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Leeds Catholic Post History

Newspaper for the Diocese of Leeds

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Nov 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

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Nov 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

CATHOLIC POST THE NEWSPAPER FOR THE DIOCESE OF LEEDS NOVEMBER 2012 www.dioceseofleeds.org.uk awww.catholicpost.org.uk FREE West Yorkshire celebrates 25 Years of Unity The success of WYEC over 25 years has been marked at three special services: in Batley Central Methodist, Bradford Cathedral, and St Anne’,s Cathedral. The preacher in Batley was Vincent Nichols, Archbishop of Westminster. He heard stories of local unity, including the public outdoor Christmas and Easter witness of St John Fisher High School which is assisted by a Methodist / United Reformed church in Dewsbury, and how the Diocese of Leeds works with education officers in other churches to produce CLAY (Christians Learning Across Yorkshire). The Archbishop, in his sermon, commended a new WYEC book, ‘,Unity in Process’,, edited by Clive Barrett*, he also encouraged us to use the Year of Faith and the anniversaries of Vatican 2 to work more closely with our neighbouring churches. The St Anne’,s Cathedral celebration brought together many figures from In 1987, David Konstant, then Bishop of Leeds, was a key figure in senior leaders of different churches signing a Covenant to work together across denominational boundaries. It marked the start of West Yorkshire Ecumenical Council (WYEC) which brings together Anglicans, Baptists, Catholics, Lutherans, Methodists, Moravians, Quakers, Salvation Army, United Reformed, and African Caribbean churches across the region. WYEC’,s past, including Bishop Konstant, Mgr Steele (former Ecumenical Officer for the Diocese) and past County Ecumenical Officers . Current Church Leaders reaffirmed their unity and the WYEC Covenant. The Greek word ‘,oikoumene’, means ‘,the whole inhabited world’,, an incentive for evangelisation, and at one point the whole congregation disappeared under a huge banner of the flags of the nations! Ernie Whalley, the Baptist preacher, reminded us of the key principle of Christian unity, that we should try to do everything together except that which, in conscience, we have to do apart. Now if only we really would try that…, Over the past quarter century, the Diocese and its bishops have been key to WYEC’,s work for Christian unity at all levels. There are many good local stories, but still much to be done. If you would like WYEC to help you to build relationships with your neighbouring churches, please contact clivebarrett@wyec.co.uk. * ‘,Unity in Process’,, edited by Clive Barrett. With strong Catholic contributions, including Vincent Nichols. Available for only £,14.99 from ‘,WYEC’,, Hinsley Hall, Headingley Lane, LS6 2BX. You can download an order form from www.wyec.co.uk. Clive Barrett Below: Rev Clive Barrett leads the service in the Cathedral

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Nov 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

by Anne Gilpin (Head, St Edward`s Catholic Primary School, Boston Spa) On October 22nd St Edward`s hosted a community ",Peace Event", as their first event to promote and celebrate the Year of Faith. The Peace Event was also scheduled to coincide with the 100 days of Peace, which over 60 organisations and churches ran around the Olympics. The 100 days of Peace ran for 50 days before the Olympics and for 50 days after the Para-Olympics, finishing on October 29th. The event began with a ",Peace Liturgy", to which the whole school community, the parish and the residents living close to the school were all invited. During the liturgy, presided over by St Edward`s deacon, Dave Murray, the school sang hymns about peace, heard various readings from the New Testament on the theme of peace, and said prayers for peace. Every pupil in school had previously written their own peace prayer on paper doves, which were hung on ",Peace Trees", for the liturgy. Children from each class read one of their peace prayers during the service and hung them on the tree too. The liturgy was followed by an open-house coffee morning for the whole community, the idea being to bring people together in peace. Fair Trade coffee, tea and cakes and biscuits were served, with all donations going to the charity, War Child, who work with children in areas of the world affected by war. The ",Peace Event", was a beautiful way to come together and think about how Jesus came to bring us all peace, and how through faith in him we can all be at peace with ourselves and with others. It was a wonderful way to begin the Year of Faith for the whole school community. Page 2 Leeds Catholic Post Once again, Catholic Care has been rejected. The tribunalʼ,s justification is the European Convention on Human Rights which seems to work against Catholic Care, despite article 9, which gives them the right to “,manifest ...religion or belief, in worship, teaching, practice and observance”,. The catch is that the next paragraph limits this right insofar as they may affect “,the protection of the rights and freedoms of others.”, This has a smack of Health and Safety Legislation, in that it can cover any situation you need. All this may still be unfinished business, so we should move away and consider the whole issue of the freedom to practice your religion. Is there an “,aggressive secularism”, around, which may now prevent those who wish to practice their faith in their daily lives from doing so? Cases appear in the papers: just as the scandals of abuse can now prevent the most innocent human contact, so a compulsory liberalism seems to prevent people from quietly withdrawing from those things which conscience would prevent them doing, or working in society- health or education, for example- according to their religious lights. The national compass is spinning, searching for moral bearings. One personʼ,s freedom becomes anotherʼ,s mandate. There are few things worse than an intolerant liberalism. Whilst we must not run back into the apparent certainties of the past, nor must we be dragged forward into some brave new world which is never going to be compatible with our essential beliefs. That is the paradox: whilst we are supposed to be embracing more freedom in our lives, are we actually finding less? Freedom must be shared, not imposed, tolerant, not absolute. The Post Says St. Mary’,s Pink Day S t. Mary’,s Catholic High School Sixth Formers and staff turned pink for a day to support Breast Cancer Research. Sporting favourite pink items and collecting donations from students and staff throughout the school, £,270 was raised for this extremely worthwhile and valuable cause. Otley Town Mayor, Councillor Mary Vickers visited St. Maryʼ,s on the day, also wearing pink, to support the students with their fundraising efforts. Mr Pritchard, Headteacher, said: “,It is wonderful to see so many students supporting this charity. I am grateful to everyone concerned for the money raised and to the Lady Mayor for visiting our school.”, N otre Dame Student Grace Eyles was part of the winning Relay team which won the Gold medal at the English Schools’, 2012 Track and Fields championship in July. She also came 4th in the 200m final. This was Graces fourth consecutive year representing West Yorkshire schools. `I had an amazing time at Gateshead in the English Schools Track and Field Championships and I was really proud to finish fourth in the 200m final against some of the best runners in the UK,ʼ, said Grace. ʻ,The icing on the cake for me was definitely winning the gold medal in the 4x100m relay with the other girls in the West Yorkshire team in front of a packed stadium. We all even appeared on Sky Sports TV!` These were not the only successes for Grace in the 2012 season as she also came first in the North of England 200m under 20 ladies and achieved a new personal best of 24.43 seconds for the 200m at the National Junior Athletic League Northern Premier Division meeting where she was awarded ʻ,Female Athlete of the Matchʼ, Grace is currently ranked 8th in the UK and 1st in Yorkshire for Under 20 Ladies 200m. Her home athletics club that she has competed for since the age of 8 is Wakefield District Harriers and A.C. Notre Dame Student wins Gold for Yorkshire St. Edward`s Catholic Primary School: Peace Event Pictured above: Sixth Form students, Lady Mayoress of Otley, far right Mr Robert Pritchard, St. Mary’,s Headteacher

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Nov 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

By Margaret Sibbery I n October 1962 I was in the third year at Notre Dame High School, Mount Pleasant, Liverpool. Across the road that same month, work had finally started to build ‘,A Cathedral for Our Time’,. It was to rise above the majestic, solemn and imposing crypt, built as part of an earlier design. The new cathedral was to be completed within five years and it was commissioned to express the spirit of a liturgy that was being renewed. Every morning for the five years it took to build the cathedral walk from the bus stop to school, skirted the perimeter of the building site, giving a sense of the scale of the new design. The cathedral began to rise elegantly, as if guarding and blessing the city as well as proclaiming an exciting new era. According it its full title, the Metropolitan Cathedral of Christ the King was then, and has always been, an icon of hope for me. It seemed to embody in concrete and glass the changing shape of the Church. During those years at High school, as I watched the Cathedral grow, the second Vatican Council was taking place in Rome and the buzz around what was coming to birth was tangible. It definitely filtered through to the Notre Dame students, not only through the sisters, who were wonderful educators, interested in and well-informed about developing theology, but also through dedicated teachers, one of whom was member of the Grail who passed on the ethos and spirit of that lively lay organisation. The central message of the formation we received during those years was the call to share responsibility for the life and work of the church, for its mission in and for the world. It was an exciting, empowering and liberating call to be active, to be witnesses and to play our part in bringing to birth the transformation of the church.. As well as looking outwards locally within our own parish communities, we were encouraged to learn about global justice issues and take action through supporting overseas development work. I look back now and see those years as foundational in recognising that the journey of faith is always rooted in the here and now, in engaging with the reality of our world and in the struggle to overcome poverty and injustice. The cathedral was officially opened on Pentecost Sunday the year I left school in 1967. I joined representatives from our school at a choreographed mass, one of the many celebratory events that marked its opening. It was a breathtaking, vibrant and courageous celebration that I think would rarely be commissioned now. It was also deeply reverent, prayerful and inspiring. That mass seemed to emphasise welcome, inclusivity and joy as the dancers offered their graceful and grace-filled movements around the open spaces. Sitting in the full to capacity cathedral that day, totally captivated by the wonder of the liturgy and the beauty of the cathedral, made me feel alive, excited and full of hope for the possibilities ahead of us as Church. The building itself spoke of the fundamental shift in our image, of our sense of mission and place in the world. Reflecting the emerging theology of Vatican ll, its very shape, space and essence was designed to hold and express this new way of being church. Built at the opposite end of Hope Street to the Anglican Cathedral, it celebrated a strong commitment to ecumenism, reflecting the fact that Christians in Liverpool were already working together for the poor and underprivileged of the city and of the world. Like the name of the street that linked the two churches, our new cathedral promised the hope of continuing collaboration, deepening understanding and prophetic witness to the city and beyond. Its circular shape spoke of welcome and inclusion, of openness and participation. Its wide spaces offered freedom to move, inviting creativity and imagination in how we celebrate the liturgy. The corona of coloured glass wove dancing patterns of colour and light, ever changing and ever new –, just as the church is called always to change and renew herself. Emerging from the foundations of the crypt, an earlier model of Church, it remained true to the heart of our tradition, our heritage and yet recognised the need for a contemporary language, shape and vision to speak to the reality of life for people of our time. Its inviting doors seemed to open courageously, full of hope towards the future in a fast-changing world. That was the image of church that launched me into adult life –, exciting, enabling and liberating and entirely in tune with Vatican II. Full of possibility and full of grace, full of new life and full of hope, it expressed the invitation I felt as a young adult to play my part, with others, in the transformation of the church and of the world. It was an expansive, imaginative and hope-filled vision that called forth and valued the graced contribution of all Godʼ,s people in the service of the gospel, in and for the world. The inspiration of Gaudium et Spes and subsequently, Populorum Progressio, led me into the justice and peace movement that has been integral to my faith journey all my adult life. Over the years, in all that has happened since those youthful, hope-filled days it would be easy to become disillusioned and angry as so much of the potential for renewal that Vatican ll promised still remains unfulfilled. Iʼ,ve certainly experienced those emotions, as I am sure many of us have. How then does one hold onto hope, a realistic hope, a resurrection hope? Once a vision has captured your heart, in a way that you know it to be true in the core of your being, it wonʼ,t go away. You are changed forever. Back in the sixties I naively expected the institutional church to deliver all that my Cathedral icon promised. Now, like so many others, I realise that hope is to be found in a myriad of ways, in everyday experiences, in the people we meet, in wisdom from unlikely places. Nowadays, amongst my generation at least, in the light of a seeming centralisation of power, I sense a growing confidence to trust in oneʼ,s own inner wisdom, a readiness again to follow intuition and let imagination flow, as well as a determination to take adult responsibility for our faith- to question and critique and not be ready to accept easy answers. I see a renewed courage and desire to discern, with others, where the Holy Spirit is moving and guiding, to find inspiration, hope and energy from many sources, and to trust oneʼ,s own inner authority more, rather than relying solely on the external validation and authority of the institution. Since Vatican II I think of the many ways this has been happening:- how the breaking open of the Word in small groups has profoundly formed people in the spirit of the Gospel, how the contribution of theologians from the global south, especially liberation theology has energised us, how the voice of women theologians has given us a new lens with which to read scripture, we are learning from people of other faiths, how in the light of exciting new scientific discoveries about the universe, cosmologists and eco-theologians are drawing us into the wonder and awe of our origins and helping us to understand more deeply the urgency to recognise our interdependence within Godʼ,s creation. I also think we owe a huge debt to religious orders, especially womenʼ,s orders, who have faithfully undertaken a process of renewal in order to rediscover their original charism and discern how that calls them to minister in todayʼ,s world. They have led the way and have been an inspiration. We all know through our own life experience that in the midst of this so-called ʻ,secularʼ, world Godʼ,s Spirit is at work in abundance among people of all faiths and none. God becoming human in Jesus tells us that Godʼ,s heart beats already in every human heart and Godʼ,s love and compassion are expressed in a myriad of ways if only we have eyes to see. Perhaps our role in this Year of Faith is, after all, ʻ,Kingdom Spottingʼ, as moral theologian Fr. Kevin Kelly used to say –, having the confidence to name and celebrate that Godʼ,s spirit is alive and well in the midst of everyday life. Thatʼ,s a source of hope for me. This quote from Fr. Tom Cullinan, (taken from ʻ,Turn the Tablesʼ,, a CAFOD publication) always challenges me: ʻ,In scripture, prophecy was not disengaged criticism . . .It was rather a demand from God, usually an unwelcome and painful demand, to lay bare the truth of the present, to energise creative alternatives, to insist that God will fulfil Godʼ,s story and to warn that God will not do as we expect.ʼ, I think heʼ,s saying, in the spirit of Vatican II, it is up to all of us to energise creative alternatives and we can look forward to lots of surprises as God challenges our expectations. Leeds Catholic Post Page 3 Are we still an Easter People? Recalling the hope of Vatican ll Vatican II Fifty Years On This October it will be 50 years since the opening of Vatican II –, over the months from now until the end of the Year there will be an article reflecting on the Council. These articles are not offered as deep reflections on the Council or the Documents from it, rather they are written from the point of view of those who experienced the Council in its time –, some are from people who were there, some are about people who were there –, some are by people who were the first to try and put into action the documents as they came out. They are all from a personal point of view and try to capture at least a little of that ‘,freshness of the Spirit’, as it blew through a church thrust into a modern World trying to find a Rock to hold fast to.

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Nov 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 4 Leeds Catholic Post F or the first time in its twenty-five-year history, Andrew Lloyd Webber’,s soaring West End musical Phantom of The Opera is coming to Harrogate! St John Fisher Catholic High School in Harrogate is one of the first schools in the UK to present the hit West End musical, following licence changes by The Really Useful Group earlier in the year. The dramatic show, which will remain true to the original script, score and costume, will be staged at St John Fisher High School, Hookstone Drive, Harrogate on 27th, 28th, 29th and 30th November. Directed by Karl Hansen, Head of Drama, with musical direction from Craig Ratcliffe, Head of Music and choreographed by Claire Noonan, Head of Dance, the musical features a cast of forty St John Fisher students, with leading roles for Michael McGeough as The Phantom, Matthew McKernan as Raoul and Esme Varley as Christine. The schoolʼ,s award-winning string, brass and woodwind players have joined forces for the first time to support the cast with a combined orchestra of thirty-five. St John Fisherʼ,s Head of Music, Craig Ratcliffe is determined to present a dramatic and authentic production and is working with the cast to produce sets that will result in a temporary transformation of the school hall. “,One of our long-standing teachers Teresa Carmody is making many of the period costumes and we are hiring some fantastic props that were recently used on Strictly Come Dancing. A group of students are also working hard threading over 14,000 beads for the custom made chandelier! “,We are extremely excited and proud to have been granted the first licence to stage Phantom of the Opera in Harrogate, and are pulling out all the stops to make it our best ever show. As part of our curricular offering, we are committed to providing all our music, dance and drama students with the best opportunities to perform in public. Being part of this amazing production will be a fantastic experience for the whole cast and we are very much looking forward to showcasing some of the great talent we have here at St John Fisher.”, For more information and tickets, please contact Carey Hueget at St John Fisher Catholic High School. 01423 887254. The Phantom reaches Harrogate! Exciting News - UK Aid Match takes CAFOD Lent Appeal to £,18.6 million –, a huge thank-you to everyone for making this possible! T ens of thousands of families in the developing world will get access to clean water and improved sanitation to help prevent life-threatening diseases thanks to the match funding from the UK government for all public donations to CAFOD’,s annual Lent appeal. A total of £,9.4 million was donated to CAFODʼ,s appeal between February 17th and May 17th to expand access to safe water and sanitation in the developing world. Virtually all of the money raised –, £,9.2 million in total –, is eligible for match funding, raising the total value of the Lent appeal to £,18.6 million and shattering previous records. Chris Bain, Director of CAFOD, said: “,Our supporters usually donate around £,2 million to our Lent appeal, so –, at a time when budgets are tight –, it is wonderful to see so many schools, parishes and individuals respond with compassion and generosity to the simple needs of those in the world without access to clean water. “,The donations we have received will make a massive difference to those poor communities, whether it is building dams, boreholes and new sanitation facilities, improving the management of water resources, or helping women to have a greater say in the decisions affecting their lives. “,We have valued working in partnership with the government on the UK Aid Match scheme, and we are delighted that they are matching the donations of the Catholic community –, a huge shared effort to help those in the world who have the least.”, Justine Greening, Secretary of State for International Development, said: ",The record-breaking response to this yearʼ,s appeal shows the extent of support for CAFODʼ,s work and UK taxpayers through DFID are helping this go even further by matching pound for pound all public donations. This will allow CAFOD to double its impact working to improve water access, sanitation and hygiene for some of the world`s most vulnerable and neglected people, including those affected by war, climate change and disease. ",CAFOD can now continue its work to help tens of thousands more families have access to clean water and sanitation, providing life-saving items such as water purification kits and soap. I am particularly pleased that CAFOD`s work will continue to help girls attend school rather than having to fetch water and help all children learn about hygiene and waterborne diseases.", Since the Lent appeal concluded, programme staff in countries where CAFOD is operating have been developing project proposals alongside local partners to introduce or expand water, sanitation, water resource management and gender projects over a 3-year period. Some examples of these projects include: •, Expanding CAFODʼ,s work to increase access to clean water and sanitation in South Sudan, as a result of which over 35,000 people will be reached with projects such as the construction of boreholes, training in hand pump mechanics and the building of latrines, •, Expanding CAFODʼ,s work in Kenya, which includes funding the establishment and training of water associations where local communities come together to agree how their water supplies should be managed, distributed and made sustainable for the long-term. More than 40,000 people will benefit from these expanded projects, and •, Expanding CAFODʼ,s women`s empowerment programme in Ethiopia to reach 10,000 women, helping them to access the support and resources they need to take more control over their own lives, including establishing saving and lending groups so that women can access the credit they need to start or grow their own businesses. Money has also been allocated to support CAFODʼ,s humanitarian and emergency response work across the world, particularly to tackle those `silent emergencies` where communities are living in a state of constant crisis due to shortages of water and other basic needs. For example, in Darfur, an additional £,300,000 will be invested over the next year to help the Caritas effort to reach the hundreds of thousands of vulnerable people still living in refugee camps in the region.

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Nov 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Leeds Catholic Post Page 5 By the time we know the results of the US election, this column will have been whisked off into the ether, so I write in ignorance (so whatʼ,s new?) How does this affect us, anyway? The President of the United States affects us a great deal. Think of the last Bush presidencies, and of the havoc that accompanied and followed. Was there a connection? Nearer to the readers of this paper is the battle of the Titans going on between the Obama administration and the Catholic Church- certainly many of the Bishops of the US Catholic Church. This is mainly over the Obama governmentʼ,s universal healthcare legislation, which you may think should be supported by all Christians. The States being what it is, there are many there who think that people should look after themselves and anything else is dangerous “,socialism”,- still a dirty word to many, and to some Catholics synonymous with atheism. The sticking point is that employers will be obliged to provide health insurance, and for Catholic institutions, this means to them that they will be providing contraception. Furthermore, if the contraceptive is a “,morning after”, treatment or an abortifacient type, then this is tantamount to providing abortion. The battle-lines are drawn: no concessions, no surrender. Bishop Jenky of Peoria has been in the forefront and on the Sunday before the election, he ordered under obedience all celebrating Priests to read a letter at Mass. “,Today, “, he said “,Catholic politicians, bureaucrats, and their electoral supporters who callously enable the destruction of innocent human life in the womb also thereby reject Jesus as their Lord. They are objectively guilty of grave sin.”, Does this mean anyone who votes Democrat and for their candidate? In our old democracy, we embrace, the American commentator George Weigel says, a “,polite pusillanimity”, in the face of the secular assault- or in English, a timidity or lack of courage. We seem to manage to sidestep these issues. Even amidst our rejection of abortion, we allow ourselves to vote for a partyʼ,s wider agenda, but not specifically for such an evil even if they do not reject it. We might otherwise find it difficult to vote. Our taxes go towards abortion services, but we take the same attitude as we may over weapons of destruction. We are obliged to give, but not support or apportion. It is, after all, a battle not to impose law in any country, but for the hearts and minds of our fellow citizens. That is what matters. If Obama has been defeated, the same Bishops must now have to look to new President Romney for a solution to these and wider concerns, which they seem to believe they will get. It will be a test of Catholic-power. If Obama is still President, though, then what? A lot hangs on this result. Benchmark Sidelines I have been trying to picture a Vatican version of “,Yes Minister`s”, Sir Humphrey, and how he would have reacted following the first session of Vatican ll, after the Bishops threw away the Curia`s plan for the conciliar commissions. I suppose he would be cross! You will have guessed that I thought I might hitch up to the `Fifty years since the Second Vatican Council` bandwagon. I planned to extract a pithy quote or two about music liturgy from the relevant Constitution, then comment on the `Before` and `After`. But I have been blown off course, and found myself in the stormy waters of the internet. Finding the relevant constitution is easy –, Constitution on the Sacred Liturgy (1), and Chapter VI on sacred music, lists its benefits: “,..sacred music is to be considered the more holy in proportion as it is more closely connected with the liturgical action, whether it adds delight to prayer, fosters unity of minds, or confers greater solemnity upon the sacred rites”, and... Everyone at Mass should be involved: “,Choirs must be diligently promoted, especially in cathedral churches, but bishops and other pastors of souls must be at pains to ensure that, whenever the sacred action is to be celebrated with song, the whole body of the faithful may be able to contribute that active participation which is rightly theirs...”, and…,. Gregorian chant gets a big thumbs up: “,The Church acknowledges Gregorian chant as specially suited to the Roman liturgy...”, Sixty years earlier, in 1903, Pope Pius X had attempted to restore this type of music (2) I wish I had clearer memories of pre-Vatican ll church music, but in my South London parish I cannot recall any music at Mass, and certainly no chant. It was t here that my internet wanderings led me into conflict, ostensibly about music. “,On one side, there are those who want to maintain and develop the status quo established after Vatican II, with its emphasis on a participatory vernacular liturgy. …, On the other side, there are the traditionalist conservatives, who want a less populist, more centralised and more uniform church.”, (3) An article in the Tablet (4) created controversy: I appreciated comments by `Matthew`, “,…, Music should of course be liturgical but that does not mean it should be limited to traditional style. Again the music is a means of raising our prayer to God and that can be done in plain chant, hymn, folk, even rock in its place.”, (Pun alert!) I expect St Peter would appreciate the rock music... Tim Devereux tim.devereux@ssg.org.uk West Yorkshire Church Music Network e-mail list- contact http://www.westyorkshirechurchmusic.org.uk/ National Network of Pastoral Musicians: http://nnpm.org/ Society of Saint Gregory: http://www.ssg.org.uk/ 1) Search for `Constitution on the Sacred Liturgy` –, it`s available on the Vatican website 2) Search for `Tra Le Sollecitudini` –, available in Italian on the Vatican website 3) Roman Catholic Church Music in England, 1791–,1914: A Handmaid of the Liturgy? T.E. Muir 4) http://www.thetablet.co.uk/blogs/333/18 Musical Notes by Tim Devereux OFFICE FOR EVANGELISATION &, CATECHESIS The Year of Faith “,The “,door of faith”, is always open for us, ushering us into the life of communion with God and offering entry into his Church. It is possible to cross that threshold when the word of God is proclaimed and the heart allows itself to be shaped by transforming grace. To enter through that door is to set out on a journey that lasts a lifetime.”, Porta Fidei, Pope Benedict XVI On Sunday 16th October 2011 Pope Benedict XVI announced a YEAR OF FAITH for the whole Church, to run from the 50th anniversary of the opening of the Second Vatican Council on 11 October 2012 until the Solemnity of Christ the King on 24 November 2013. The YEAR of Faith is an invitation to everyone in the Church to celebrate and renew their faith - individually, in families, in parishes and schools, in our Diocese, country and across our global Catholic community. The Vicariate for Evangelisation will be holding a variety of courses and events as part of the Year of Faith –, check this page for details. Introduction to Catholic Foundation Stones –, Choice of dates &, venues Catholic Foundation Stones is a basic introduction to the Catholic faith. It is simple and straightforward and can be used with all kinds of different groups and individuals. As part of the Year of Faith the Vicariate for Evangelisation is holding evening sessions around the Diocese to offer an introduction to Catholic Foundation Stones and to discuss how it can be used in many different areas of parish and school catechesis and faith formation. Time: 7:00pm –, 9:00pm –, refreshments from 6:45pm. There is no charge but booking is essential. Please choose ONE of the following evenings: •, St Mary’,s Church, Selby, YO8 4HS Thursday 7th February, 2013 •, Holy Redeemer, 34 New North Road, Huddersfield, HD1 5JY Thursday 25th April, 2013 •, St Joseph’,s Church Hall, Harrogate, HG1 3HD Thursday 16th May, 2013 Advent Retreat Day –, LTUC, Chaplaincy, Saturday 1st December Everyone is welcome to the Advent Retreat Day, in the Chaplaincy at Leeds Trinity University College, Brownberrie Lane, Horsforth, LS18 5HD. Time: 10:00 –, 16:00. Leaders: Fr Chris Angel &, Mrs Linda Pennington. Cost: £,20 - includes lunch. Booking essential. Ways of Praying –, LTUC, Chaplaincy, Saturday 2nd February 2013 This is a day for anyone involved in parish ministry - A day to reflect on the meaning of prayer, to experience different ways of praying and to explore methods of leading others in prayer. Workshops led by Canon Ann Hemsworth, Carol Daley, Canon Joseph Smith, Sr Anne Hammersley &, Linda Pennington. The day starts at 9:00am with the Celebration of Mass and concludes at 3:15pm. Cost £,20 –, includes lunch. Booking essential. Youth Ministry Day –, Saturday March 2nd 2013 Myddelton Grange, Ilkley, LS29 0EB. 9:30am - 4:00pm. This event is for anyone who works with young people in the Church including parish catechists, youth ministry co- ordinators, parish volunteers, school chaplains, school ethos staff, RE staff, parish clergy. Cost: £,33 - includes lunch &, refreshments. For group bookings: book four places and get a fifth place for £,16. Booking essential A Starter Course for Catechists: Learning and Teaching the Catholic Faith. Diocese of Leeds training for new &, existing catechists, leaders of the Liturgy of the Word with children and anyone interested in catechesis. Led by Mrs Linda Pennington and experienced catechists at Hinsley Hall. Dates: Saturdays from 10:00am –, 4:00pm: March 9, March 23 and April 20 2013. Cost: £,65 (for 3 days) to include resources, lunch &, refreshments. Booking essential WHO TO CONTACT AT HINSLEY HALL There are many courses and events organised by the Office for Evangelisation and Catechesis throughout the year which help to support formation in faith and training for catechists, leaders of the liturgy of the word with children and other parish ministries. Check this page in future editions and also the website: www.dioceseofleeds.org.uk/evangelisation - see Forthcoming Events. For further information or booking for any of the above events please contact Catherine Green on 0113 261 8040 or evangelisation.admin@dioceseofleeds.org.uk PAPAL HONOUR FOR ST AUSTIN’,S PARISHIONER O n 20 October Canon Maguire celebrated the Catholic Care Annual Adoption Mass at the church of St Peter &,Paul in Wakefield. The Mass itself was a lovely celebration of family life, with family members participating through Readings, Bidding Prayers, the Offertory and the whole Congregation singing in praise. Afterwards we all enjoyed a truly fantastic feast of food while the children and young people were entertained by a “,Story Teller”, who brought along several exotic pets including a snake and a tarantula! Excitement levels almost reached fever pitch and one little boy shouted “,this is so cool!”, There were also rabbits and guinea pigs for those of us not quite as brave. The occasion was a wonderful opportunity for adoptive and foster parents and grandparents to meet new people, catch up with old friends and exchange their experiences. “, It was a truly inspirational afternoon”, remarked Carol Hill, Catholic Careʼ,s newly appointed Director. Left to right: Deacon N Shields, Rev T Swinglehurst , Mr R Finnigan, Mr David Chappell and Rev M Kelly

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Nov 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 6 Leeds Catholic Post Many of the Deacons of the diocese met for a study day at the Mirfield Centre in October. In the morning, deacons from this diocese who are engaged in various chaplaincy work spoke about their varied experiences of this form of service. After lunch, students for the diaconate spoke about the new formation programme based at Maryvale in Birmingham, but including distance learning. It is not always made clear that the diocese is also seeking vocations to the diaconate who can enter this programme with a view to ordination. Mgr Paul Fisher at Batley Carr, the Director of Deacons, welcomes enquiries. There was then an open forum, covering a number of topics relating to the work of our deacons and the paths set out for them in the official Directory for the Diaconate. A number of thoughts and ideas were aired. A change in the diocese can be seen as a problem, but as the Kinharvie Institute pointed out to everyone recently, such events can also be an opportunity. There are certainly many opportunities for deacons to make a renewal of their service in this diocese. For encouragement, it is worth considering a statement from an unlikely source. At the recent Rome Synod the Bishop of Sheffield, Rt Rev Steven Croft made this intervention in the Bishopsʼ, debate, from an Anglican perspective: “,For the last ten years, the Church of England has actively encouraged a new movement of mission aimed at beginning fresh expressions of the church, as a natural part of the ministry of parishes or groups of parishes or dioceses. …,. who will be the new evangelisers? I commend further reflection on diakonia and the ministry of deacons. The ministry of forming fresh expressions of church is rooted theologically in diakonia and the ministry of deacons: listening, loving service, and being sent on behalf of the Church. In the Church of England ordinal deacons are described as heralds of Christ`s kingdom and as agents of God`s purposes of love.”, Amen! Deacons Diary E id-ul-Adha took some people by surprise when they realised that there were fewer taxis out on the streets. The simplistic explanation of “,Its their Christmas,”, does go some way to exposing the importance of the festival and justifying that Muslims want the time to celebrate both at the Mosque and with their families. It does, however, short-change the story behind the feast and obliges Muslims to “,Christianise”, their faith by translating key notions into Christian language to make them acceptable. Eil-ul-Adha is the festival of sacrifice which recalls the prophet Ibrahim`s willingness to sacrifice his son in obedience to Godʼ,s orders. The man we Christians know as Abraham is called Ibrahim by Muslims. They see him as the father of the Arab people as well as the Jewish people through his two sons, Isaac and Ishmael (Isma`il in Arabic). The Muslim story of Ibrahim Ibrahim is presented in the Qur`an as somebody who, from a very early age, had problems trying to understand God and trying to discover God, being restless, knowing that perhaps the pagan environment which he was in did not have the answers. That, ultimately, God was not the star or the sun or the wind or the moon - all these forces that he saw - God was something else. Consequently Ibrahim is considered to be neither Jewish, nor Christian, nor Muslim, but somebody who is a hernif - somebody who essentially and intrinsically knows that there is really only one God. He is praised for this yearning and is known as a friend of God. The tradition of God testing Ibrahim`s devotion by asking him to sacrifice his son is the heart of the story. God appeared in a dream to Ibrahim and told him to sacrifice his son Isma`il. Ibrahim and Isma`il set off to Mina for the sacrifice. As they went, the devil attempted to persuade Ibrahim to disobey God and not to sacrifice his beloved son. But Ibrahim stayed true to God, and drove the devil away. As Ibrahim prepared to kill his son God stopped him and gave him a sheep to sacrifice instead. Compare and contrast with Genesis Chapters 21 and 22, in the Christian narrative Abraham is told to sacrifice Isaac. Ibrahim was the first Prophet who was asked for the ultimate sacrifice: ",I want you to sacrifice your own flesh and blood for me",. And he passed the test because he was prepared to do it, in his submission and devotion to God. Ibrahim`s complete obedience to the will of God is celebrated by Muslims each year at Eil-ul-Adha. The feast reminds them of their own submission to God, and their own willingness to sacrifice anything to God`s wishes. During the festival Muslims who can afford to, sacrifice domestic animals, usually sheep, as a symbol of Ibraham`s sacrifice. The meat is distributed among family, friends and the poor, who each get a third share. British law insists that the animals must be killed in a proper slaughterhouse and some families will make a charitable donation of cash rather than distributing meat. As with all festivals there are prayers, and also presents. The Hajj Every day Muslims pray wherever they happen to be at prayer time, once a week (on Friday) they gather at a local Mosque for communal prayer. On major feast days they attend at a regional Mosque. Once a year, Muslims of the world gather together in Mecca for prayer. Making the pilgrimage is compulsory for Muslims at least once is a lifetime (if they can afford it and are physically able). The ritual of the Hajj strips away all markers of social status, wealth, and pride. In the Hajj all are truly equal. The Hajjis or pilgrims wear simple white clothes called Ihram. After circling the Kaaba they re-enact part of the story of Ibrahim by symbolically looking for water, they also throw pebbles at a column representing the devil to underline their commitment to turn away from evil So perhaps Eid-ul-Adha is a bit more akin to Ash Wednesday than Christmas! INTERFAITH Events a fortnight this year! Look out for events local to you. Make an effort to speak to someone that you see regularly, such as a colleague at work, about faith and belief Monday 19th November, 6pm. Launch of Interfaith week. Kirklees Join with, Kirklees Faiths Forum for a shared meal and learn about the important faith and interfaith activities taking place across Kirklees at our AGM in the Deighton Centre, Deighton Road, Deighton, HD2 1JP. For catering purposes, please RSVP zainab.akudi@kirklees.gov.uk Tuesday 20th November. 9am-4pm. Bringing communities together, Beeston Promoting greater cultural awareness at the Hamara Healthy Living Centre, Tempest Road, Beeston LS11 6RD. Different faiths and cultures will have displays and activities to help young people see the value of working together. For more information contact Shanaz shanaz@hamara.co.uk 0113 277 3330 or Naveed naveed@hamara.co.uk Tuesday 20th November. 7pm. Heroes of Faith, Sheffield Join with Sheffield Interfaith to talk about people you admire from your faith tradition, or just listen and learn. St Andrewʼ,s Psalter Lane Church, Sheffield S11 8YL. Contact Tina 0113 2678289 office@saplecclesallmethodist.org Thursday 22nd November. 6.30pm. Come to the Edge, Women’,s event. Bradford An event for Christian and Muslim Women at Kala Sangam (opposite Bradford Cathedral`s West End). To include a launch of the Report, `Come to the Edge` which captures conversations between Muslim and Christian women across the country. Meal, workshops, entertainment. Booking essential: dilly.baker@bradfordcathedral.org or Saima Nazir 07542 036444 Thursday 22nd November. All day. Multi-Faith Exhibition. Leeds An event at the Merrion Centre where different faiths join together in putting on a multi faith exhibition. An opportunity for the voice of dialogue to be heard in public. For further details contact cdobbin@aol.com Saturday 24th November. Noon-4pm. Symposium on Discipleship in faith traditions. Sheffield At Burngreave Ashram, 86 Spital Hill, Sheffield S4 7LG. Starts with vegetarian lunch –, booking essential. Contact Nirmal on curlsu@hotmail.com 07932 017929 to book your place. Sunday 25th November. 1.30pm. Multi-faith tree planting. Wakefield At Thornes Common, Wakefield with Wakefield Interfaith Group, attended by the Mayor of Wakefield. Meet at the carpark at the end of Monckton Road WF4 7AL (off Denbydale Road). Plant a ʻ,Faith Standʼ, of native trees. Ample car- parking, accessible to all. Followed by refreshments and ʻ,tree appreciationʼ, at Thornes Park Stadium sports hall. Contact cynthia9@phonecoop.coop Thursday 29th November. 7-9.30pm. Making Dialogue Happen. Bradford A very practical session exploring ways of engaging with dialogue in its many shapes and forms. Open to people of all faiths and none. To book, contact: Dilly: dilly.baker@bradfordcathedral.org or Elizabeth: sharakatbradford@gmail.com Thursday 20th December. All You Need Is Love exhibition. Leeds A new exhibition (until June 2013) in Leeds City Museum looking at aspects of love and commitment between different couples and the rituals and traditions associated with love, marriage and/or commitment, including displays from the different faith traditions of Leeds. Festivals November 28th. Birthday of Guru Nanak (Sikh) Guru Nanak (1469-1539) was a great religious innovators and the founder of the Sikh religion. Guru Nanak`s birthday is celebrated by some Sikhs on April 14th (Nanakshahi calendar). The date according to the lunar calendar changes annually but is usually in November. Nanak`s religious ideas draw on both Hindu and Islamic thought, but are far more than just a synthesis. Nanak was an original spiritual thinker and expressed his thoughts in extraordinary poetry that forms the basis of Sikh scripture. Little is known about the life of Nanak, but Sikh tradition has a much-loved set of stories or janam sakhis which relate various incidents from his life, and include many of his important teachings. December 8th Bodhi Day (Buddhist ) On Bodhi day some Buddhists celebrate Gautama`s attainment of enlightenment under the Bodhi tree at Bodhgaya, India. December 9th Hanukkah (Jewish ) Hanukkah is the Festival of Lights and marks the restoration of the temple by the Maccabees in 164 BCE. Hanukkah is celebrated at roughly the same time as Christmas, but there is no connection at all between the festivals. “,There’,s no taxis!”, “,I know, it is their Christmas”, Course 1 –, Understanding Islam T his four-day course is held at Campion Hall, the Jesuit community in Oxford, and aims to help Catholics understand how their beliefs shape the world views of the Muslims they live and work with. Participants are encouraged to see the world through Muslim eyes, and are taken through a stimulating programme including sessions on Muhammad, Islamic beliefs, laws and prayer life. There are also opportunities to learn about Islamic perspectives on Christianity, developments in the modern Islamic world, and Islam in Britain. The course is a safe space for Catholics to discuss their attitudes and judgements, and to consider how to respond to the call of their bishops to dialogue with Islam. A maximum of 10 participants ensures that there is plenty of opportunity for discussion. The course is presented by Dr Damian Howard SJ, currently a lecturer at Heythrop College with a special academic interest in the Christian theological response to Islam, and the Reverend Dr David Marshall, who organises the “,Building Bridges”, Muslim- Christian dialogue programme. This course normally runs twice a year in the November &, February. The next course will take place 12th-15th February 2013. Participation is free, thanks to generous support from Georgetown University, but students cover their own expenses such as travel To apply: e-mail Katharina.smith- muller@cbcew.org.uk with a short paragraph on why you think that you would benefit from taking part in this course. Course 2 - Jews, Christians and Muslims in Europe: Modern Challenges. The Woolf Institute in Cambridge is delighted to announce that applications are now being accepted for the e-learning course, Jews, Christians and Muslims in Europe: Modern Challenges. Following two successful years, the course will commence in late February 2013. More than fifty participants from around the world - Australia and New Zealand, China, Japan, Poland, United States, Germany, the Czech Republic, Belgium, Switzerland, and the United Kingdom - have already engaged in this three-part course which focuses on the relationships between Jews, Christians, and Muslims and their impact in modern Europe, looking at their history, culture and issues of citizenship. Find out more about this programme at: http://www.woolf.cam.ac.uk/courses/jcme.asp The course is taught at a final-year undergraduate level and the e-learning approach allows participants to study wherever and whenever they choose via the internet. With the support of Woolf Institute tutors, you will work both individually and jointly with other students. The deadline for applications is Friday 1 February 2013. The course commences, with induction week, on Monday 25 February 2013. The application form is available to download at http://www.woolf.cam.ac.uk/courses/jcme.asp. The course fee is £,350. Further details: Dr Emma Harris eth22@cam.ac.uk

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Leeds Catholic Post Page 7 ONE WORLD WEEK 2012 “,Sharing Destiny- working towards One World.”, This week in school continues to be a week of fun, games, activity and learning with a twist. It is not primarily a fund raising effort. The underlying principles remain the same, co-operation, better understanding and better respect for each other with justice and peace for all. Our learning touches on fair trade and on looking after our environment. We were also again focusing especially on PERU and incorporating our Autumn term fund raising for PERU in support of Diocesan projects in the townships of Lima. This will enable communities to have a better chance to develop skills for life and to better help themselves in the long term. In school we met up with other classes for parachute games and to swap stories from around the world, that have a clear moral to teach. Some of the highlights included a school hunger cloth similar to those displayed in the Cathedral recently and a One World Cross. Many children composed messages to send on greetings cards to Prisoners of Conscience and decorated them before posting to China, Iraq, U.S.A. and Azerbaijan. We have been celebrating One World Week in school now for more than twenty years. Often we launch balloons and attach goodwill messages matching the theme of One World. Last year we had replies from east of York and almost as far as the coast. Among other activities during the week were a bun sale organised by the infants and a bazaar on Wednesday afternoon. This included lots of stalls in the school hall that various classes had devised. There was a book stall, a tombola, a find the treasure activity, lucky straws, guess the sweets in the jar and a raffle. Not only was it great to see the children so creative, but their efforts raised over £,1000. This was added to the money from Fridayʼ,s non uniform day. The events of the week were drawn together in our whole school Sangam where we shared examples of the work undertaken in class. Guests who attended included our local PCSO and Emma who had co-ordinated a series of visits to Huddersfieldʼ,s places of worship. These had taken place across the first half of Autumn term for all junior classes. We celebrated the One World which we share, care about and must look after for our future generations. It was a fantastic week and one that we are committed to celebrating every year: it is too important and too much fun to miss!

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Nov 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 8 Leeds Catholic Post NEWS FROM LEEDS TRINITY UNIVERSITY COLLEGE L eeds Trinity staff and students celebrated All Saints’, Day on 1 November, with a programme of worship and activities. Mgr Paul Grogan, Leeds Trinity’,s Chaplain, shares his thoughts on the day: “,A striking description of Leeds Trinityʼ,s role in society was presented by Mgr John Wilson, the Administrator of the Diocese of Leeds, in his homily for All Saintsʼ, Day. He said that while the university college needed to “,stand in the marketplace”, it had to do so “,as a cathedral of education, where learning and faith jointly point heavenward, like twin spires lifting our gaze and our spirit.”, Listening to his words at the patronal feast day Mass in the chapel was the Lord Mayor of Leeds, Cllr Ann Castle and the Chair of Horsforth Town Council, Cllr Jude Arbuckle as well as many current and former governors, members of staff and students. In his closing remarks Mgr Wilson, who is a Leeds Trinity governor, expressed his appreciation of Professor Bridge on the occasion of her final All Saintsʼ, Day as principal. After a well- attended festal lunch, he blessed the new all- weather sports pitch, in the presence of a good number of staff and students, including members of the Department of Sports, Health and Nutrition and powerchair footballer and sports journalism graduate Ben Cropper. Mgr Wilson provoked delighted laughter when he ran half the length of the pitch in his ecclesiastical robes to bless one of the goal mouths. In the afternoon, staff and students gathered for a showing of “,In One City”,, a film about 13 peopleʼ,s beliefs values and lives, to mark the beginning of One Community Week. A fascinating discussion about diversity in Leeds Trinity ensued. At the same time a fun netball match saw the ladies first team beat the all- male student union All Stars by a convincing margin. The day ended with Chaplaincy Tea with cakes generously provided by members of the Leeds Trinity community. Donations for St Gemmaʼ,s Hospice and CAFOD amounted to £,268.”, Events One Community Month Leeds Trinity celebrates Equality and Diversity during November with a series of One Community Month events. One Community Month offers a series of free lunchtime, afternoon and evening events for staff, students and members of the public during November. The programme looks at different aspects that make up the equality and diversity agenda. ‘,Life, Death and Beyond’, Starts 11am, 28 November, Conference Suite The Department of Theology and Religious Studies is hosting a one-day symposium, which aims to promote interdisciplinary dialogue and make contemporary research available to participants. As such, the papers will address, and appeal to, students and academics working in a range of different fields. The symposium begins at 11am in the Conference Suite of Leeds Trinity, with papers being presented through the day. There will also be a keynote address from 6-7pm by Dr. David Cheetham, Philosopher of Religion and Head of Theology at Birmingham University, on the relationship between religious diversity and conceptions of the afterlife. It`s free to attend the symposium, but booking is advised to guarantee your place. For more information and to book your place, please email the organiser, Luke Fox, at l.fox@leedstrinity.ac.uk. Annual Carol Service 7pm, 6 December, Leeds Trinity Chapel Postgraduate Graduation Ceremony 6pm, 11 December, Leeds Trinity Chapel For more information on Leeds Trinity events, please visit leedstrinity.ac.uk/news_ events/events/Pages/default.aspx Leeds Trinity celebrates All Saints’, Day T he Year of Faith in the Chaplaincy started with the inaugural Mass at Leeds Cathedral, which was attended by Mgr Paul Grogan and many students and members of staff. This year was proclaimed by Pope Benedict XVI on the occasion of the fiftieth anniversary of the Second Vatican Council in order to foster what he has termed the “,new evangelisation”, of western society. Mgr John Wilson, a governor at Leeds Trinity, celebrated the Mass in his new role as the Administrator of Leeds Diocese, a role which he will continue to exercise until the Pope appoints a new bishop following Archbishop Rocheʼ,s move to Rome. Year of Faith Mass L eeds Trinity is hosting ‘,Churches in the Modern World’,, an exhibition from The Glasgow School of Art. The exhibition explores the period of extraordinary change in church architecture over the two decades either side of the Second Vatican Council. Nine key buildings are illustrated in depth using new and original photographs, archive documents and significant texts from the period. The subject of post-war Roman Catholic church architecture is articulated through three themes: Tradition and modernity, Devotion and Liturgy, Church and City. The exhibition is one aspect of a major research project by Robert Proctor, Lecturer in History of Architecture at the Glasgow School of Art, funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council, with Ambrose Gillick as Research Assistant on the project. The exhibition is in Leeds Trinityʼ,s Atrium, please contact Dominica Richmond at d.richmond@leedstrinity.ac.uk for further information. Leeds Trinity hosts ‘,Churches in the Modern World’,

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Leeds Catholic Post Page 9 50 Year Celebration O n Thursday, 18 October 2012 Our Lady of Lourdes Catholic Primary School in Huddersfield welcomed the Administrator of the Diocese, Mgr John Wilson to celebrate the occasion of 50 years of Catholic primary education in Sheepridge, Huddersfield. In attendance was Father Larkin who supported Mgr Wilson throughout his visit. Welcomed by Mr Harry Rowan, Headteacher Mgr Wilson was given a long tour of the school, which has had a new Foundation Stage built, remodelled classrooms and corridors and an outdoor environment to support the childrenʼ,s learning. Mgr Wilson was really impressed with the school allotment helping children in the Foundation Stage pick the broad beans for the school dinners, whilst at the same time visiting the schoolʼ,s eco- friendly greenhouse. Moving throughout Key Stage 1 Mgr Wilson spent time talking to the children, asking them what they were learning in their classrooms and praising them for their hard work and kindness to one another. Five years ago Our Lady of Lourdes School consulted with the parents and governors of St Patrickʼ,s Catholic Primary School in Huddersfield to discern the process of federation between the two schools. Mgr Wilson, at the time, was a governor at Our Lady of Lourdes and with this being his first visit since the formation of the federation he was delighted with the success and progress made over the past four years. Equally, the children were excited by Mgr Wilsonʼ,s visit and asked him many questions about his role in the Diocese before they had their celebration ice cream in the afternoon. As the morning drew to a close the school organised lunch for the governors, visitors which included Mrs Hegarty, a Trustee of the Diocese, and all the staff. This was a wonderful occasion in order to celebrate the success of the school community, following on from its successful OFSTED inspection in February, with the Administrator of the Diocese. As Mgr Wilson left the school he was presented with a photograph of the children, a prayer card and a jar of chutney made from Our Lady of Lourdes home grown tomatoes. FROM JUST £,299 R.G.R. MEMORIALS COLOUR CATALOGUE QUALITY MEMORIALS AT AFFORDABLE PRICES IN GRANITE, MARBLE &, STONE ALL PRICES INCLUDE DELIVERY &, FIXING Ogee top memorial 2’,6”, high Fully polished Black Granite, Delivered and Fixed for £,399 inc VAT FREE Tel: 0113 282 3888 43 High Ridge Park, Rothwell, Leeds LS26 0NL

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Nov 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 10 Leeds Catholic Post FIDEM FIDEM S o rang out the cry in a full hall at St Wilfrid’,s High School and Sixth Form College, Featherstone. Keep the Faith ! they sang and so ushered in the half term break for another year. It was once, again, the traditional day of celebration for the Feast of St Wilfrid. A day that has by now developed its own pattern Mass first for all the school followed by lunch and then various kinds of entertainment for the afternoon. This year there proved to be a slight change to the plans owing to the fact that the fire alarm went off just as the first Mass was to be said and so everything moved away from the times given. Putting all that aside, at last the Main Mass of the day got underway with a full Hall and the young students ready and eager to take part. Mr Pyle the Head explained the theme of the Mass ʻ,Fan into Flame The Gift Of Faithʼ,. He explained how this month we enter the Year Of Faith and at the next St Wilfridʼ,s Day in 2013 the ʻ,Year Of Faith will endʼ,, but will be the fiftieth year of the School. ʻ,The Holy Father,ʼ, he said, ʻ,pleads that we look inside ourselves to rest our eyes upon the person of Christ. He pleads as does Paul to Timothy that we may fan into flame a passion for God, that we may not be ʻ,timidʼ,, ʻ,bashfulʼ, or uneasy about our faith, but instead strong and bold. Our faith is a great gift, but it is our personal task to cultivate that which our father has blessed us with, to re-visit it, revive it and to add to it. For this to happen though, we cannot rely on our own strength, but on the strength of our heavenly father.ʼ, Taking up the theme of flame and love the celebration opened with two separate dances performed by two groups who set the standard for an excellent celebration of the Mass. As good as the dancers were with their performance they were well matched by the quality of music produced throughout both vocal and instrumental. Fr Simon Lodge, now the Parish Priest of St Josephʼ,s, Pontefract, was the main celebrant along with Fr David and Deacon Jerry, he too took up the theme of the Year of Faith after a short tour through his holiday activities and an explanation of KiKi parties. Unlike them he stressed our Faith is to be shared –, the idea is to bring everyone in and keep nobody out. He challenge the students to do something with their Faith to Fan it –, grow it not just Keep it –, to face the challenge it gave them. It is, he said, the gift of God. So to the signing of the school hymn –, as has come to be expected now this was a credit to the school and to all who took part as the Headmaster said they all needed to be thanked and demonstrated their Faith and belief in their actions. Holy Family Admissions September 2013 P arents who are considering Holy Family Catholic Primary School for their child are warmly invited to contact school to arrange an opportunity to look around our happy school at work, on 5th December The Governors will admit 30 children aged 4+ in September 2013. Children born on or between 1st September 2008 and 31st August 2009 may be admitted full time. The closing date for applications this year is Friday 15th January 2013. Forms will be sent direct from Children Leeds. If you wish your child to attend Holy Family you must also complete a Supplementary Information Form (SIF) These are obtainable from the school office and should be returned to the office by 15th January. An offer of places will be made on 16th April 2013. Parents are encouraged to apply online, if you are not able to do this please see us for a paper copy of the application form. If you need any help at all please call into the school office.

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Leeds Catholic Post Page 11 SERVAVI

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Page 12 Leeds Catholic Post Thirst for Change - Messages of Hope and Thanks from Guatemala I n September, Tom Walsh, our representative for Central America, visited our water programme high in the hills of Guatemala. Access to safe drinking water for families living in the region has always been a problem. These testimonies from the villagers Tom met are just one example of the many ways our Thirst for Change fundraising last Lent is changing lives. Ana Pu lives in Xetabal, a village with 342 families. Ana is 21 years old and her father is a community leader. “,Even before my village was forced to flee from the violence of the war in 1983, we wanted to build a water system. When we returned in 1996, we began to look at how to bring water to our community. The water came from a polluted stream that dried up in the summer. Then we found a spring high up in the mountains, in an area of forest. It was only when we approached Caritas Quiché, in 2010 (CAFODʼ,s partner) that we found the support we needed to design and build the water system. Within a year, the project was finished. Each family worked for 66 days in its construction. The men did the heavy manual work of digging the trenches and the women prepared the food, taking it up the mountain to the work site. We did a map of the village, with the name of each family and the number of people living in each house. This helped us work out who was most in need, the widows and single mothers, and they were given priority. We are now planning a second stage to the project that will benefit more families in the community. As a young woman, I now have more time each day for my studies. I no longer have to go down to the river and carry heavy buckets of water back home. One thing I have noticed from drinking the clear spring water is that I no longer have the skin rashes and infections that I used to have when I drank the river water.”, Rosa Virginia Castro Capó,n works as a health educator within the diocesan water programme. She is 32 years old and has worked at Caritas Quiché, for 8 years. “,I feel motivated by my Christian faith to serve. I believe we are all born equal and have equal rights. I think it´,s important that people get involved to fight for their rights. As Caritas staff, we are not the leaders of these projects. The people are. Since 1991, Caritas Quiché, has helped build more than 206 community water systems. About 14,000 families have benefited from having access to clean drinking water. That´,s about 81,000 people in all. But even with this huge effort, nearly half of the villages in our diocese have still not benefited. I would like to explain to CAFOD´,s supporters that there is still so much to do. We work with the most excluded people, those who live furthest from the towns, those with no access to health and education services. The extra support from CAFOD will enable us to build more water systems and dry latrines. 250 families will have latrines. In this way, their health and basic services will be improved and give them greater opportunities in life. Nothing compares with the happiness of having drinking water in the home.ʼ, Father Santos is an advisor to the Caritas Quiché, diocesan social outreach programme. He is 54 years old and has worked at Caritas Quiché, for 21 years. The slogan in the poster reads “,Without water, there is no life.”, “,In the Mayan tradition, water comes from God, from the creation. Water is Life. This is central to our beliefs. I am happy when I see how much people´,s health and lifestyle have improved as a result of getting clean drinking water. In the name of the Church, I thank you for this sign of solidarity. You are putting into action God´,s commandment to love oneʼ,s neighbour.”, CAFOD News What life’,s like in the refugee camps –, finding hope within the struggle Catherine Mahony, one of our Emergency Response Officers, writes: I often feel that life in refugee camps is misrepresented. I donʼ,t like the images of camps we see on television, in which people always look sad and helpless. I know why we are only shown the horror: itʼ,s undeniably awful that people have had to run from their homes because theyʼ,re being bombed, that theyʼ,ve had to walk for a month to find safety, that theyʼ,re tired and sick and donʼ,t have enough food. But that isnʼ,t the whole picture. I met Samia Hussein because the beautiful stoves she was selling made me stop in my tracks. We were in the marketplace in Yusuf Batil refugee camp in South Sudan, home to more than 35,000 people who have fled fighting in Blue Nile State in Sudan. Samia was selling portable, energy-efficient stoves that were made from donkey dung, for about 50p each. When I approached her, she was stirring a big pot of okra stew that she was planning to sell that night, but she smiled and welcomed me into her shelter. She told me that she, her husband and her two sons had fled from their village last September. “,We were being bombed,”, she said and mimed the Antonov planes that had roared overhead. Since then, the family had travelled on foot, with almost no possessions, before arriving in Batil this June. I asked Samia how she was finding life in Batil. Given how difficult I knew things were in the camp, I was surprised by her response: “,Itʼ,s good,”, she said, smiling. Her positive outlook must have helped her get through –, she and her family had arrived with nothing except a small amount of savings. She had used the money to buy a cooking pot and food and set up her stall in the market. Later, she had seen someone making a stove and copied the design. The neat little devices she was now selling could retain the heat from burning charcoal more effectively than traditional stoves, meaning people wouldnʼ,t need to use so much fuel. I was struck by how incredibly resourceful she was. Samia was open about the challenges of life in Batil, in particular that there wasnʼ,t enough food. Because the roads to the south are cut off in the rainy season, food and medical supplies have to be airlifted in. When it rains heavily, there are pools of stagnant water, and the poor sanitation means that diseases like malaria and Hepatitis E are rife. But at the same time, the camp is a hive of activity: everywhere people are doing something productive, using whatever they can find. People have set up tea shops and crafted stoves out of the cans that the vegetable oil rations come in. Stalls sell freshly baked bread that has been cooked in hollowed-out termite mounds. Even though there isnʼ,t much space, some people have planted small vegetable gardens with seeds they were able to bring from home. Their ingenuity and enthusiasm is staggering. By spending time talking to the refugees in Batil, CAFOD has learned from their strength and dynamism, and designed programmes that donʼ,t just give them hand-outs, but help them to help themselves. Weʼ,re aiming to support people in growing food by distributing tools and seeds and by setting up kitchen gardens. Weʼ,re also planning to give training to entrepreneurs like Samia, to give them basic literacy, numeracy and book-keeping skills. We want them to realise their plans of earning enough money to support their families. Weʼ,re also aiming to prevent the spread of disease, by improving hygiene conditions in the communities around the camp and by distributing soap and mosquito nets to people who canʼ,t afford them. The situation for refugees in Batil is undoubtedly very challenging. Before I said goodbye to Samia, I asked her what the most difficult thing had been for her –, and I immediately wished that I hadnʼ,t. She didnʼ,t answer quickly, as she had before, but looked away. Our translator thought she hadnʼ,t understood and began to repeat, but stopped when she nodded. She answered uncharacteristically quietly. “,Itʼ,s the war,”, she said. “,It divided my family”,. Samia and the other women and men I met in Batil face incredible hardships, but they donʼ,t see themselves as victims who deserve pity. They are entrepreneurs with phenomenal drive. We want to support them as they help themselves recover, with dignity and respect.ʼ, Please Pray for Peace-makers in Nigeria At least seven people have died and dozens have been injured in a car bombing in the northern Nigerian city of Kaduna, at St. Rita`s Catholic Church in the Malali neighbourhood on Sunday 28th October. A CAFOD spokesperson said: ",What extremists of any type want is to divide communities and sow violence, so all people of God must stand together for peace and unity in this time of trouble, sending the message out that the extremists will not be allowed to succeed in dividing Nigeria. ",After decades of violence and exploitation, what the Nigerian people need above all is a sustained commitment to peace, democracy and good government, and we cannot allow todayʼ,s events to derail that. Most of all, we know that extremism thrives on hopelessness and despair so we must continue to offer hope, including Western companies maintaining their investment in Nigeria, and using it to create jobs and opportunity for the people.", A long-term partner of CAFOD`s in Nigeria, The Archbishop of Jos, Ignatius Kaigama, sits on the Interfaith Council. In response to this latest bombing he said: ",These bombings deal a devastating blow to the unity and stability and progress of the country. I must however insist that this is not a religious war. Nigeria needs to be able to cater for the basic needs of all her citizens especially the army of young people. There is no doubt that poverty is a major cause of some of the violent crises in Nigeria. ",Both Christians and Muslims condemn these unjustifiable acts of violence and are cooperating to find solutions. The Catholic Church has maintained that genuine dialogue and reconciliation are very essential ingredients for social co-existence.", Prayer for Peace Jesus, friend and guide, Your example teaches us how to love. You are present in each moment Shared between mother and child, and in the caring look between friend and stranger. Prince of Peace, You suffered at human hands Yet acted out of love for all humanity. The people of Nigeria Have known sorrow and hurt Yet reach out to one another in love. Welcoming Christ, Help us respond to your call With generosity and warmth, Building your kingdom free from division for all peoples. Amen. Linda Jones/CAFOD

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Page 13

Nov 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Leeds Catholic Post Page 13 Vocations –, News Mgr Paul Grogan A large group from our diocese attended the recent ground-breaking meeting in Newcastle to launch the new national vocations framework which was recently approved by the bishopsʼ, conference. The diocesan group comprised representatives from the Afro-Caribbean Chaplaincy, Family Life Ministry, the Youth Service, the Saint Vincent de Paul Society, university chaplaincies, female religious congregations and the Vocations Service. Fr Christopher Jamison, osb, the keynote speaker, described how cultural changes within society and the Church meant that it was no longer possible to seek to recruit candidates for the priesthood as has happened in the past. Moreover, there was a growing recognition that vocation is a term that applies to all Christians by virtue of their baptism. Fr Jamison, who is the director of the National Office for Vocation, said that the Church needed to devote its energies in the coming years to facilitating opportunities for young people to discern Godʼ,s will for them through well prepared programmes and group activities. Sister Cathy Jones, ra, the Religious Life Promoter at the National Office, then provided details of various groups which currently exist in different parts of the country as examples of good practice. These included Samuel Groups, which meet on a monthly basis and focus on lectio divina and spiritual direction, Quo Vadis Groups, which focus on personal formation in terms of growth in virtue, and residential weekends, such as those provided by Compass, an initiative which is aimed at those who are discerning religious life. A presentation by the National Officeʼ,s Development Coordinator, Judith Eydmann, revealed that the number of those beginning formation for the priesthood and male and female religious life had actually increased in recent years, albeit not especially markedly, while the proportion of weddings taking place in churches continues to decline. Bishop Seamus Cunningham, the Bishop of Hexham and Newcastle, attended the whole meeting. The national vocations framework seeks to build on what is already happening in dioceses throughout the country to foster a culture of vocation. It seeks to raise awareness of what vocation is, to improve the way the Church communicates this vision, and to help young people to discern their own particular vocation. The representatives from Leeds and Middlesbrough Dioceses at the meeting, which was held in the Catholic Chaplaincy to Newcastle University, used the afternoon session to discuss how best they might take forward some of the frameworkʼ,s recommendations. The boxes below list some of the ideas that emerged in the discussion. Scripture scholar to speak at Invocation 2013 Bishop Michael Campbell, the Bishop of Lancaster, has kindly agreed to give a talk at Invocation 2013, the discernment festival for the north which will take place at Ampleforth Abbey between 14th and 16th June next year. Bishop Campbell, who is a scripture scholar and the author of numerous books, has been the Bishop of Lancaster for four years. His responsibilities beforehand included teaching at a seminary in Nigeria and at schools in Britain as well as extensive parish work. Bishop Campbell represented the bishops of England and Wales at the recent Synod in Rome on the new evangelisation. He visited Leeds Diocese in June to attend the international conference on the theme of the Synod at Leeds Trinity University College. He is the second bishop to confirm attendance at the festival: Bishop Terry Drainey of Middlesbrough will also be present, as will Mgr Wilson, if he is still in post then as the Diocesan Administrator. The weekend will include prayer and discernment workshops, a walk in the countryside around the abbey, a nocturnal procession of the Blessed Sacrament and Divine Office with the monastic community. The festival is open to all young people aged between 16 and 35 who wish to reflect further on Godʼ,s call. Further details will be published soon. In the steps of St Wilfrid Young people are being invited to mark the Year of Faith by joining in a six-mile walk near Ripon on Saturday 1st December. It is the latest in a series of Faith Walks in areas which have special Catholic significance. After the walk the group will visit Ripon Cathedral, which stands on the site of the monastery where the great seventh century Anglo-Saxon Saint Wilfrid was abbot, and have Evening Prayer and a cup of tea in the nearby Catholic parish of St Wilfridʼ,s. The walk will take place in Studley Royal Park, very near that other great Christian monument, Fountains Abbey. A minibus will leave Leeds Cathedral at 9.30am. The day, which is free, is open to young people aged between 14 and 19. Participants are invited to bring a packed lunch. Parish youth leaders are invited to contact the diocesan vocations office if they would like to register a group for the walk. PICTURE OF THE MONTH As the days become progressively colder, it is nice to recall warmer moments last summer. This picture was taken just after the Postgate Rally Mass in July at the Church of St Anneʼ,s, Ugthorpe in the North York Moors. The Vocations Pathways group from our diocese (pictured) had joined in the traditional walk from Egton Bridge to honour blessed Nicholas Postgate, the “,Priest of the Moors”, who ministered to Catholics it the area for several decades before being executed in 1679, aged 82. The beauty of the lay vocation Lay people are co-responsible with the bishops for the new evangelisation of society, vocations director Mgr Paul Grogan said at meeting of the Associates of the Sisters of the Holy Family of Bordeaux last month. He recalled that the lay vocation consisted of building up a civilisation of love within secular society. Only lay people, reflecting prayerfully on their own experiences and assessing possibilities realistically, could engage in this task. Mgr Grogan pointed out that the term “,co-responsibility”, had been used recently by Pope Benedict with regard to the lay vocation. The Pope has praised lay-led groups, such as the Focolare Movement, for their life and work. Mgr Grogan noted that just-published Vatican guidelines said that promoting vocations to the priesthood should always take place within the context of promoting the vocation to holiness of all the members of the Church. Mgr Grogan said: “,Each of us is called to respond to the call of the Holy Spirit sounding in our depths. The new evangelisation involves first of all going inwards. The more we do that, the more confident we will become in contributing to the life of the Church, each of us according to our different vocations.”, Fresh look at vocations promotion Principles underpinning good vocations promotion It is a task for the whole Church Young people must be taught to pray if they are to be able to discern Exposition of the Blessed Sacrament is especially helpful Forthcoming initiatives A new Samuel Group in York which is being organised by the Congregation of Jesus and the Carmelite Friars A 2013 Family Day in Leeds Diocese Invocation 2013, a discernment festival for the north, which will take place at Ampleforth Abbey in 2013 (see separate article) World Youth Day (at home), organised by the diocesan Youth Service Good current initiatives A recent retreat for young women at Stanbrook Abbey Padre Pio Prayer Days organised by the Franciscan Friars of the Renewal in Bradford The monthly Handmaids Group for women which meets at the Convent of the Franciscan Sisters of the Renewal in Leeds Faith Walks for 15 to 19-year-olds to places of particular Catholic interest Monthly Discernment Group for men who are considering the priesthood Youth Service initiatives such as Revelation and Myddelton Grange retreats

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Page 14

Nov 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 14 Leeds Catholic Post St Austin’,s Choir in Rome S t Austin’,s Choir from the parish of St Martin de Porres in Wakefield, recently returned from a highly successful and enjoyable weekend in Rome. Despite the Vatican vicariate changing the choir’,s plan at the last minute the trip had many high spots. The highlight of the trip was singing at the Vigil Mass at the Altar of St. Joseph in St Peter’,s Basilica in the Vatican. In the mass, in which Fr Michel Kelly from St Martin de Porres concelebrated, the choir sang motes by Tye, Palestrina, Byrd, da Viadana and a Sanctus from Casciolini. In addition both John Cuttell (former organist at St Ignatius, Ossett) and Daniel Justin (organist at St Anne’,s Cathedral) played the organ for the Mass. At the end of the Mass the celebrant, Mons Dario Rezza, thanked ‘,il coro inglaise’, for their ‘,exquisite execution of polyphony’,. After the service the choir were warmly applauded by the mainly Italian congregation. Patrick Ganley, director of music, said: “,It was a highly emotional occasion for the choir and a wonderful experience. To sing in such a beautiful and holy place was an honour and a really special Mass”, Earlier in the day the choir had given a super recital in All Saints Anglican Church, who had provided rehearsal facilities for the choir. The recital was well received by a small but appreciative audience. In the recital the choir again performed Renaissance music whilst there were solos from Lorraine Mawbey and organ solos by John Cuttell and Daniel Justin. Ann Hargrave and Lorraine also sang Pie Jesu written and accompanied by Paul granger, the organist at St Austinʼ,s. Due to the change in arrangements there was a vacant time for the choir on Sunday evening. After some negotiation the choir were given the opportunity to sing in Romeʼ,s oldest church-the Pantheon. Built about 125 AD as temple to the gods it became a church in the 7th century and gas been ever since. In the unique atmosphere inside the choir performed to a very large crowd that gathered as well as the thousand or so people walking round. Archbishop Arthur Roche joined the audience and spoke and mingled with the choir afterwards. Patrick Ganley said: “,This was a great way to round off the weekend, singing in such an iconic building in a very special atmosphere. It was great to see Archbishop Roche as he been unable to join us earlier in the weekend due to his new commitments. The choir were outstanding throughout the weekend and moved many people with heir lovely singing”, Knights of St. Columba by Dennis Bristow (Grand Knight Bradford Council 83 Knights of St Columba At the beginning of the summer 2012 the Knights decided that following the comments by Cardinal Keith Oʼ,Brien they would take up his stand and try to make available to the parishioners of the Bradford Deanery a free lapel cross to show their faith. After contacting the Dean and subsequently the other PPʼ,s we established a positive consensus to go ahead with the project. Fr. Pat Wall, our Chaplain, contacted a company in Ireland who provided us with the 4000 lapel badges we sought and these were then dispersed throughout the Deanery and given free of charge to the parishioners. Cardinal Keith O`Brien urges Christians to `proudly` wear cross Britain`s most senior Roman Catholic Church cleric has called for Christians to wear a cross every day. In his Easter Sunday sermon, Cardinal Keith O`Brien will tell worshippers to ",wear proudly a symbol of the cross of Christ", each day of their lives. The leader of the Church in Scotland, he will voice concern at the growing ",marginalisation", of religion. Cardinal O`Brien will say in his Easter Sunday homily at St Mary`s Cathedral in Edinburgh that many people wear crosses ",not in any ostentatious way, not in a way that might harm you at your work",. He will say: ",Just 18 months ago, Pope Benedict XVI stood in Westminster Hall in London addressing a vast audience of politicians, diplomats, academics and business leaders. ",There he clearly stated that `religion is not a problem for legislators to solve, but a vital contributor to the national conversation`. ",In this light, I cannot but voice my concern at the increasing marginalisation of religion, particularly Christianity, that is taking place in some quarters.", The cardinal, who is the Archbishop of St Andrews and Edinburgh, hopes increasing numbers of Christians will adopt the practice of wearing a cross in a ",simple and discreet", way as a symbol of their beliefs. A Home Office spokesman said: ",People should be able to wear crosses. The law allows for this, and employers are generally very good at being reasonable in accommodating people`s religious beliefs.", The government says UK law ",strikes the right balance", between employees` rights to express their beliefs at work and the requirements of employers. LECTURES 2012 Wheeler Hall, St Anne Street Wednesdays at 7.00pm Admission free, retiring collection Wednesday 5th December 2012 Anthony McCarthy Education and Publications Manager for the Society for the Protection of Unborn Children. Author of Cloning and Stem Cell Research “,The Church and ‘,Same-Sex Marriage’,”, ( Neither the church nor the state has the right to redefine marriage. To try to change the heterosexual nature of marriage is to undermine an institution which protects children and society ) Wednesday 9th January 2013 : Speaker to be announced later (Note that this last talk will be on the second Wednesday of the month. The first three will take place as usual on the first Wednesday of the month) GROWING OLD GRACE-FULLY Advent Days of Recollection for Older People •, Wednesday 5 December 10.15 –, 3.15 Ss Mary and Monica, Cottingley, Bingley, led by Fr Michael Mahady •, Thursday 13 December 10.30 –, 3.30 Our Lady of Lourdes, Huddersfield, led by Fr Richard Atherton Information and booking: Cath Mahoney 077 399 75019 cath.mahoney@dioceseofleeds.org.uk

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Page 15

Nov 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Leeds Catholic Post Page 15 Classified Advertising MARRIAGE CARE Marriage isn’,t always easy —, Counselling can help For an appointment in confidence, with an understanding and experienced listener, please telephone: 0800 389 3801 A Relationship Counselling Service W. Lever Ltd BRADFORD 01274 547137 524 THORNTON ROAD, BRADFORD BD8 9NB FOR OVER 75 YEARS PROVIDING A COMPLETE PERSONAL &, CARING 24 HOUR FUNERAL SERVICE CHAPEL OF REST H UGHES F UNERAL S ERVICES (Catholic Funeral Directors) 180 YORK ROAD, LEEDS LS9 9NT. Tel 2480953/63 152 GREEN LANE, CROSSGATES. Tel 2326900 3 HOLLIN PARK PARADE, OAKWOOD ROUNDABOUT Tel 2499338 Web: wwww.hughesfuneralservices.co.uk Email: info@hughesfuneralservices.co.uk Family owned and managed. Fully Qualified in all aspects. 24 Hour Service Guaranteed Fixed Price Funeral Plans etc. “,At a time of bereavement we carry out our duties with dignity and respect”, In times of bereavement please contact: B. J. MELIA &, SONS (B. J. Melia Dip F.D.) F UNERAL D IRECTORS AND M ONUMENTAL M ASONS Private Chapel of Rest 64 GIBBET STREET, HALIFAX Telephone: 01422 354453 PRE-PAID FUNERAL SERVICE AVAILABLE DETAILS ON REQUEST Looking to advertise a company or an event –, why not advertise in the Leeds Catholic Post This space could be yours! We have good rates for adverts, reaching a local population of 15,000 Contact: Louise Ward, Catholic Post, Hinsley Hall, 62 Headingley Lane, Leeds LS6 2BX Tel: 0113 261 8028 louise.ward@ dioceseofleeds.org.uk Catholic Care celebrates Family Life O n 20 October Canon Maguire celebrated the Catholic Care Annual Adoption Mass at the church of St Peter &,Paul in Wakefield. The Mass itself was a lovely celebration of family life, with family members participating through Readings, Bidding Prayers, the Offertory and the whole Congregation singing in praise. Afterwards we all enjoyed a truly fantastic feast of food while the children and young people were entertained by a “,Story Teller”, who brought along several exotic pets including a snake and a tarantula! Excitement levels almost reached fever pitch and one little boy shouted “,this is so cool!”, There were also rabbits and guinea pigs for those of us not quite as brave. The occasion was a wonderful opportunity for adoptive and foster parents and grandparents to meet new people, catch up with old friends and exchange their experiences. “, It was a truly inspirational afternoon”, remarked Carol Hill, Catholic Careʼ,s newly appointed Director. The first day of the rest of our lives O n a sunny day in October, 4 vulnerable men, each with learning difficulties, stood on the threshold of their new home, eyes shining and eager to walk through the door. After several weeks of planning and preparation the time had come and they entered “,Wow”, Neil uttered. This simple expression summed up the happiness experienced by the gentlemen themselves, their families and the Catholic Care staff. The story started in the summer when Catholic Care were asked by one of the families to provide a service that would care for and support their cherished family member. Working in conjunction with the Local Authority a suitable property was located in the community and 3 other men with similar needs were invited to live in the house. Our skilled and qualified workforce spent time with these men before they moved in as for each of them “,supported living”, was not a “,One cap fits all”, but a practice that assesses the needs of the individual and tailors services to answer those needs. For the staff at Catholic Care the focus was not upon the disability but the ability to find and develop in each person the skills that would facilitate each of these people to become “,doers”, and not be perceived as “,done for”,. Sharon Forbes, Service Manager for Adults with Learning Difficulties said “,Independence through support became our mantra.”, Five weeks later these 4 vulnerable men are living happily in their own secure home and with support from the staff team have become a family. “,The most gratifying thing to see is that the pleasure of those first few moments is still with us all”, added Sharon. Closure for Catholic Care? –, Absolutely Not! F ollowing the recent disappointing court decision from the Upper Tribunal in relation to Catholic Care amending it’,s constitution to limit the provision of its Adoption Service in accordance with the principles of the Roman Catholic Faith, there was much reporting in the media that Catholic Care may be forced to close. Carol Hill, Director of Catholic Care confirmed “,this is absolutely not the case”, She added “, It is true that the Adoption Agency may have to close and the Trustees are carefully considering the future, but Catholic Care has so much more to offer.”, The Mission of Catholic Care is to take the “,Caring Church into the Community”,. The Charity achieves this through offering a varied range of care and support services to people of all faiths and none in the community and especially to the weak and vulnerable members of our society. From the earliest days when the charity was first established nearly 150 years ago, particular emphasis was placed on looking after children. Today this legacy is continued with 2 childrenʼ,s homes which offer medium to long term care to children who can no longer live with their own families. These are wonderful homely places offering upto 6 places for often the most emotionally and physically damaged children –, the most vulnerable members of our society. Catholic Care also cares for and supports adults with learning difficulties, having 3 residential homes and 8 supported living schemes. The dedicated staff work with each person to support them to their full potential and to lead as full a life as possible. Many can go out to work and some hold down full time jobs as a result of this support. “,It is truly amazing what people can achieve”, said Carol Hill. The Charity cares for people with mental ill health and has 3 supported housing schemes. Support is provided for people with a variety of mental health issues ranging from breakdown over the stress and strain of everyday life to paranoia and schizophrenia. These schemes house around 9 people in their own tenanted flat. Support focuses on recovery and independence with the aim being to support people back to making a positive contribution to their community. The service within Catholic Care which is expanding the most is that of the school and community social work team. They provide advice, support and counselling for children, young people and their families as well as teaching staff and in our difficult and complex world with so many pressures imposed by society this service is in great demand. We have an aging population and an increasing number of older people brings its own dynamics, particularly loneliness and isolation. Catholic Care has set up itʼ,s first project near Huddersfield to promote practical, social and spiritual well being for the older people. The project, which is staffed by 2 part time employees and 40 volunteers, offers luncheon clubs, walks, exercise classes and outings. The Gianna Project was launched last year with the aim of saving the lives of unborn babies. It provides practical help to women who may find themselves worried or isolated when they become pregnant. It is clear that Catholic Care undertakes a large amount of varied excellent work. These services will continue unaffected by the Courtʼ,s decision regarding the Adoption Service. Catholic Care will not be closing. The Residents of Westhaven (residential home for adults with learning difficulties) celebrating the 80th Birthday of Mavis with a party on a barge.

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Page 16

Nov 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 16 Leeds Catholic Post SUPORTING A COMMON KITTY There is increasing criticism of what is sometimes described as the “,compensation culture”,, claiming compensation for injury, insult or redress for miss selling. Some major banks are now threatened with bankruptcy as a result of mis-selling “,personal protection insurance”, and having to pay out to victims. Hospitals are running up huge debts as a result of paying out compensation for tragic mistakes. Local councils pay out millions of pounds for accidents incurred on their pavements and roads. More and more claims farming companies are springing up urging individuals to claim compensation, cold callers advise about road accidents we should claim for that have never actually happened to us. Partly this trend is the result of a major shift to a market economy in which we are all consumers now and if we fell we have been sold a pup we have the right if not obligation to demands our individual consumer rights. And of course defence of individual rights against the great powers of corporations, business organisations and state or utility bureaucracies is a good thing but there is now a real danger that by reducing us all to individual consumers in the market place there is areal undermining of any sense of the “,common good”, central to the tradiotions of Catholic Social Teaching”,. Compensation culture inculcates the notion that we should get out at least what we individually put in. Thus if I pay tax I must get at least the same amount back in benefits or services. What became clear in the recent American Election was how far this individual pay in –,to get out culture can go. AS one voter loudly expressed it “,I shouldnʼ,t go to work to pay for the healthcare of those who donʼ,t”,. That voter was mortally opposed to Obamaʼ,s healthcare proposals as a form of unacceptable “,socialism “, He argued people should individually pay for their own healthcare. The problem however is that in America which has no national health systen like ours and other European systems, most have inadequate privare health insurance. Some 50 million people have no health insurance at all and the most common cause of bankruptcy in America is falling ill. In other words the poor in America are not cared for in a society in which 15% of the population are officially in poverty and 1 in 7 receive food stamps for their subsistence. When in Britain the pioneers of our welfare state introduced the national health service Beveridge, and William Temple insisted that what was needed was not “,welfare (not understood as a perjorative concept) but “,Social security “, for all from cradle to grave providing what was needed when it was needed. It was a concept of the “,common good”, pooling resources of those in work through a national insurance payment to contribute to retirment pensions, free healthcare cover and provisions for the sick and unemployed. Of course Bveridge presumed a society of full employment in which all who could work had work and were able to contribute but the basic principle was for contributions into a central kitty that then provided for peopleʼ,s needs. While ensuring full employment is a current challenge (and it was achieved a few years ago) it is also the case that greater awareness of the waste of resources by governments on such things as expensive unworkable computer systems, bad private contract arrangements and failed major projects all undermine confidence in governments to manage the common kitty well. But the future cannot be to shift back to private provision in which we are reduced to the survival of the richest. The Churchʼ,s social teaching stresses that we are “,persons”, (notably not individuals) and that persons are always located in community. No person is born unattached. We are “,persons in community”,. The practical implications of this are that if we make contributions through national insurance to support a national health system we do not count how much we take out in our own life time and if by the grace of God we do not suffer ill health and need to draw much from the health service we do not ask for a rebate on what we have not used on our death bed. Our contributions remain in the kitty for others around us who may need it more than us. The ruthless individualism of the market place is destroying the bonds of “,persons in community”,, whether in terms of the development of the compensation culture (for which we all pay out ultimately) or in terms of resisting paying our taxes. The issue is not simply one of crude “,fair shares”, but of how we live together as “,persons in community”, through the generations rather than imagining it to be a desperate case of individual survival. Restoring the concept of a common kitty is central to the “,social security”, of all us. John Battle KSG A week Of Celebration To Open Year Of Faith T he Year of Faith began at St. Thomas à, Becket Catholic College with twenty-six Year 9 gifted and talented pupils, from the departments of Art, Dance, Drama and Music working with the local Catholic primary schools from the 15th -19th October. On the 15th October, Art leaders attended St. Austinʼ,s Catholic Primary School to work with Year 4 children to produce pastel images of St. Thomas à, Becket and St. Austin. The theme of the day was ʻ,What we believeʼ,, the children even attempted to produce images of modern day saints. Tuesday 16th October saw the Dance leaders working with Year 3 and 4 children from St. Ignatius School, Ossett. The theme of the day was ʻ,How we Prayʼ,. The children focused on the Rosary and produced a beautiful dance to represent one decade of the Holy Rosary. On Wednesday, the Music leaders worked with Year 4 children from English Martyrs Catholic Primary School, Wakefield. The theme of the day was ʻ,How we Celebrateʼ,. The children certainly did celebrate by singing and making up new actions to ʻ,Shine Jesus Shineʼ,. It was back to St. Austinʼ,s on Thursday, when the drama group worked with Years 3 and 4 on the theme of ʻ,How we liveʼ,. The children produced wonderful, thought –, provoking, modern interpretations of the Parable of the Good Samaritan. On Friday, all the children from the primary schools travelled to St. Thomas à, Becketʼ,s for a celebration of their week. Year 7 pupils from the school watched the children as they showcased all their wonderful achievements from the week. All the children received a special Year of Faith badge and awards were given for outstanding achievement from throughout the week. By Linda Wright 2012 Celebrate the Year of Faith 2013 at Boarbank Hall All our residential events combine lectures and discussions with prayer in common and opportunity for personal prayer, in a context of friendship, community and shared ideals, in our beautiful Cumbrian setting beside Morecambe Bay. 2013 7th-12th January Health and Salvation: Love your Neighbour. For healthcare professionals. 11th-16th February Vision in Education. For Catholic schoolteachers and those who teach in Catholic schools. Participants may attend for part of the week only. 8th-10th March Time to Reflect: . Weekend for lecturers in higher education. 13th-18th May Freedom and Hope: Forgiveness and Redemption. For all who work with and for prisoners. 1st-8th June Thinking Scripture: The Gospel of Mark. Open to all. 20th-26th July Thinking Faith: Faith and Truth. For Catholic students and young professionals. 5th-12th October Thinking Scripture: The Gospel of Mark. Open to all. 11th-16th November Health and Salvation: Love your Neighbour. For healthcare professionals. For more information see www.boarbankhall.org.uk/events, or contact Sr Margaret Atkins on margaret@boarbankhall.org.uk or 015395-32288. Prayer Study Community Hospitality Peace Relaxation OUR GUEST HOUSE IS OPEN TO ALL GUESTS THROUGHOUT THE YEAR

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Page 17

Nov 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Leeds Catholic Post Page 17 Itʼ,s been a season of significant anniversaries here at the Vatican over the past month: the half century since the opening of the Second Vatican Council and the 20th anniversary of the publication of the catechism were events that were publicly celebrated and much discussed by the bishops attending the recent Synod on new evangelisation. But at the very end of October another, smaller celebration took place to mark the 500th anniversary of what is arguably the most famous cycle of paintings anywhere in the world. On the evening before All Saints Day, Pope Benedict gathered with members of the Curia, cardinals, bishops and lay people from the papal household, to celebrate Vespers in the Sistine Chapel, just as one of his predecessors, Pope Julius II, did exactly 500 years ago. Pope Julius of the della Rovere family, who had begun the rebuilding St Peterʼ,s Basilica six years earlier, was marking the completion and dedication of Michelangeloʼ,s great cycle of frescos on the chapel ceiling –, the same paintings that continue to attract some 20.000 visitors a day, 5 million tourists a year, who stand with faces upturned to wonder at the creation story which unfolds in its nine central panels. Michelangelo, perhaps the most famous sculptor, artist, architect and poet of his day, had been thoroughly unwilling to undertake the project, since it meant neglecting other preferred commissions including Juliusʼ, own tomb inside the basilica. But the pope was adamant, the contract was signed in May 1508 and the artist reluctantly began constructing a special wooden platform that would allow him to work on the 20 metre high ceiling. The walls of the chapel had already been decorated some twenty years earlier by many of the other great Renaissance painters, Botticelli, Ghirlandaio, Perugino, Pinturicchio, Signorelli and Cosimo Rosselli. The frescos on the left hand side illustrate stories from the life of Moses, while those on the right hand side depict scenes from the life of Christ and the ceiling was originally painted blue, possibly with gold stars representing the signs of the zodiac. Michelangeloʼ,s complex scheme would take him four years to complete, comprising over 340 figures who illustrate many of the best known stories and characters from the Old Testament. Some of the human figures, in particular the figure of Adam with outstretched arm being given life by an all-powerful creator God, are instantly recognisable and have been reproduced innumerable times over the centuries. Unlike many of his contemporaries, Michelangelo reduced background scenery to a minimum, focusing on details of expression and movement, the gestures and actions of the men and women who seem to come alive and almost escape from the panels and lunettes, the arches and corner sections. Iʼ,ll never forget the first time I walked in to admire those bright colours and giant figures that had been brought back to life following the lengthy restoration process that cleaned away several centuries of grime, dirt and candle smoke. While the museum, alongside the Colosseum, may top the list of most tourist groups travelling to Rome, not everyone is aware that - 500 years on - the chapel is still in regular use, not just for the election of a new pope, but also for liturgical celebrations and special events throughout the year. As the Pope was marking the anniversary, speaking of the way the paintings illustrate the light of God liberating us from darkness and sin, the director of the Vatican museums, Antonio Paolucci was discussing the very practical difficulties of preserving the famous frescos today. He acknowledged how hard it is to maintain a quiet, prayerful atmosphere when the chapel is filled with crowds of chattering tourists. Furthermore the large numbers of visitors filing through the room means more wear and tear than ever before. Paolucci said plans were underway to update the ventilation system, tackling the problem of increased humidity, but he also admitted the Museums may one day have to start limiting the number of tickets sold each day. Itʼ,s not a move anyone wants to see, partly because of the sizeable contribution the Museums make to the Vatican budget, but also because of the spiritual significance of Michelangeloʼ,s work. Quoting the great 16th century art historian Giorgio Vasari, Pope Benedict described the masterpiece as ʻ,truly the lamp of our art that gave so much benefit and light to the art of painting, which has been sufficient to illuminate the worldʼ,. Not just the light created by the colours and shadows of the skilled master craftsman, he added, but the light of God which shines through the stories on the ceiling, conquering chaos and darkness and bringing life and salvation to each one of us. Thatʼ,s a message that should continue to be seen and heard by as many people as possible today: as one of the key points to emerge from the recent Synod of Bishops points out, “,beauty should always be a special dimension of the new evangelisation.”, Philippa M Hitchen Our Rome Correspondent 30 years service at Holy Family School T he staff and students at Holy Family, Keighley, recently hosted the annual Sacrament of Anointing for those who are seriously ill. This year was the 30th consecutive such event. It was 1983 that the Church declared was to be kept as a year of Great Jubilee being 950 years after 33AD. In the Keighley Deanery it was agreed that we would mark the year with several events at various points in the year. The Holy Family School volunteered to the Anointing of the Sick. It would be an exercise in practical Christianity with plenty of opportunity for all the members of the school to be involved. And so it was. The Famous Five students from the Sixth Form, led by Michael Devlin, rolled up their sleeves and got on with it This was to be a key event in the year as the emphasis of the sacrament had shifted from Extreme Unction –, only available to the seriously ill at the point of death –, to anointing and prayers available to anyone whose health was seriously impaired by illness or old age. The preparations included giving talks in each parish to explain the new ideas and to re-assure people that the sacrament was available to them The first celebration was so well received that the school was asked to continue the arrangement on an annual basis. And so we came to this year. Fr Mike Walsh, the school chaplain presided ably assisted by Fr John Oʼ,Keeffe and Fr Michael McLaughlin. It was Fr McLaughlinʼ,s first visit to the school as he has only recently taken up station at Our Lady of Mount Carmel in Silsden, from where he also works as the hospital chaplain at Airedale Hospital The afternoon began with Mass and the anointing followed by tea and a social. Left to right: Revv M McLaughlin, M Walsh and J O’,Keeffe.

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Page 18

Nov 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 18 Leeds Catholic Post First Friday of the Month SINGLE CATHOLICS (appeals mostly to over 35s) meet for mass at 7.30pm at Our Lady of Lourdes church, 130 Cardigan Rd, Headingley, Leeds LS6 3BJ, and a social afterwards. Events held during the month include walks, meals, cinema, theatre etc. For further details tel Sean (Chair) 07811 468939. Leeds Cathedral 20-35 Group Young people (20-35 years old) who attend St. Anne`s Cathedral in Leeds meet regularly every Thursday for spiritual, social and charitable activities. For further details search Facebook for “,Leeds Cathedral 20-35 Group”,, phone 07816 891872 or 07759 591233 or email leedscathedral20-35@hotmail.co.uk Crusade Mass The crusade Mass and Rosary of Mary Immaculate is held at St Patrick`s Church, Bradford, on the first Saturday of the Month after 12.15pm Mass , Second Sunday of Month 2pm Meeting of Bradford Fraternity of the Secular Franciscan Order at St. Anthony`s Convent, Clayton, Bradford.` `Third Sunday of Month 2.30pm Meeting of Leeds Fraternity of the Secular Franciscan Order at the Cathedral. Ampleforth Renewal Community Ampleforth Abbey, meet 1st Sunday each month, at Ampleforth. 11 .30am Praise, Speaker, Sharing Groups, Reconciliation, Exposition, Finishing with Mass and Healing at 4.00pm. All enquiries: Seamus McEneaney 01429 426181 Monthly Vocations Mass Mount St Josephʼ,s Chapel 11am First Wednesday of Month. Calix: An organisation for those recovering from addiction and working the 12 Step Programme of AA so that they can develop and deepen their relationship with Jesus as their Higher Power. Meets on the First Sunday of every month at Corpus Christi Church, Neville Rd. Osmondthorpe. Leeds. Mass at 4.30pm followed by meeting. Contact: Fr. Michael on 01977 510266 Helpers of Gods precious infants, prayer vigils, regular weekly prayer vigils at Marie Stopes Abortuary, 7 Barrack Road.LS7 4AB, next to Jaguar car showrooms. Fridays 12-30 to 1-30, and Saturdays 9am-l1am. Monthly all night vigil of reparation in St Marys Horsforth 12th of every month, 9-30pm to 6am . Other times variable. Further details Pat 0113 2582745 Rosary rally Sat Oct 9th 2010 12-30pm Leeds cenotaph, outside art gallery, Headrow. Contact 07747698553/ or 0113 2582745 Leeds Schola Gregoriana The Schola meets on the 2nd Saturday of each month (except August), at 2.00 p.m., for rehearsal, followed by sung Latin (Vigil) Mass in the Ordinary Form, fulfilling the Sunday Obligation. An opportunity to learn and sing Gregorian Chant on a regular basis. Contact Michael Murphy (Director) on 07810 808 530, or Peter Lawley (01423 884274), or Rev. G.M. Parfitt (01756 793794). Days Of Renewal St. Wilfid`s Deanery Day of Renewal led by Fr. Stephen Wright OSB. Second Saturday of the month beginning Sat. March 10th from 12 noon to 4pm. Venue St. Aelred`s Church hall, Woodlands Drive, Harrogate. Please bring a contribution for a shared table lunch. For more information ring Dolores Omand 01423870789 or visit the Diocesan web site www.ccrleeds.org Diary 20 –, 35 years group Email: leedscathedralgroup@gmail.com Facebook: Leeds Cathedral 20-35 Group Phone: 07810 291 154 Helpers of Gods precious infants/Leeds people for life. Regular weekly prayer vigils at Marie Stopes, to pray and offer help to women considering abortion and witness to the sanctity of life. Thurs 10am, Fri.12-30, sat 10am other days by arrangement. Monthly all-night Eucharistic vigil St Marys Horsforth, 12th of every month 9-30pm (Mass) till 4am. Rosary and divine mercy every 1st sat of month, Cenotaph, outside the art gallery the Headrow Leeds.10-30.am Enquiries Pat 07747698553/0113 2582745 Diary A few moments for thought and prayer Christ the King: “,I have said this to you, so that in me you may have peace. In the world you face persecution. But take courage, I have conquered the world!ʼ,”, John 16:33 Be Still Deadline: For receipt of material for next edition: December 6th 2012 Parishes receive their copies: December 12th 2012 Send articles, reports &, pictures: Mr John Grady, Hinsley Hall, 62 Headingley Lane, Leeds LS6 2BX. Send text as word doc, pictures as jpeg, e-mail to: john.grady@dioceseofleeds.org.uk Tel: 0113 261 8022. Advertising Deadline December 17th 2012 Please note paid-for advertising is dealt with by: Louise Ward Hinsley Hall, 62 Headingley Lane, Leeds LS6 2BX Telephone: 0113 261 8028 Email: louise.ward@dioceseofleeds.org.uk Your Cath Post Y ear 11 student Tom Holland has this week been offered a two year scholarship programme at Manchester City FC following two years working in their Academy set up. Tom will start the programme next summer when he finishes his GCSE’,s. Tom said:- “,This is a dream come true, I have had some disappointments at other clubs but I was determined to succeed. I have loved playing with Manchester City over the last two years. School has given me brilliant support and I cannot thank all my teachers enough for all the extra help they have given me”,. Mr David Geldart, Assistant Headteacher has mentored Tom during his time at Manchester City and is delighted with the news. “,Tom has worked very hard over the past two years. He has had to be very dedicated, determined and organised to fit in all his academic work alongside his football. Tom fully deserves this wonderful opportunity and we wish him well”,. Tom joins a small army of St. Maryʼ,s students who are making their way in the professional game: Aidan White (Leeds United), Luke Hendrie (Manchester United), Niall Heaton (Liverpool), Niall Canavan (Scunthorpe United), Tom Taiwo (Hibernian), Jordan Sinnott (Huddersfield Town) and Jordan Hendrie (Bolton Wanderers). Tom Holland offered two year scholarship at Manchester City FC M embers of Holy Family Church, Leeds, have received some good news from Heritage Lottery Fund (HLF). They have been awarded a grant of £,24,000 towards the restoration of their historic organ, which has served the church for nearly a century. Research indicates the organ predates the 1895 church. Much work is required to restore worn mechanisms and pipes that have ceased to work. The award of the grant, combined with over £,18,000 already donated to the appeal, means the work can now go ahead with projected completion of this refurbishment by Easter next year. The project includes community information and educational works to help people to learn about their own and other people`s heritage. Organ open days are planned, so look out for the opportunity to come and play a church organ and see how it works. If you cannot make it to an open day then get hold of one of the educational DVDs which are to be produced. Fiona Spiers, Head of Heritage Lottery Fund Yorkshire and the Humber said ",This project will help to rejuvenate Holy Family Church and its organ, bringing it back into use and giving a new lease of life to its fascinating history.", Thanks to Heritage Lottery Fund support Holy Family will be once again have a fully functioning organ, part of the heritage of the Wortley and Armley area of Leeds. This will be an enhancement to the parish in praising God and an interesting and beautiful legacy for the benefit of future generations. Details of the organ can be viewed on the National Pipe Organ Register website www.npor.org.uk. Organ RO1657 For further information contact: - Chris Redding (Project Co-ordinator) e-mail chrisred@freeuk.com Tel: 07815681343 or Rev Francis McGrath Tel: 01132637484 Go Ahead For Organ Restoration The fantastic summer of sport we have just had has really inspired the children of St Clare’,s Catholic Primary school, Fagley, Bradford. The children and the school are very proud of the Silver medal they achieved in the newly introduced sport of Frisbee. Children from year six competed against six other schools from Bradford East in the Frisbee Festival and were absolutely delighted with their Medal winning performance. Frisbee Runners Up

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Page 19

Nov 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Leeds Catholic Post Page 19 I n 1982 at the age of 42, Sylvia Wright sold all her worldly goods in Leeds to go alone to care for poor, sick and disabled people in Tamil Nadu, Southern India. The Sylvia Wright Christmas Card for 2012, illustrated, is a unique and colourful design by Ramjayam, one of the deaf boys in Sylviaʼ,s school. His stunning Indian interpretation is entitled “,In search of Bethlehem”,. On the back is a first picture of the full complement of the 80 nursing students in Sylviaʼ,s Florence Nightingale School of Nursing –, all this achieved in just 3 years since it opened. The greeting inside the card is: “,With all good wishes for Christmas and a Happy New Year”,. To encourage sales, the price of the cards remains unchanged from last year. Readers are invited to cut out and use the order form below. All proceeds go to support Sylviaʼ,s wonderful, life-saving work. The Sylvia Wright Trust takes pride in sending 97 pence in every pound raised direct to Sylvia. Readers who would like to find out more about Sylvia Wright are invited to request a free copy of the Christmas Newsletter by emailing: newsletter@sylviawright.org For more details about the Sylvia Wright Trust and more Christmas Card order forms go to: www.sylviawright.org Sylvia Wright’,s Indian Christmas Card “,In search of Bethlehem”, Sylvia Wright Christmas Cards Please send me: 100 cards £,28 ❏, 80 cards £,23 ❏, 60 cards £,17.50 ❏, 40 cards £,12 ❏, 20 cards £,6 ❏, Postage per order £,2 Donation _____ To: Mrs Barbara Dodman, 13 Creskeld Drive, Bramhope, Leeds, LS16 9JE 0113 2619152 From: ...................................................................................................... (block capitals) ................................................................................................................ Phone: .................................................................................................... E-Mail: .................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................... I enclose a cheque for £, …,…,…,…,…, payable to the Sylvia Wright Trust T uesday October 23rd was the day chosen to invite the Governors of the Catholic Schools, Colleges and Trinity University to a special Mass of celebration and thanks in the Cathedral. The Celebration was led By Mgr John Wilson in his position of Administrator of the Diocese and his role in guiding education provision by the Diocese. In his opening remarks Mgr Wilson welcomed everyone who had turned out on the night and thanked them. He set as his theme for the Mass the message of the Gospel passage to be read …,.. ʻ,See that you are dressed for action and have your lamps lit.ʼ, In his Homily he spoke of how this Year Of Faith was a year of Doors and Doorways –, they had all gone through many doors in the day –, the last one being the Door to the Cathedral as they had come in to celebrate and they would go through yet more throughout their lives. The Pope, he told them, had chosen a Door for the Year of Faith because The Door Of Faith was always open and they, in their roles in Education, were the Door Keepers. He thanked all of them for the role they played and pointed out that without them the Diocese could not fulfil its role –, they were the people the Diocese relied on and they should be Proud Of Their Faith. At the end of Mass Mgr John thanked everyone for coming out into the Centre of Leeds from across the Diocese and offered them a cup of tea before they faced the journey home. Have Your Lamps Lit KS2 Teacher (Main Scale) Required for January 2013 (MPS) Number on roll: 217 The Governors are seeking to appoint a talented, motivational and inspiring classroom teacher for Year 5. Applications from experienced teachers are particularly welcome, as there will be the opportunity to lead a core subject (English) across the school. An additional recruitment incentive will be considered for exceptional candidates. The successful candidate should, •, Support the Catholic ethos of our school, •, Be a good to outstanding practitioner, able to motivate children, •, Be innovative, creative and forward thinking, •, Have high expectations of children of all groups and abilities. We can offer, •, A strong Catholic ethos, •, A friendly, happy school that lives by its motto, ʻ,As a family, we strive to learn, love, serve and achieve our full potential through the teachings of Christʼ,. •, Happy children with exemplary standards of behaviour, •, Supportive parents, governors and parish Community, •, A strong commitment to continuous professional development Our school is committed to safeguarding and promoting the welfare of our children and expects all staff and volunteers to share this commitment. This post is subject to a satisfactory Criminal Records Bureau enhanced disclosure certificate. Informal visits to our school are warmly welcomed. Please contact Mrs Mewse, School Business Manager, to arrange a visit. Application forms can be downloaded from the CES website and further details available from school. Closing Date: Monday 26th November, 2012 Shortlisting: Tuesday 27th November, 2012 Lesson Observation: Week beginning Monday 3rd December Interview Date: Friday 7th December, 2012 Headteacher: Mrs. A.M. Ashworth Mount Pleasant Road Pudsey Tel: 0113 2565407 Leeds Fax: 0113 2146100 West Yorkshire Email: ashwora02@leedslearning.net LS28 7AZ mewseca01@leedslearning.net Website: www.stjosephscatholicprimary.co.uk

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Page 20

Nov 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 20 Young People are the future of the Church P ope John Paul II was passionate about the importance of young people in the Catholic Church throughout his papacy. In 1995 at the Word Day of Prayer for Vocations he said, “,This is what we need: a Church for young people which will know how to speak to their heart and enkindle, comfort and inspire enthusiasm in it with the joy of the Gospel and the strength of the Eucharist, a Church which will know how to invite and welcome the person who seeks a purpose for which to commit his or her life, a Church which is not afraid to ask much after having given much, which does not fear asking from the young people the effort of a noble and authentic adventure, such as following the Gospel”,. Pope Benedict XVI has continued this focus on young people, committing much time and energy to spending time with them. Archbishop Vincent Nichols said to the youth of the Church, when he was appointed Archbishop of Westminster: “,You are the Church. You are often the best of the Church. You are vitally important to our present as well as to our future. I want to see all the vitality that young people bring, all the idealism. I donʼ,t want that idealism cut short, disappointed. I want to help them keep their ideals alive, and to believe that they can make a difference to the world through their generosity and through their passion for what is right”,. In the Diocese of Leeds, young people are provided with numerous opportunities for faith growth and development. In order to strengthen and open up these opportunities to more young people, Bishop Arthur decided to unite the various aspects of Youth Service in the Diocese at Myddelton Grange. I was appointed to the new position of Co-ordinator of the Youth Service and have been working at Myddelton Grange since August, along with Father Anthony Jackson, Diocesan Youth Chaplain. Together, we work closely alongside Anna Cowell, Youth Officer, and two Youth Service Assistants, Emily and Simon. You may wonder what we do…, At Myddelton Grange we are fully booked in school term time with residential retreats until the end of July. Each week we welcome two school groups from the Diocese of Leeds, from Year 6 through to Year 13. Those retreats offer a valuable opportunity for reflection on their own faith. They challenge the students in a safe environment, where they can explore their Catholic faith in a fun way. In the future, we hope to extend provision at weekends and currently welcome enquiries from Youth Groups for day retreats on Saturdays or Sundays. Adult groups can be accommodated on occasion, but the Youth are given priority. The Diocesan Youth Service Team, with the help of numerous willing volunteers and Parish Youth Ministry Co-ordinators, arrange other events, most open to all young people Year 9+: pilgrimages (Lourdes, Walsingham, World Youth Day), retreats and festivals, faith walks (in conjunction with DOLVOC), prayer (Revelation monthly on Wednesday evenings at Hinsley Hall, Refresh prayer groups weekly on Tuesday evenings at the Cathedral), plus many other one- off events and experiences. We offer training and faith formation for parish youth workers and collaborate closely with schools, chaplains and the Vocations Service. In the Year of Faith, our vision is to reach out to greater numbers of young people through extended retreat provision, better communications and connections with parishes and schools. A Mission Walk is being planned for July 2013 in Leeds, the first week of the school holidays, to coincide with World Youth Day, for students aged 15+ and a British World Youth Day Festival in Aylesford Priory in Kent, 26th –, 29th July 2013. We plan to develop a new website, update IT facilities and support Parish Youth Ministry Co-ordinators better. Our young people need the help of ordinary parishioners in every Parish. We ask for your prayers for all young people, so that their faith will be renewed and strengthened in todayʼ,s world. We ask for your support, perhaps by providing lifts to Revelation or other events. Finally, we ask for your generous donations, so that we can realise the vision of a lively Youth Service which meets the needs of the young people in our Diocese. A second collection will be taken on the Feast of Christ the King, 24th November. Please support our Diocesan youth. For more information, see www.facebook.com/groups/LeedsDYS follow us on twitter atLeedsDYS email info@myddeltongrange.org.uk or ring 01943 607887

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