime ALL WELCOME! Tickets available from the Youth Office TBC St. Austin’,s Theatre, Wakefield Saturday 29th –, Sunday 30th January WYD Residential Retreat For those young people who are signed up to the WYD pilgrimage, Hinsley Hall Leeds Diocesan Youth Service Calendar The New Revelation H i! Let me introduce myself –, I’,m Jade Broadley, 18 from Woodlesford and I go to St. Theresa’,s Church. I am currently working with the Leeds Diocesan Youth Service. I went to Corpus Christi High school and then Notre Dame Sixth Form, where I got involved in many events happening within the Youth Service. n:fuse Before going to University next September, I am taking a gap year where I am part of a programme called n:fuse. This is for 16-19 year olds wanting to gain practical skills by volunteering, receiving training and being mentored, learning more about life and God. One of my placements on n:fuse is working with the Youth Office and helping to plan the monthly event ‘,Revelation’,. This month’,s Revelation, “,Leap of Faith”,, looked a bit different to usual as it was a celebration of National Youth Sunday, along with the Feast of Christ the King, which brought in many new people to the event. We started the day off with a leaping competition, followed by watching a Nooma DVD to help explore the theme of “,Leap of Faith”,. We had small group discussions on how taking the Leap of Faith now can affect us for all of eternity! This led into a Holy Hour of Adoration of the Blessed Sacrament in the Church, led by the Franciscan Sisters of the Renewal with music, the Divine Mercy chaplet and a chance to go to the Sacrament of Reconciliation, an opportunity which many of our young people took. The day ended in a celebration of Mass, joining with parishioners from the Immaculate Heart of Mary. Many of the young people were able to take the ‘,Leap of Faith’, by helping with parts of the Mass including the music, offertory and readings. Revelation, which is for young people across the Diocese of Leeds in school years 9-13, will be taking place in Cathedral Hall, Leeds, (on the following dates over the coming months : •, Wednesday 8th December 2010 •, Wednesday 19th January 2011 •, Wednesday 16th February 2011 •, (Look out for information about special LDYS events during Lent!) •, Wednesday 18th May 2011 •, Wednesday 15th June 2011 LDYS Registration Forms are available from www.leedsyouth.org.uk or from the Youth Office. We hope to see you there! FROM JUST £,299 R.G.R. MEMORIALS COLOUR CATALOGUE QUALITY MEMORIALS AT AFFORDABLE PRICES IN GRANITE, MARBLE &, STONE ALL PRICES INCLUDE DELIVERY &, FIXING Ogee top memorial 2’,6”, high Fully polished Black Granite, Delivered and Fixed for £,399 inc VAT FREE Tel: 0113 282 3888 43 High Ridge Park, Rothwell, Leeds LS26 0NL CINDERELLA : THE PANTO! T he World Youth Day pilgrimage leaders, plus some special guests from around the Diocese of Leeds are planning to tread the boards to raise funds for the pilgrimage to Madrid. The LDYS production of ‘,Cinderella’, is a one night only production –, Friday 28th January at St. Austin’,s Theatre in Wakefield - and should not to be missed! Come and support the WYD pilgrims and find out if poor Cinders manages to escape from Hinsley Hall to go to the Vatican Ball!! Tickets are available from the Youth Office –, 0113 2618058 abcleedsdiocese@hotmail.com

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Dec 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

O ne of the most endearing Christmas traditions I have ever heard about comes from somewhere in the Americas. On Christmas Eve the children, in excited anticipation of the birth of Jesus, fill a box with hay or grass. The boxes are put under their beds and in the morning, lo and behold, the grass has gone, eaten by the donkey as it rests after the journey, and in its place is a small gift for each child. In this simple ritual and in terms that a child can see, the birth of Jesus as the true gift we all celebrate is symbolised and personalised in the gift left in the box. God has become ‘,present’, to us. Our culture can make it a little more difficult to see the connection between Christmas and God. The tradition of leaving a carrot for Rudolph and a mince pie for Santa is a sign of how far the season has been adopted by commerce. The Santa myth in its modern form was created as a marketing tool. (‘,It must be Christmas, I saw the coca cola ad on TV!’, has become as ubiquitous a herald this year as the first charity catalogues through the door after the summer holidays used to be.) The jolly bearded man bearing luxurious presents for all sets up expectations that can be quite problematic for all. Parents are the hardest hit because children are the most vulnerable to the messages of our media. We all know that presents do not have to be bought. They do not have to be expensive. (A child I know once gave her family promissory notes to do little jobs around the house or something special for them that she knew they would appreciate.) We all know that it’,s the thought that counts. Expensive is not the issue. Even a gift that is bought at great price, one that involves a sacrifice can be a powerful statement of love. It is a distant echo of the ultimate gift of the baby Jesus whose birth we celebrate now - His life on the cross for our salvation Love is what the Christ child came to teach us. How we share in that love, show our gratitude for the gift of himself, and how we express that gratitude and love in real terms and in real ways with each other, is what Christmas is all about. So, what can we do in our world in 2010? In ‘,Listening 2004: My Family, My Church’, family people were quite clear that the greatest blessing they enjoyed was time, time to be together as family. In our culture time to be present to one another is perhaps one of the most costly things we can give. There are myriad distractions to consume our time even in the lull of the holidays when banks and shops are shut. It takes time to be truly ‘,present’, to another person but it is an astonishing experience. Barriers collapse when we take the time to be with and to look at one another in love. In fact we discover that we can only love, not hate, those that we are truly present to. This is how we live our Christian call in family life. If we take time to attend to a spouse, a child, a parent, a friend we are giving the greatest gift we can. Love is at the heart of God’,s gift to us in the baby at Bethlehem. Life, the universe, everything is the abundant gift of an abundantly loving God. Our inability to see that truth in the daily distractions of our lives is what Jesus is warning us of when he told Martha that, in sitting at his feet and listening to him, in being ‘,present’, to him, instead of helping Martha in the kitchen, Mary had chosen the better part. A scientist might say that love, if it could ever be located, is what holds our DNA together and what gives our matter life. A theologian might say that love is written into our hearts. I think that both are true, or at least as true as any statement about love, which is God, can be. Love is the powerful truth written in to our humanity. Commerce exploits this deep truth to persuade us to part with money we do not have to buy things we do not need, that do not last and that do not satisfy, in order to try to express the deep and genuine love we all have written into our hearts. Making the effort to be truly present to one another at this holiday time is a good way to open ourselves to the possibility of the peace and joy that God’,s gift of Jesus promises. How can we make the connection between God, Love, Jesus and presents evident at home? We already live it at home, where God is in the mundanity of the washing of feet. Pointing this out, gently, easily (you will know how) is how we make the connection for our children. Pointing out the story of baby Jesus when it appears in the midst of the glitz, making time to go to Carol services, considering how we show love in our apparently ordinary activities, going to see the Christmas lights that brighten up our winter gloom is something we can all do. Nothing might change on the surface, but we can be transformed in the very act of being present to one another. Our children won’,t get it all at once, but a lifetime of showing will eventually open their eyes too. Going back to gifts by going forward to the epiphany, our Catholic teaching shows us how to recognise Jesus’, kingship in the gold, his priesthood in the frankincense, and his humanity in the myrrh. I will still buy things and give them. I will still enjoy receiving presents, but I will this year try to think about what messages I send with the gifts I give, try to see beyond the object to the person, and hope that my presence in love will be present them in the present I give. Transformation takes a lifetime, so do not expect to see or feel real results every single time. The transfiguration was a glimpse of truth, but the disciples could not have lived in that presence without being blinded. Jesus came to make us see and we do get glimpses occasionally. For the rest we have faith, hope and, most important of all, love. Happy Christmas Page 4 FAMILY LIFE / SIDELINES / MUSIC As a child in the fifties, I recall an occasion of family prayers one Advent, finished by singing a carol. I was the youngest at the time (before my little sister usurped my position...) and had chosen “,O Come All Ye Faithful”,. But as the singing began, I started sobbing. I was upset because we were singing the English version, not the Latin “,Adeste fidelis”,. I think I have swung somewhat away from this pro-Latin stance as the years have unfolded, but carols certainly stir strong emotions. Early in the Christmas season (I mean the secular, commercial Christmas season, after Halloween, but before the January sales) I was singing carols with a non-church group. One of the musicians resented the number of carols which had Christian things in –, he meant Mary, Joseph, the Christ child, etc. He preferred carols with more of a pro- wassailing message. Despite his reservations, he played skilfully, and made a good job of his involuntary Christian witness! We included one of my favourites, “,Silent Night”,, and though we didn`t quite reach the beauty and impact the carol can have in church on Christmas Eve, we were pretty good! (I notice from my internet wanderings that you can download this as a ring tone... “,#Silent Night Ringtone £,3 + 100`s More Xmas Ringtones No Subscriptions, No Cons!”, I think I`ll keep my £,3 for more worthy causes.) At St Joseph`s, we are trying to learn a new Mass setting –, “,Mass of Glory”, by Bob Hurd and Ken Canedo. The OCP website describes it as “,one of the most popular contemporary Mass settings”, and I am looking forward to singing and playing it. I was very impressed with the number of members who turned up to a recent practice, despite cold and snow. I hope the commitment translated to good music the following Sunday! I realise that March 2011 may seem remote, but it`s just a couple of Catholic Posts away, and there are two events of interest. “,The New Texts: A Seminar for Composers”, on March 26th in Manchester is jointly hosted by the Society of St Gregory and the National Liturgy Office. More from Secretary@ssg.org.uk. The other is “,Washing the Feet of the World”,, on March 19th at Leeds Catholic Chaplaincy - an afternoon exploring the music and spirituality of the Iona Community with Philip Jakob. This will appeal to anyone involved in the music ministry–, in fact, anyone who likes singing in church. It will also engage those interested in the ideas of the Iona Community and/or Justice issues. More information, and registration, is online at the WYCM Network website- www.westyorkshirechurchmusic.org.uk/ Wishing you a joyful, peaceful and musical Christmas! If you`d like to add your name to the email list to receive information about WYCM Network events, I`d be happy to hear from you. tim.devereux@ssg.org.uk Tim Devereux tim.devereux@ssg.org.uk Musical Notes by Jane Shields Christmas presence for all By Breda Theakston A year with a proper name draws to a close: we can now call our years “,twenty”,- ten, eleven and so on: no more of that “,two thousand”, stuff! We have reached the end of the “,Noughties”,, andthat may be a good thing. Talking in words, the Oxford Dictionary has relaunched itself online and good it is, too. It publishes a list of the words of 2010- these include politicospeak like “,big society”, and “,double-dip”, with more obvious words like “,Boris-bike”, and “,vuvuzela”,- and Tea Party too- with its connotations of right-wing American politicians pinching the swashbuckling heritage of the Boston Tea Party and turning it into a sort of Me-first culture. Then there are the less obvious- Los33, the Spanglish spoken at that Chilean mine and showmance, a romance for the duration of a show- or perhaps, strictly speaking, a dance. The Dictionary also has a good rant about cliches, too: “,at the end of the day”, wins the lazy journalism prize, along with “,split second”, and “,concerned residents”,: to newspapers, all residents are concerned, all Catholics are devout, and all wingers, of any code “,jet heeled”,. I confess to cringing at “,fit for purpose”,, and “,piece of work”, but reserve a special cringe for the meaningless “,going forward”, which seems capable of inclusion anywhere in a sentence. Education has a special language with statisticianspeak like “,quartile”, and “,cohort”, becoming cliched into common parlance (to use a good cliche), to add to the mysteries of “,sats”, and “,key stages”,. In church, we can use cliches too: and do you ever wonder what newcomers make of some of our prayers? People confess themselves puzzled by …,”,we may both imitate what they contain and obtain what they promise…,”, at the end of the Rosary: “,that by faith, fruitful in good works”, the tongue-twister at the end of the old Prayer for England can reward a bit of reflection, but if only said aloud, it will always remain a mystery, along with the question of whether it is “,Holy Holy Holy, Lord, God of power…,. or Holy Holy Holy, Lord God of …,. A comma either way…,? Which brings me, seasonably, to the Angels, carols and cribs: do we have any scriptural basis for cattle and oxen at Bethlehem: sheep perhaps- but camels? Then there’,s snow- snow upon snow in the deep midwinter: was there? Not if the flocks were still being watched, I’,m told, and not sheltering. At least we know all about snow here, as do cohorts of schoolchildren finding schools closed because the snow came over their wellies (do you remember caretakers, laying down ash from the boiler?) We all know King George VI’,s 1940 poem from Minnie Haskins, too, spoken in the darkest of winters: “,I said to the man who stood at the gate of the year ‘,Give me a light that I may tread safely into the unknown.’, And he replied, ‘,Go into the darkness and put your hand into the hand of God That shall be you to better than a light and safer than a known way!’,”, But do you know, as we look dimly out into our coming teeny years, how it continues? “,God knows. His will is best. The stretch of years which wind ahead, so dim To our imperfect vision, Are clear to God. Our fears are premature. In Him All time hath full provision.”, A Happy Christmas &, a grace-filled New Year. Benchmark Sidelines

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Dec 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

CATECHESIS AND EVANGELISATION Page 5 St. Mary’,s Matheletes F our students from St. Mary’,s Menston Sixth Form took part in the Regional Final of the National Senior Team Maths Challenge at Leeds University on Monday 8th November. The team had the opportunity to work independently, in pairs and as a group on a range of difficult maths problems. These took the form of an individual complex problem round, a cross-number where one pair had to work on the across questions while the other concentrated on the down questions, and a relay round, where one pair worked on a problem and passed their answer to the other pair. This answer formed part of their question. Answers were passed back and forth in a certain time limit. All four competitors thoroughly enjoyed the evening and the opportunity to be challenged on one of their A-Level courses in a different setting and with more enjoyable activities. They were rewarded for their efforts by finishing in 4th place out of the 25 schools that participated. An excellent achievement. Well Done!!! The Missionaries of Silence Aims, objects, commitment is to live by prayer and silence in the Secular World Prayers, Meditation, Contemplation are the Missionaries tools of co-operation: , For the conversion of us all to love God , For bringing souls to our blessed Lord , Calling the presence of the Lord within us always , Through saying our prayers or mantras in silence each morning and evening It is also a way of living at peace with oneself, ones neighbour, the world and with God WHY NOT SHARE WITH US OUR COMMON BOND 13 Fairfax Crescent BD4 8BP Telephone: 07976 634574 Mathlethes Team:, Chris Overton, Rosie Fulton, Tom Grant and Patrick Kirkham T.V. and Evangelisation F irst the coverage of the Pope’,s visit, then The Big Silence in November and now The Nativity due to be shown later this month! It makes a pleasant change to see quality programming that is sympathetic to the Christian Faith. What a great opportunity it gives us to chat about faith with our friends in a non-threatening way. In case you didn’,t see it, The Big Silence, shown on BBC2, followed five people who, under the guidance of Abbot Christopher Jamison, stepped back from their busy lives to experience silence. The programme showed their journeys and the impact it had on their lives. The BBC has now announced the schedule for its Nativity drama. It will be broadcast on BBC1 in four episodes of 30 minutes each. The first one will be on Monday 20th December at 7pm. Then it will be at the same time on the following three nights, ending on Thursday 23rd December at 7pm. This is the slot normally occupied by The ONE Show, which has an average audience of around 5 million viewers. The Church and Media Network has produced a small website with information about the series, ideas for how churches can use it and space for comments and reviews. You will find it at www.nativitydrama.info. Recommended website www.growingintosilence.com This website follows up the TV series The Big Silence. It includes information on prayer, silence, faith and more. This is particularly good for people currently seeking to know more about the Catholic Faith and prayer. Catechesis and Evangelisation Events Calendar Friday 4th February More Ways to Pray (for school staff) Leeds Trinity University College, Horsforth Saturday 5th February More Ways to Pray (for parishioners) Leeds Trinity University College, Horsforth For further details visit www.dioceseofleeds.org.uk/evangelisat ion or telephone Mrs Janine Garnett 0113 2618040 CATEECHESIS AND EVANGELISATION Sylvia Opens Nursing College S ylvia Wright’,s dream of opening a Nursing College alongside her hospital for the poor and her school for profoundly deaf children in Thiruvannamalai in Southern India has come true. The Florence Nightingale School of Nursing was officially opened on 16 November in the presence of two hundred representatives of the local community and five Sylvia Wright trustees and supporters who were on a ten day visit from the UK. The second intake of twenty student nurses who have now begun their four year course took part in the colourful opening ceremony. A further twenty students will join them each year until the complement of eighty is reached in 2012. “,We urgently need well-trained, kind and considerate nurses,”, says Sylvia. “,The numbers are few.”, The student nurses follow the curriculum of the Indian Nursing Council leading to the diploma. This is similar to the UK diploma but also emphasises practical patient care in Sylvia’,s hospital, other local clinics and in the poor village communities of Tamil Nadu. When completed, the college will have ten teaching staff supported by specialist visiting lecturers. The students pay a modest annual fee which covers their tuition and accommodation. This is still a major sacrifice for their families whose incomes are very low. The college buildings are being funded by the Leeds- based Sylvia Wright Trust at a total cost of £,190,000. The Trust, a registered charity, has raised one half of this and is now considering the best way of raising the remaining £,95,000. Tony Allinson, Chairman of the Sylvia Wright Trust, said: “,The college is tremendous value for money. In two years time, it will be self- financing and will produce a regular supply of nurses who will have both formal qualifications and Sylvia’,s magic ingredient of real, committed, patient care. This will be a wonderful legacy for the future, a jewel in the crown.”, Further information, news, photographs and suggestions about how to make donations can be found on the Sylvia Wright website: www.sylviawright.org

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Dec 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

T he wonderfully named NCDDDD- National Conference of Deacon Directors and Deacon Delegates- met at Hinsley Hall as usual in November. Bishop Terence Drainey of Middlesborough was keynote speaker and outlined his vision of the diaconate, using the model of Holy Week. There were workshop discussions about various aspects of a deacon’,s work and ministry- relationships between Priests and Deacons in parishes, retreats and spiritual direction, and formation and training, both before and after ordination. An outline was also provided of the new formation programme for deacons at Maryvale, Birmingham, which will soon take students from Leeds Diocese. This will be made up of distance learning and regular times at Maryvale, together with local support. The next national assembly of Deacons will take place on the weekend of 24 –, 26 June 2011 at St Mary’,s University College, Strawberry Hill, Twickenham. It is the policy of the conference to encourage dioceses and parishes to see the cost of this assembly as part of what they pay for the ongoing formation of deacons, so it is hoped that “,no one will be prevented from coming for financial reasons.”, The assembly will also be the first international conference of the North European Circle of the International Diaconate Study Centre, the body which publishes the new journal, the New Diaconal Review so delegates will be welcomed from elsewhere in Europe. Among speakers and visitors confirmed so far are Cardinal Keith O’,Brien, Archbishop of St Andrews and Edinburgh, the Most Revd Vincent Nichols, Archbishop of Westminster, the Revd Professor Michael Hayes, Vice-Principal of St Mary’,s, Professor Joseph Wissink from the University of Utrecht and Professor William Cavanaugh from the University of St Thomas, Minnesota. There will be other speakers, special workshops and the quadrennial meeting of the wives of deacons. If by any chance you are a deacon who has “,slipped through the net”, and not been mailed about the conference by the organizers- the lists have been renewed this time- contact Fr Paul Fisher, Diocesan Director of Deacons as soon as possible. Bishop Drainey also said that he was now going to arrange for the publication of the England and Wales version of the Basic Norms For The Formation Of Permanent Deacons and Directory For The Ministry And Life Of Permanent Deacons which have Vatican approval. The June 2010 version can be found on the Bishops’, Conference website under “,deacons”, and the global version of this document on the Vatican website- rather than a long reference, just put eg “,Deacon Vatican Norms”, into Google. It is hoped that all Deacons will have a busy and fulfilling Christmas season! Page 6 DEACONS NEWS Deacons Diary Mr Chris Edwards helps celebrate success at St Mary’,s T he outstanding GCSE results of St. Mary’,s, Menston were this week celebrated at the annual Year 11 Achievement Evening Presentation Evening. This year the school recorded superb GCSE results with 92% of students gaining five or more GCSE passes at grade A*- C. In addition to the presentation of GCSE certificates, Mr Chris Edwards Chief Executive of Education Leeds gave a speech in which he praised the efforts of students, parents and staff in Leeds’, “,most successful High School”,. Music on the evening was provided by last year’,s GCSE music students Matthew Roberts and Jack Loughlin. Acting Headteacher Mrs McMahon said’, “,Events such as this provide opportunity to thank the school community, parents, students, staff and governors for the contribution they make to St. Mary’,s. I was delighted to see so many students recognised for their splendid achievements spanning a wide range of school life,”, St. Mary’,s students and staff pictured with Christopher Edwards (far right)

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Dec 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

INTERFAITH Page 7 Classified Advertising “,Meeting God in Friend and Stranger”, –, Summary Part 2 Chapter 2: The Changing Face of Britain The Bishops place their teaching on interreligious dialogue within the context of our lives in Britain today. We live alongside neighbours of no faith and of many other religions, all within an overarching secular framework. The 2001 census found 72% of the population who describe themselves as Christian, 3% as Muslim, 1% as Hindu, 0.6% as Sikh, 0.5% as Jewish, 0.3% as Buddhist and 15% of no religion. In parts of our area of course there are much higher proportions of Jews, Muslims, Hindus and Sikhs. All these groups contain smaller groupings and loyalties –, just like Christianity. The skyline of most of our northern cities and towns make our multi-religious society visible in the shape of different places of worship. Our society’,s customs, laws, and moral expectations and the customs, legal and moral worlds of the different religions are in a state of accommodation with each other. It is a time of adjustment not without disturbance and threat as well as opportunity for growth in understanding and enrichment. Our society is also part of a wider context where world events, natural, political and economic have huge impact for good or ill on our own daily lives. The Haitian earthquake, the aftermath of cholera can lead us to generosity, terrorist activity, done in the name of an unauthentic appeal to religion, fuel our sense of insecurity and fear. Our Bishops then ask: What is the position of Christianity in all this? Church attendance is falling as aggressive secular culture seeks to exclude religion from the public sphere. Many tell us to keep our Christianity as a private affair which has no wider authority. At the same time over 70% of the population wish to identify themselves as ‘,Christian’,. The Catholic community 50 years back, due to its history of persecution and immigration, was distinct from the rest of the population. We are now more assimilated into culture and society and far more multi-cultural with folk newly arrived from Africa, India, Vietnam, South America, the Caribbean, the Philippines and Eastern Europe. A truly “,catholic”, (‘,embracing all peoples’,) Church would not be living up to its vision, if it excluded itself from being enriched by the wider diversity of multi-religious Britain. So the Bishops emphasise that as members of the Church we recognise, respect and promote pluralism or diversity through dialogue. This helps us appreciate the culture and religion of others and the gifts they can bring to our society. There is one danger that the Bishops alert us to –, the danger of “,relativism”,. Whilst we are encouraged to celebrate the fact of religious pluralism, we do not go on to say that all religions are of equal validity, on the grounds that truth only relates to the believer. In this view there is no objective, public truth that holds good for everyone. These “,relativists”, say that our claim that in Christ we meet the universally valid truth about God means that only if we abandon that claim is dialogue possible for us. The Church rejects this. “,Its respect for the freedom of all to practise their religion does not stem from the conviction that belief is relative. Quite the contrary, it stems from the conviction that truth is one and universal.”, (Para 27 p 21) In Chapter 3 the Bishops go on to say how this one truth and goodness of God can be glimpsed in other religions. So the Bishops then call on us in our parishes and schools to bear witness to our love of neighbour against all prejudice and intolerance. Sometimes we are tempted to share the open hostility of our society towards migrants and asylum seekers. Jesus told the story of the “,Good”, Samaritan precisely because there was intense hostility between his own people the Jews and the Samaritans. There are ample chances for us to join local organisations which aid asylum seekers: our own Justice and Peace organisation, many parishes have schemes, there are many ways in which we can join members of other Christian Churches and of other religions in offering friendship and support to asylum seekers and migrants. This, along with all collaboration with members of other religions in the work of justice and peace and care for the environment is called “,the dialogue of action”,. The Bishops then offer this new situation as an opportunity for us to deepen the knowledge of our own faith so that we can share it with others. Dialogue can quite simply mean being with others in shaping a better humanity. All this does not mean that we remain silent when here or abroad Christians are persecuted and dealt with unjustly. Not all problems are easily overcome, but the reality of ill-will and evil must not excuse us from repaying it with love. Our own Christian past can illustrate how any religion can cloak its misdeeds by an appeal to divine sanction. “,We are right, therefore, to rejoice at the great diversity of peoples within the universal Church and we respect the religious diversity of modern Britain, seeing it as an opportunity for dialogue.”, (Para 36 p 24) Contact us via: www.dioceseofleeds.org.uk/interfaith or (for David Jackson) Tel 01274 581094 or email : dandt55@btinternet.com Feasts and Festivals of Other Religions (Dec 19th to Feb 20th) 26 December: Zorastrian –, Zaratusht-No- Diso. The commemoration of the death of the prophet Zarathustra. 31 December: Japanese –, Omisoka. A festival that prepares for the New Year by cleansing Shinto home shrines and Buddhist altars. The bells of Buddhist temples are struck 108 times to warn against the 108 evils to be overcome. 5 January 2011: Sihkism –, the Birthday of Guru Govind Singh (1666 CE). The tenth Sikh guru who instituted the 5 Ks and founded the Order of the Khalsa on the feast of Vaisakhi in 1699. 14 January: Hindu –, Makar Sakranti. Called Lohri in Punjab and Pongal in Chennai (Tamilandu). Unlike other festivals which are based on the lunar calendar, this is based on the solar calendar. It is a day of almsgiving and patching up quarrels. 20 January: Jewish –, Tu B’,Shevat. Jewish New Year for Trees. 31 January: Sikh –, Birthday of Guru Har Rai (1630 –, 1661) the 7th Guru. 8 February: Hindu –, Vasant Panchari. Dedicated to Saraswati, the goddess of learning and Brahma’,s wife –, marks the beginning of Spring. 8 February: Buddhist –, Parinirvana or Nirvana day –, the anniversary of Buddha’,s death (or 15 Feb) 15 February: Muslim –, Milad un Nabi. Birthday of the prophet Muhammad –, celebrated by Shia Muslims on 20 February. 18 February: Buddhist –, Magha Puja. The Fourfold Assembly or Sangha day when Buddha addressed a meeting of 1250 arahants (holy men). Contact Caroline on 01223 968 649 for information LEEDS CATHOLIC MARRIAGE CARE Marriage isn’,t always easy —, Counselling can help For an appointment in confidence, with an understanding and experienced listener, please telephone: LEEDS 0113 261 8045 HUDDERSFIELD 01484 422523 A Relationship Counselling Service Wanted for the Missions Large Statues (Even damaged ones), old vestments, pictures, church fittings, rosaries, prayer books, etc. Please ring Mr. B. Ferris KSC, 102 Moor St, Earlsdon, Coventry CV5 6EY Tel: 02476 676986

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Page 8

Dec 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

PAGE 8 We are truly blessed by our seminarians’, Vocations Director Fr Paul Grogan has over the last month visited all four of the seminaries where our thirteen seminarians are studying and has met with each man and with the respective rectors. “,We are truly blessed by our seminarians’, generosity of heart,”, he said. “,Each man is participating wholeheartedly in the process of formation. It is edifying to see how they change through God’,s grace, how they go deeper. Chatting to them makes me realise how much they love the priesthood and that is humbling. We need to pray that that these fine young men are able to persevere so that they can serve us all in the years ahead.”, Our diocese currently has five seminarians at the Royal English College in Valladolid, Spain, where they are taking part in a propaedeutic year, six at the Venerable English College in Rome and one each at the Pontifical Beda College in Rome and at St Mary’,s College, Oscott, Birmingham. Fr Grogan is pictured with Middlesbrough Diocesan Vocations Director Fr William Massie on the landing of the English College where they took part in the annual celebrations to mark the anniversary of the death of the College’,s first martyrs. The seminarians will meet with Bishop Roche on Monday 20 December at Bishop’,s House. NUMBER OF SEMINARIANS INCREASES The overall number of men from dioceses in England and Wales who are beginning formation has risen, latest figures show. In September of this year 28 men began the propaedeutic year at Valladolid (compared to 14 in 2009) while 39 began studies at one of the other seminaries (compared to 42 in 2009). The lowest number of entrants occurred in 2001 when just 12 men began at Valladolid and 22 at one of the other seminaries. The overall 2010 figure is the highest in ten years. These figures were published at the annual meeting of vocations directors which this year took place at Oscott College, Birmingham. During their meeting, the directors visited the Birmingham Oratory, celebrating Mass in Blessed John Henry Newman’,s Chapel (where they are pictured afterwards) and visiting his private room and his library. In the business sessions of the conference, the directors considered a wide range of issues, including the role of school leadership in fostering vocations, the psychological assessment of candidates and ways of liaising with diocesan youth services. They reflected on the significance of the Papal Visit for their work and made plans for the forthcoming World Youth Day in Madrid and Invocation 2011, a day for young people who are open to the possibility of the priesthood or the religious life, which is to take place at Oscott College next June. The directors welcomed Fr Christopher Jamison OSB who is the new Director of the National Office for Vocation in London. NEW VOCATIONS ADMINISTRATOR A former member of the Papal Nuncio’,s staff has become the Administrator of the Diocesan Vocations Service. Celia Blackden, who belongs to the Focolare Movement and who has lived at the movement’,s house in Headingley for the last two years, has just begun work at a newly designated office in Hinsley Hall. Her appointment, which is for one day a week, follows the recent increase in interest in vocations to the priesthood in the diocese and the resultant growth in administration. Ms Blackden is the part-time Interfaith Officer for Churches Together in England and has also worked for the Diocese of Southwark. As well as engaging in general administration, she will develop means of promoting vocations in the diocese. Her contact details are as follows: (0113 261 8000, celia.blackden@dioceseofleeds.org.uk) TALKS ON MARY AND THE PSALMS Two fascinating talks have been delivered in recent weeks to the monthly discernment group. Fr James Callaghan (pictured, left) the Dean of Bradford, speaking on Mary, Mother of Christ, Mother of the Church, explained how the fathers of the Second Vatican Council treated of Mary in the document about the Church, Lumen Gentium, in order to bring out her role as the mother of all believers. Mgr Richard Atherton (pictured, right), who was formerly President of St Cuthbert’,s College, Ushaw, and has published several books, spoke on Praying the Psalms in the Liturgy of the Hours. He described how the psalms were Jesus’, own prayers which he recited, for example, every Sabbath in the synagogue and at the end of the Last Supper. He reminded those present that Jesus even recited a line from a psalm on the cross, namely “,My God, My God, why have you forsaken me”, (Mark 15:34), which is the opening line of Psalm 22. The meetings are open to all men who wish to know more about the priesthood. They consist of a holy hour with the opportunity for confession in the Chapel at Leeds Trinity University College, followed by a talk and a meal. The next meeting is on Friday 17th December, beginning at 7pm. PROGRAMME FOR YOUTH GROUP Details of the 2011 programme for the youth discernment group have been published –, it draws inspiration from the life of Blessed Pier Giorgio Frassati (pictured) whom Pope John Paul II commended as a role model for young people in the modern period. Blessed Pier Giorgio, who died in 1925, aged 24, was a mountain climber and a political activist as well as a daily communicant and a generous friend of the poor in the slums of Turin. The activities of the group will reflect some of his passion: they will include a trip to the theatre, the ascent of Simon’,s Seat in the Yorkshire Dales and a skiing evening at Xscape near Castleford. The group is open to any young man aged between 13 and 18 who wishes to know more about the priesthood. Details of forthcoming events are available on the diocesan vocations website and on brochures which are being distributed to parishes. VOCATIONS PREACHING MISSION NEARS END The vocations preaching mission which has been conducted throughout the diocese over recent years, is now virtually complete and will soon begin again. Several priests have collaborated in preaching on the theme of vocation to the priesthood in virtually every parish of the diocese. The picture shows several generations of the Wood family at St Theresa’,s, Queensbury, after a recent Mass at which parish priest Fr Michael Nealon kindly invited Fr Grogan to preach.

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Dec 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

CAFOD PAGE 9 E arthquake-devastated Haiti is facing the most severe outbreak of cholera in its history. According to the World Health Organisation (WHO), the disease has killed more than 1,250 people. The number of cases referred to hospital has reached 20,000. An estimated 52,000 Haitians are now said to be symptomatic. What CAFOD is doing We`re bolstering the work of our Caritas partners in the fight against cholera by: •, Supporting the clean water, sanitation and health promotion work of Catholic Relief Services (CRS) within camp communities whose poor sanitary conditions make them vulnerable to infections. •, Working through Caritas Switzerland and Caritas Gonaives to support the purchase of medical supplies for seven health centres. These supplies include antibiotics, oral and intravenous rehydration fluids, and sanitation products such as aqua-tabs, bleach, hand sanitizers and soap. •, Supporting Caritas Port au Prince in their work distributing aqua tabs, and in their public awareness campaign in eight camps. A father sits by his daughter`s bed in Hopital Alta Mater in the commune of Gros Morne in the Artibonite region supported by CRS/Caritas. [Picture by: Dominique Chadwick/Caritas] ",Our highest priority", “,We are working with our partners to provide life-saving medical supplies and meet urgent healthcare needs”,, said Matthew Carter, CAFOD’,s Head of Humanitarian. “,CAFOD’,s Caritas partners are scaling up all their efforts to respond to the challenges of preventing the cholera from spreading further. This is our highest priority, as prevention is simple, with clean water and regular hand washing. We are reinforcing our partners` efforts because we know how vital it is to keep people healthy. We will continue to work with those on the ground to try to prevent any further spread of the disease as far as possible.", The cholera outbreak began last month in the Artibonte region, north of Port au Prince. Cholera is easily treatable with oral rehydration salt sachets, but if left untreated it can kill quickly following the onset of symptoms. The earthquake that hit Haiti on 12 January killed more than 250,000 people, and left an estimated 300,000 injured and 1.3 million homeless. Our Haiti Earthquake Appeal raised £,5 million, which has been used to provide water and sanitation in camps, as well as hygiene and health education. The money has also been spent on Disaster Risk Reduction programmes and a permanent house building project. Very many thanks to all in Leeds diocese who gave so generously. Cholera threat in Haitia Connect2 Christmas in Puentecitos, El Salvador A t the end of November a small group from the UK was privileged to be able to visit CAFOD’,s ’,Connect2’, community in Puentecitos, El Slavador. The warmth of the community’,s welcome was overwhelming as they shared their food and their stories. We only appreciated the extraordinary extent of their generous hospitality when we realised that recently life has been really difficult for this tiny, rural community. Erasmo explained. ‘,Well, this year we have had an abnormal rainy season. There has been so much flooding and heavy rain and most people have lost all or most of their harvest. I have never seen things as serious as this in all the years that I have worked here. The corn has rotted and turned completely black. Most of the bean harvest has been lost. The situation is pretty awful. And if there is a food shortage now, what will it be like next year, if now is meant to be the time of production? For people here, the basic diet is corn and beans. The government is trying to import beans from other countries like Nicaragua, but they are in the same situation. The advantage that Puentecitos has is that it is near the coffee growing zone and the price of coffee is good at the moment. Some people are going to pick coffee to earn some money. For example, Rodrigo has gone to pick coffee. He travels every day to Jujutla. The problem is that the coffee season only lasts for two months.’, Even with these extra hardships, the community were really looking forward to making Christmas a holy and communal celebration. They were delighted to receive Christmas cards and greetings from parishes in the UK, and to hear our news. Fidel told us how their community looks forward to coming together every Advent: ‘,We are getting ready to celebrate Christmas, which for us starts on 1 December. We have a programme of family visits from 1-24 December in all of the community. The church congregation comes together and we celebrate the story of Mary and Joseph looking for a room at the inn. We start at 6pm with a candlelit procession. It’,s a tradition here, the procession, and we leave the figures of the Saints, Mary and Joseph, at a different house each night. We sing songs and do a drama of the story and celebrate the word of God. It’,s really fun. Sometimes 40 or 50 people come along. On 24 December, at the end of the event, we invite everyone we have visited to the church and we hold a vigil. We prepare food and drink and do the performance of the play at 6pm. At 7.30 pm we have mass and sing Christmas carols. And then we hear testimonies of how people are feeling and how the year has been.’, We took with us a Christmas prayer specially written for the community, which was translated into Spanish. Fidel told us that their community always sing the traditional carol “,Campana sobre Campana”, . Here’,s a translation - perhaps we can pray it in solidarity with them this Christmas? Bells over Bethlehem pealing, God`s sacred presence revealing! There in a cradle is resting Jesus, the earth`s richest blessing! Refrain: The bells, the bells of Bethlehem Are ringing out the tidings, ",good will to all men!", Leave your sheep and come, O shepherds, presents bring the Babe so lowly, Bring some cheese and bring some wine For the Mother Mary holy. The bells, the bells of Bethlehem Are ringing out the tidings, ",Good will to all men!", Shepherds, if you will but hasten, Mary the beautiful Virgin, May grant that you may be keeping Watch o`er the dear Baby sleeping. Refrain Connect2: offers a unique opportunity for making connections with communities overseas. How do people cope with severe drought? Or the aftermath of war? Or the constant threat of losing their homes? This is your chance to get behind the headlines and take a journey with ordinary people leading extraordinary lives. Connect2 is an exciting new way to create solidarity across the world. When your parish joins, you`ll hear directly from people in developing countries who are working hard, often against the odds, to improve their lives. This is their chance to tell you themselves, in their own words, about how your support is changing their lives. You`ll get to know the local people and discover how our partners are making a difference. There are communities in El Salvador, Bangladesh, Rwanda, Brazil, Ethiopia and Cambodia who would like to connect with you. If you would like to know more, contact CAFOD Leeds 0113 275 9302 or email leeds@cafod.org.uk

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Page 10

Dec 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 10 T he Bradford Catholic Deputy Heads Association held their annual Liturgy at St Mary’,s and St Monica’,s Cottingley, Bradford on 25th November 2010. This year the chosen theme was “,The Kingdom of God”,. Children from nine primary schools across the city attended. Pupils from St John the Evangelist introduced the event, with the choir from St Walburga’,s leading the hymns. Two parables about the Kingdom were retold using acting and dance, by St Anthony’,s Shipley and St Winifred’,s. A tableau was used to explain the sacraments this was staged by St Josephs and St William’,s. Children from St Mary’,s and St Peter’,s performed a liturgical dance, with St Matthew’,s Allerton reading a mediation on the prayer ‘,The Our Father’,. Finally St Cuthbert’,s and First Martyrs led the offertory and the closing mission. Father Anthony Jackson kindly gave the blessing. During the day the children from each of the schools shared lunch and refreshments together before they travelled back to their own schools. A Shared Liturgy In Bradford

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Page 11

Dec 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 11 B ishop Roche was out and about in Sowerby Bridge recently as part of his Diocesan Visitation and after such a long trip out to the Valleys he was glad of the chance of a cup of tea. The pupils of Sacred Heart Catholic Primary School were delighted to welcome the Bishop Class 3`s `Community Cafe`. The children acted as waiters and photographers. While the Bishop was there they enjoyed making Christmas Decorations with their parents and even organised a raffle! The Bishop then visited each of the five Classes and left a prayer card signed by Pope Benedict XVI. The Headteacher, Mrs Whitworth said ‘,We were privileged and blessed by Bishop Arthur`s visit to our school today.’, Bishop drops in for ‘,CUPPA’, Welcome to Alexandra Court! We are a small private family orientated residential home for the elderly, where standards of care and cleanliness are our priority. Together with my three children, a dedicated and conscientious manager and our wonderful team of staff members, some of which have been with us since we opened in 1992, we have ensured Alexandra Court continues to exceed expectations. We have home cooked meals and desserts, tailored care plans to meet each resident’,s individual needs and activities galore including entertainers, fitness instructors, beauty and cinema afternoons and two little dogs visit regularly who bring a lot of happiness to our residents. Most rooms are en-suite complete with television and telephone points, nurse call systems and they are decorated regularly to ensure the Alexandra Court stays fresh, clean and always smells nice! In order to experience life at Alexandra Court please feel free to contact my daughter Marilouise, to arrange a viewing or alternatively have a look at our website for more information. We look forward to welcoming you soon. 333 Spen Lane, Leeds LS16 5BB Tel: 0113 274 3661 Email: court_alexandra@yahoo.co.uk www.alexandracourtcarehome.co.uk Family orientated residential home for the elderly

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Page 12

Dec 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 12 LEEDS TRINITY UNIVERSITY COLLEGE A n innovative project to encourage people to get involved in local news has opened its doors at Leeds Trinity University College. The Leeds Community News Hub is an initiative of Leeds Trinity’,s Centre for Journalism, in association with Guardian Local. It was launched in November by Meg Pickard, Head of Digital Engagement for Guardian News and Media, who talked about the importance of bringing communities together through their shared news. Speaking at the launch, Catherine O`Connor, Head of the Centre for Journalism (pictured), said, “,We have always expected our students to go into the community, make contacts and understand what is going on. Now we aim to change the dynamics by giving community groups access to experts and events to encourage people to get more involved with the local news agenda.”, Guardian Local is the ideal partner for Leeds Trinity in this venture, having recently pioneered a collaborative community journalism initiative providing online local news in three cities, including Leeds. Guardian Local editor Sarah Hartley said, “,We have created a new journalism role with a beatblogger in each city to report from their locality. The Community News Hub is an exciting new step that has great potential to engage with local communities and unearth good local stories.”, Whether you are involved with a community group and need advice on publicising events and sharing news, or simply want to learn more about blogging or other projects, help is at hand from the Hub’,s professional journalists. Leeds Trinity and Guardian Local staff will hold workshops and drop-in sessions on Wednesday afternoons at Leeds Trinity’,s campus in Horsforth. For more details email c.o’,connor@leedstrinity.ac.uk, and visit www.leedstrinity.ac.uk for upcoming events. Leeds Community News Hub opens for business Graduate teachers give Leeds Trinity top marks for training L eeds Trinity University College has once again achieved excellent results in an important national survey of newly qualified teachers (NQTs). The Training and Development Agency for Schools (TDA) conducts an annual survey of NQTs to gauge their views on the quality of their initial teacher training and how well it prepared them for their first year in teaching. The survey poses 27 questions to NQTs, starting with three key criteria on the overall quality of training, of assessment and feedback, and of support and guidance. For all three of these crucial criteria Leeds Trinity is the most highly rated institution in Yorkshire and the north east, with an excellent second place nationally. 98% of respondents said the overall quality of their training at Leeds Trinity was good or very good. When scores are aggregated for the last three years, Leeds Trinity has consistently performed better than the sector as a whole across all criteria. Sarah Trussler, Head of Primary Education at Leeds Trinity, said, “,These scores mirror the perceptions of employers who strongly advocate the training received here. “,Our employability remains high at 93%, with a further 6% unwell or travelling, so we are maintaining our high standards as recognised by Ofsted earlier in the year.”, Alexandra Moon graduated from Leeds Trinity in 2009 with a degree in Primary Education, and now teaches a reception class at Margaret McMillan Primary School in Bradford. Alexandra said, “,Returning to study after more than 10 years out of education was very daunting, however thanks to Leeds Trinity’,s first class support system, I gained a 2:1 which is a dream come true. “,The course was fantastic and prepared me for the big wide world of teaching. I have been commended on a lot of my professional values and interactive activities for the children.”, Events at Leeds Trinity University College Please visit our website at www.leedstrinity.ac.uk for more details and a full events listing. Lecture for the Week of Prayer for Christian Unity Wednesday 19 January at 7.00pm Receptive ecumenism after the Papal Visit, presented by Dr Paul Murray, Director of the Centre for Catholic Studies at Durham University. For more information email d.richmond@leedstrinity.ac.uk Eastern Christian Studies Lecture Thursday 20 January at 6.00pm Christianity in the Middle East: Theological and Ecclesiological Perspectives in contemporary context, presented by Anthony O`Mahony, Reader in Theology and the History of Christianity, Heythrop College, University of London. For more information email s.simpson@leedstrinity.ac.uk An evening with Gervase Phinn Tuesday 25 January at 6.30pm Tickets cost £,12 with a share of the proceeds from the evening being donated to Bury Hurdles Family Support Group for Disabled Children. To book call Sara Sellars on 0113 2837226 or email s.sellars@leedstrinity.ac.uk Inaugural Lecture Thursday 3 February at 6.00pm Teaching as a Profession Myth or Reality? Inaugural Lecture by Professor Freda Bridge, Principal, Leeds Trinity University College Winnie the Pooh helps with the bear necessities of academic work L eeds Trinity University College has welcomed writers Susan Barker and Peter Guttridge to its study skills support team, under a Royal Literary Fund (RLF) fellowship scheme. Thanks to financial support from the estate of AA Milne, author of the Winnie the Pooh stories, the RLF places professional “,writers in residence”, in higher education institutions to help students and staff develop their academic writing skills. Susan Barker, author of Sayonara Bar and The Orientalist and the Ghost, takes much of her inspiration from the Far East. She is currently working on a novel based in contemporary Beijing, drawing on her own experience of living there. Peter Guttridge is best known for his crime writing as the author of the Nick Madrid series. His other roles include literary journalist, writing teacher and fiction prize judge. His latest project is a crime trilogy set in Brighton, based on a real case from the 1930s. Previously a writer in residence at Southampton University, Peter said, “,The narrative structure is the same whether it is a novel or an essay, so whatever the topic we are well placed to help students with their writing.”, Susan said, “,As a novelist I am working in the medium of language, and the same skills are readily applied to academic writing. We can offer help and advice with a variety of writing projects whether essays, articles or other assignments.”, Tim Leadbeater, Leeds Trinity’,s Director of Learning, Teaching and Research, said, “,We are proud of our long association with the RLF, lasting over a decade from the inception of the writers in residence scheme. This scheme is immensely valuable to students, providing impartial advice that is independent of marking criteria.”,

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Page 13

Dec 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

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F UNERAL D IRECTORS AND M ONUMENTAL M ASONS Private Chapel of Rest 64 GIBBET STREET, HALIFAX Telephone: 01422 354453 PRE-PAID FUNERAL SERVICE AVAILABLE DETAILS ON REQUEST ‘,Off to Bethlehem’, T his year KS1 staff at St Mary’,s, Batley decided that the Christmas Performance ‘,Off to Bethlehem’, would be done around a centre circle in the middle of the hall. Uniquely, each of the four classes in KS1 would play all the various parts in the Nativity play around the central theme. This ensured all the children were actively involved in the performance and could be clearly seen by parents. All staff and children have worked extremely hard at learning the songs and acting parts over the last few weeks. The recent bad weather has severely restricted rehearsal times for the children, but they have risen to the challenge and in a very short time have managed to be ready to perform for their parents. Jennings Funeral Services (Catholic Funeral Directors) 13 Racca Green, Knottingley WF11 8AT Telephone: 01977 677715 •, Highest standards of care •, Family owned and managed •, Pre payment plans •, 24 hour service •, Personal attention of Barry and Elizabeth Jennings A Personal and Dignified Family Business that Cares S J F Why Catholic schools? The first in a series of articles marking the Year of Catholic Education T he end of term approaches and everyone looks forward to Christmas. Soon our thoughts will turn to the ending of one year and the start of another, with all its undoubted challenges and opportunities. As always, it’,s a time for reflection and on this occasion –, during the Year of Catholic Education - not a bad time, perhaps, to reflect on the life and work of our Catholic schools. In our own diocese we have more than ninety schools, many of which can trace their origins back to the middle part of the nineteenth century. In fact, they have been around for so long that in some ways we ‘,take them for granted’,. It goes without saying that we should never take anything for granted and that applies to our schools, and there are good reasons for this. Although the Diocese is committed to providing enough school places for all the Catholic children within its boundaries, circumstances mean that the pattern of school provision changes over time as pupil numbers rise or fall in a given area. This has been going on for as long as we have had our Catholic schools and continues today. A case in point is the situation at St Catherine’,s High School in Halifax. For a few years now it’,s been evident that there are not enough Catholic children in the Halifax deanery to support a viable Catholic secondary school in the area and earlier this year the decision was taken that the school should close and that we concentrate provision in this part of the diocese at All Saints High School in Huddersfield. The size of this school, together with its location and the demographics of both the Huddersfield and Halifax deaneries mean that it can serve the needs of Catholic pupils in both areas in the years ahead. The world has changed a great deal since the days of the great expansion in Catholic education after the Second World War, when schools like St Catherine’,s were established. Today, across our diocese the future of every school depends in large part on the support, or otherwise, that they receive from Catholic parents. Another reason why we should not take things for granted is the fact that some politicians and commentators in the media are prone to question the continued existence of our schools in the context of a 21st century secular, multi-cultural society. With this in mind it’,s worthwhile standing back and asking ourselves, ‘,why Catholic schools?’, So here are some thoughts on how we might answer that question. In the first place Catholic schools are central to our local faith communities: a place where Christ and his Church are encountered. In other words, Catholic schools are distinctive and that distinctiveness derives from our Catholic faith. It’,s on that foundation that we are able to establish a shared vision for our schools –,a vision that manifests itself in each school’,s mission statement, its development plan, polices and practice, which together uphold Catholic teaching on faith and morals. For this reason it is vital that senior leaders and foundation governors in our schools are practising Catholics who have the confidence and conviction to engage with the Church’,s mission in society. As a community of faith every Catholic school is a worshipping community. Classroom prayer, year group and whole school liturgies –, especially the Mass –, and assemblies are also a key element in the distinctive identity of our schools. The age- old liturgical calendar is the basis for the school’,s spiritual life and gives shape and rhythm to the school year, not least during Advent and at Christmas. In this regard chaplaincy is vitally important and its profile and resourcing has to be a priority for every school. Likewise, in a Catholic school the whole curriculum is underpinned by, and is an expression of, Catholic beliefs and values. Religious Education is a core subject, as demonstrated by its prominence within the school timetable. Promoting excellence in the quality of teaching and learning in RE is of paramount importance for every headteacher and governing body. But that also goes for the other subjects and activities. In our schools the diversity and uniqueness of children and young people are appreciated and they all get the opportunity to succeed. Purposeful leadership and governance leads to good practice and high moral and academic expectations. Pupils are cherished for who they are, as much as what they achieve, and all kinds of achievements are recognised and celebrated. The promotion of excellent education for the children in our schools is a tangible indication of the value we place on realising each child’,s gifts and talents. Finally, we do not ‘,hide our light under a bushel’,. Catholic schools actively promote strong and positive links with the wider community, they are outward looking and faith is often put into practice through collaboration with other schools and through charitable works and loving service towards others. Our schools are therefore places where everyone is valued as a child of God and where every individual is enabled to mature and achieve their rightful potential. It is the spirit of Christ who brings life to Catholic schools: giving strength and hope, promoting harmony and reconciliation and ensuring that, with enthusiasm and celebration, the things of God take first place. Surely, that can’,t be a bad manifesto for education in the Diocese of Leeds in 2011?

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Page 14

Dec 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 14 Awards Evening at Corpus C orpus Christi Catholic College hall was packed on 25 November when last year’,s Year 11 students stepped up to collect awards for academic achievement and service to the community. Awards for sports, the arts, technology, science and school attendance were also presented by the MP for Leeds East, George Mudie, who was the guest speaker at the annual Awards Evening. Top awards included the Headteacher’,s Shield which was won by last year’,s Head Girl, Missie McLean, and Deputy Head Boy, Sean Kilcoyne. Two awards for service to the community went to Alex Gunn and Tshanna Adams. Becky Gallagher won the Nolan Shield for service to the school along with the Peter Fusco Sports person of the Year Award. James Leeman and Lauren Kerr picked up the Sports Shields for PE. Nearly 30 other awards for achievement were presented to last year’,s leavers including the Attendance Award which went to Joseph Dines who did not miss a single day during his five years at the college. Sports awards were made to younger college pupils for their achievements last year and a number of pupils were awarded the Duke of Edinburgh Award. Headteacher, Mike Woods, said, “,it is wonderful to be able to celebrate the achievements of our pupils, both past and present, here at Corpus Christi. They are fine young men and women and are a credit to the school. We wish our leavers every success for the future.”,

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Page 15

Dec 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 15 Fisher’,s Celebrates a Record Year A packed Town Hall full of young people and guests from Dewsbury and the surrounding areas gathered to celebrate a record year of achievement for St. John Fisher Catholic High School and its students. Those assembled were treated to some wonderful choral and musical performances from the children that were led by Miss Eileen Butterworth and Mrs Kate Lea. The school orchestra and steel band received tumultuous applause for their contributions as did the choirs whose specially arranged version of ‘,Lean on Me’, was particularly well received. The guest of honour was John Edwards, Assistant Director of Learning for Kirklees Metropolitan Council. His speech was most complimentary of the work of the school’,s leadership and staff in bringing about record examination results with a 99% pass rate at ‘,A’, level and more than 800 points per pupil in the sixth form with over 80% , 5A*-C at GCSE and a 15% rise in those gaining 5 A*-C including English and Maths. He particularly praised the pastoral care that students received at the school and the support given by parents and families. Mr. Edwards recognised the strength of the Catholic community centred on the school. However, his greatest compliments were saved for the young people who he recognised for what they achieved, who they were and also what they would become. The address from Headteacher Kevin Higgins focused on the celebration of pupil achievement not just academically but across the full range of human endeavour. He spoke of the threats that young people face from an increasingly secular society and the need for the school to continue to offer a strong alternative vision of the world for the children in the school’,s care. The school would never apologise for offering a vision centred on the teachings of Jesus but would confidently proclaim this vision to all and seek to live it day by day in the opportunities offered to the students. He spoke of liturgies, retreats and charity work that were done in support of a number of good causes. He also talked of the great successes of the school not just academically but as Sports College and the hub of a 49 school Sports Partnership. He acknowledged the difficult economic climate that we all now face but pledged that the school would continue its work, build on its success and never become complacent. Rev Dr. Joseph Cortis, Chair of Governors was the third speaker. He also focused on the development of the whole child and used the words of Pope Benedict on his recent visit to highlight the message to children that in Catholic schools, ‘,there is always a bigger picture over and above the individual subjects you study and the different skills you learn. All the work you do is placed in the context of growing in friendship with God, and all that flows from that friendship’,. A very poignant part of the evening was the presentation of the first ever Stephen Curley Award for Endeavour to pupil George Welford. Stephen Curley was an ex-student of the school, a marine killed this year serving in Afghanistan. His mother and aunt were in the audience to witness the presentation. Amongst the winners of main prizes were Catherine Booth, Ben Hopkins, Lucy Wood and Jester Salter for most progress in examination courses and Sophie Williams, Nathan Walker, Ruby Holland James Brooke and Colette Peyton for outstanding or best results. The Community Achiever of the year was Chloe Lumb. Carols For 100 Years Catholic Care’,s Carol Service this year in the presence of the Bishop commemorated 100 years of their work in the Diocese, a fact reflected on both by the Bishop in his Homily and by Sharon Forbes, one of the service managers, in her reflection during the service. A brave young man from the choir stepped forward to start the proceedings with the solo opening for Once In Royal David’,s City and so set the tone and standard for the rest, which the five participating schools lived up to. Under the watchful eye of Choral conductor Ms Lucy Haigh the schools of St Anthony’,s Beeston, St Joseph’,s, Hunslet, St John’,s, Pudsey and St Urbans Leeds sang beautifully a range of Carols from The Friendly Beasts to Angels from the Realms of Glory. The high spot in more ways than one came with the singing by Anna Crossley of O Holy Night, at the end of which the full Cathedral rang with applause. This was followed by a moving dance piece performed by the pupils from St John’,s school Normanton, which again brought applause. The Bishop in his homily took up quite clearly the caring work that Catholic Care have done over the 100 years, and pointed out that the message of love was the real meaning of Christmas ‘,God so loved the world that he gave his only Son, that whoever believes in him should not perish but have eternal life. (John 3:16)’,…,…,.. How sad that would be if, amidst all the festivities of this season, we were to forget what lies at its heart –, and what kind of a heart was needed then as now amidst the hustle and bustle of life –, the challenging realities that some people have to face. Never forget the deepest meaning of Christmas: God so loved the world, so loved you, that He came to find a space in your heart where He can be with you and you can be with Him and through you He can draw others closer to Himself so that His abundant love can be visible and felt in our world.’,

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Page 16

Dec 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 16 BATTLE John Battle KCSG At the time of Pope Benedict’,s visit to Britain, a young Muslim girl who goes to a Catholic school in Bradford was asked if she was looking forward to the visit as a Muslim. She replied that she was. Her father was reported as adding that “,Britain would be a safer place for Muslims –, if it became a more Christian society”,. Their response as Muslims was not perhaps as expected, not least because in the recent years of post 9/11 tensions, Islam is regularly reported as a problem religion, intent on converting the world to Islam and sharia law and provoking an inevitable “,clash of civilizations”, as the American academic Samuel Huntington predicted. Nor were Raisa Gazi and her father isolated in their comments. In welcoming the Holy Father’,s visit, Ibrahim Mogra, a Leicester Imam who is also the chairman of the Muslim Council of Britain’,s mosque and community relations committee backed up their remarks with an even stronger and more challenging statement, “,It would be wonderful if the Pope can encourage the Christian community of our country to bring more of the Christian life into their lives, not just in terms of caring for the needy and the poor, but in terms of their own spirituality and connecting with God through prayer and obedience to his laws and commandments”,. In other words, we have Britain’,s Muslims urging us Christians to be better Christians, to start really practicing what they preach and particularly to revive our prayer lives. Significantly their Muslim expectation of Christians is characterised by a twofold demand that we both help the poor and needy and at the same time attend to our regular prayers and develop through daily practice our own personal spirituality. Being reminded by Muslims to make sure we as Christians pray regularly is an interesting cultural development in a so-called Christian society in which Christian prayers are still officially said before our Parliament starts each day and indeed should be said before every local council meeting in our town halls. I recall one local employer contacting me to help with an industrial dispute at his factory with some of his Muslim employees. He had been faced with their request for regular daily prayer-breaks during work hours and he thought this would drastically affect productivity and also upset other non-Muslim workers. When I met with him and enquired what he believed the Muslims actually wanted he replied “,Oh I don’,t know, probably time out breaks for lengthy prayer chanting sessions”, When I replied that it was Buddhists and not Muslims who practiced chanting and that for Muslims all it would involve would be a brief hand-rinsing , three low bows, a couple of verses of the Holy Koran followed by three more bows, taking up five minutes maximum, and not hours out of work time , the manager of the firm replied in surprise “,well in that case they can do it because I’,ve just been forced to negotiate a longer time out break for the smokers”,. He then asked could I help persuade the smokers to take up prayers to save time and themselves. I also well remember a Muslim delegation from the local Mosque coming round to my home one February weekend to invite me to address their community in the Mosque in the afternoon one Friday in April. I happened to know that that particular Friday was actually Good Friday so I politely informed them that as I knew they would appreciate just as Muslims treat their season of Ramadam and Eid festival very seriously the Easter season from Holy Thursday to Easter Sunday is very special as the holiest time in the Christian year and it is the one time when I try to drop everything to try and participate in the Church liturgies, so unfortunately I couldn’,t come that particular Friday. “,We know it is Good Friday”, they replied “,because we’,ve checked with your Church and the Good Friday service will be over by 4.30 so you can come over to us at 5”,. As I continued to resist they then insisted “,but we want you to come and explain to us what Good Friday means to you”,. “,Oh no”, I protested “,that’,s a job for a priest or a vicar not me”,. “,But they wouldn’,t come and you have to or we won’,t be voting for you”, was the response. I gave in and for the whole of that Lent I had to seriously think about “,what did Good Friday really meant to me”, so that I could try and explain it –,to Muslims, for whom the Cross itself is a real scandal and a sign of oppression by Christians. It was like undergoing a full Lent retreat. What I learnt from the experience though is that dialogue with people of other faiths means that we have to deepen our own reflections and understanding of our own faith in order to be able to explain and express it to others. In other words in a very practical and personal way, dialogue with other faiths can actually be “,a personal call to holiness”, and not a dangerous occasion of being knocked off course or of being undermined in your own faith commitment. Being encouraged by Muslims to become better Christians and pray more is hardly the dilution of our own faith that sometimes crude comments on the public acknowledgements of the religious light festivals of others such as the Hindu “,divali”, and the Jewish “,Hannakah”, implies. Britain is not being seduced away from Christianity by other faiths. Perhaps we Christians are just not making enough effort to do what we proclaim we should do in our everyday practice. As the Chief Rabbi Jonathan Sacks expressed it “,If each lights a candle it does not cause another’,s candle to be extinguished, it rather increases the available light in dark times”, Be Better Christians New Choral Director for Leeds T he newest member of the music department staff is Lucy Haigh. She explains a little about her background and new role here: Having spent the last five years working with young choirs in Perth, Western Australia (and previously, 14 years as Director of The Hildegard Choir for talented girls in Oxford), I was looking to return to the UK to take up a Cathedral post. I had also become increasingly interested in the idea of outreach and had followed the Diocese of Leeds` Music Programme via the internet with great interest. I was delighted to join the team of Choral Directors and commenced my new position at the beginning of September. I now visit 11 primary schools (and one secondary school) every week and spend an hour at each one. The job is enormous fun: even more so than I could have imagined! The schools vary a great deal: some children have virtually no singing experience, while others sing all the time. Usually, I teach whole classes, but in one school, I have been asked to form an elite chamber choir. I aim to enthuse all of the children - even the reluctant singers- while improving their vocal and musical skills. I use fun warm-ups, musical games and a wide variety of repertoire including hymns, folk songs and Taize chants. I prepare the children for events such as assemblies, masses, concerts and carol services. I often find that the boys need special attention, so I have strategies to engage them. These include using a ball as part of a singing game, teaching plenty of ‘,masculine` songs such as sea shanties, and allocating parts according to which football team they support. Fortunately, these activities also seem to work with the girls! I am also at the Cathedral most days, helping out with whatever is necessary. This can include assisting with training and supervision of the Girls` and Boys` Choirs, singing alto with the Adult Choir and conducting the various choirs when needed. Another important part of my role is ‘,talent spotting` for the Cathedral while I am working in the primary schools. I try to monitor individuals quite closely: not easy when I see well over 500 children each week! Solo singing is part of every lesson - I made it a normal expectation from the start, and most children take part willingly. I am now establishing two new Junior Choirs at the Cathedral for boys and girls of age seven upwards, to begin rehearsals in January. These choirs will train the children`s voices and ears, prepare them for membership of the main Cathedral Choirs and generally foster their love of singing. My first three months with the Diocese of Leeds Music Department have been immensely enjoyable and rewarding. I was thrilled when a Year 5 boy from the inner city recently told his class ‘,I didn`t used to like singing, but I love it now!` December 2010 also sees the departure from the Diocese of Leeds Music Department of Dr Christopher Johns who has been appointed Director of Music at Leicester Cathedral, a well deserved promotion. Chris has been working in the Diocese for the last four years and has done much to raise the standard of singing in primary schools in addition to leading the Bradford Boys’, Choir in many performances in concerts, liturgies, broadcasts and tours. ",Presence Unwrapped", ", Presence Unwrapped", formed the theme for the Staff Advent Liturgy at Mount St Mary`s High School this year. As darkness descended we, the staff, gathered in the candlelit Chapel to begin together our Advent journey. In the reflection on ",Persons are Gifts", we heard that each person is a gift differently wrapped and we must not mistake the wrapping for the treasure within. A ritual of unwrapping our personalised gift from God followed, and the little heart shaped box when opened, revealed each person`s photo, God`s best gift to me is myself! As we reflected on PS.138, our attention moved to the manger into which various people wove brightly coloured cloth to create a cradle and to prepare our hearts for Christ`s coming at Christmas. The strains of `O Come Emmanuel` echoed out over the now quiet school, while artist`s materials, a key and some mistletoe were placed in the crib to remind us all (as Julian of Norwich wrote) wrote the God we are awaiting is ",our Maker, our Keeper and our Lover ", We went out into the Advent night with a new kind of Hope in our hearts and our spirits warmed with mulled wine. Maranatha Come Lord Jesus.

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Page 17

Dec 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

ROME Page 17 Among the last major media events before the Christmas season gets underway is the publication of the Pope’,s annual message for World Peace Day, celebrated by the Church on January 1st. While the theme is announced several months ahead of the event, the message is released to journalists in the Vatican press office around the middle of December and often sparks interest well beyond the realms of the Catholic media. That’,s likely to be the case again this year as Pope Benedict has chosen to focus on religious freedom as an essential factor in the search for peace in our conflict ridden world. This is clearly a concern very close to the Pope’,s heart, not just in the dramatic context of Asia or the Middle East, where Christians continue to suffer persecution and death on account of their religious beliefs, but also in the secular West, where public manifestations of faith can be marginalised or ridiculed as out of step with modern, democratic societies. During the October synod of bishops on the Middle East here in the Vatican, problems of discrimination and difficulties for the minority Christian communities across the region featured high on the two week agenda. During the November consistory of cardinals from all over the world, gathered in Rome to welcome 24 new members to their ranks, the issue of religious freedom was again one of the topics of a closed door meeting, offering Church leaders the opportunity for a frank exchange of ideas and experiences. Speaking on November 21st, after handing the new cardinals a ring as a sign of their allegiance to the See of Peter, the Pope urged all Christians to pray for those who suffer for their faith in Iraq, as well as those who lack religious freedom in other countries around the globe. His words came as Archbishop Louis Sako of Kirkuk in northern Iraq appealed again for greater solidarity from the international community. ``Our people in Iraq today are persecuted, threatened and suffer martyrdom,`` Archbishop Sako said. ``Since 2005, 900 Christians have been killed, among them five priests and the Archbishop of Mosul, 52 churches attacked. Many families have been forced to leave their homes and flee to save their children and their Christian faith.`` On October 31st over 50 worshippers died during an attack by Islamic militants on the Syriac Catholic Cathedral of Our Lady of Salvation in Baghdad. Widespread bombings, shootings and death threats directed at Christians have been blamed on extremist al-Qaida supporters, determined to remove all traces of Christianity from Iraq, despite appeals from leaders of the Sunni and Shi`ite Muslim communities there for a return to peaceful co-existence. In his Peace Day message, Pope Benedict continues to develop a theme that has been at the heart of the Church’,s social teaching since Pope John XXIII’,s 1963 encyclical ‘,Pacem in Terris’,, followed five years later by Pope Paul VI’,s first message marking the January 1st celebration. Peace among nations, they stressed, can never be based merely on “,a false rhetoric of words”,, but on justice, equality and full “,civic, cultural, moral and religious”, freedoms for individuals and peoples. Pope John Paul II went a step further in his 1991 message stating that “,The importance of religious freedom leads me to stress once more that (it) is not merely one human right among many others, ",rather, (it) is the most fundamental, since the dignity of every person has its first source in his essential relationship with God the Creator ....Religious freedom, an essential requirement of the dignity of every person, is a cornerstone of the structure of human rights... thus the most profound expression of freedom of conscience.”, Two decades on, Pope Benedict picks up on this theme and explores how the fundamental human right to believe in God is “,a prerequisite for full human development”,, as well as “,a condition for the realisation of the common good”,. Making a clear distinction between authentic religious freedom “,which broadens the horizons of humanity”, and religious fundamentalism “,in which the truth is manipulated or exploited to the detriment of people”,, the message reiterates the conviction that “,authentic religious beliefs unite people and can have a positive impact on society.”, As he noted during his 2008 visit to the United Nations in New York, Pope Benedict believes that religious rights are also in need of protection in places where they “,clash with a prevailing secular ideology”,, a theme he also touched on in his key address to Britain’,s policy makers in Westminster Hall in September. Noting the subtle pressures on Christians to relegate their beliefs to the private sphere, he said “,Religion ...is not a problem for legislators to solve, but a vital contributor to the national conversation”, and he concluded with an appeal to all in positions of authority “,to seek ways of promoting and encouraging dialogue between faith and reason at every level of national life”,. Any attempt to assess the impact of the papal visit must surely take a close look at the response to that heartfelt papal appeal. Philippa M Hitchen Our Rome Correspondent ‘,RELIGIOUS FREEDOM: THE PATH TO PEACE’, Mass For All Nascent Life At the request of Pope Benedict an afternoon vigil was held at Leeds Cathedral on Saturday 27th November. Exposition of the Blessed Sacrament was held throughout the afternoon and Life Groups from different parishes led prayers that the dignity of all nascent human life may be respected. There was also an opportunity to venerate a relic image of Our Lady of Guadalupe. Bishop Arthur celebrated Mass to conclude this Vigil and recalled some of the occasions on which Pope Benedict spoke about the dignity of life during his recent visit to Great Britain. He also encouraged all those engaged in supporting life at every stage.

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Page 18

Dec 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 18 BE STILL/DIARY/ENGAGEMENTS First Friday of the Month SINGLE CATHOLICS meet at 8.00pm for mass at our Lady of Lourdes, Leeds. We also a have a program of 4-8 events during the month, walks, meals, cinema and theatre trips, etc. Phone David Easterbrook Chairman LDSC on 0113 2289468 evenings between 6 and 7.30pm only. Membership is open to all single Catholics who are free to marry within the church. Leeds Cathedral 20-35 Group Young people (20-35 years old) who attend St. Anne`s Cathedral in Leeds meet regularly every Thursday for spiritual, social and charitable activities. For further details search Facebook for “,Leeds Cathedral 20-35 Group”,, phone 07816 891872 or 07759 591233 or email leedscathedral20-35@hotmail.co.uk Crusade Mass The crusade Mass and Rosary of Mary Immaculate is held at St Patrick`s Church, Bradford, on the first Saturday of the Month after 12.15pm Mass Second Sunday of Month 2pm Meeting of Bradford Fraternity of the Secular Franciscan Order at St. Anthony`s Convent, Clayton, Bradford.` `Third Sunday of Month 2.30pm Meeting of Leeds Fraternity of the Secular Franciscan Order at the Cathedral. Ampleforth Renewal Community Ampleforth Abbey, meet 1st Sunday each month, at Ampleforth. 11 .30am Praise, Speaker, Sharing Groups, Reconciliation, Exposition, Finishing with Mass and Healing at 4.00pm. All enquiries: Seamus McEneaney 01429 426181 Monthly Vocations Mass Mount St Joseph’,s Chapel 11am First Wednesday of Month. Calix: An organisation for those recovering from addiction and working the 12 Step Programme of AA so that they can develop and deepen their relationship with Jesus as their Higher Power. Meets on the First Sunday of every month at Corpus Christi Church, Neville Rd. Osmondthorpe. Leeds. Mass at 4.30pm followed by meeting. Contact: Fr. Michael on 01977 510266 Helpers of Gods precious infants, prayer vigils, regular weekly prayer vigils at Marie Stopes Abortuary, 7 Barrack Road.LS7 4AB, next to Jaguar car showrooms. Fridays 12-30 to 1-30, and Saturdays 9am-l1am. Monthly all night vigil of reparation in St Marys Horsforth 12th of every month, 9-30pm to 6am . Other times variable. Further details Pat 0113 2582745 Rosary rally Sat Oct 9th 2010 12-30pm Leeds cenotaph, outside art gallery, Headrow. Contact 07747698553/ or 0113 2582745 Diary Be Still A few moments for thought and prayer A prayer for Advent: Jesus, love of all loving, in the ploughed-up earth of our lives you come to plant the trusting of faith. A small seed at first, faith can become within us an unmistakable Gospel reality. It keeps alive the inexhaustible goodness of a human heart. Taize: www.taize.fr Bishops Engagements - December Deadline For receipt of material for next edition: February 4th 2011 Parishes receive their copies: February 20th 2011 Send articles, reports &, pictures: Mr John Grady, Hinsley Hall, 62 Headingley Lane, Leeds LS6 2BX. Send text as word doc, pictures as jpeg, e-mail to: john.grady@dioceseofleeds.org.uk Tel: 0113 261 8022. Advertising Deadline Please note All paid-for advertising is dealt with by: CathCom, L4 Blois Meadow Business Centre, Steeple Bumpstead, Haverhill, Suffolk, CB9 7BN. To advertise call 020 7112 6710 or email: ads@cathcom.org Your Catholic Post Monday 20 December 10.30am Meeting with Diocesan Seminarians, Wheeler Hall, Leeds, 7pm WYEC Christmas Dinner, Woodhouse Grove School, Leeds Friday 24 December Christmas Mass, HMP, Wakefield Midnight Mass, Leeds Cathedral Saturday 25 December 11am Solemn Mass of Christmas, Leeds Cathedral A team of young mathematicians from St. Joseph’,s Catholic Primary School in Hunslet is celebrating coming top in the annual primary maths competition organised by The Grammar School at Leeds. The Year 6 pupils, Nicky Manu, Karthi Sivaganesh , Hollye Hudson and Ellie Spirrett were up against teams from 31 primary and prep schools in a closely fought final at Alwoodley Gates, Leeds. The youngsters had initially beaten off stiff competition from 71 West Yorkshire schools in the first round of the challenge, which is aimed at pupils in their final year at primary school. Runners-up were Westville House School, Ilkley, with Brodetsky Primary School , Leeds, finishing in third place. “,It was great to see so many talented children taking part and enjoying maths. The standard was extremely high with just 1 point separating the winning teams”, said Mr Pat Brotherton, maths teacher at GSAL. It All Adds Up For St Josephs The winning team from St. Josephs Catholic Primary School are (L-R) Nicky Manu, Karthi Sivaganesh , Hollye Hudson and Ellie Spirrett A new DVD about Sylvia Wright has been launched. The DVD tells the story of former Leeds nurse, Sylvia Wright OBE, whose inspiring vision and dedicated service has changed the lives of thousands of poor, sick and disabled people in the rural community of Thiruvannamalai in Tamil Nadu, South India. ‘,The Sylvia Wright Story’, DVD has been sponsored by two supporters and produced by the Sylvia Wright Trust. Most of the filming, by a supporter in India, was edited by students from the Media Studies Department of Leeds Trinity University College. The 20 minute DVD is introduced by Sylvia Wright herself who talks about her early life in East Keswick and Leeds and her decision to sell all her possessions and go alone to India in 1982. “,Nothing could have prepared me for the shock of moving from the UK to a totally different life and for the poverty and deprivation I found,”, says Sylvia. “,The area was very poor and health provision was totally inadequate and often non existent.”, As well as graphic pictures of rural life in Thiruvannamalai, the DVD contains recent film of Sylvia’,s 220 bed hospital, her boarding school for 210 profoundly deaf children, two day centres for 80 severely disabled children and the new Florence Nightingale School of Nursing which was officially opened on 16 November. Copies of the DVD have been sent to Sylvia Wright supporters. In an accompanying letter, Tony Allinson, Chairman of the Sylvia Wright Trust, says: “,I know that the DVD will give you a clear and accurate impression of Sylvia’,s projects in Thiruvannamalai. Her achievements are amazing and are a credit to her faith, determination and relentless hard work as well as to your loyal support over the last 29 years.”, He added, “,We are most grateful to Chrissie Poulter and the staff and students of Leeds Trinity who have given so much time, enthusiasm and professional expertise to this production.”, A number of ‘,The Sylvia Wright Story’, DVDs are still available and can be obtained from: SWT DVD, 14 Kings Road, LS16 9JN. Tel: 0113 2675735 Sylvia’,s Story on DVD +REGULAR EXTRAORDINARY RITE MASSES+ Every Sunday 3.00p.m. St. Joseph`s, Pontefract Road, Castleford. Every Saturday (Vigil Mass) 6.00p.m. St. Marie`s, Gibbet Street, Halifax. Every first Sunday of the Month 11.30 a.m. Sacred Heart, Broughton Hall, Skipton, Missa Cantata. Every Monday 6.45a.m. St. Mary of the Angels, Cross Bank Rd. Batley (term time) Low Mass, 9.30 a.m. Sacred Heart, Broughton Hall, Skipton, Low Mass. Every Tuesday (term time) 6.45a.m. St. Mary of the Angels, Cross Bank Rd. Batley. Low Mass. Every Wednesday, 6.45a.m. St. Mary of the Angels, Cross Bank Rd. Batley (term time) Low Mass. 9.30 a.m. Sacred Heart, Broughton Hall, Skipton, Low Mass. Every Thursday (term time) 6.45a.m. St. Mary of the Angels, Cross Bank Rd. Batley (term time) Every Friday (inc. first Fridays) 9.30 a.m. Sacred Heart, Broughton Hall, Skipton, Low Mass, 7.30p.m. Holy Spirit, Bath Road, Heckmondwike, except last Fridays of the month. Every second Sunday of the month 3.00p.m. St. Peter`s, Leeds Road, Laisterdyke, Bradford. Missa cantata. Every third Sunday of the month 5.00p.m. St. Augustine`s, Harehills Rd. Harehills, Leeds. Every fourth Saturday. (Vigil Mass) 3.00p.m. St. Mary of the Angels, Crossbank Road, Batley. Every fifth Saturday (Vigil Mass) 4.00p.m. Notre Dame chapel, Leeds University chaplaincy, St. Mark`s Avenue, Leeds. Every Saturday 9.30a.m. Sacred Heart, Broughton Hall, Skipton.

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Page 19

Dec 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

NATIVITY PAGE 19 Celebrating Christmas By Harry Rowan, Headteacher O ver one hundred and fifty families visited St Patrick’,s Catholic Primary School in Huddersfield to watch the children from Key Stage One and the Foundation Stage perform the Nativity Play. The performance was part of our celebrations during the season of Advent as we prepare for the coming of the Christ child on Christmas Day. As usual the children sung, spoke and shared their talents for the benefit of our school community. Their efforts did not go unrewarded as the parents, grandparents and other family members applauded the children and praised them for their work. On behalf of all our children, staff and governors from the Federated Schools of St Patrick’,s and Our Lady of Lourdes we wish you all a Happy and Holy Christmas and Peaceful New Year.

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Page 20

Dec 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 20 Designed and produced by CathCom, L4 Blois Meadow Business Centre, Steeple Bumpstead, Haverhill, Suffolk, CB9 7BN. To advertise call 020 7112 6710 or email: ads@cathcom.org LEEDS DIOCESAN TRUST Dear Friends, I am pleased once again to provide you with a summary of our diocesan accounts. I am grateful to our Finance Office for preparing these in a user friendly format. If, however, you wish to consult a fuller edition of them these will be available from your parish priest or via the link on the Diocesan Website www.dioceseofleeds.org.uk/report.php. First of all, I wish to acknowledge how deeply indebted I am to those of you who help with financial matters throughout the diocese: our parish clergy and their finance committees, the Sunday collectors, the counters and the bankers, those who organise offertory envelopes and look after GADs, and those who keep the accounts in order. Above all, I am most indebted to all of you who support us week by week through Offertory giving. We are dependent on this for the many services that we provide as a diocese. At the beginning of Lent I wrote you about the Plea for Realistic Giving. I expressed my concern that for quite some time our expenditure as a diocese has been greater than our income. I explained to you that in the past we had been able to rely on diocesan investments to shore up expenditure both in our parishes and schools as well as providing for the central services that are needed in the diocese to support our parishes. That fall-back position, however, is no longer viable in this present economic climate. I said then that in view of this, we needed to address more realistic ways in which to operate in the future. What I had in mind was cutting back on expenditure in every way possible and, at the same time, increasing our parish income. Accordingly, I requested our parishes to make a special plea during Lent for an increase in Offertory giving. I am delighted to inform you that the response was immediate and very generous and that the diocesan officers are monitoring budgets on a monthly basis to control expenditure. I hope that in these ways we will get our year-end figures to where they should be in the not too distant future. I was further pleased to receive very positive reports about the Regional Finance Evenings that have taken place recently in Bradford, Leeds and Wakefield. It is encouraging to hear that these evenings have proved helpful to all who attended them and it is my hope that regular meetings like these, together with frank exchange, will create a greater openness, cooperation and trust between our parishes and our central services. Finally, I want to express my very sincere thanks to each and every one of you for all that you give of your time, and from your talents and treasure so that the work of the Church can continue in our diocese. Be assured that the Lord will bless you for your generosity in supporting his work and in helping to build up his Kingdom. Yours sincerely in the Lord + Arthur Roche, Bishop of Leeds SUMMARY TRUSTEE`S REPORT The Trustee presents this summary report for the year ended 31 March 2010. This summary is extracted from the Annual Report of the Leeds Diocesan Trust for the year ended 31 March 2010 For further information the Annual Report, which consists of the full annual accounts, the auditors’, report on the accounts and the annual report of the Trustee should be referred to. Copies can be obtained from the Secretary to the Trustee, Diocese of Leeds, Hinsley Hall, 62, Headingley Lane, Leeds LS6 2BX or via the website www.dioceseofleeds.org.uk. The Trustee approved the full accounts on 14 October 2010 and the Annual Report was submitted to the Charity Commission thereafter. The report of the Auditors, PKF (LLP) UK on the full accounts for the year ended 31 March 2010, was unqualified. The Auditors have intimated their willingness to continue in office. By Order of the Trustee Rt Rev Arthur Roche, Bishop of Leeds, Chairman December 2010 Key Points of the Report a) Weekly Offertory Income In 2009/10 £,2.44 per head on a Mass Attendance of 34,400 In 2008/09 £,2.37 per head on a Mass Attendance of 35,600 Mass attendance down 3.4% Average Offertory per head up 3.0% on last year b) Weekly Parish Running Costs In 2009/10 £,3.47 per head In 2008/09 £,3.67 per head In the Diocese there are: •, 94 parishes in West Yorkshire and parts of North Yorkshire, Greater Manchester, East Riding of Yorkshire and Lancashire. •, 82 Primary Schools •, 16 High Schools •, 1 Sixth Form College DIOCESAN INCOME BY CATEGORY Total income £,10.0m (Last year £,10.3m) Offertory income received in parishes plus the tax recovered via the gift aid scheme was 50% of the charity’,s total income and is clearly the most significant of all the income sources. Offertory income fell slightly as did the associated tax recovered through the gift aid scheme resulting in the overall total being lower than last year. However it is hoped that the estimated average uplift of 17% following the “,Plea for Realistic Giving”, during Lent 2010 will be sustained. Numbers attending Mass were 34,400 compared to 35,600 resulting in an average per capita giving of £,2.44 (£,2.79 if gift aid is included). Collections and Donations 16% £,1,626,000 (Last year - £,1,196,000) These are the sums of money received via general donations given to parishes or the Diocese plus the “,second”, collections made in parishes for specific purposes, either diocesan or external agencies, e.g. Cafod and Missions. Income from these second collections is shown in the accounts as restricted meaning that it cannot be used for any other purpose, parish or diocesan, than the original intention. Legacies 3% £,254,000 (Last year - £,774,000) Legacies received last year were considerably lower than the previous year which itself was the highest in recent years. A number of parishes benefited from this source along with the Poor Mission and Priests’, Training Fund. This area of income highlights the importance of everyone making wills and remembering their church. THANK YOU Activities which generate funds 14% £,1,397,000 (Last year - £,1,504,000) This heading includes income received through Hinsley Properties Ltd, mainly Hinsley Hall, and from the use of parish social clubs. In both cases income fell slightly and represents nearly 14% of total income. Investment Income 8% £,842,000 (Last year - £,610,000) This source of income is made up of monies received from the rental of investment properties as well as that received from the Diocesan investment funds. Income from properties increased slightly in the year but the main reason for the increase is the higher level of dividend from investment funds. Other Income 9% £,848,000 (£,1,199,000) In parishes this source of funds includes monies raised for parish building projects (including grants from third parties e.g. English Heritage), sale of votives and sales of surplus property. Non parish sources include cemetery fees, charges and commissions raised by Diocesan departments DIOCESAN EXPENDITURE BY CATEGORY TOTAL £,10.8m (Last year £,11.3m) TOTAL EXPENDITURE £,10,793,000 (£,11,304,000) All % in the charts represent a share of Total Expenditure (Gross). In Parishes £,6,215,000 (£,6,787,000) Parish Running Costs 58% £,6,215,000 (£,6,787,000) Parish running costs, including £,665, 000 of second collections paid over to either a Diocesan Restricted fund (e.g. Priests Training, Retired Clergy etc) or third parties CAFOD, was £,6.2m and takes up 58% of the entire income of the charity. Of the parish total over £, 2.8m was spent maintaining the parish property and estate which is lower than in 2009 reflecting the reduction in our property stock. Non Parish Costs £,4,578,000 (£,4,517,000) Costs shown are the gross costs for the department/ area concerned to tie in with the statutory accounting requirements. Some cost centres are able to generate income which of necessity is included with other income in the analysis above Vicariate for Evangelisation £,702,000 (£,722,000) This area includes not only the central evangelisation team but also the work undertaken by the youth office, Myddelton Grange, the schools support office and the Chaplains to the Universities of Leeds, Bradford and Huddersfield. Vicariate for Clergy £,954,000 (£,852,000) With increasing numbers of our priests reaching retirement age of 75, the cost continues to rise. Grants to 43 retired priests (41 in 2009) and payments for nursing/ residential care totalled £,320,000 of which £,180,000 was taken from the Priests’, Retirement Fund established for this purpose. This vicariate also includes the fees and costs of priests in seminary, ongoing clergy formation and those who are sick and needy. Other Vicariates, Curia and Tribunal £,642,000 (£,788,000) The other Vicariates are Christian Life and Outreach. Curia and Tribunal includes curia administration, Marriage Tribunal and Chancery, Archives, Media office, Justice and Peace commission, support to the Bishop. Support to Schools and parishes £,855,000 (£,812,000) Includes a variety of areas e.g. the Music department, Child Protection office, Finance and Property departments, Killingbeck Cemetery and some parish costs for exceptional circumstances Costs of generating Funds £,847,000 (£,856,000) Principally the costs of the trading subsidiary Hinsley Properties (including Hinsley Hall) but also charges made by the investment manager for managing our portfolio. Interest and bank Charges £,499,000 (£,405,000) Although overall borrowing (overdraft and loans) remained constant through the year the higher interest charges payable with the new agreements taken in December 2009 has resulted in a higher cost. Actual charges for operating the various parish and other accounts also increased following a change in methodology introduced by our main clearing bank. SUMMARY AND BALANCE SHEET Although the underlying “,operating position”, was a deficit this was lower (£,0.8m) than recent years (1.0m in 2009 and £,1.3m in 2008) . Total income was down (mainly legacies) but resources expended fell by a larger amount. With the value of investments recovering most of the losses incurred in the previous year the net value of total funds shows an increase of almost £,3m and now stands at £,36.4m. The were fixed asset additions in parishes notably “,final”, bills for works started earlier at Leeds Cathedral, Leeds St Urban’,s, and Huddersfield Holy Redeemer along with urgent capital works at Leeds St Theresa, Bradford St Patrick, Pontefract St Joseph and Huddersfield, Immaculate Heart. The largest single addition was the cost of the restoration of the organ at Leeds Cathedral with a secondhand organ also being installed at Burley St John Fisher and Thomas More. Properties held for sale increased slightly although the figures reflect the inclusion of new properties this year replacing properties sold during the year. Net borrowings are down from £,10.4m to £,7.9m as Directors decided to repay a short term loan to the AIB in part by drawing down £,3.5m from a longer term loan with the balance of £,2.5m coming from the main investment fund. LOOKING FORWARD Although last year’,s results were more encouraging than others recently the Directors are very mindful of the need to bring expenditure in line with ordinary income. As Bishop Roche says in his opening remarks this will be achieved by reducing central costs where possible and maintaining the good work on offertory income achieved by the “,Plea”, Directors of Diocese of Leeds Trustee and Members of Diocesan Finance Board Rt Rev Arthur Roche, Bishop of Leeds Mgr M McQuinn VG Mr Peter Lomas Mgr Kieran Heskin, VG Mr Tony Hester (Resigned Oct 2009) Mgr Donal Lucey Miss Ann O`Brien Mrs. Trina Hagerty Mr Robin A Smith Mr Terry Forbes Company Secretary: Mr David R Herd Registered Office: Hinsley Hall, 62, Headingley Lane, LEEDS LS6 2BX FINANCIAL REPORT FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31 MARCH 2010

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