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Leeds Catholic Post History

Newspaper for the Diocese of Leeds

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Jul/Aug 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

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Jul/Aug 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

CATHOLIC POST THE NEWSPAPER FOR THE DIOCESE OF LEEDS JULY/AUGUST 2012 www.dioceseofleeds.org.uk www.catholicpost.org.uk FREE Prominent Catholic figures join Our new Archbishop in celebrating anniversary of Vatican II S cholars from throughout the world joined Church leaders last month for what was the most significant ecclesiastical event ever to take place at Leeds Trinity: a theological conference on the theme: Vatican II, Fifty Years On: The New Evangelization. The Second Vatican Council (1962-1965) marked a watershed in the life of Catholics, enabling the Church to engage with the modern world in a spirit of dialogue. The conference, which was oversubscribed, examined how the Councilʼ,s findings can be implemented in the years ahead. Lectures were delivered by notable Church leaders: Francis Cardinal George, the Archbishop of Chicago, Fernando Cardinal Filoni, Prefect of the Congregation for the Evangelization of Peoples, and Archbishop Salvatore Fisichella, President of the Pontifical Council for the Promotion of the New Evangelization. Scholars delivering papers included Professors Tracey Rowland (Melbourne), Mathijs Lamberigts (Leuven) Susan Wood (Marquette), Paul Murray (Durham), Gavin Dʼ,Costa (Bristol) and Annemarie Mayer (Freibourg) and the Superior General of the Missionaries of Africa, Dr Richard Baawobr. During the course of the three-day conference, a number of key points emerged. Archbishop Fisichella noted that the Catholic Church has an irreplaceable role in making society more human. Cardinal Filoni pointed out the necessity of good person-to-person contact in spreading the gospel in society. Cardinal George said that there is a link between celebrating Mass and social justice: the former puts us in right relationship with God opening the way for the development of good relationships with each other. Professor Dʼ,Costa showed that Catholics demonstrate their esteem for members of other faiths precisely through offering them, as opportunity allows, their most precious possession, namely friendship with Christ. Professor Rowland analysed how a well- intentioned desire not to offend non-Catholics had led various educationalists to speak of “,kingdom values”, rather than the person of Christ, and that this had profoundly confused Catholic children. A total of 44 scholars also presented parallel papers during the conference, during which there was daily Mass, a daily Holy Hour and the opportunity for confession. The Chaplain Mgr Paul Grogan, who worked with our Principal, Professor Freda Bridge and Professor Kirsteen Kim, the Head of Theology and Religious Studies, in organising the conference, said: “,This conference is undoubtedly one of the key events to have taken place in the Catholic Church in England this year –, it is of that magnitude. We have managed to bring together some of the finest minds in the Catholic Church –,some of them lay, some of them clergy –, to investigate how we can build on the legacy of the Council. The Catholic Church will always be strong because the Holy Spirit is at her core. At the same time, many Catholicsʼ, faith is, as Pope Benedict has described it, ʻ,tired.ʼ, We have a God-given opportunity now to reach out to them and help them to reconnect. After all, it is not as if they have anywhere else to go. Only Christ reveals man to himself and only in the Catholic Church are found the fullness of the means of salvation, for example the authentic teaching of the Magisterium and the sacraments. If we demonstrate that we care that they take their rightful place once more in our family, I am sure that they will respond. And there are lots of people in our society who do not know what to believe. This conference has given us the confidence to say to them: ʻ,You are worth more than you know. Accept Jesusʼ, friendship. Join his Church.ʼ,”, Left to Right: Archbishop Roche, Prof Freda Bridge, Cardinal George, Archbishop Fisichella, Fr Flens, Mgr Paul Grogan Picture by Ivor Hughes

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Jul/Aug 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 2 Leeds Catholic Post St Joseph’,s gets its new buildings FROM JUST £,299 R.G.R. MEMORIALS COLOUR CATALOGUE QUALITY MEMORIALS AT AFFORDABLE PRICES IN GRANITE, MARBLE &, STONE ALL PRICES INCLUDE DELIVERY &, FIXING Ogee top memorial 2’,6”, high Fully polished Black Granite, Delivered and Fixed for £,399 inc VAT FREE Tel: 0113 282 3888 43 High Ridge Park, Rothwell, Leeds LS26 0NL NEW ARCHBISHOP MAKES HISTORY FOR THE DIOCESE By Robert Finnigan, Diocesan Archivist T he raising of Bishop Roche to the dignity of Archbishop by Pope Benedict XVI is undoubtedly a significant event in the history of the Leeds diocese. He becomes only the third priest from the diocese to be honoured in this way since it was established in 1878, and there have been something like eight hundred Leeds priests in total during that time. Archbishop Roche was not only the ninth Bishop of Leeds from April 2004 until just a few weeks ago, but also a priest of the diocese since his ordination by Bishop Wheeler thirty- seven years ago this month. An earlier Leeds priest became an Archbishop in somewhat unusual circumstances. Thomas Shine was born in County Tipperary in 1872 and completed his studies for the priesthood at the Leeds Seminary prior to his ordination for the diocese in 1894. In 1908 he became the Administrator, or Dean, of Leeds Cathedral where he remained until 1921 when he was appointed as Coadjutor Bishop of Middlesbrough. Following the death of Bishop Richard Lacey in April 1929 he was enthroned as the second Bishop of Middlesbrough. In January 1955, a few weeks short of his eighty-third birthday, Bishop Shine was awarded the personal title of Archbishop by Pope Pius XII. He died in November of the same year after more than sixty years of priesthood, including a quarter of a century as a bishop. Someone else, like Archbishop Roche, a Yorkshireman born in the diocese (and christened Arthur) not only became an Archbishop but eventually a Cardinal. Arthur Hinsley was born at Carlton, near Selby in 1865 and ordained for the Leeds diocese in 1893.In 1900 he founded St Bedeʼ,s Grammar School in Bradford but five years later he left the diocese and was incardinated into the Diocese of Southwark. So, unlike Archbishops Roche and Shine, he was not actually a Leeds priest when he was honoured by Pope Pius XI in 1930. Previously Mgr Hinsley had joined the Vaticanʼ,s diplomatic service and became an Archbishop when he was appointed Apostolic Delegate to West Africa in 1930. Five years later he was made the Archbishop of Westminster and in December 1937 he became a Cardinal. Cardinal Hinsley served as Archbishop of Westminster until his death in March 1943. In 1940 he had ordained Fr. William Gordon Wheeler to the priesthood, thirty-five years later as the seventh Bishop of Leeds, he in turn ordained a young man from St Josephʼ,s parish, Batley Carr as one of his own diocesan priests. Archbishop Rocheʼ,s new appointment takes a Leeds priest to the heart of the Universal Church. Indeed, no English-born priest from any diocese in this country has occupied such a senior role at the Vatican since the days of Cardinal Rafael Merry del Val who was Pope Pius Xʼ,s Secretary of State from 1903 to 1914. He was born in Middlesex in 1865 of Spanish- Irish descent, entered Ushaw College in 1883 to study philosophy, and was ordained for the Westminster diocese in 1888. He became a Cardinal in 1903 and died in 1930. All that was a long time ago and it really means that Archbishop Roche is effectively breaking new ground as an English prelate at the Vatican. So, we wish our former bishop well, as he leaves us to begin his new life in the Eternal City. Many will no doubt wonder what the future there holds in store for His Grace. As ever time will tell. But if history does have a habit of repeating itself letʼ,s not forget an English cleric from an earlier age, Nicholas Breakspear, and where he got to in the end. O n a glorious morning, while the sun was at its highest, the children and staff at St Josephʼ,s Bingley experienced the grand opening of their new build. After a long exhausting, 15 year journey, the school finally opened their new learning environment on the 24th May. Francis Harrison age 11(a student at the school) who is doing his SATʼ,s said: “,I love the new build it is a comfortable environment to do my lessons and papers in!”, This school has been persuading many people to let them go on with this major construction. In 1997 Mr. Boyle –, the past head teacher- started this challenge and worked hard and well for the school. The current head teacher, Mrs. McAndrew, followed the tradition. Finally in 2012 their hard work and sheer dedication paid off as the Local Priest, Fr. Sean, opened the school and blessed it. BISHOP ROCHE HEADS FOR ROME It was announced from Rome on Tuesday June 26th that The Rt Rev Bishop Arthur Roche, the Bishop of Leeds has been appointed by the Holy Father to be the Secretary of the Congregation of Divine Worship and Discipline of the Sacraments in Rome. He is expected to take up his appointment sometime in September, but in the meantime he has been appointed Apostolic Administrator of the Diopcese. This is, he said, to ensure that what is already in place or has been planned and authorised will go ahead. Though he is happy to face the new challenge that this calls him to, Bishop Roche said: “,I would like to say that despite my great sadness at leaving the diocese I am most grateful to you for assisting me so generously and ably these last ten years.` Bishop Roche has been raised to Archbishop and will be the second person in the congregation which promotes liturgical pastoral activity, especially regarding the celebration of the Eucharist. It gives support to the diocesan bishops so that the Christian faithful may share more actively in the sacred liturgy, sees to the drawing up and revision of liturgical texts, grants the recognitio to translations of liturgical books and their adaptations that have been lawfully prepared by conferences of bishops. It is one of the nine congregations (department with a jurisdiction) in the Holy See that form the Roman Curia. The Roman Curia, together with the Pope, is the administrative apparatus of the Holy See and the central governing body of the entire Catholic Church. Each Congregation is led by a prefect, who is a Cardinal, the current prefect is Cardinal Antonio Canizares Llovera. The outgoing Secretary is Joseph Augustine Di Noia, O.P.

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Jul/Aug 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Vatican ll was the only one of the so-far twenty-one Ecumenical Councils of the Church which did not set out to urge and force on individuals an external compliance with doctrine and law. Rather, it set out to change hearts. That is why it is described as a ʻ,Pastoral Councilʼ,. Like Christianity itself, Vatican ll is far more about ʻ,walking the walkʼ, than it is about ʻ,talking the talkʼ,. The continuing reform of the Church is not obtained from the academic study of the formal Council documents, its Decrees and Constitutions, or even by reading commentaries on them. Rather, as Pope Benedict explained recently to one of the parishes in his own diocese of Rome, on 4 March 2012 - “,the parish is the place in which we learn our faith as part of the ʻ,usʼ, of the Church”,. So when the Editor asked me “,How did the Council affect you?”,, I saw that in this question he had captured the true spirit of the Council, and the true thrust of what should be our reflections as we approach this Golden Jubilee. It is a question we all need to ask ourselves. Because unless Vatican ll has converted and reformed me, converted my family, my parish, my diocese, “,as part of the ʻ,usʼ, of the Church ”, then it cannot convert and reform the world, and no amount of study will enable it to do so. Watching that True Meaning of the Council Develop I had a very privileged view of the Councilʼ,s development during the immediate post- conciliar years. From 1965 to 1977 I served as a priest not only in the Vatican but on four continents. I saw the seed of Church reform, sown by the Council, begin to grow in the Far - East of Asia, in Central Africa and in South America, as well as in the Benelux countries of Europe. My job was not just to take Vatican ll to these very different cultures and civilisations, but to feed back to Rome the effect the Council was having in these places. And here one immediately saw what was special about Vatican ll. After the Council of Trent in the fifteenth century a Congregation of the Council was set up in Rome. Its sole purpose was to interpret authoritatively the Decrees of that Council. No such single introspective body was set up after Vatican ll. Instead, a whole wealth of innovative post- conciliar documentation from both existing and newly-formed Vatican congregations was built up in response to the way that the teaching of the Council was beginning to influence and itself be influenced by “,the ʻ,usʼ, of the Church”,. Liturgy and Ecumenism were two particular fields. Here, Rome responded to the way in which different countries were reacting to the respective urging of the Council to participate actively in the liturgy, and to pray and act ecumenically with other Christians and those of other faiths. And those documents were issued in many instances by offices which had themselves sprung up to meet the pastoral needs of those who were trying to convert themselves, to let Vatican ll influence and change them so that they could change the world. There are particularly rich documents of this kind on the interplay of the Council with ecumenism, and with the priesthood and religious life. The Indispensable Contribution of Pope Paul Vl It has often been said, with what I am sure is a great deal of truth, that the ultra-careful Pope Paul Vl , for whom scrupulous attention to the minutest detail was an art form, would never have taken that great leap forward of initiating Vatican ll, while the irrepressibly adventurous Pope John XXlll, who did begin it, would never have closed the Council. But Pope Paul did far more than steer the Council to a successful conclusion, he masterminded the whole strategy of post-conciliar development, oversaw those difficult days when a newly- planted seed makes its first growth, and when he died he left a Church which he had inspired to begin its reform of itself by becoming a poor Church rather than simply a Church of the poor. The liturgical participation of the whole People of God, as well as an ecumenical groundwork based on justice as well as love, was complemented by a structural framework for the participation of bishops with the Pope, and of priests and people with their bishops in the daily life of the Church. Any suggestion that the priesthood was a superior or even separate Christian ʻ,casteʼ, was eliminated by the insistence on the all-surpassing common privilege of Baptism in Christ. It fell to me to help in the distribution and explanation of these guidelines across the world, as well as having a hand in the translation of several of them. But most of all I value those treasured moments when the usually reclusive Paul Vl would show his own personally deep and heartfelt determination to allow Vatican ll to reform the Church. I shall never forget the time in Kampala, during his visit to canonise the Uganda martyrs, when Pope Paul quizzed me about the singing at Mass “,in England and Yorkshire”, –, he often got Yorkshire mixed up with Scotland. Recalling his own ascent of Ben Nevis as a young priest , and the descent to Fort Augustus Abbey where he was staying, he said that everyone sang on the way back to celebrate their achievement. “,You must lead the people to sing the Mass”, he told me. Now Pope Paul, like me, was totally tone-deaf, and his secretary, Pasquale Macchi, couldnʼ,t believe what he was hearing –,“,Holy Father, Loftus is even worse than you musically”,, he told him. “,It doesnʼ,t matter”,, Pope Paul said “,we must encourage the people to sing”,. Then there dawned the Holy Year of 1975, when virtually every Tuesday night was spent in the Vatican Secretariate of State, translating into English the miniscule handwriting with which Pope Paul himself wrote out what he wanted to say to the pilgrims at the Wednesday morning Audience. I never wore spectacles before that Holy Year, Iʼ,ve never been able to do without them since! The theme of that Holy Year and of all those talks was the Conciliar one of “,Renewal and Reconciliation”,. And during that year and through those talks he revealed his inner self. He then called together Vatican officials of different languages and varying specialisms and said he wanted to gather everything together in the form of an Apostolic Letter on Christian Joy, and he wanted everyone to feel they could contribute to it. The Current State of Play So, dear Editor, for me the personal effect of Vatican ll was not based on the driving of bishops to and from the sessions of the Council. It was not the part I played in the late- night skulduggery to get the better of the Roman Curia, which Derek Worlock, then head of our secretariat which serviced the English and Welsh Bishops, mischievously revealed in his published diaries. It was not even the contacts I had with the Communist ʻ,mindersʼ, of Eastern-bloc bishops, some of whom I then came across later in their respective embassies abroad, and to one of whom I gave a carefully concealed consecrated Host so that the next day, on return to his own country, he could give Holy Communion to his equally devout but of necessity secretly Catholic mother who was dying. Rather, it was seeing how that Council changed and reformed people from within, not so that they could conform externally to some Church directive, but so that they could better bear witness to the love of God for them, and to their love of Him and of one another, and so that they could praise him more effectively in the liturgy and play an ever greater part in the day-to-day life of the Church. Rather than just conform to existing guidelines the whole People of God spawned post-Conciliar documents which monitored and encouraged their progress. Documents on ever greater use of the vernacular in the liturgy, on Communion in the hand and under both Kinds, as well as on lay ministers of Communion bear witness to this. I saw the effects of the Council first of all in our own English and Welsh bishops. They came home different men as a result of their participation in the Council. When people ask why today there is not the same impetus in the Church to drive forward the process of reform, I say simply that it is because today there are no bishops who experienced what it was to be present at the Council. In the same way the early enthusiasm of the infant Church had been all the greater because it had personally witnessed the coming of the Holy Spirit. That is why in 1978 we had the Liverpool National Pastoral Congress –, many of the bishops then had been at Vatican ll, they were still witnesses to that new Pentecost. Effectively, what Vatican ll did was to initiate the inner reform of the hearts and minds of all who formed the Church. This reform in itself necessitated the fairly speedy sweeping away of some elements of the Churchʼ,s external trappings which were clearly no longer fit for purpose –, accretions from an age of the Papal States and Absolute Monarchy - thrones, tiaras, lace, pomp, imperial purple and associated flummery. St Augustine had already contrasted what should be the simplicity of Christianity with the empty pomp of pagan liturgies, and the Council followed his lead. It also demanded swift action to eradicate scandalous discrimination against other religions. In the days of the First Vatican Council Jews living in the Papal States were made to wear distinctive clothing with yellow-patches, so that other people could avoid them, and on the eve of Vatican ll the Church was still referring in its public prayer to “,the perfidious Jews”,. This was changed very quickly. Next, the inner reform of the Church focused the minds of men and women on participation, not just in the liturgy but in the running of the parish and the diocese, just as bishops had stressed their own collegiality with the Pope in the governance of the universal Church. Church structures were to be altered, but by this time the fervour was no longer that of participants in the new Pentecost of the Council, so it was less effective. Changes took and are taking, a lot longer. Even further down the line there is now consideration, not least in Austria and in Ireland, of further steps that our inner reform of minds and hearts is currently focused upon. Previously unthought - of changes to the Churchʼ,s external structure are being mooted, because they are thought necessary to its survival. But just as we no longer have three thousand converts to the Church in a small community in one day, as the Acts of the Apostles recounts of the infant Church , so we no longer drive forward the external consequences of our inner reform with the same panache that was there immediately after the Council. As a result, many fear that the Church is not going forward, and is in fact going backwards. Precisely because I am no longer young, as I was when I played my tiny part in Vatican ll, I reflect often on Wordsworthʼ,s lines about the French Revolution, which also did its fair share of sweeping away outmoded social structures: Bliss it was on that day to be alive, But to be young was very Heaven. So, am I disheartened? In a Church which does not move forward for instance on on issues of clerical celibacy and Communion for the divorced and re-married, am I fearful of seeing again a return to a pre-conciliar Church which, in the words of Roger Aubert, was “,rendered immobile by its certainties”,? No. Why? Because every day I also read a part of Pope Paulʼ,s Apostolic Letter on Christian Joy, in which I played an even smaller part, and see there the certainty that as long as the Church continues to reform itself at the level of what Pope Benedict terms “,the ʻ,usʼ, of the Church”,, then it will always go forward to the Kingdom. Let Pope Paul give the reason for our joy: “,we who have...anxiety for all the churches and preoccupation for their immediate future...are sure that grace will not fail the Christian people, and we hope that they themselves will not fail grace, or reject....the inheritance of truth and holiness.”,. The Council will not fail us if we do not fail the Council. Basil Loftus Leeds Catholic Post Page 3 The True Meaning of the Council is not Endless Discussion but Inner Change Vatican II Fifty Years On This October it will be 50 years since the opening of Vatican II –, over the months from now until the end of the Year there will be an article reflecting on the Council. These articles are not offered as deep reflections on the Council or the Documents from it, rather they are written from the point of view of those who experienced the Council in its time –, some are from people who were there, some are about people who were there –, some are by people who were the first to try and put into action the documents as they came out. They are all from a personal point of view and try to capture at least a little of that ʻ,freshness of the Spiritʼ, as it blew through a church thrust into a modern World trying to find a Rock to hold fast to. VATICAN ll –, A PASTORAL COUNCIL (A personal reflection by Basil Loftus) Left to Right Mgr Basil Loftus, Mgr (Now Cardinal) Santos Abril Y Castello, Pope Paul VI

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Jul/Aug 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 4 Leeds Catholic Post T he Olympic Torch made a couple of surprise visits to FLM at the Diocesan Pastoral Centre this month, at our Annual Renewal Day and at our Parentsʼ, (and grandparentsʼ,) Coffee Morning. At the FLM Renewal Day on Saturday 7th July we had listened to our guest speakers presentations and were just about to break for a famous Hinsley Hall lunch when Marjorie Parker brought the torch in. The torch belongs to her friend Phil Marshall, who was one of the bearers in the relay and he now uses it to raise money for Faith and Light and Life. Parentsʼ, Coffee Morning Earlier in the week while parents from different parishes were enjoying a quiet coffee and Molly Fieldhouseʼ,s delicious cakes at our annual Open Morning, the torch came calling, much to the amusement and interest of Hinsley Hall staff and guests. Almost everyone wanted his or her picture taken with it, including a visitor from Zimbabwe. FLM staff, facilitators and parents from Holy Rosary Chapeltown with the torch at Hinsley Hall The Parentsʼ, Coffee Mornings are an open event for everyone who has facilitated or attended one of the parenting programmes in parishes and schools around the diocese. This year, over two mornings, parents and parenting facilitators from Wakefield, Pontefract, Leeds and Wetherby gathered to share their experiences, see where we at Family Life Ministry organise much of our work and enjoy some time out and fun together. Every year we hear amazing stories of transformation and healing in relationships and families. This year a striking story is of the disappearance of a childʼ,s long standing communication problems when his mum attended one of the parish parenting courses. Is it just a coincidence or does her new confidence and enriched appreciation for her good listening skills make a difference. It doesnʼ,t really matter does it? What really matters is that he now can do something he could not do before and the freedom to communicate is an essential tool in all our relationships. Then on Saturday we had our FLM Renewal Day Our guest speakers this year, Dr Evleen Mann, Natural Fertility Teacher, and Catherine Wiley, founder of the Catholic Grandparents Association, and the woman who famously persuaded the Pope to write a Universal Prayer for Grandparents, took us through the generational life cycle in two very distinct but intimately connected ways. Sexuality through the Life Cycle was Dr Mannʼ,s brief and this was very well received and led beautifully towards the afternoon workshop on Natural Fertility and Family Planning led by Cordelia and Michael Mkpadi, newly trained teachers in NFP. For more information please contact flm@flm.org.uk Grandparents and Passing on the Faith were Catherineʼ,s themes, and she began with a very personal reflection of her own conversion to this ministry for grandparents and the creation of the first grandparentsʼ, pilgrimages in the world. Catherine Wiley, Founder of the Catholic Grandparents Association, spoke recently at the World Meeting of Families in Milan and the Eucharistic Congress in Dublin but did not get to hold the Olympic Torch until she talked to us at Leeds on 7th July. After lunch Catherine then took an extended workshop on being a grandparent today including how we understand our baptismal responsibilities and how we can honour them even when we are distanced from our grandchildrenʼ,s spiritual life. For the Universal Prayer for Grandparents and information about the pilgrimages for grandparents all over the world go to www.catholicgrandparentsassociation.com. Afternoon workshops included Parenting Facilitator Training, presented by Val Preece of St Markʼ,s Parish in Harrogate who was there to talk about the Family Caring Trust parenting and relationship programmes and the one day training in facilitation that she is approved by the FCT to deliver. All enquiries to Val at parentingfacilitator@gmail.com The Parish Family Groups DVD was available for view and there is now a waiting list to borrow this so if you would like to show it in your parish or parish group contact admin@flm.org.uk. Fr Peter McGrath, founder of Parish Family Groups in Australia, was due to return in the autumn. If he does two parishes in our diocese have already requested a visit from him. If your parish would like to find out more about who he is and what Parish Family Groups can do for your local church contact flm@flm.org.uk What else is happening? Marriage Preparation We are looking to train more people to work with parish priests in their task of helping engaged couples to prepare for married life. If this strikes a chord in you please look at the website www.flm.org.uk to see how our programme works then have a word with your parish priest. Or, contact Breda at flm@flm.org.uk or 0113 261 8050 (Tues-Fri am). Training takes place over four Monday evenings in November. The FLM office will be open again in September. Until then leave messages at 0113 261 8050 or flm@flm.org.uk Wishing you a wonderful summer break! For more on the work of Family Life Ministry go to www.flm.org.uk Family Life Matters in the Diocese of Leeds Missionary activity celebrated in St Winefride’,s parish, Bradford O ver 50 people gathered at St Theresa and St Winefrideʼ,s church in Bradford to celebrate the missionary work of the Association of the Propagation of the Faith (APF) and the Mill Hill Missionaries through the Red Box on Saturday 16 June 2012. The Mass was celebrated by Fr Anthony Chantry, General Superior of the Mill Hill Missionaries as well as Fr John McAulay MHM and the parish priest of St Theresa and St Winefrideʼ,s, Fr Keiron Walker. Fr Anthony said: “,It is great that so many of you have come to celebrate our work today. Thank you to you all for your support and for all that you do for the missionary activity of the Church. It is not only your fundraising through the Red Boxes, but also your support and prayers that are so appreciated by our brothers and sisters in missionary dioceses around the world.”, The Mass was followed by refreshments and a presentation in St Winefrideʼ,s School.

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Jul/Aug 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Leeds Catholic Post Page 5 “,Thus it is evident to everyone, that all the faithful of Christ of whatever rank or status, are called to the fullness of the Christian life and to the perfection of charity”, Lumen Gentium 40 Recently our own Trinity University College promoted a prestigious “,New Evangelisation”, conference. It was in part to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the second Vatican Council this year, although some at first wondered whether it was, instead, going to rearrange it. We must be careful not to take Vatican II for granted: the ideas set out for the church –, the People of God- are refreshing. We ignore such an invita- tion to renewal at our peril. The great constitutions of the council like Lumen Gentium are the inspired work of the bishops and the pope gathered together- this constitution was approved by by 2151 votes to 5. Press reports about the keynote address of Professor Tracey Row- land at the conference seemed to suggest that she objected to what others may regard as the fruits of the Council, and certainly to the Dominican theologian Edward Schillebeeckx, something she seems to share with the sixties Holy Office Cardinal Ottaviani, the conserva- tivesʼ, voice at the Vatican Council. “,The tendency of Post Vatican II re- ligious education, she is reported (and I say reported) as saying, to present Christ as a person who was kindly to the marginalised would only lead to people leaving the church”, That has a certain Gospel fa- miliarity about it which suggests that Christ was indeed kindly to the marginalised, and the people who actually left were not those who en- joyed His approval. ***** It was disturbing to read that because the Dalai Lama was received in Leeds, the continuation of Chinese Olympic training in Leeds was put under threat and this in turn threatened trade, and that meant money…, need I go on. It sounds as if, in reality, the Dalai Lama suc- ceeded, through his visit, in putting a powerful message over to the people of Leeds. Is trade and money and material success all that matters? Still, I now read that the Chinese are taking 50 sports cars back to China from here, so thatʼ,s all right, then. ***** The translation (wrong word but it sounds right in the circumstances) of Archbishop Roche to Rome did not come as much of a surprise to many as it did to him. After all, few bishops recently have been in- volved so much in liturgy and made so many contacts around the world. When these sorts of things happen many papers fill up with things you don`t really need to know –, personal trivia –, so never want- ing to miss an opportunity –, here goes. Archbishop Roche was the ninth Bishop of Leeds in 133 years, and held the post in his own right for eight years, longer only than Bishops Heenan and Dwyer (just). He was the fifth of the nine to be Yorkshire- born, perhaps showing the Vaticanʼ,s commitment to native clergy. The time of “,interregnum”,- between bishops- has been as little as four months, but there are other sees to fill: we shall see indeed! Things do not seem too easy in Rome, and Archbishop Roche has our prayers. Benchmark Sidelines Thank goodness for holidays and the chance to step off the wildly whirling hamster wheel of work, and do something different. Even a short break can invigorate, and I much enjoyed a recent visit to Bury to take part in the 2012 Street Choir Festival. It was “,created initially to promote the development –, through song –, of a society free from all forms of oppression, exploitation, exclusion and violence.”, Nearly thirty choirs met, and as well as concerts and workshops, we had a `Massed Sing` in the busy town centre on Saturday. I won`t pretend: this is a politically tinged event –, you will guess one of the hues when I say the last number of the Sing was the Internationale. The festival moves each year as a different host choir takes on the job of organising. “,There is no national council overseeing it and no constitution governing it.”, An organisation with no rules? Heaven! No constitutional battles! So, it is not like our sister church, the Anglicans, whose governing General Synod has just postponed the vote on whether to allow women to become bishops- but a little like St Joseph`s music group, which I mentioned a few months ago, which was planning a meeting/social/curry supper to see what we`re doing well and what we can improve. Well, the event has now taken place. I rather recommend the format –, we widened the food choice to include non-curried items (we are part of a broad church...) and borrowed the church hall to have an enjoyable evening. We all wrote down a couple of comments/concerns, folded them raffle ticket style, and popped them in a box. We took it in turns to pick and read out a comment. Discussion followed, action was agreed, and the box was passed to the next person. Soon, the notes of what we decided wiil be circulated to members. (Sorry it hasn`t happened earlier, I think I`ll play the `I`ve been busy with my new grandchild` card...). Compared to a more formal meeting, it is easier for everybody to have an input, plus everyone gets fed! Finally, the notices: the next West Yorkshire Church Music network afternoon will be on Sunday 7th October, at St Joseph`s Pudsey. We will be looking at `all purpose` hymns, such as those for offertory and communion and will share ideas of alternatives to old favourites. We will also assess some `re-writes` of well known Mass settings. Next time, I hope to give reports on the National Network of Pastoral Musicians conference at Worth Abbey (20th/22nd July), and the Society of Saint Gregory`s summer school in Whitby (23rd/27th July). Meanwhile, I hope you enjoy any holidays you take, whatever the weather! Tim Devereux tim.devereux@ssg.org.uk If you`d like to add your name to the email list to receive information about WYCM Network events, I`d be happy to hear from you. West Yorkshire Church Music Network: http://www.westyorkshirechurchmusic.org.uk/ National Network of Pastoral Musicians: http://nnpm.org/ Society of Saint Gregory: http://www.ssg.org.uk/ StreetChoir Bury 2012: http://streetchoir2012.weebly.com Musical Notes by Tim Devereux OFFICE FOR EVANGELISATION &, CATECHESIS Catholic Certificate in Religious Studies (CCRS) The next diocesan Foundations in Faith course which incorporates the CCRS begins in September 2012. For further details please contact the administrator on 0113 261 8040 or evangelisation.admin@dioceseofleeds.org.uk Or download information from www.dioceseofleeds.org.uk/evangelisation - click on Foundations in Faith. Catechist Forum –, Saturday November 17 –, Wheeler Hall All catechists are invited to this day of reflection, discussion, resources &, networking. 10:00am –, 2:30 pm at Wheeler Hall, St Anneʼ,s Cathedral. There is no charge for this event but please bring a packed lunch. Advent Retreat Day –, LTUC, Chaplaincy, Saturday 1st December There will be an Advent Retreat Day for anyone interested, in the Chaplaincy at Leeds Trinity University College from 10:00 –, 4:00. More details to follow. A Starter Course for Catechists The next starter course for catechists and leaders of the liturgy of the word with children will take place at Hinsley Hall on the following Saturdays from 9:30 am –, 4:00pm: March 9, March 23 and April 20 2013 WHO TO CONTACT AT HINSLEY HALL There are many courses and events organised by the Office for Evangelisation and Catechesis throughout the year which help to support formation in faith and training for catechists, leaders of the liturgy of the word with children and other parish ministries. Check this page in future editions and also the website: www.dioceseofleeds.org.uk/evangelisation - see Forthcoming Events. For further information or booking please contact Linda Pennington on 0113 261 8043 or linda.pennington@dioceseofleeds.org.uk Cardinal Heenan Pupils meet Dalai Lama P upils at Cardinal Heenan Catholic High School, Leeds, met the Dalai Lama, the Tibetan spiritual leader and Nobel Peace Prize winner on Friday 15 June. The internationally renowned leader held a meeting with Cardinal Heenan students after he addressed delegates on business and ethics at the Yorkshire International Business Convention. The pupils were guests at the Leeds conference after winning a competition. Teacher Mrs Victoria Wragg said: “,It was once in a lifetime opportunity for our pupils. They were greatly moved when the Dalai Lama urged everyone to take action on child poverty.”, In discussion with Cardinal Heenan students the Dalai Lama said that the issue of child hunger was the personal responsibility of every human being. He said “,There is no ʻ,themʼ,. There is no ʻ,usʼ,. It is just ʻ,weʼ,.”, Mrs Wragg is Curriculum Leader for Geography at the school for 900 pupils aged 11 to 16. In an address to hundreds of delegates at the convention, the Dalai Lama criticised the Chinese government`s ",immoral", censorship He said: ",All 1.3 billion Chinese people have every right to know the reality. Then they will have the ability to judge what is right and what is wrong and what is good and what is bad.”, The Dalai Lama left the stage to a standing ovation after placing white sashes around the shoulders of TV presenter Clare Balding, who compeered the event, and Leeds North East MP Fabian Hamilton, chair of the All Party Parliamentary Group on Tibet. Pictured below: Cardinal Heenan pupils Joseph Stephenson, aged 13, front left, and Matthew Forbes, 15, front right, are pictured with the Dalai Lama, the Tibetan spiritual leader and Nobel Peace Prize winner. Photograph by Victoria Wragg attached, copyright free Mass for the Feast of St Bernard Fountains Abbey –, Monday 20th August 2012 By John Tweddle Catholic Lay Representative, Fountains Abbey Chaplaincy. F ollowing what is now an established tradition of celebrating Mass in honour of the founding Fathers of Monasticism, this yearʼ,s Mass at Fountains Abbey will be for the Feast of St Bernard. Last year over 500 people gathered to celebrate St Benedict with Bishop Arthur Roche, this year Fountains Abbey Chaplaincy is delighted to announce that the Very Rev Terence Richardson OSB Prior, Ampleforth Abbey will be the principal celebrant. Linking our new liturgy to its Latin tradition, this year the Mass will include extracts from the plainsong that would have been heard in the liturgy of the Abbey. The congregation will be invited to join in the Gloria, Sanctus and Agnus Dei from Missa de Angelis. Fountains Abbey has been a place of religious worship for nearly 900 years, a tradition that is joyfully continued through the work of the Fountains Abbey Chaplaincy, an ecumenical group of Ministers and lay readers of all denominations from local churches working as part of National Trust Volunteering. Several services are organised throughout the year including Mass for the Feast of St Bernard which will be held at 12 noon on Monday 20th August. Fountains Abbey and Studley Royal is designated as a UNESCO World Heritage Site recognising that it is one of the greatest cultural sites of its type in the World. Fountains Abbey, founded in 1132 soon became one of the largest and richest Cistercian abbeys in Britain, before being closed by Henry VIII in 1539 during the Dissolution of the Monasteries and was partially demolished soon after. The influence of Fountains Abbey extended across Yorkshire and beyond with the development of 33 grange farms and trading assets. The Fountains Abbey ruin are the largest ecclesiastical ruins in the country and is one of the few Cistercian houses surviving from the 12th Century and providing an unrivalled picture of a great religious house in all its parts. The extensive standing remains that include, in particular, a surviving 12th Century mill and precinct wall, represent an outstanding testimony to Cistercian architecture and power. As well as a spiritual centre, by the end of the 13th Century, Fountains was an industrial estate and had become the largest producer of wool in the North of England. The abbey ruins also provide a dramatic focal point to the gardens of Studley Royal, laid out between 1718 and 1781 by John Aislabie and his son William in the beautiful setting of the Skell valley and building on work commenced by the Mallory family in the 1670s. The Abbey is one of the key attractions of the whole site. For visitors it is a very special place giving an insight into monastic life in the Cistercian order and valued architecturally and aesthetically. Access to the Abbey is free to National Trust Members and by special arrangement the National Trust has kindly agreed to waive normal admission charges for those attending the Mass. After Mass visitors are welcome to take full advantage of the Estate picnicking in the grounds, lunching in the tea rooms and Visitor Centre Restaurant.

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Jul/Aug 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 6 Leeds Catholic Post For deacons, having no bishop is a serious matter, because their whole ministry depends on their relationship- bishop and deacon. The earliest church writings include this “, Let the deacons of the church move about intelligently and act as eyes of the bishop, carefully inquiring into the actions of every church member....let them find out those who are sick in the flesh, and bring such to the notice of the main body who know nothing of them, that they may visit them and supply their wants, and the president may judge fit.”, “,For let the bishop preside over you as one honoured with the authority of God.... But let the deacon minister to him, as Christ does to his Father, and let him serve him unblameably in all things, as Christ does nothing of himself, but does always those things that please his Father.”, Seventeen centuries later, the churchʼ,s norms for Deacons include these paragraphs: “,It is a duty incumbent on the bishop to care for the deacons of his diocese with particular solicitude. This is to be discharged either personally or through a priest acting as his delegate. Special pastoral care should always be shown to those in particular difficulties because of personal circumstances.”, “,By virtue of their ordination, deacons are united to each other by a sacramental fraternity. They are all dedicated to the same purpose —, building up the Body of Christ —, in union with the Supreme Pontiff and subject to the authority of the bishop. Each deacon should have a sense of being joined with his fellow deacons in a bond of charity, prayer, obedience to their bishops, ministerial zeal and collaboration.”, “,The Deacon receives office by a decree of the bishop. In his decree of appointment, the bishop shall ascribe duties to the deacon which are congruent with his personal abilities, his celibate or married state, his formation, age, and with his spiritually valid aspirations. “,The bishop, during the rite of ordination, gives the book of the Gospels to the deacon saying: “,Receive the Gospel of Christ whose herald you have become”,. Like priests, deacons are commended to all by their conduct, their preaching of the mystery of Christ, by transmitting Christian doctrine and by devoting attention to the problems of our time. The principal function of the deacon, therefore, is to collaborate with the bishop and the priests in the exercise of a ministry which is not of their own wisdom but of the word of God, calling all to conversion and holiness.”, Deacons Diary Whither religious freedom? A s we begin the process of putting Catholic Post “,to bed”, for this edition news breaks about the decision of the German courts to effectively outlaw the circumcision of boys as a matter of religious practice. It appears that the ruling was provoked by the case of a four-year old boy who was admitted to hospital with post-operative bleeding. The court attempted to balance three elements of law: the rights of the parents, the freedom of religious practice and the right of the child to avoid physical harm. Whatever the merits or de-merits of circumcision, and it has been under discussion by lawyers and medics in Germany for some time, it is another decision that puts religious communities under pressure. Our own diocese fought long and hard for the freedom to place adoptive children in what we firmly believe would be the best circumstances for them. In America Catholic establishments are facing a problem in responding to the demand that they provide medical care, including contraceptive advice to employees. We live in a tolerant situation within an atmosphere of religious tolerance but it begs the question, “,Where do we draw the lines?”, While we have our own angst to deal with over adoption other communities are similarly under question. This is all well and good but not much lies within our own sphere of influence. Apart from signing petitions or writing to MPs there is not much positive action beyond prayer and reflection that is open to us. It is a different matter in our personal relationships. Many of us will live and work alongside those of other faiths who are obliged to make decisions on a daily basis about how they remain faithful to the call of their faith while continuing to play a full part in the world. I was at college with an American Jew. He had been offered a Marshall scholarship to study in the UK but this was a problem to him and his family as they were strictly observant Jews. If he took the place up then he was placing himself outside his community for a significant length of time. On the other hand, if he turned the opportunity down he was, in a way, letting his community down as they needed to have Jewish Marshall scholars. His compromise, in order to play a full part in university life, included the decision to eat in the halls of residence. It was not kosher food but he would select items from the menu that would have been kosher had it been cooked in a kosher kitchen. He thought this was preferable to taking the scholarship but holding himself separate and pure in a kosher sense. Talk to people around you –, and not only those of other faiths, we all have difficult decisions to make that may mean that we canʼ,t do exactly as we would wish. Find out where difficulties lie. Ask how things could be different The Ramadan fast began about a week ago –, one of the difficulties of being a Muslim is a calendar based on the actual rather than calculated sighting of the moon! If you have Muslim friends and colleagues ask them about the fast. Help to make it easier for them by being discreet when you eat rather than flaunting food in front of them. This year it will be a long fast during the hours of summer daylight. In other years, as Ramadan moves in relation to the western calendar, fast- breaking will occur in the evening and could land in early evening during working hours or at an after-work meeting. Ask for advice about how to react and what to say then you are informed and ready to act. Finally check out the Vatican website www.vatican.va or the diocesan website www.dioceseofleeds.org.uk/interfaith for the official greeting to Muslims of the world from the Catholic Church to mark Eid as the fast closes. Send it on to with your greetings to your Muslim friends INTERFAITH Olympic Torch Burns Brightly in Barkston Ash I t`s come a long way from Mount Olympus all the way to Barkston Ash, but Tuesday saw the Olympic torch relay reach the village and what seemed like the entire community came out to support the torch bearers and share the moment that London 2012 came to the village. Barkston Ash Catholic Primary School celebrated the day with a full programme of events and activities. Earlier in the morning, the road outside school started to fill up with villagers as staff, pupils and parents from the school filled the car park ready for the arrival of the torch. Pupils in brightly coloured t-shirts watched in anticipation as the vehicles and police outriders edged nearer the village. A mass of Union flags and cheering saw the arrival of the Olympic torch as the pupils, staff and parents cheered. Andrew Bastable, Deputy Headteacher at Barkston Ash Catholic Primary School said ",This has been a fantastic day for the entire village as well as the school community, it`s been one of those days that will hopefully stay in the mind for a longtime for all those who experienced the build-up, the anticipation and finally the arrival of the torch. We`ve worked closely with the parish council to try and organise a day, inclusive of different groups within the community. We invited Barkston Ash Pre-School to join us this morning as well as residents and carers from Highfields Care Home at Scarthingwell. Everyones shared the moment together and it`s been great to see the village come together",. Following the torch`s arrival, the school organised a traditional tea party and picnic for parents and staff and invited local MP Nigel Adams. Mr Adams spent time speaking with children, parents and staff as well as taking the opportunity to play cricket with the school cricket team. After a picnic lunch with parents and pupils, Mr Adams thanked the staff and pupils of the school for their warm welcome and hospitality. As part of `Sports Week 2012` the school have a week long themed week of sporting activities and opportunities for pupils, staff and parents. A big part of Sports Week is the traditional sports afternoon, a popular celebration of school sports involving sack racing, egg and spoon racing amongst other sports. BBC RE:Think festival The first ever BBC RE:Think festival is coming to MediaCityUK 12 and 13 September Bringing together those at the heart of the faith and ethics agenda, the festival will explore and debate the issues affecting society. Join us and be inspired by speakers including Prof. Richard Dawkins and Chief Rabbi Lord Sacks. Email RethinkFestival@bbc.co.uk to join the audience for special editions of BBC shows. Festivals August 3rd - Raksha Bandhan (Hindu) Raksha Bandhan is the Hindu festival that celebrates brotherhood and love. ",Raksha Bandhan", means a thread for protection. It is the tradition for sisters tie a rakhi, a bracelet made of interwoven red and gold threads, around their brothers` wrists to celebrate their relationship. More recently rachis may be shared between close friends August 14th - Lailat al Qadr (Muslim) Lailat al Qadr, the Night of Power, marks the night in which the Qur`an was first revealed to the Prophet Muhammad by Allah. August 19th - Eid-Ul-Fitr (Muslim) The end of Ramadan when Muslims celebrate the end of fasting and thank Allah for His help with their month-long act of self- control. September 17th - Rosh Hashanah (Jewish) Rosh Hashanah is the Jewish New Year festival commemorating the creation of the world. It lasts 2 days. The traditional greeting between Jews is ",L`shanah tovah", ... ",for a good New Year",. Events Sunday 5th August World Wide Picnic for Peace Noon –, 3pm. Near the Mansion House in Roundhay Park. Please bring vegetarian food or soft drinks to share. Everyone welcome Thursday 9th August Hiroshima-Nagasaki Commemoration Leeds City Council Peacelink Group and the Lord Mayor of Leeds in Park Square Saturday 11th September Interfaith Forest Gardening 10.45am –, 2pm. Meet at Parkwood Springs Forest Garden car park, Shirecliffe Road, Sheffield S5 8XB. Wear appropriate clothes and footwear. Bring food and drink. Join a diversity of people to experience the diversity of nature in this ʻ,infantʼ, woodland. Plants, people, faiths growing together –, beautiful and productive. Contact sheffieldinterfaith@hotmail.co.uk Friday 14th September Rites of Passage in Hindu Traditions 2pm at the Friends Meeting House, 136 Street Lane, Roundhay LS8 2BW Monday 24th September Wakefield Interfaith Group 6pm. Open meeting in Treacy Hall (next to Wakefield Cathedral). Please bring vegetarian snacks to share. Tea and coffee provided.

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Jul/Aug 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Leeds Catholic Post Page 7 Singing the Missal Tones By Mrs Lesley Darren Primary and Secondary pupils from the Wakefield and Out of District Catholic schools came together on the morning of 19th June to sing the Missal Tones, musical settings for the new Mass translation. The workshop took place at St. Wilfridʼ,s Catholic High School and was led by Mr Thomas Leech, Director of the Schools Singing Programme, accompanied on piano by Mr Benjamin Saunders, Diocesan Director of Music. This workshop was organised following a successful staff training session for Headteachers and Music Co-ordinators to learn the Missal Tones earlier in the year. The Wakefield Headteachers felt it was important for the children to become more familiar with the Missal Tones, so that the settings can be used in school Masses. Mr Leech enthused and engaged the pupils throughout the workshop and provided a historical background to music sung at Masses throughout the ages. In her opening comments, Mrs Lesley Darren, Headteacher of St. John the Baptist Catholic Primary School, reminded the pupils that when they are singing the Missal Tones they are expressing their praise, adoration and thanks to God. Even The Rain Stopped! D espite early rain and fore-boding dark clouds, there was no need for umbrella- cover as the children from the Immaculate Heart of Mary Parish in South Huddersfield processed from St. Joseph`s School to the church of English Martyrs` at the start of their First Holy Communion celebration on Saturday 16th June. Lead by altar servers from across the Parish, together with Frs. Duane Reilly and Michael Hall, the procession of over thirty youngsters - dressed in their finery - made an impressive sight as they took their places in church for the Mass celebrated by Fr. Nicholas Hird, their Parish Priest. Each of the children had a special role to play during the Mass, as readers or as part of a team of bearers who brought forwards items with which to dress the altar as well as the more usual items brought forwards in an offertory procession. As each item was brought forwards, comment was made upon it by a reader. In a packed church, with family members, friends, and representatives of the four churches served by the Diocese`s largest Parish, there were obvious signs of team- work, not least amongst the musicians and also the UCM`s of English Martyrs` and St. Joseph`s, who came together to provide a Communion Breakfast for the children in St. Joseph`s School. In speaking to the children, Fr. Nicholas shared memories of his own First Holy Communion day in 1972, and told them that it was a day in their lives that they would always remember. In explaining how they receive Holy Communion on their hands, he also said that it was important to remember that as they received the Lord in this way, so also they should seek ways of taking the Lord with them into all the experiences of their daily lives. Holy Communion he said was a gift to be shared. This was the first occasion when children from across the Parish of the Immaculate Heart had come together to celebrate their Holy Communion. Whilst the majority of children prepared for the celebration at St. Joseph`s School, others attended catechetical classes at both Shepley and Meltham, where Mass is celebrated weekly in the local Anglican churches. Parents commenting on the celebration afterwards said how moving it had been to see the children so involved in the Mass, and mention was also made of the nostalgia that had been evoked through the processing of the children to and from church, and the excitement of the children themselves to be a part of a Communion Breakfast ! The following weekend saw the children - dressed in their finery once again - attending their usual Mass, obviously still basking in the delight of receiving the Lord in such a special manner. Father O’,Keeffe’,s Golden Jubilee Mrs Long, Headteacher at St Josephʼ,s Primary School in Keighley, presented Father Oʼ,Keeffe with a cross made from individual tiles drawn and painted by the children. A local artist worked with children from Reception to Year 6 to produce a gift for Father for his Golden Jubilee. The tiles represent the school, the church and parish life.

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Jul/Aug 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 8 Leeds Catholic Post We Will Remember Them T he day started with showers of rain but fortunately by 10am the time of Muster for the Parade things had picked up considerably. The Parade started from the Town Hall headed by the Crofton Silver Band. who played extremely well arriving at John the Baptist Roman Catholic Church where a Guard of Honour received the Mayor of Normanton and others from around the Wakefield area and the Civic Dignitaries passed by into the Church. Canon Peter Maguire started the proceedings by welcoming everyone. After the first Hymn All People that on Earth Do Dwell played by John Wedgwood. The Mayor of Normanton, Councilor Bill Wood, did the first Reading from the book of Samuel 5: 1-3. Next a Song from Christine Shakespeare the Godden Coach well received by the congregation receiving a loud applause, Christine a local girl with an excellent voice. Then a Reading by the President of The Royal British Legion South and West Yorkshire County. This followed by a song from David Jackson a rousing rendition of Vow to thee my Country and very well received with a loud applause. Sister Brenda Kendall of The Relief Society and a member of The Royal British Legion, Normanton Branch gave an address on life during WWII which she covered in great detail. Churches Together Minister Barry Lotz led the congregation in prayer and the Children of St John the Baptist Primary School sang a song. The Service finished with the last Hymn “,Onward Christian Soldiers”, St Stephen’,s Skipton First Communion Mass On Saturday 16 June 23 children made their First Communion at St Stephenʼ,s Church, Skipton. Mass was celebrated by Mgr Andrew Summersgill, the Parish Priest. St Benedict’,s Sixth Form in Bradford Celebrates its First Two Years W ith its patronal figurehead inspired by the Popeʼ,s visit in 2010, the recently reorganized Post-16 provision for Catholic education in Bradford, West Yorkshire, has reached the end of its second year. As Yorkshire Martyrs Catholic College closed its doors, and St Josephʼ,s Catholic College and St Bedeʼ,s Catholic Grammar School joined forces under one federated governing body, St Benedictʼ,s Sixth Form was created with the stated intention to provide, “,one outstanding, coeducational Catholic sixth form for all our students.”, Having nearly 500 students on roll makes St Benedictʼ,s one of the largest school sixth forms in the country and enables a broad offering of courses at both Level 2 and Level 3 to cater for the needs of a truly comprehensive intake. Engineering, Travel and Tourism, Hairdressing and Public Services are all offered at Level 2. Students also have the advantage of a course in Religious Education as well as opportunities to take Mathematics and English at GCSE, in addition, the Jamie Oliver course in Home Cooking Skills provides students with a basic working knowledge of food preparation. At Level 3, the full traditional range of AS/A2 courses is on offer with some that are hard to find elsewhere –, such as Dance. Being based on both school sites, at St Bedeʼ,s and St Josephʼ,s, St Benedictʼ,s is able to build on and develop the longstanding traditions of both schools, dating back to 1900 and 1908 respectively. There is also the advantage of the excellent up-to-date facilities that each site now has to offer, in addition to drawing talented teaching staff from the two schools. This year the end of the year was marked on St Benedictʼ,s Feast Day with Mass celebrated by Father Martin Kelly who advised the students in his homily to be the very best that they can be now –, not to put their effort off to the future.

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Jul/Aug 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

NEWS FROM LEEDS TRINITY UNIVERSITY COLLEGE Leeds Catholic Post Page 9 Leeds Trinity seeking University title L eeds Trinity University College is delighted to confirm that it will be seeking to obtain full University status, following the governmentʼ,s announcement that the qualifying threshold for university title will be lowered from 4,000 to 1,000 students. The institution will be consulting widely on its proposed new title, Leeds Trinity University. Leeds Trinity, which has over 3000 students, has been able to award its own degrees since 2009 and is a recognised provider of high quality university education. Professor Freda Bridge, Principal and Chief Executive of Leeds Trinity University College, said: “,This is a very welcome development. It will reduce confusion and further recognise our exceptional achievements in preparing graduates for the world of work with high quality professionally focused degrees.”, Partnership between Leeds Trinity and St Maryʼ,s Catholic College, Hull The Secondary Education department at Leeds Trinity and St. Maryʼ,s Catholic College, Hull have formed a partnership to lead the new School Direct training initiative for trainee teachers. School Direct is a school based training programme leading to the award of PGCE with Qualified Teacher Status. Leeds Trinity is working with St Maryʼ,s to jointly provide training, support and assessment as outstanding providers in the Catholic education sector. The main aim of School Direct is to allow schools to recruit and select the trainees they want with the expectation that they will then go on to work within the school or group of schools in which they were trained, although there is no absolute guarantee of employment. St Maryʼ,s College, Hull has been awarded 10 secondary places on the ʻ,School Directʼ, teacher training programme starting from September 2012. The placements will lead to qualified teacher status (QTS) with an opportunity to be awarded professional graduate certificate in education (PGCE) validated by Leeds Trinity. There is no standard model for School Direct so St. Maryʼ,s College and Leeds Trinity are currently working together to design a school-based programme that is based on the high-quality Leeds Trinity Secondary PGCE. Stephen Wilkinson, Head of Secondary Education at Leeds Trinity, commented: “,School Direct is an exciting development for Leeds Trinity as it provides further opportunities to enhance and extend our partnership with schools. We are all acutely aware of the recruitment challenges facing schools –, and particularly RC schools –, and see School Direct as one way to address these challenges and train the next generation of outstanding teachers. We encourage schools to contact us if they wish to develop their own School Direct programmes for September 2013.”, Leeds Trinity Student carries Olympic Torch Weʼ,re extremely proud of Leeds Trinity student, Ben Cropper, who was an official Olympic Torchbearer for Bradford on Sunday 24 June! Ben was nominated by his former carer, Carol Russell, who also used to study at Leeds Trinity. Speaking about the experience, Ben said: ",It was a real honour to carry the Olympic Torch through Bradford last Sunday. As a proud Yorkshireman it means so much to see everyone in the county being so united in the build-up to the Games. Until I had carried the torch I had not realised that the excitement ahead of the games was so widespread. I`d like to thank everyone who has supported me to achieve such a feat, none more so than my fellow Leeds Trinity University student Carol Russell who submitted the successful nomination, much to my surprise.", Professor Freda Bridge –, Principal Holy Family Students return from Rhineland T he Holy Family School, Keighley, has long held an International School Award, the school has partner schools in many countries. The oldest contacts are those Europe supporting the traditional triangle of French, German and Spanish language teaching and the Language Department organises a trip for lower schools students at least each year. This year it was the turn of Germany to host a visit and Cain Godfrey set off from Keighley late one Sunday night with a party of 35 students. After the Dover-Calais ferry crossing they drove through Belgium and Holland before arriving at Hotel im Rheintal in Kamp-Bornhofen situated on the Rhine The purpose of the trip is twofold, to develop the students` cultural knowledge as well as their German language skills The 35 students and accompanying members of staff all had a great time. Cain Godfrey explained, “,One day we went on a boat cruise on the Rhine, followed by a visit to Marksburg castle and then a trip on the nearby Boppard chairlift. We also had a day in Cologne where we visited the Lindt chocolate museum (the museum shop there proved very popular!), the famous Cologne cathedral, and then went shopping around Cologne centre, giving the students opportunity to practise their German. Evening activities included bowling and mini-golf.”, The last day saw the inevitable visit to a theme park, Phantasialand, a day that was enjoyed by students and staff alike before embossing for the 17-hour journey home.

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Jul/Aug 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 10 Leeds Catholic Post Best Ever! O ur 74th Diocesan Pilgrimage to Lourdes ranked among one of the best. We accomplished everything set out in the Pilgrimage itinerary. The ʻ,yellow seaʼ, of more that 440 young pilgrims - under the encouraging oversight of school and college staff - generously made themselves available to serve the wheelchair needs of our sick and less able pilgrims. The Pilgrimage Hospitality Team of nurses, doctors and carers operated a 24/7 shift system as some pilgrims required overnight assistance in Hotel Padoue. At the same time the Team kept in supportive contact with other pilgrims by visiting different hotels daily. The presence of Archbishop Arthur meant that Leeds Pilgrimage was chosen to lead the Blessed Sacrament Procession on our first full day in Lourdes, this was also the only day we saw some ʻ,proper south of France summer sunshine.ʼ, On every other day it rained or we were shrouded in grey low cloud. Indeed on the night of our Penitential Service an angry mountain weather system swiftly descend on Lourdes and a dense black sky threw out torrential rain and launched 2cm ice balls at us! Priests, Religious, and pilgrims of every nationality dashed for the nearest shop awning, hotel entrance or telephone box to avoid a soaking and possible injury! We enjoyed several bookings at the Baths such that up to half of our 650 Leeds were able to go and ʻ,wash in the waters.ʼ, The Mass and Anointing of the Sick was, as ever, a lovely high point of the itinerary. And at the end of our early Wednesday morning Mass in the Grotto - which we shared with Ampleforth College - Archbishop Arthur took his leave of the Pilgrimage a day early. He urged us to pray for a new Bishop of Leeds and asked that we pray for him as he begins his new task in Rome. We wished him Godspeed. The Diocesan Pilgrimage is alive and well and in very good heart, with an excellent school/college staff group to lead the Youth Section and a Hospitality Team committed to serve the needs of our Adult Section sick pilgrims. We are already counting down the days to July 2013 –, when we shall embark on our 75th Jubilee Diocesan Pilgrimage to Lourdes.

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Page 11

Jul/Aug 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Leeds Catholic Post Page 11 Wilf’,s Fest 2012 T he School Council of St Wilfridʼ,s Featherstone planned and organised a whole school FUNdraising event on the afternoon of Tuesday 26th June: Wilfʼ,s Fest 2012! The students chose to raise money for two charities: Great Ormond Street Hospital and Multiple Sclerosis. Funds were raised in many imaginative ways including making the day a non-uniform day, selling ʻ,Wilfʼ,s Fest 2012ʼ, wrist bands, selling cakes, doing face painting and more! To tie in with the ʻ,festivalʼ, theme, there were a range of acts performing including many talented singers, dancers and a GB gymnast. The afternoon was a huge success and a total of £,3,392.25 was raised which will be split between the two charities. St. Mary’,s is a Route to Oxbridge N ew data showing how many students progressed to further or higher education or training for each school, college and local authority in England has just been published. It is the first time that the number and proportion of young people in a school, college and authority who attend Oxbridge or a Russell Group university is being published. The statistics –, published as part of the Governmentʼ,s transparency agenda –, give parents and the public even greater information with which they can choose the right school or college for their child. St. Mary`s Catholic High School, Menston are included in the top ten non-selective schools in the country which sends students to Oxbridge. Mr Robert Pritchard, Headteacher said:- ",We celebrate the success of all of our students and want them to have high aspirations. We also want our young people to progress and achieve and this is another measure which illustrates the hard work of students and staff.”,

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Page 12

Jul/Aug 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 12 Leeds Catholic Post St Benedict’,s Garforth Thirst for Change Makes a Big Splash P upils at St. Benedictʼ,s Primary School in Garforth were proud to invite Margaret Siberry, CAFOD Leeds Manager, to receive a cheque for £,825.40 to support water and sanitation projects. They had undertaken all kinds of water- related challenges during Lent, including carrying water for a day and donating the proceeds of sales from their Gardening club. The children can be reassured that their efforts will make a huge difference. Children and young people from all over England and Wales have pulled out all the stops during Lent to help bring clean water to communities around the world. Together with CAFOD supporters in parishes we have raised a record amount for our Lenten fundraising appeal. Most years we would raise about £,2 million - £,2.5 million. But in our 50th anniversary year your amazing efforts have broken the £,9 million mark to help the millions of people around the world without access to clean water. Thank you for also for of the campaign actions you sent us. Your actions showed the UK government that you care about the water and sanitation crisis. They listened and took action, letting us know when they doubled their commitment to water and sanitation in April. Over 60 million people, in some of the worldʼ,s poorest countries, are expected to benefit from this investment over the next three years, showing this is an announcement of huge significance. CAFODʼ,s partner, LemLem from Ethiopia pictured here on the left, visited schools and parishes during Lent and over Easter. She said, “,I have been inspired by the determination and dedication of CAFOD supporters. I have never seen such generosity. When I heard that over 60,000 actions had been taken in support of the Thirst for Change campaign, I was shocked. I imagine thousands of individuals wanting to help the people I work with in Ethiopia and I feel hope. I have been particularly impressed by all the young people who want to help communities without water. That means a lot to me.”, The CAFOD Leeds Team would like to thank you once again for your overwhelming support. Supporters run for CAFOD in the Jane Tomlinson’,s Run For All Leeds 10K T he sun was welcome on Sunday morning 8th July as thousands of runners started off on the Headrow to raise funds in the cityʼ,s famous charity run. For the first time supports were running for CAFOD and we were delighted that Fr Peter Kravos and Fr. Eamonn Hegarty took up the challenge. They were both surprised and very pleased at their fast finishing times. They were joined by students John Laux and Laurynas Pukenas –, all pictured above with CAFOD partner Geoffrey Chongo from the Jesuit Centre for Theological Reflection in Lusaka. Also running for CAFOD were Sayed Hussain, bottom left, a student at Notre Dame Sixth Form College, Andy Birch, teacher at St. Maryʼ,s Menston and Paul daswell from St. Benedictʼ,s Garforth. Congratulations and thanks to all the runners for giving their time and energy to CAFOD raise funds for CAFODʼ,s work. South Sudan - one year on W hen the people of South Sudan went to a referendum in January last year to decide on whether to split from Sudan, the result was decisive. Nearly 99% voted in favour of independence. The worldʼ,s youngest country marked its first anniversary on 9th July. There has been relative progress in improving South Sudan`s crumbling infrastructure, with roads and telecommunications networks expanding, however the challenges facing the country still remain immense. Almost 4.7 million people, more than half the population are not able to grow or buy enough food to eat. According to the UN`s World Food Programme, the cereal deficit for 2012 is estimated at more than 470,000MT - almost half the country`s total consumption requirements for the year. CAFOD`s Country Representative based in the capital Juba, Telly Sadia said: ",There has been a poor harvest, food supplies in the northern border areas have been constrained by the closure of the border with South Sudan by the Sudan government and bad roads and rising fuel and food prices have left the country extremely fragile.”, South Sudan is dependent on oil for 98 per cent of its revenues. The decision in January to halt oil production until a dispute with Sudan over transit fees is resolved has sparked rampant inflation. People have not been able to afford to buy the countryʼ,s stable food –, the cereal crop Sorghum –, as prices for this and other basic foods have sky- rocketed. Mori Francis, part-time radio journalist with Radio Bakhita, a Catholic radio station supported by CAFOD, talks in his latest blog about food price inflation: “,Juba is one of the most expensive cities in the world. Prices have shot up. Fruits have become a luxury food for ordinary people. I used to buy an apple for half a South Sudanese dollar but today it costs 2 dollars.”, In addition to the food crisis, the influx of tens of thousands of South Sudanese returnees and those fleeing conflict in the border areas is exacerbating the food shortages. Since October last year, 372,000 South Sudanese have returned from Sudan, those that arrive have no means of earning a living, and schools and health services are already severely under resourced through years of neglect because of the war. The influx of returnees has left these services barely able to function. In March this year CAFOD visited some of the rural areas in the diocese of Yei and saw the dire situation many of the returnees are in - unable to plant and grow their own food because of the drought, with uninhabitable school buildings and fearing for their childrenʼ,s wellbeing because of lack of clean water and lack of health clinics nearby. Through Caritas Yei, CAFOD has been able to respond with food distribution, and building water boreholes in returnee villages providing clean safe drinking water. In a pastoral letter to mark the first anniversary of independence, the Catholic Archbishop of Juba, Paulino Lukudu Loro and the Anglican Archbishop Daniel Deng Bul, have published a joint pastoral letter praising the positive developments they have seen in road and telecommunications infrastructure over the past year but also express in their letter a real vision of the future. ",We dream of two nations at peace with each other, cooperating to make the best use of their God-given resources, promoting free interaction between their citizens, living side by side in solidarity and mutual respect, celebrating their shared history and forgiving any wrongs they may have done to each other. We dream of people no longer traumatised, of children who can go to school, of mothers who can attend clinics, of an end to poverty and malnutrition, and of Christians and Muslims who can attend church or mosque freely without fear. We call on the governments of both countries to work towards making that dream a reality.”, Bishop david Konstant with Bishop Rudolph Deng from Sudan who visited the Sudanese community in Leeds ahead of the election last year. For further information please contact: (London) Nana Anto-Awuakye on: Tel: 020 7095-5456 - email: nanto- awuakye@cafod.org.uk Sister Pascalina Mambwe, Franciscan Missionary Sisters of Assisi, Visits Leeds Diocese S ister Pascalina from Ndola Diocese in the Copper belt region of Zambia, is manager of the Integrated Aids Programme for the diocese. She was in the UK to describe the vital work that the programme undertakes. As well as offering testing and counseling, the programme includes nutrional support and woks especially with pregnant women to prevent mother to baby transmission of the virus. She also coordinates the orphans and vulnerable children projects. Whilst at Hinsley Hall Sr. Pascalina bumped into an Olympic torch bearer who was pleased to let her be photographed holding the torch. During her brief stay in Leeds she met with supporters in St Jeanne Jugan parish where she discussed her work over afternoon tea. Sr. Pascalina also wanted to thank all our supporters for their magnificent fundraising efforts to provide clean water this Lent.

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Page 13

Jul/Aug 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Leeds Catholic Post Page 13 New classmates at a Leeds school are helping pupils to fly high T he creation of a ʻ,living classroomʼ, –, home to ducks, hens, rabbits and guinea pigs –, at Holy Family Catholic Primary School in Armley, has provided youngsters with more than just a host of furry friends. Rachel Reeves MP joined Pupils, Staff, governors and parents for the official opening of the exciting new school area. Headteacher Peter McQuillen Strong, known as Mr Strong to his pupils, said the creatures were inspiring and motivating students on a daily basis. Teachers report “,The writing that classes have done, just from the experience of holding a warm egg is amazing –, their imagination is inspired by touching it.”, For children who perhaps arenʼ,t always keen to come to school itʼ,s a wonderful ʻ,carrotʼ,. Mr Strong said “,It helps with attendance and motivation.”, And youngstersʼ, imaginations were put to the test with a naming competition for the new arrivals, which resulted in a chicken called Mummy, another called Kylie and a duck called Quack Quack. The school council came up with the idea of keeping animals when they were asked what should be done with a piece of disused land that had been the school nature garden many years ago. Mr Strong said: “,We were trying to do something on that area that would inspire the children and what the children were telling us would inspire them was animals.”, They secured a grant from First Direct for £,2,500 to kit out the area with everything they needed, from chicken coops to hutches, flood lights and a security camera. And local businesses helped out with deals on equipment. The school has now provided a spacious new home to 12 rabbits and guinea pigs who needed rehousing and the children hatched their own hens and ducks with eggs acquired from Meanwood Valley Urban Farm. They take turns to care for the animals, feeding and cleaning them out as well as collecting around 14 eggs every day, which are used in baking classes or sold on to parents. 7-a-side Cup 2012 The now annual 7-a-side Catholic Cup was held at St Theresaʼ,s Catholic Primary School in East Leeds in May 2012. Over 20 schools and approximately 250 children took part in this fabulous advertisement for Catholic sport in the city of Leeds. The children play in mixed leagues in the morning session with 5 seeded teams to separate out the semi-finalists from the 11-a-sde Bishopʼ,s Cup competition along with last yearʼ,s winners. The afternoon session sees the winners from each of the morning leagues playing each other for the chance to be crowned champions. The teams that finished 2nd, 3rd, 4th and 5th also play off against their respective peers and the winner of each league gets a trophy at the end. This year the competition was as fierce as ever and we found it very difficult to separate the eventual winners, Our Lady of Good Counsel who won on penalties after extra time. The runners up St Josephʼ,s, Wetherby came a very close second. The winners of the 2nd League were St Augustineʼ,s, the 3rd League winners were St Paulʼ,s, the 4th League winners were St Francis, Morley and the 5th League trophy was shared between St Nicholas and Immaculate Heart (A). As ever the whole event was played in a spirit of true comradeship and camaraderie and the real winner was Catholic sport which continues to thrive in our city, long may it continue. Something none of us expected W ow, Wow, Wow that was something I donʼ,t think any of us expected and Iʼ,m not talking about Englandʼ,s ability to reach the Euro Quarter finals but the splendid spectacle that is the Olympic torch relay. Many negative articles and reports have been written about the Olympic Games coming to London, quite a few of them I would have to agree with. Iʼ,m sure some of the money could have been better spent, Iʼ,m sure that when the modern Olympics were first played out that they were not about commercial gain for athletes or multinational companies but I think, no I know the torch relay has been nothing but positive as it winds its way through the streets of the British Isles, not forgetting a fleeting visit to Dublin where my friends who live over there have told me it was greeted with as much gusto that has been witnessed up and down this land. Now Iʼ,m not here to worship false gods but the torch does deserve a pat on the back at least and so do the designers of the Olympic torch. It has been my absolute pleasure to spend the last couple of weeks visiting many schools around Leeds and beyond to let the kids see, touch and learn about the Olympic torch and its meaning and this is where the torch designers deserve a gold medal. When I knew that I would be visiting schools, I thought I had better do some research to avoid being caught out by a five year old child who knows more about the Olympics than myself and Iʼ,m glad I did. Not just because of the hundreds of question that have been thrown at me since it was my honour to carry the torch, but also because I have learnt a variety of things that are relevant to todayʼ,s society as they were in ancient Greece. Most of us know now that the torch is gold because of the relevance with gold medals and most of us know that the torch has 8000 holes in it to represent the 8000 torchbearers that are carrying it. However most donʼ,t know that the torch is triangular in shape for three reasons with each reason having three points to it, the first reason is easily explained with the fact that the 2012 games will be the third time the games have been held in the UK with previous games being held in 1908 and 1948. The second reason represents the ethos of the games, stronger, higher and faster which can be translated into always try your best. The third reason is my favourite though as the triangular shape also represents hope, unity and peace thus meaning as the flame gets passed from one torchbearer to another, this is the message that is also being passed along the streets from one community to another, which has probably been the most memorable part of the whole process for me. The mere fact that the torch has been up and down this country has brought communities, religions, and ethnic groups together like never before and I for one want to hold my torch up high and shout about that fact. My own personal “,moment to shine”, will be remembered by me, my family and friendsʼ, for the feeling of togetherness and community spirit that was felt by all, so letʼ,s embrace this feeling and letʼ,s take the positives out of the torch relay and as they say “,spread the good news”, because I certainly will be as I visit the many schools that too have embraced this new found spirit. Aspirations Week - St Joseph’,s School Pudsey Year 6 pupils from St Josephʼ,s School, Pudsey took part in an Aspirations Week, during which they welcomed a number of guest speakers, came to school dressed for their dream career and took part in work experience around their school. One pupil said, “,The week was inspirational and made me realise I would like to do more than one job.”, The children were provided with a wealth of information about the range of careers available to them. A number of parents and governors volunteered to speak to the class about their career, the qualifications that are needed and described a typical day at work! The children heard about work as a barrister, town planner, vet, physiotherapist, architect and many more. Another pupil said, “,The week has helped me to learn what jobs are out there. There are a lot more than I thought.”, The highlight of the week was ʻ,workingʼ, around school. The children wrote a letter of application for a job either in the school office, kitchen, as a lunchtime supervisor, as a teacher and teaching assistant in nursery and infant classes. The children then experienced planning and delivering lessons, answering the telephone, baking buns and washing up and keeping the younger children entertained during a wet lunchtime! The week ended with an assembly for the rest of the school and parents to celebrate all that had been learned and experienced during Aspirations Week. The week was summed up by one pupil as “,eventful and exciting.”, Deacon Tom Marshall and his son, Phil

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Page 14

Jul/Aug 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 14 Leeds Catholic Post O n Saturday 30th June, Holy Family &, St Michaelʼ,s Pontefract once again hosted the Annual Wakefield and Out of District Catholic Primary Schoolsʼ, Football Tournament. This year eight of the Catholic schools from across the Wakefield and out of district region participated in the tournament. These included: St. Benedictʼ,s Garforth, English Martyrs Wakefield, Holy Family &, St. Michaelʼ,s Pontefract, Sacred Heart Hemsworth, St Austinʼ,s Wakefield, St. Johnʼ,s Normanton, St. Ignatius Ossett and St. Josephʼ,s Pontefract. It was a very keenly fought tournament full of exciting and flowing football that kept the spectators, parents, staff and supporters, entertained throughout. The tournament once again showed what a high standard of footballer is being produced within the Catholic schools in the Wakefield district. After the group stages, the two thrilling semi-finals saw St. Benedictʼ,s Garforth beat English Martyrs Wakefield 1 –, 0, whilst Sacred Heart Hemsworth beat St. Ignatius Ossett 1 –, 0. The resulting third/fourth place final saw English Martyrs eventually beat St. Ignatius 3 –, 1 but only after a closely fought game was forced into extra time. The tournament ended with the final between the two best and probably most evenly matched teams in Sacred Heart Hemsworth and St Benedictʼ,s Garforth. The two teams matched each other throughout in an extremely tense but entertaining final before eventually St Benedictʼ,s Garforth triumphed 1 –, 0 and took the cup as 2012 champions. Wakefield Cup Ed Ballʼ,s MP for Morley and Outwood visited St Francis Catholic Primary School, Morley, on Friday 15th June. He was greeted by two Year 6 children, who along with Head Teacher Mrs J Burns gave him a tour of the school. This was followed by ʻ,Question Timeʼ, organised by the Year 6 children. A selection of questions had been prepared by children throughout Key Stage 2. A confident and composed Ed Balls rose to the challenge of answering a range of well prepared questions about his job, ambitions, achievements and his hobbies. Ed gave lengthy and detailed answers to all the childrenʼ,s questions and said he ʻ,wished all Question Times were as fun and as easy as this!ʼ, because the audience were so well behaved. Olympic Sports Day Following the excitement of seeing the Olympic Torch in Morley on Monday 25th June, St Francis Catholic Primary celebrated their own `Spirit Alive` mini Olympics. Year six produced a colourful and entertaining opening ceremony. This included a procession led by Olivia Sykes wearing a genuine Olympic torch bearerʼ,s tracksuit and caring an original Olympic torch. Key Stage One started with traditional races whilst Key Stage Two carried out Olympic themed activities such as javelin. The day was rounded off with medals presented and a closing ceremony. It was a fabulous day enjoyed by the staff and parents. Children Grill Ed Balls MP By Jo Buck N ot only is 2012 the year of the Queenʼ,s Diamond Jubilee, but it also marks the 50th anniversary of the opening of our present church on Kirkgate, Shipley by Bishop Dwyer on June 4th. 1962. St Walburgaʼ,s is now part of the parish of St Teresa Benedicta of the Cross, and we are marking our Golden Jubilee with a series of events being held throughout the year. We have tried to make these events as varied as possible, so that everyone in the parish can feel involved and interested. We began our year with a 1960ʼ,s themed New Year Party, with appropriate costumes, music and entertainment. This was followed in February by a Day of Reflection, led by Canon Joe Smith, during which we looked at our past achievements, and also ahead to future challenges. In March, we had a talk about the life of the new patroness of our parish, St Teresa Benedicta, given by Father Robert Opala, followed in April by a wine and cheese evening as part of a sharing of memories. During this event, we saw a film which had been made at the time, recording the last days of the old church and the construction of the new. Our guest for the evening was Father Donal Oʼ,Leary who was the first curate in the new church and who appeared several times in the film. In early May, we had a parish walk to Middleton Grange in Ilkley. Some energetic souls walked all the way, as parishioners had in the past to attend mass at Middleton Lodge. The rest of us caught the train, and walked from Ilkley station! We paused at the Calvary on the way round, and then descended through the masses of bluebells back down to the river. The first part of our year climaxed with a Flower Festival, held to coincide with our First Eucharist weekends. This was open to the public, and the other churches of Shipley were invited. The theme of the festival was “,The Sacraments”,, and the church looked wonderful, flooded with colour and light. As can be seen from the pictures, the arrangements were imaginative and thoughtful, and also represented many aspects of our church life, such as music and the childrenʼ,s liturgy. We are now planning more events for the remainder of the year. Later in June, there will be a garden party for the younger members of the parish, with fun and games for all. In July, there will be a parish celebration for the ordination of Michael Doody, while in August some of us are going to York to see a performance of The Mystery Plays, held in the grounds of St Maryʼ,s Abbey. In September, there will be a talk on the history of the Catholic parish in Shipley, which dates from the 1860ʼ,s. October will be a very busy month, with a youth event and a harvest tea for our older parishioners. While we were planning this year, it was realised that the church had never been consecrated, so on October 5th there will be a special consecration Mass and celebration. There will be a musical evening in November to showcase all our talents, of both young and old, and to round off the year we hope to hold an International Evening, with food, music, dance and entertainment from all over the world to illustrate the origins and backgrounds of the wonderfully diverse people who make up our parish. Ours is one of the new parishes in the diocese, created from the amalgamation of St Walburgaʼ,s, St Aidanʼ,s in Baildon, and St Antonyʼ,s in Windhill. We are beginning to find that this Golden Jubilee Celebration is helping to bring us together as a united and active community. ST WALBURGA’,S CHURCH, SHIPLEY: GOLDEN JUBILEE CELEBRATIONS 1962-2012 A date for your Diary Leeds Catholic History Day Wheeler Hall, Leeds Cathedral Saturday, 20th October Further details in September edition of the Catholic Post

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Page 15

Jul/Aug 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Leeds Catholic Post Page 15 Classified Advertising MARRIAGE CARE Marriage isn’,t always easy —, Counselling can help For an appointment in confidence, with an understanding and experienced listener, please telephone: 0800 389 3801 A Relationship Counselling Service W. Lever Ltd BRADFORD 01274 547137 524 THORNTON ROAD, BRADFORD BD8 9NB FOR OVER 75 YEARS PROVIDING A COMPLETE PERSONAL &, CARING 24 HOUR FUNERAL SERVICE CHAPEL OF REST H UGHES F UNERAL S ERVICES (Catholic Funeral Directors) 180 YORK ROAD, LEEDS LS9 9NT. Tel 2480953/63 152 GREEN LANE, CROSSGATES. Tel 2326900 3 HOLLIN PARK PARADE, OAKWOOD ROUNDABOUT Tel 2499338 Web: wwww.hughesfuneralservices.co.uk Email: info@hughesfuneralservices.co.uk Family owned and managed. Fully Qualified in all aspects. 24 Hour Service Guaranteed Fixed Price Funeral Plans etc. “,At a time of bereavement we carry out our duties with dignity and respect”, In times of bereavement please contact: B. J. MELIA &, SONS (B. J. Melia Dip F.D.) F UNERAL D IRECTORS AND M ONUMENTAL M ASONS Private Chapel of Rest 64 GIBBET STREET, HALIFAX Telephone: 01422 354453 PRE-PAID FUNERAL SERVICE AVAILABLE DETAILS ON REQUEST Vocations –, News A New Horizon “,God is love, and the one who abides in love abides in God, and God abides in them”, (1 Jn 4:16). These words from the First Letter of John express with remarkable clarity the heart of the Christian faith: the Christian image of God and the resulting image of human kind and its destiny. In the same verse, St John also offers a kind of summary of the Christian life: “,We have come to know and to believe in the love God has for us.”, We have come to believe in Godʼ,s love: in these words the Christian can express the fundamental decision of their life. Being Christian is not the result of an ethical choice or a lofty idea, but the encounter with an event, a person, which gives life a new horizon and a decisive direction..... Since God has first loved us (cf Jn 4:10), love is now longer a mere “,command”,, it is the response to the gift for love with which God draws near us. Pope Benedict XVI I once heard it said of a priest, that “,his people knew that he loved them.”, It would be hard to think of a greater tribute than that, not easy to find a better epitaph. He may have been a fine preacher, an excellent administrator, a good theologian, a wonderful broadcaster, admirably efficient, but what are these if there is no love? ... Odd, is it not, that we rarely hear St Paulʼ,s hymn to charity at an ordination to the priesthood, and yet it would be so very appropriate, and indeed, so practical too.... A priest has to show the face of Christ, firm in respect of principles, but always kind and loving. When the people know that you love them, they are drawn to see something of the love of God which God has for each one –, the ambassador has not only spoken about that but also shown it in his ministry. Basil Hume Book Review –, PRIESTS TODAY ed Brendan Leahy and Michael Mulvey Perhaps the best advert for this book is a run through the chapter headings: Believing in God who is Love, Following Jesus, Making the Church the Home and School of Communion, Reaching Out to Everyone, Unity among Priests, Learning the Art of Loving, Unifying Life, Living Eucharistically - Living and Preaching the Word, Radiating the Risen Christ - Embracing Jesus Forsaken, Taking Mary into Your Home, Listening to the Voice of the Spirit. The short and profound reflections contained in this book are of immense value to priests, but also to those who live out the mystery of the common or royal priesthood of all the baptised, and those who wish to understand the vocation of their priests more in depth. The editors are Brendan Leahy, Professor of Systematic Theology at St Patrickʼ,s College, Maynooth, Ireland, and Michael Mulvey, Administrator of the Diocese of Austin, Texas. The book includes reflections by St Augustine, Hans Urs von Balthasar, Benedict XVI, Helder Camara, Basil Hume, John Paul II, Chiara Lubich, Mother Teresa, Edith Stein, Jean Marie Vianney and many others. Available from New City Online Store £,6.95 Largest Uk Vocations Festival A Resounding Success Around four hundred young adults, including a group from the Leeds Diocese, gathered at Oscott College, Birmingham, earlier this month for the third national discernment festival, Invocation. Young people from across the UK heard addresses from Canon Luiz Ruscillo, Sr Catherine Holum CFR, and Bishop Mark Davies. They also venerated the relic of the heart of St John Vianney, patron saint of parish priests. The Apostolic Nuncio, Archbishop Mennini, preached at the final Mass, saying: “,This Festival is a wonderful opportunity for you to seek out others who share your desire to know Godʼ,s will and who visibly remind you that you are not alone. None of us is alone when we know and love the Lord! Here ...it is possible to make the time, the space and especially the silence ... to help one another in listening for, and hearing Godʼ,s call”,. The festival offers young people the chance to speak with priests and Religious who are joyfully living their vocation. Fr Stephen Langridge, one of the organisers of the event, said, “,It is a privilege to help these young Catholics find the life that God is calling them to lead, and with the Lordʼ,s help, the Church can be confident of an exciting future”,. Next year a regional Invocation event will be held at Ampleforth Abbey. Photo acknowledgement: Catholic Church in England and Wales photostream Young people ated 15+ are welcome to attend the gathering at Hinsley Hall 62 Headingley Lane LS6 2BX on Sunday 29th July 2 –, 5 p.m. “,If you want it Jesus, I want it too”, will look at the life of Blessed Chiara Badano, one of Pope Benedictʼ,s role models for young people. There will be testimonies, discussion DVD, games, prayer. Bookings to vocations.office@leedsvocations.org.uk Looking to advertise a company or an event –, why not advertise in the Leeds Catholic Post This space could be yours! We have good rates for adverts, reaching a local population of 15,000 Contact: Louise Ward, Catholic Post, Hinsley Hall, 62 Headingley Lane, Leeds LS6 2BX Tel: 0113 261 8028 louise.ward@ dioceseofleeds.org.uk Mgr Paul Grogan

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Page 16

Jul/Aug 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 16 Leeds Catholic Post SHOPPING FASTER For the “,Ford”, generation that superb film starring Charlie Chaplin “,Modern Times”, brilliantly undermined the so called “,Taylorist”, factory worker mass production line system as the route to future productivity and growth. The worker on a speeding up conveyor belt was quickly reduced to a dumb extension of the machinery, robbed of personality, and unable to cope. The only way out of over routinisation was to throw a spanner in the works to stop the whole process and get a breather. Of course since then industrial factory production, as well as moving east (in search of more poorer human servants), has been taken over by robots and computerised controls. Workers have been replaced by machines. But as we have witnessed that shift from industrial manufacturing to services sector industries , such as giant retail businesses, it would seem that the conveyor belt attitude to the worker has not gone away. Did you know that as you stand in a large supermarket queue where most of us now do our weekly shopping that the person on the check-out till has a time target imposed on them as the management try to push them to be more “,efficient”, and work faster to get customersʼ, goods through the cashier points quicker? Morrisons has instructed its cashiers recently that they must scan one item every three seconds to hit store managers weekly reported targets. Staff who fail to keep up will be taken off the tills. The ability to measure and monitor everything in fine detail certainly enables managers to keep a close check on time. Most supermarkets have built in to their productivity monitoring close scrutiny of check out times arguing that they do not want to keep customers standing for a long time in queues. It is reported for example that a family shopping once a week will spend an extra six hours a year at the Coop checkouts as the supermarkets compete to impress on speed. Apparently according to a newspaper test of a typical basket of 20 identical items the Asda checkout used proved the quickest taking 35 seconds to be scanned through ( roughly each item took 1.75 seconds), the Morrisons store came second at 37 seconds, and Waitrose took one minute and five seconds (3.25 seconds per item ). Tesco came fifth at one minute 25 seconds (4.5 seconds an item ). The Coop were the slowest taking one minute 58 seconds (5.9 seconds per item ). In fact it is reported that the new target for Morrisons is being set at 1.85 seconds per item through the scanner. But it illustrates that you might spend a couple of minutes at their till but up to 9 minutes at a Coop. Of course customers increasing use “,convenience stores “, for quick convenience, to nip in and out but it should not be believed that the only reason for speeding up the checkout is for the benefit of customers in a hurry. It is primarily to “,increase productivity and efficiency”, at a store. In other words the aim is to “,ship out even more goods”,. Shopping has moved into “,Modern Times”,. For all the myths about the British addiction to forming orderly queues we are increasingly irritated by them and telling us how much of our precious time is ”,wasted”, in them just ups the ante. And from now on treating a person at a check out till as a real human being and trying to talk to them in a friendly and engaging manner could actually cost them their job. Deliberately holding up the queue for a minute or two for a brief chat or words of recognition could damage their work prospects and wages, such has become our economic obsession with putting a price tag on every second of our time. Subverting the reduction of till staff to automatons is no longer so easy as having a friendly word or two. We as customers are under an obligation to them to quickly get through. Perhaps we should subvert the queue. I can recall a retreat which stressed the need to cultivate everyday prayer in ordinary circumstances and it focussed on praying at bus stops and whilst doing the ironing. Maybe handing out short prayer cards notes in supermarket queues to “,make good use of the time”, might go some way to reducing the customer pressure but it would not tackle the basic cause of the problem which is the voracious intense competitive search for profits in among the big supermarkets. But they do need to be challenged on behalf of the persons who actually work for them. Reducing people to silent barcode scanners is an inhuman way to treat a worker. A Pope Leo X111 stressed in his seminal Encyclical Rerum Novarum written in the wake of the industrial revolution people should not be exploited to “,hired hands”, each person has human dignity that should always be acknowledged. He insisted that we should always give priority to the rights of workers. It may be that the new self check out scanning systems now increasingly in supermarkets reduce both the queues and the need for checkout tills in the not too distant future. We will be able to check ourselves out. Moreover we will be able to visit a supermarket in silence and do our shopping without speaking to anyone at any point in the process accompanied only by piped music, unless of course the staff are “,freed up”, to wander around and help and advise as “,store assistants”,. In the meantime while supermarkets may monitor our minutes we should be insisting to the managements that checkout staff are not put under strict targets that prevent them from having ordinary human conversations and we in the queues quieten down and regard them as opportunities for a few minutes prayer. John Battle KSG Mission Week at Notre Dame N otre Dame students returning to college after working hard for their exams were treated to a week of talks from a variety of speakers on the theme of mission who addressed the question ʻ,what is my mission in life?ʼ, This was specifically relevant to the young people who are at present engaged in making a whole range of life choices such as, what do I want to study at university and what job do I want to do? The aim of the week was not to answer questions about courses or future employment but to look at mission in life in a wider sense, i.e. What am I called to do with my life? Mgr Paul Grogan clearly expressed this in his talk ʻ,Heart speaking to Heartʼ, in which he spoke of Godʼ,s message to you about how you should live. Vocation and the call to many different walks of life were explored over the week, Mgr Grogan and Fr. Eugene McGillycuddy spoke eloquently of their vocations to be priests and the service they give to their communities. Breda Theakson spoke about the importance of family life, echoing Mgr Groganʼ,s point that the first and most important educators of a child are their parents and that the vocations of marriage and parenting were vital for the general health of our society. ʻ,Homeʼ,, she said, ʻ,is a holy place where there is life and love in it.ʼ, John Walsh and the Jesuit Volunteer Community spoke about their vocations to work with the more marginalised in our society, the poor and the homeless. John a regular speaker at Notre Dame explained the issue of homelessness and how initially he had not thought he could do the job, but that fear should not stop anyone from following their vocation. The JVC speakers talked about the gap year opportunities they offer to allow young people to not only help others in the inner cities, but to grow and develop as people, exploring their values and how they may want to express this in their education or their future careers. The students offered many useful comments about the state of family life today and asked some interesting and perceptive questions which were answered openly and honestly by all the speakers. It was agreed that Mission week expresses eloquently the wider vocation of Notre Dame Catholic Sixth Form College –, that our motto, having faith in your future, is not simply about passing exams and going on to university, college or a job, but that the college has a wider mission, to help young people explore who they are and what they are called to be because they are all uniquely special children of God. A reflection by Fr Simon Lodge Myddelton has seen many changes down the centuries. Around 460 years ago the open practice of the Catholic Faith was forced underground, and local Catholics loyal to the Pope, including the Myddelton family, were forced to celebrate Mass in secret and, potentially, at great personal cost. A few centuries later the ancient house passed out of Myddelton hands after many centuries and then passed again into the care of the Passionist Fathers before finally passing into the hands of the Diocese in the early 1980s. Then, just 10 years ago, Myddelton Lodge having been sold, the purpose built youth retreat centre was opened and is currently fully booked next year, hosting retreats for young people between the ages of 10 and 20. Those young people come from all over the Diocese, but there are also groups coming from elsewhere, including South London! However, when the children arrive next year they will be encountering another big change. A whole new team will be in place headed by Anne Trotter, the newly appointed Co-ordinator of the Diocesan Youth Team. Fr Anthony Jackson will be the new Diocesan youth chaplain and Warden of Myddelton Grange. They will be assisted by Simon Fitzgerald (from Warminster) and Emily Tysoe (a local lass from Addingham). Also based at the Grange will be Anna Cowell, the Diocesan Youth Officer. This whole new chapter in the life of Myddelton is as a result of a thorough review of the Diocesan youth services headed by Mgr John Wilson. The current retreat team are going to pastures new. I am going as parish priest to Pontefract, Joe Dennison is joining the Youth Mission Team in Hexham and Newcastle and Stephen Longfellow is placing his first foot on the rung of the teaching ladder and joining the staff at St Philipʼ,s, Middleton. But the saddest farewell is reserved for Frank McCrickard who has been here for only marginally less a time than the Myddelton family themselves! Frank joined the team in the early 1990ʼ,s and in those intervening decades he has poured his heart and soul into the mission of the Lodge and, now, the Grange. Thousands upon thousands of young people have been guided and inspired by Frank, whose simple unassuming faith has underpinned so much of all that has been achieved here over the years. It is impossible to imagine what Myddelton Grange would have been like without him, and how we would have survived without his dedication particularly in the years of re-building when Frank travelled the country leading retreats for our established clientele and thus maintaining vital contacts. Frank hails from Cumbria, and the strong faith that he inherited from his parents has been passed on to several generations of Yorkshire, Derbyshire, Mancunian, Scouse, Cheshire, North Eastern children. Even Southerners have benefited! This, to my mind, is the essence of our Catholic Faith. It is not a text-book experience to be studied, but a life to be lived –, and this is precisely what Frank has offered to our Diocese over the years. “,Talkʼ,s cheap and money buys houses”, so my grandmother used to say, Frank can (and does) speak eloquently in the language of the Church, but he also practices his Faith through his devotion to the sacraments (public and private) and his attentiveness to the needs of others both in his own local community and the wider global community. He has an immense sense of social justice which should characterise the life of any disciple of Christ and he has taught so many young people (and adults) to never be afraid of challenging those systems, governments and institutions that undermine the beauty and dignity of Godʼ,s created order. Inspired by local heroes of the 16th century, Frank regularly reminds our retreatants of the lives of the Martyrs who kept the Faith alive in this country and the modern martyrs who seek to do the same all over the world. This has not been without personal cost at times, but Frank recognises that this “,goes with the turf”,, so to speak, in the same way that Blessed John Paul II often spoke of a certain “,white martyrdom”,. He would be the first to say that this has only been possible with the support of his beloved wife, Jean and their children and their own, rapidly growing, families. Jean, having recently retired as Head of a primary school in Skipton, is now in training for her own kind of “,white martyrdom”, as Frank retires from the Grange!!! It has been an enormous privilege to work with Frank so closely over these last 6 years and I have benefited immensely in my life as a priest by learning from this man. So many of my brother priests would say the same, as indeed would the countless teachers and assistants who have been connected to or worked here over the years. We all wish Frank the best of everything for the years ahead, and we humbly ask Almighty Godʼ,s blessing on him for his retirement. Our Diocese, indeed the Church in this country, has been greatly blessed by God through the work of Frank McCrickard. “,Let us give thanks to the Lord, for His love endures forever!”, The End of an Era at Myddelton Grange S r. Helen was born in Dagenham, Essex on 22nd February 1927. She had two sisters and five brothers. The family moved to Teddington, Middlesex, where she attended Sacred Heart School, and was taught by the Sisters of Charity of St. Paul. After leaving school she worked in Local Government and Banking. She felt drawn to enter religious life, which her mother was pleased about, because she had also wanted to be a religious herself before meeting Helenʼ,s father, George. After her profession she went to Holywell in North Wales to study and then on the St. Paulʼ,s College, Newbold Revel, Rugby, where she graduated in 1954. Her innovative teaching career started in Langley, Manchester, as a primary class teacher, her love of football started prompting her to foster close links with the players from Manchester United football club. Her enthusiasm for teaching children continued when she was appointed as a Senior Mistress in the local Secondary School. She took up the Headship of St. Brigidʼ,s School, Leeds in 1969, where she inspired her staff and pupils by working tirelessly for the benefit of all. Her understanding of the children she taught and the joy of being with them was evident to everyone who knew her. Helen loved fishing and would organise groups of boys to join her at Roundhay Park Lake on many a Saturday or Evening. After her retirement in 1989 she worked as Catechetical Coordinator in Hounslow and Banbury. The poor were always close to her heart and she was often at the embankment in London serving them. Following a severe stroke in 2004, Helen became a patient in St. Paulʼ,s Nursing Home, Selly Park, Birmingham. For nearly eight years her example of patient suffering was exceptional and an example to everyone. She is buried in the Congregation Cemetery in Birmingham. May she rest in peace. Sr. Hele N Bailey, Former Headmistress Of St. Brigid’,s School, Leeds 1969 –, 1989

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Jul/Aug 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Leeds Catholic Post Page 17 The summer season, for many, is a time of exam results and graduation ceremonies, a time for celebrating academic achievements and looking ahead to the challenges of the job market. In Bethlehem at the end of June, nearly 700 new graduates, Christian and Muslim men and women, celebrated the results of their hard work, as they waited in their gowns and caps to receive degree certificates from the university run by the De La Salle Christian Brothers. The order, founded by John Baptist De La Salle first began opening schools in Bethlehem, Jerusalem, Jaffna and Nazareth back at the end of the 19th century, but it was during the historic visit of Pope Paul VI to the Holy Land in 1964 that Palestinians asked for an institute of higher learning –, one that has just been recognised by the International Federation of Catholic Universities for its high academic standards. Beginning with 112 students in 1973, Bethlehem University now enrols around 3.000 students a year and is looking forward to a period of further expansion to meet the changing needs of the Palestinian nation. “,I think one of the biggest challenges we have is to keep hope alive,”, is how Brother Peter Bray, vice-chancellor of the university, describes those needs, as he talks about the difficulties for students dealing with the daily realities of Israeli occupation. The university has been closed 12 times –, though lessons have always continued, on or off campus –, and many students have to make the lengthy journey twice a day through the so-called security wall that snakes menacingly around the town. Itʼ,s not often in my job that I see grown men moved to tears, but Brother Peter is unable to hide his emotion as he speaks of the extraordinary courage and resilience of his students. In particular, he describes a conversation with one young woman from East Jerusalem who takes the bus twice a day through the towering concrete barrier and each time, as she approaches the checkpoint, she worries about what will happen to her. “,Will they simply wave the bus through? Will a soldier get on and check passengersʼ, IDs? Will a solider take their IDs and have them sit there for half an hour, an hour, an hour and a half? Will they be herded off the bus and made to stand in the sun while their IDs are checked? Are they going to be individually interrogated? Strip searched? All of those things have happened to her and yet every day she comes back …,…,.you know, they say that no matter what the Israelis have taken from them, their land, their hopes, their freedom, they canʼ,t take away their education.”, As well as providing high quality undergraduate education, the university is now developing a number of Masters Programmes to support the advancement of Palestinian society. It already offers a Masters in international cooperation and development, exploring ways of improving the struggling economy, and has applied for a Masters in governance and public administration, aimed at people already working in local municipalities or the Palestinian National Authority. Also on the horizon is a Masters in diplomacy and foreign service, another in social work and one in tourism management due to start next January. In order to accommodate these activities, the university is hoping to expand onto a nearby piece of land and has started a 40 million dollar fund raising campaign to try and finance these developments. Perhaps the hardest challenge of all is finding jobs for new graduates, especially those whoʼ,d like to stay in the West Bank but are often faced with the choice of unemployment or emigration. Yet Brother Peter does offer a few encouraging examples of former students whoʼ,ve moved abroad and started some creative initiatives back in their home towns –, such as a call centre in Beit Jala seeking to employ several dozens graduates, or a computer business run by a couple in America which offers jobs long distance to at least two Bethlehem students. Originally from New Zealand, Brother Peter has headed the only Catholic university in the Holy Land since 2009 and he willingly admits itʼ,s the most difficult job heʼ,s ever done–, but also the place where he feels his work is the most worthwhile. “,Education is the basis on which any peace will grow,”, he says, as he talks proudly about the compulsory religious studies programme that all students must take, Christians and Muslims together. “,I have this naï,ve hope that as those students move on, they will start to undermine prejudices within their communities and peace will grow in this land.”, While the university describes itself as ʻ,a beacon of hopeʼ, and ʻ,an oasis of peaceʼ, in a troubled part of the world, I ask Brother Peter how he personally copes with the continuous problems facing staff and students alike. Without hesitation, he looks back to the example of Saint Jean Baptist de La Salle, who “,spent his whole life trying to get the brothers established and the schools going”,, but was strongly opposed by Church authorities and at the end of his life “,faced a very real possibility that the whole thing would collapse”, His attitude was to “,place all his work in the hands of the Lord”, and Brother Peter says, without wishing to sound pious, he has learned to do the same. “,Iʼ,m not sure how long Iʼ,ll be there, but Iʼ,ll use all my talents and energies, knowing that in the end, it doesnʼ,t depend on me. During my time there have been disasters and there have been things that Iʼ,ve struggled to believe how well theyʼ,ve turned out. In the end though, it comes back to us daring to believe that we can step out in faith, knowing that the spirit is working there too.”, Philippa M Hitchen Our Rome Correspondent Sacred Heart choir hit all the right notes! T wenty children from Sacred Heart Catholic Primary Leeds, joined up with twelve other local partnership primary schools at Leeds Trinity University College. They sang songs covering the theme of The Olympic Games, a theme chosen to celebrate Great Britain being the host nation in 2012. Since November, Sacred Heart and the other partnership schools have been rehearsing and their hard work paid off, according to Jenny Stuart-Collins, Associate Principal Lecturer at Leeds Trinity department of Primary Education, who organised the concert. Jenny said “,Music is something I feel passionate about and I believe all children should have the opportunity to experience good music teaching. The concert promotes and strengthens links between Leeds Trinity and our partnership schools. “, Participating schools: Hollingwood Primary School, Bradford, St Peter &, Paul`s, Yeadon, St Theresa`s Crossgates, White Laith, St Joseph`s Otley, Our Lady of Good Counsel, St Joseph`s Pontefract, Rothwell St Mary`s, Beeston St Anthony`s, Wetherby St Joseph`s, Hunslet St Joseph`s, New Wortley Holy Family and Sacred Heart. St Nicholas’,s Netball Champions 2012 The second year of competition for the Bishop Roche Netball Trophy was held over the last two months. The competition began last year when our bishop donated a trophy to help start a competition to encourage girls sport in our primary schools. 16 Catholic Primary schools from the Leeds area of the Diocese took part. Teams had practiced all year and competition was fierce. Group stages were hosted and run by the local Catholic High Schools, St Maryʼ,s, Cardinal Heenan and Corpus Christi. Six schools qualified from the groups to participate in the trophy finals held at Notre Dame Catholic Sixth Form College. Three schools, Holy Family, Our Lady of Good Counsel and St Josephʼ,s Pudsey had been finalists in the previous years competition. The three other qualifiers, St Maryʼ,s Rothwell, St Josephʼ,s Wetherby and St Nicholasʼ,s were new to the final stages of the competition. Staff and Students from the college gave up a study afternoon to umpire what turned out to be a competition of amazing quality and skill. It was an extremely humid afternoon and even a slippery court did not stop the girls from producing netball of the very highest order. After 3 hours of competition the final places were only decided at the final whistle of the final game, it was all that close. The eventual champions taking home the Bishop Roche Netball Trophy were St Nicholasʼ, from Gipton. St Josephʼ,s Pudsey were the runners up. It is hoped now the competition is a fixture on Leeds Primary Schools sporting calendar and all Leeds based schools will be in training to try and win next years competition. Report by Peter McQuillen Strong

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Page 18

Jul/Aug 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 18 Leeds Catholic Post First Friday of the Month SINGLE CATHOLICS (appeals mostly to over 35s) meet for mass at 7.30pm at Our Lady of Lourdes church, 130 Cardigan Rd, Headingley, Leeds LS6 3BJ, and a social afterwards. Events held during the month include walks, meals, cinema, theatre etc. For further details tel Sean (Chair) 07811 468939. Leeds Cathedral 20-35 Group Young people (20-35 years old) who attend St. Anne`s Cathedral in Leeds meet regularly every Thursday for spiritual, social and charitable activities. For further details search Facebook for “,Leeds Cathedral 20-35 Group”,, phone 07816 891872 or 07759 591233 or email leedscathedral20-35@hotmail.co.uk Crusade Mass The crusade Mass and Rosary of Mary Immaculate is held at St Patrick`s Church, Bradford, on the first Saturday of the Month after 12.15pm Mass , Second Sunday of Month 2pm Meeting of Bradford Fraternity of the Secular Franciscan Order at St. Anthony`s Convent, Clayton, Bradford.` `Third Sunday of Month 2.30pm Meeting of Leeds Fraternity of the Secular Franciscan Order at the Cathedral. Ampleforth Renewal Community Ampleforth Abbey, meet 1st Sunday each month, at Ampleforth. 11 .30am Praise, Speaker, Sharing Groups, Reconciliation, Exposition, Finishing with Mass and Healing at 4.00pm. All enquiries: Seamus McEneaney 01429 426181 Monthly Vocations Mass Mount St Josephʼ,s Chapel 11am First Wednesday of Month. Calix: An organisation for those recovering from addiction and working the 12 Step Programme of AA so that they can develop and deepen their relationship with Jesus as their Higher Power. Meets on the First Sunday of every month at Corpus Christi Church, Neville Rd. Osmondthorpe. Leeds. Mass at 4.30pm followed by meeting. Contact: Fr. Michael on 01977 510266 Helpers of Gods precious infants, prayer vigils, regular weekly prayer vigils at Marie Stopes Abortuary, 7 Barrack Road.LS7 4AB, next to Jaguar car showrooms. Fridays 12-30 to 1-30, and Saturdays 9am-l1am. Monthly all night vigil of reparation in St Marys Horsforth 12th of every month, 9-30pm to 6am . Other times variable. Further details Pat 0113 2582745 Rosary rally Sat Oct 9th 2010 12-30pm Leeds cenotaph, outside art gallery, Headrow. Contact 07747698553/ or 0113 2582745 Leeds Schola Gregoriana The Schola meets on the 2nd Saturday of each month (except August), at 2.00 p.m., for rehearsal, followed by sung Latin (Vigil) Mass in the Ordinary Form, fulfilling the Sunday Obligation. An opportunity to learn and sing Gregorian Chant on a regular basis. Contact Michael Murphy (Director) on 07810 808 530, or Peter Lawley (01423 884274), or Rev. G.M. Parfitt (01756 793794). Days Of Renewal St. Wilfid`s Deanery Day of Renewal led by Fr. Stephen Wright OSB. Second Saturday of the month beginning Sat. March 10th from 12 noon to 4pm. Venue St. Aelred`s Church hall, Woodlands Drive, Harrogate. Please bring a contribution for a shared table lunch. For more information ring Dolores Omand 01423870789 or visit the Diocesan web site www.ccrleeds.org Diary 20 –, 35 years group Email: leedscathedralgroup@gmail.com Facebook: Leeds Cathedral 20-35 Group Phone: 07810 291 154 Diary A few moments for thought and prayer The Prayer of an American Sister “,May God Bless You with enough foolishness to believe that you can make a difference in the world, so that you are able, with Godʼ,s grace, to do what others claim cannot be done”, Be Still Deadline: For receipt of material for next edition: September 7th 2012 Parishes receive their copies: September 23rd 2012 Send articles, reports &, pictures: Mr John Grady, Hinsley Hall, 62 Headingley Lane, Leeds LS6 2BX. Send text as word doc, pictures as jpeg, e-mail to: john.grady@dioceseofleeds.org.uk Tel: 0113 261 8022. Advertising Deadline September 17th Please note paid-for advertising is dealt with by: Louise Ward Hinsley Hall, 62 Headingley Lane, Leeds LS6 2BX Telephone: 0113 261 8028 Email: louise.ward@dioceseofleeds.org.uk Your Cath Post Rev Brian Green F r Brian Green of the Diocese of Hallam and a former priest of the Diocese of Leeds, died in hospital in Rotherham on Friday, 8th June, following a stroke, aged eighty-two. Born in Sheffield on 7th September 1929, in the years after the Second World War he studied for the priesthood at Ushaw College in County Durham, then the major seminary for the Catholic Church in the North of England. He was ordained for the Leeds diocese at St Marieʼ,s, Sheffield on 19th July 1953. His first appointment was to St Peterʼ,s, Doncaster where he stayed until 1957 when he joined the staff of St Anneʼ,s Cathedral in Leeds. During his time there he became renowned for his talks for non-Catholics which resulted in dozens of converts each year. In 1961 came the first of three appointments in what was known in those days as the Heavy Woollen District. He served at St Paulinus, Dewsbury from 1961-62 and St Maryʼ,s, Batley from 1962-66. He was a curate at St Josephʼ,s, Batley Carr from 1966-71, where one of his parishioners and altar servers was a young man who would go on to become the ninth Bishop of Leeds, the Rt Rev Arthur Roche. During the 1960s Fr Green developed a reputation for a warm and dedicated commitment to the parishes he served along with a talent for effective communication and people skills. This led in 1971 to him joining the staff at Ushaw College to create a pastoral programme for students, the first of its kind at Ushaw, which complemented a hitherto strongly academic regime. He was very much an enthusiast for the reforms of the Second Vatican Council and his role at Ushaw was to draw on this and his own extensive pastoral experience to train a new generation of seminarians in the practicalities of life as parish priests. By 1980, when the Diocese of Hallam came into existence, Fr Green had already been back in South Yorkshire for three years, following his return from Ushaw in 1977. He was to remain there for the rest of his life, a total of almost thirty-five years. He was Parish Priest of St Josephʼ,s, Dinnington for three decades until his retirement in 2008. It was here that he applied his wisdom to the spirit of Vatican II, using the liturgy and the scriptures to nourish peopleʼ,s minds and hearts with a love for the word of God and so rooting the values of the Gospel in everyday life. Shortly after arriving in Dinnington Fr Green started the Pastoral Renewal Exchange (PRE) as a means of reproducing and sharing documentation about examples of good pastoral practice and experience, by way of a simple photocopied periodical. Initially he distributed copies of PRE to about 150 people but by the time of his death the circulation had grown to 1,500 world-wide. The intention is to continue publication of PRE in memory of Fr Green. Fr Greenʼ,s body was received into the church at Dinnington on the evening of Wednesday 20th June and the Funeral Mass, celebrated by Bishop Rawsthorne and in the presence of Archbishop Roche, was held the following day at St Maryʼ,s Church at Herringthorpe in Rotherham. In his final years Fr Green had continued to live at St Josephʼ,s presbytery along with his successor, former student and good friend, Fr Andy Greydon. At the Funeral Mass Fr Greydon paid tribute to Fr Green, remarking on his ʻ,massive mind and a heart just as massiveʼ,. He described him as the oldest youngest man he had ever met with a spirit that was eternally young and always open to learning. Above all, he said, it was his friendships which kept him young, friendships characterised by reliability, depth and humour. The congregation that gathered for his funeral from across Yorkshire and further afield was testimony to the esteem and affection in which Fr Green was held by so many. Rev Deacon Patrick Kenny D eacon Patrick Kenny, who died aged eighty-eight, was one of the longest serving permanent deacons in the diocese, if not the country, having been ordained by Bishop Wheeler on 7th December 1978. He was only the third man from the diocese to be ordained as a permanent deacon, following Anthony Winn and the late Maurice Pearce in 1971. Patrick Kenny came originally from York and was born on 15th February 1924.As a young man he embarked on studies for the priesthood but later withdrew from Ushaw College. He subsequently joined the Royal Navy and saw active service in the Second World War. After qualifying as a solicitor he was for many years a partner in the firm of Willey Hargreave &, Co and a much respected figure in legal circles in Leeds. In this context he was always generous in placing his legal expertise at the disposal of the diocese and in particular he was a valued advisor to Bishop Wheeler. Following his ordination to the permanent diaconate in 1978 Patrick joined the pastoral team at St Anneʼ,s Cathedral, where he was a familiar face for the next decade or more. While his ministry there was primarily liturgical he also had a role in parish ministry, including chaplaincy work at the Leeds General Infirmary. He and his wife Patsy were originally parishioners of Immaculate Heart in Leeds, but later moved to live in Menston and after he left the Cathedral he exercised his ministry at St John Fisher and St Thomas More parish, Burley in Wharfedale. Here he played an important supporting role to successive parish priests until he suffered a stroke around the time of his eightieth birthday in 2004. This prompted his decision to take up residence in the nursing home at Boarbank Hall in Cumbria, while his wife went to live in nearby Grange-over-Sands. They had a long association with Boarbank where Patrickʼ,s sister was a Canoness of St Augustine of the Mercy of Jesus. It was here that Patrick died on 2nd July 2012 and where his funeral took place the following week, on Wednesday 11th July. Patrick Kenny is survived by his widow and three sons and a daughter. Obituaries Open Futures Children’,s Conference The first ever Open Futures Childrenʼ,s Conference took place at Airedale Infant and Junior School, Castleford on Tuesday 3rd July 2012. Children from 7 local schools took part in the ground breaking event, including twelve conscientious pupils from St. Josephʼ,s RC School, Castleford. These pupils were selected to represent the school for their commitment to learning and positive attitude towards others. The Open Futures initiative enhances the curriculum by providing inspirational contexts for learning, in which children discover and develop practical skills, personal interests and values to enhance their lives as adults. The Olympic theme permeated through each subject strand as the children planted ʻ,British Runner Beansʼ, after discussing healthy bodies and healthy plants in the ʻ,grow itʼ, strand of the programme. During a philosophical ʻ,ask itʼ, discussion the children explored the techniques of dialogic talk and debate related to Olympic success and achievement. Other activities included an athletic animation in the ʻ,film itʼ, strand and healthy fresh fruit smoothies in the ʻ,cook itʼ, strand.

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Page 19

Jul/Aug 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Leeds Catholic Post Page 19 To advertise contact Louise Ward Leeds Diocesan Curia, Hinsley Hall, 62 Headingley Lane, Leeds LS6 2BX Telephone: 0113 261 8028 CATHOLIC POS THE NEWSPAPER FOR THE DIOCESE OF L Reception and Class 1 children at St Francis Catholic Primary School, Morley performed the Christmas play ‘,A Little Nativity’,. It was an outstanding performance and the children participated throughout with confidence and enthusiasm. High praise was given by all that attended. As a school we feel that it is very important that the children understand the true meaning of Christmas. The Lady Mayoress of Morley, Judith Elliott, commended the children, parents and staff for their hard work in producing an enjoyable play. Mary –, Francesca Lambert, Joseph –, Kieran Ryan, Donkey –, Jack Mallinson, Angels –, Charlotte Benson &, Keira Pearce, Kings - Fintan Armour, Antionetta Sibanda-Ilimezekhe &, Daniel Brown. A Little Nativity CATHOLIC POST THE NEWSPAPER FOR THE DIOCESE OF LEEDS NOVEMBER 2011 www.dioceseofleeds.org.uk www.catholicpost.org.uk JIMMY SAYS A LAST GOOD –, BYE I t was fitting that the Funeral Mass for Sir J immy Savile, OBE KCSG w as held in Leeds Cathedral. This w as the church he grew up in and the o ne w here he not only went to on a Sunday but also other days of the w eek as and w hen he could. ple who gathered fo r the celebration o f h is lif e and to pray fo r h is soul y s tr ands of h is lif e. So it was th at the Marines c arr ie d his body in, ds read th e Prayers o f t he Fa it hfu l, the L ittl e Sisters and he offer to ry , six peop le gave eu log ie s, some The Hom il y was del iv ered by Mgr Mass in the Immacu la te t man , an s FREE CATHOLIC POST THE NEWSPAPER FOR THE DIOCESE OF LEED CELEBRATING THE YEAR OF EDUCATION O ver the past twelve months t he e ducation department of the D iocese has been celebrating t he Year o f E ducatio n. So on Thursday, October 6th the Bishop c e le brated M ass f or all t he Headteachers f rom across t he Diocese to bring the Y ear to a f it t in g close . He chose t o c elebrate a votive Mass O f B le ssed John Henry Newman , for as the Bishop explained at the opening of t he Mass, Blessed John Henry Newman ‘, was a s tr ikin gly o riginal th eologian and a celebrated educational t heorist `. He c ont in ued in h is homi ly to e xp lain in m ore d epth, ‘, As many of you w ill k now, he (Cardinal N ewman) del iv ered a ser ie s of influen tia l le ctures which w ere gathered together in a book ent itle d ", The Idea of a University.", T wo o f the points wh ich h e made in this book are of particu la r re le vance to us tod ay. F ir st ly , he a rgued t hat rea lit y is a s ing le u ndiv id ed w ho le and that the dif fe rent disc ipli nes in an ed ucat io na l in st it ut ion need to be coord in ated in order to ref le ct th at f act . Secondly, theology needs to be taught in our s choo ls an d universi ti es because r e lig io us tr uth ",bears upon", all truth........ .. . .. . .. ... T he d iv erse sub je ct areas wh ic h ar e t augh t in our schoo ls have been deve lo ped in the w ay they have prec ise ly because they correspond to the C atho lic vi s io n of educat io n wh ich B le ssed John Henry Newman art ic ulated so beaut if ul ly .` The B is hop c onc lud ed h is homi ly by u s in g a q uote fr om the Leeds Mercury pr inte d at the T ime of The Card ina ls dea th ‘,F ew cu lt ivated E ng lis hmen w ill h ear w it hou t emo ti on the news o f Card ina l N ewman `s death. I n th e fash ion o f h is dea th , in deed, there is noth ing t o regret, he had outlived the storms of controversy, th e clouds of misunderstanding, and h e is ca ll ed away in the peacefu lne ss of an honoured old age. H is countrymen w i ll m ourn for h im w it h no b it terness, bu t in suc h w is e as is fit ti ng wh en th e venerated figure of a man of conspicuous genius a nd goodness p asses from the scene. ` The B is hop added ‘,How truly marve ll ous it wou ld be i f th e same cou ld a ls o be sa id of us no t only for what we p ersonal ly pursue in our Chr isti an vocat ion , but for allowing what lies at it s heart to s hape us. Newman `s greatness came no t from self p ursu it but from Christ h is Lord a nd h is T eacher.` At th e conc lu sion o f the Mass the Bishop thanked al l the H eads for the work they are doing and then jo in ed them for coffee. Why not subscribe and have the Catholic Post delivered to your home! Individual subscriptions, valid for one year (including postage and packing) cost: £,10, Europe: £,12 Complete the form below or email: louise.ward@dioceseofleeds.org.uk to register your interest Post cheque - payable to: Diocese of Leeds, Hinsley Hall, 62 Headingley Lane, LEEDS LS6 2BX –, Tel: 0113 2 61 8028 Name: …,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…, Address: …,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…, …,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,Postcode: …,…,…,…,…, Telephone: …,…,…,................................................... Email: …,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…, Subscription Form F or the past eighteen months Caroline and Adrian Strain - of Blessed John Henry Newman Parish, Crossgates - have been working in southern Tanzania, living in a teachersʼ, college. Adrian has been teaching secondary school teachers, helping them to improve their spoken English and Caroline as well as taking a full part in local life in the small town of Mtwara, has helped out in a local nursery. Tanzania is one of the twenty poorest countries in the world. A huge proportion of the population exists on less than £,1 a day and for lack of medicines and a healthy diet, thousands of children die from malaria. The United Nations accepted some years ago that the sustainable route to development for sub- Saharan Africa is through education and great strides have been taken in the last five years in increasing the numbers of children –, boys and girls –, attending full-time school. Teachers need to be trained and quality of learning improved. Slowly, improvements are being made. Adrian and Caroline work closely with the Sisters of the Holy Redeemer. The Sisters have a small training college for primary school teachers, they run a small dispensary from where they feed the most needy and they also run a small kindergarten. The Sisters were given land in a remote district some thirty miles from the main town of Mtwara. Their plan was to farm the land and with the produce feed the hungry, but the land is not irrigated and the water, lying deep in a nearby well, needed a pump to bring it to the surface. Adrian and Caroline contacted Hunslet engineering company Corrocoat who were pleased to support the project. CEO Charles Watkinson said, “,We have done much work in Africa and when Adrian contacted with this excellent project we were pleased to help,”, A solar pump will be installed paid for by Corrocoat and the Sisters as well as local villagers will have a sustainable water supply. Close to where Caroline and Adrian live there are children who whilst not orphans, spend their days foraging for food. They do not attend school because as well as having no money for food, they have no school clothes or shoes and certainly could not pay for a pen a book or a stool to sit on (in Tanzania school students pay towards the cost of their seat or stool!). To help in some small practical ways, Caroline and Adrian have formed a small charity called Mtwara Links. HSBC in Crossgates has offered a bank account and with family members looking after things in the UK, Caroline and Adrian will return to Tanzania next month with a simple plan to sponsor a small number of children with food and clothing, enabling them to go to school, and with collecting and distributing used books for schools. Mary Brooksbank (msbrooksbank@gmail.com) has agreed to coordinate the collection and shipping of used books, and Catherine Evans (candkevs@yahoo.co.uk) has agreed to serve as Treasurer of the small charity. For more information about this small charity and ways in which you might be able to help –,either by collecting or donating books or money –, go to www.mtwarlinks.com. Donations can be made to Mtwarlinks c/o HSBC, Sort 40-27-33 Acc No. 21525409 For more information contact Adrian on 07817388332 or Caroline on 07968259928 Volunteers from Blessed John Henry newman Parish, Crossgates help out in Mtwara, Tanzania Recycling teen helps fight poverty in Leeds A Leeds project of the St Vincent de Paul Society has bagged the support of a young social entrepreneur from Harrogate. Libby Stevens, 16, has raised hundreds for local charities, including the St Vincent Support Centre in Leeds, by making and selling bags made from unwanted material such as cloth, old curtains and clothes. Libby heard about the vital work carried out by St Vincentʼ,s, and wanted to support the charityʼ,s free debt advice, counselling, education and volunteering services for local disadvantaged and vulnerable people. Libby made and sold over 400 bags, often burning the midnight oil to meet demand. As she handed the cheque to St Vincentʼ,s Manager, Charlotte Walton, Libby said “,I am pleased to be able to make a contribution towards this fantastic project”,. Charlotte expressed her thanks for the donation, “,We are very grateful for the efforts that Libby has made and hope to harness her enthusiasm and creativity in the future to support us in our work here.”, To find out more about St Vincentʼ,s, visit www.stvincents-svp.org.uk. To make a donation, please visit www.localgiving.com/charity/stvincentsleeds Bishop Roche appointed 3 priests to the Chapter of Canons and the College of Consultors: Canon Philip Fitzgerald Canon John Galvin Canon John Aveyard The new Canons replace Canons Vincent Oʼ,Hara and Tom Oʼ,Connor who are retired/retiring from parish responsibilities, and Canon Martin Forde who died unexpectedly recently. The Bishop said he was grateful for the faithful and affectionate service to the diocese of all three. Canons

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Page 20

Jul/Aug 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 20 White Hot Centre S unday July 24th was chosen by the Bishop, this year to hold the traditional Corpus Christi procession for the Diocese. Under threatening clouds it started at the Little Sisters Chapel before making its way this year by the back way round to Hinsley Hall. The change in route was due to the fact that just up the road there was both a cricket and a rugby match taking place and the Olympic Torch was about to pass by. It was the Olympic torch that was the starting point for the Homily preached this year by Fr Peter Kravos. He outlined the myth that the torch was about the theft of fire by Prometheus. In contrast, he said, Our Blessed Sacrament procession here today could not be more different –, in fact itʼ,s the complete antidote to what the origins of the Olympic flame were. In the small white host, carried in the monstrance, we have the ʻ,white-hot centreʼ, of the Divine here on earth. We talk about things being red-hot, like fire. But in fact, the ultimate source of energy, heat and light is ʻ,white-hotʼ,. And the Blessed Sacrament in the little white host is precisely that. In nothing on this planet, in fact in the whole of creation, is the divine as present as in that white-hot centre. But far from stealing anything from the divine, like the legend of Prometheus, we are given it. The Eucharist is the ultimate gift of Christ: “,Take it.... this is my body…, this my blood…,.”, He wants us to share in His divine life. “,Whoever eats this bread and drinks this cup will live for ever…,.”, He went on to speak of the Eucharistic Congress that he and Bishop Roche had just attended in Dublin and what an impression it had made recalling along the way some of the other Eucharistic Congresses that had taken part both here in England and in Dublin. ʻ,Much good will come from the renewal of appreciation of the Eucharist, in Ireland and in the new evangelisation permeating the worldwide Church. Our little procession here might seem small in comparison to the Olympic torch celebrations around our city today, tonight and tomorrow, but so did Emilie-Marie Tamisierʼ,s dream, and she is one of an impressive number of Christians who were part of a steady &, significant movement for the renewal of the appreciation of the Eucharist. The scandals of the Church in our times are part of this renewal &, movement. They have at least taught us about what it is like to be a victim. Jesus Christ Himself was a victim –, the victim. His sacrifice we must never take for granted, and our celebrations of the sacred liturgy must never detract from that, but rather draw us to a deeper appreciation &, understanding of His sacrifice. Jesus is the ultimate victim. And no victim ever wants to feel that what they endured would be taken for granted, forgotten or reduced to ʻ,mere habitʼ,, as Pope Benedict said. These days in the Church are truly formative. All the time we are delving deeper into the mystery. And Catholics are not afraid of mystery.ʼ, Become What You Receive T uesday July 3rd, the feast of St Thomas the Apostle, was chosen this year as the date to celebrate the Mass for the Celebration of Priesthood in the Diocese. This is the day when the Bishop and his priests come together to acknowledge the years of work given to the Diocese by priests who are celebrating significant anniversaries, - this year those anniversaries were Golden, Ruby and Silver. A number of lay people had gathered in the Cathedral for the event along with a significant number of the clergy. Bishop Roche first of all welcomed everyone to the service and introduced Archbishop George Stack, of Cardiff explaining that the two of them had been ordained together as Bishops in Westminster in May 2001 and served together as Auxiliary Bishops in that same Diocese for a little over a year before Bishop Roche moved back to his Home Diocese of Leeds in July 2002. Bishop Roche also took the opportunity as well as thanking and congratulating the Jubilarians for their work (pictured above), he also thanked the Franciscan Friars of Renewal and the Missionaries of Sacred Heart for their work in the Diocese. Archbishop Stack in his homily started by thanking Bishop Roche for the leadership he had given –, not only in the Diocese, but also across the World, going on to say that both of them had been in Dublin at the Eucharistic Congress and over the altar were the words ʻ,Become What You Receiveʼ, this the Archbishop pointed out was sound advice to all but more especially to Priests. In that the life of the priest lives out the life of Christ here on earth, it is the priest that puts back the broken body of Christ, it is the priest who reconciles, but he cannot do it alone –, when the priest leads and explains what he believes and what he is doing then he is the sign of unity and links the community to the world and to Christ.

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