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Leeds Catholic Post History

Newspaper for the Diocese of Leeds

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Oct 2009 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 1

Oct 2009 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Whats inside Canonization of Jeanne Jugan Page 16 Torches in Batley Page 20 CATHOLIC POST THE NEWSPAPER FOR THE DIOCESE OF LEEDS OCTOBER 2009 www.dioceseofleeds.org.uk www.catholicpost.org.uk O ctober 3rd 2009 - a blustery cold autumn day and the Relics of St Therese finally arrive in Leeds and by 11am the first people arrive to queue for their opportunity to witness this wonderful occassion. Not even the wind or the quick, heavy downpour could dampen the spirits of the gathering crowd and by 2pm the excitement mounted as Bishop Arthur Roche, Bishop of Leeds and co-patron of the Relics` visit to England, arrived. People glanced at their watches every few minutes anticipating the coming. And then finally with a quick blast of sirens the outriders came into view announcing the arrival. Inside the Cathedral applause could be heard as the thousands of people gathered outside greeted the Relics. Bishop Roche, a group of Carmelites and Knights (and Dame) of St Gregory and St Sylvester greeted the entourage at the Cathedral Door and the short, moving cermeony of greeting began with the children of St Theresa’,s Catholic Primary School singing ‘,St Theresa’,s Little Way’,. During his Homily Bishop Roche told those gathered in the Cathedral that St Therese was well known all over the world and that her autobiography ‘,Story of a Soul’, offers a new kind of spirituality for all. He added that St Therese had a deep love of God and an ardent desire to know Him. The service continued with the Litany of St Therese and ended with a Pontifical Blessing given by the Bishop. Following the service people began to come forward and Venerate the Relics while the Rosary was prayed. The wait is over BG Motors family firm established in 1979 personal service and attention to detail full vehicle sourcing service available after care necessary for trouble free motoring member of the GoodGarageScheme.co.uk free collection and delivery from home or work 11 Cowper Road, Leeds tel - (0113) 248 4441 view our cars at www.bgmotors.co.uk CATHOLIC CARE (Diocese of Leeds) - Taking the Caring Church into the community

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Page 2

Oct 2009 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 2 COME AND SEE COME AND SEE Young People Taking St Therese’,s message to the shoppers of Leeds C hildren from Leeds primary schools and young people from the Leeds Diocesan Youth Service took up the mission of St Therese, to make God’,s love known. Primary school children from Leeds made hundreds of tissue paper flowers. There was an invitation attached: God wants to bless you! You are invited to visit the relics of St Therese of Lisieux at Leeds Cathedral, Great George Street (Next to the Light) 3-5th October 2009. Armed with the flower invitations, a group of 23 people, including teenagers, parents, Franciscan Sisters of the Renewal and organisers, took to the streets to invite people to come along. Seventeen year old Leanne Jones said of her experience, “,It was good to talk to people with different views than ourselves and see that people were interested to hear about St Therese.”, The response from passers-by was mainly positive. Some asked if they had to pay, or if there was a catch, but a number stopped for a conversation. Many had heard about the relics of St Therese on the local news. Josephine Stow, Coordinator for Evangelisation for the diocese said, “,We felt we couldn’,t let the weekend go by without responding in some way to St Therese’,s missionary spirit. She longed to travel to the far corners of the earth, sharing the Good News of Jesus. We took up the challenge in Leeds city centre and found the experience to be great fun and very rewarding. Everyone who took part said they would definitely do something like this again.”, You are invited to the launch of Come &, See Year 5 - ‘,GO MAKE DISCIPLES’, E very parish and school is invited to send representatives along to the launch of the fifth and final year of Come &, See. The day is entitled Go Make Disciples. The day will be on the theme of Mission and Evangelisation and will be led by Fr Robert Barron. Fr Barron has been invited by Bishop Roche and is a sought-after speaker on the spiritual life - from prestigious universities to YouTube to national conferences and private retreats. The prominent theologian and podcasting priest is one of the world`s great and most innovative teachers of Catholicism. His global media ministry called Word On Fire has a simple but revolutionary mission - to evangelise the culture. The event will be held at the Cedar Court Hotel, Bradford on 31st October from 10.00 am to 2.30 pm. To book your place, see your parish priest or book directly with Mrs Janine Garnett by email janine.garnett@dioceseofleeds.org.uk or through the Come &, See website www.comeandsee.org.uk (go to Year 5 - What’,s On). All are welcome. Diocese of Leeds Vicariate for Evangelisation A short course on CATHOLIC SOCIAL TEACHING The Leeds Diocesan Justice &, Peace Commission and CAFOD offer a five week course covering the following: An overview of the components of Catholic Social Teaching: Scripture, The Documents of the Church, The Tradition and the lived experience of people Significant themes in the Old and New Testaments Church Teaching and Practice Contemporary Issues –, global, national and local contexts Future Directions including ‘,Live Simply’, The course runs from 7.15 –, 9.30 pm on the following dates in 2010: Tuesday 23rd February Tuesday 2nd March Tuesday 9th March Tuesday 16th March Tuesday 23rd March This is one of the specialist modules for the Catholic Certificate of Religious Studies (CCRS) but can be taken as an individual course. All sessions take place at Hinsley Hall and will be led by Shelagh Fawcett, Mgr Peter Rosser &, Margaret Siberry Cost £,35 For further information or to book please contact Janine Garnett on 0113 261 8040 or janine.garnett@dioceseofleeds.org.uk Diocese of Leeds Vicariate for Evangelisation A short course on INTERRELIGIOUS RELATIONS The Diocesan Inter-Faith Commission offers a five week course covering the following: What is meant by interreligious dialogue? Dialogue with Muslims –, a Catholic view of Islam. Thursday 11th March - Visit to the 11th of the Month Interfaith Prayers for Peace in Bradford. Tuesday 16th March. Visit to a Leeds Mosque. Dialogue in prayer and worship: interreligious marriages, chaplaincies The course runs from 7.15 –, 9.30 pm on the following dates in 2010: Tuesday 23rd February Tuesday 2nd March Thursday 11th March Tuesday 16th March Tuesday 23rd March This is one of the specialist modules for the Catholic Certificate of Religious Studies (CCRS) but can be taken as an individual course. All sessions take place at Hinsley Hall and will be led by David Jackson Cost £,35 For further information or to book please contact Janine Garnett on 0113 261 8040 or janine.garnett@dioceseofleeds.org.uk

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Page 3

Oct 2009 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

YOUTH Page 3 Leeds Diocesan Youth Service ‘,All who are thirsty, come!’, (Rev 22:17) For more information about how to register for Leeds Diocesan Youth Service events, check out: www.leedsyouth.org.uk, contact Anna at the Youth Office: 0113 261 8058 / abcleedsdiocese@hotmail.com or join the “,Leeds Diocesan Youth Service”, Facebook group. Wednesday 21st October “,Revelation”, 7 - 9pm Cathedral Hall, Leeds Mon 26th –, Wed 28th Oct. “,JUST ONE WORLD CAFOD Retreat, Myddelton Grange Saturday 31st October Boyce and Stanley Concert 7.30pm, Leeds Cathedral Saturday 7th November Leeds Oasis Prayer Group 1-6pm, Leeds University Chaplaincy Saturday 14th November St. Pio Day 1-6pm, St. Pio Friary, Bradford Sunday 22nd November “,Revelation”, World Youth Day 2011 Launch! TBC, Cathedral Hall, Leeds Leeds Diocesan Youth Service Calendar Saying ‘,Goodbye’, to St. Thé,rè,se I t was with infectious enthusiasm and great humour that Mgr. Keith Barltrop preached to the children and young people of the Diocese of Leeds on Monday 5th October during the Departure Service of the Relics of St. Thé,rè,se . Mgr. Barltrop challenged the students from the Catholic primary and secondary schools to follow the ‘,Little Way’, of St. Thé,rè,se, giving them practical examples of how they might put the ‘,Little Way’, into practice in every day life. Tilly and Mini are twin sisters, they were two of the representatives from St. Wilfrid’,s, Featherstone, who were present at the Departure Liturgy. The twins said, “,It was a once in a lifetime chance for both of us to see the relics and be part of the liturgy. It was really fun and enjoyable. We won’,t forget it!”, Mini was invited to do the special job of carrying out the flowers in the procession as the relics of St. Thé,rè,se left St. Anne’,s Cathedral. Expectant Faith …, Even Before the Relics Arrived! St. Thé,rè,se Answered Pizza Prayers! To prepare for the Overnight Vigil some of the LDYS team called to COSTCO to buy all the refreshments that would be needed to sustain us during the Overnight Vigil prepared for young people from across the Diocese of Leeds. It was a moment of inspiration and an answer to prayer as the team began talking to the Duty Manager and telling her about their shopping trip in preparation for the arrival of the Relics of St. Thé,rè,se. By the end of the simple, friendly conversation the LDYS team were AMAZED at the generosity shown to us as the COSTCO staff arranged for an incredibly generous donation towards our shopping bill. The team left COSTCO a little dumbfounded, excited and praising God for answering prayers through the intercession of St. Thé,rè,se! We knew that God had so much more in store for them over the weekend …, but a trolley full of pizza was a brilliant start! The Overnight Vigil In a dimly lit Cathedral, as party revellers outside could be heard making their way to one of the city’,s nightclubs, young Catholics aged 14 –, 35 gathered for a night of prayer. The theme of the night was ‘,St Thé,rè,se and Expectant Faith’, and from 10pm –, 6am the programme included: Veneration of the Relics of St. Thé,rè,se, celebration of the Sacrament of Reconciliation, the Rosary, Lectio Divina, Praise and Worship, the Prayer of the Church, a time of intercession, Adoration of the Blessed Sacrament, as well as time for hearing about St. Thé,rè,se, watching faith based DVDs and sharing thoughts about faith, exploring vocation with Fr. Paul Grogan and of course plenty of pizza, chocolate and caffeine to keep us going through the night. The vigil ended on a high with the celebration of Holy Mass before everyone went home for a well deserved rest! What did people say of the Overnight Vigil? One young person said of the Overnight Vigil, “,It was a wonderful privilege to be a part of the evening. Having learned about St Therese she has become a real inspiration in my own life. The one thing that stands out for me in St Thé,rè,se is her simplicity of Faith, and that we should simple Love as God loves us. For me St Thé,rè,se is a great encouragement for young people today, even though she died at such a young age having so many struggles in life she had experienced God`s Love and tried to fulfil his will in her own life.”, Lauren Jackson, the newly appointed Youth Service Assistant Volunteer expressed that the most moving part of the vigil for her was, “,…, in the times of silent prayer in front of the Blessed Sacrament, as I prayed and asked for St Thé,rè,se`s intercession I just felt truly blessed to be there and thankful for everything that God is doing for me.”, Anna Cowell, the Diocesan Youth Officer said, “,It’,s a privilege that the young people get to spend this time in church on their own. Young people have great energy no matter what time of day it is. During a night like this it’,s good to be able to teach young people about the wonders of our Catholic faith but also to give them real opportunities to experience God.”, Meanwhile 17 year old Matthew McGuire said, “,I’,ve come to broaden my horizons and hope that St Thé,rè,se will give me some guidance for the future. I’,m at a critical stage in my life and there are lots of possible routes that I could take and I’,m not sure which way to go. Thé,rè,se is a type of girl that you can relate to because she is ordinary. She had big decisions to make and I feel in the same position as she was.”, Asked about how he was going to stay awake all night, Matthew said, “,I’,ll be engaged in some deep “,sleepful”, prayer but don’,t tell anyone.”, Anna said in response to the same question: “,Sugar and caffeine!”, sanctuary@walsingham T his summer a convoy of cars travelled from Leeds to England’,s Nazareth for the annual Youth 2000 festival. The clan from Leeds entered whole-heartedly into all that Youth 2000 entails from camping to Rosary, from talk and testimonies to cups of tea in the shrine café,, from Adoration of the Blessed Sacrament to laughing hysterically with new friends! Hollywood Film Star Comes to Walsingham Eduardo Verastegui is a Mexican actor and singer who had an amazing conversion experience! At the height of his career, when he finally established himself in Hollywood, he decided to give up his secular lifestyle and use his talents to serve God. He acted in and produced the film ",Bella",, an amazing pro-life film which has won many prizes including the People`s Choice Award at the Toronto Film Festival. He also founded `Metanoia Films`, a production company in Hollywood, determined to make films that relect faith and virtue. He is also an active international speaker on pro-life issues and continues to share his powerful testimony and inspire young people to follow a path that leads to Christ. He is came to talk to us about `The Call to Holiness`. Here’,s what some of the Youth 2000 participants thought…, “, Youth 2000 has been part of my spiritual journey since I was 16yrs old and still continues to be a huge part of my relationship with God. It is always a time of spiritual refreshment, meeting other young Catholics and incredible joy!”, –, Rachel “,My first time at Youth 2000 and it was great spending time with other young Catholics from the Diocese, and of course getting to know God more in a Holy and special place!”, –, Jade “,It was amazing to see such a massive outpouring of the Holy Spirit which gave us so much joy at being one worshipping Christ. Also, was great to hear God speaking to us through others with wonderful words from some blest speakers (notably the Sister on first day and Eduardo)..main highlights - outdoor Mass &, Praise &, Worship…,”, –, Liam

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Page 4

Oct 2009 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 4 FAMILY LIFE / SIDELINES / MUSIC Sidelines O ne of the saddest stories in our papers has been the deaths of Fiona and Francesca Pilkington and the coroner’,s verdict that local anti social behaviour towards the family had been a contributory factor in the tragedy. You could just call it yobbery, but it is not always realised how frightening this sort of agression can be, especially in the dark, - and with it comes a feeling of powerlessness, as the law seems, curiously, to be on the side of the agressors. Woe betide you if you react too strongly- it could mean a night in the cells. A local man recently received a six months suspended sentence when he reacted violently in frustration to the apparent bullying of his autistic son. Mrs Pilkington made 33 complaints and it seems that she felt that they were in essence ignored. The troubling thing about her case and its tragic outcome is just that: that this vulnerable woman had reported the problem over and over again, but the police had not taken the action which she felt appropriate, had not passed her problems on, and so she remained stressed and afraid. For Christians, it is an issue about our society, and the way we treat the vulnerable: curiously, it raises the question of relativism, that word much favoured by the late Pope John Paul. It means, amongst various definitions, that “,all criteria of judgment are relative to the individuals and situations involved”,. In other words, the belief that individual police could make their own relative judgement about these complaints rather than return to the basics- the absolutes- that, singled out because of their disabilities, these people were being attacked and a crime was being committed. It would be good to return to the days when every complaint is acted upon and properly investigated without, too, that strange justice where the bully is protected against the vulnerable: the vulnerable react in their frustration, and everything goes horribly wrong. The concerns expressed here about “,Vetting and Barring”, are already mirrored in public concerns. Ofsted, of all people, are now in on the act, requiring friends who look after each other’,s kids to register as official childminders. This will, we are assured, be reviewed! If V&,B itself is not, it is in danger of being in future a stamping ground for the overpromoted, achieving power through interview processes which do not allow proper questioning…,. which is where I came in Pilgrimage is good for the soul, and I am sure that all who made the long Fenland journey to Walsingham in September with the diocese will agree. Walsingham became popular in the middle ages with those who were unable to grow abroad- and if the cost of Euros gets any worse, it is assured of another surge in popularity. One thing that always puzzles me in Walsingham is the seeming lack of an ecumenical element in the pilgrimages: by its very nature, it is a place where Anglicans and Catholics have common ground in their devotion to Our Lady: it seems such a shame to go all that way without making a little pilgrimage in the name of the unity for which her Son prayed, to the beautiful and peaceful Anglican shrine in the village. Perhaps someone can put me right? Benchmark I attended Sunday Mass recently in a village in Surrey, I had half expected stuffy, standoffishness in the stockbroker belt. At first, the hymns seemed to be biased towards the more traditional selections in `Hymns, Old and New` but the final one was something quite modern (one of Bernadette Farrell`s?) - and the congregation sang everything with enthusiasm and vigour. The organist was a girl of about twelve, playing well, to accompany the singing, not to swamp it. As the coffee and biscuits were served in the church (there was no hall), my stereotyping was completely upended by the buzz of conversation - this church was friendly to familiar faces and to visitors alike. I hadn`t seen `Old and New` for a while, and it set me thinking to what extent our musical tastes flag up our theological preferences. I heard recently of a rather traditionally inclined parish priest insisting on the organ as the only musical instrument he would allow. It strikes me that monoculture in music is like monoculture in farming - not really a Good Thing. Our parish has a music group for the 9.30 Mass (well, on first &, third Sundays in the month it does), and guitars, a bass guitar, a mandolin, a violin, a flute, keyboards and a bodhrá,n all make their contribution. Within the dozen or so singers and musicians, though we join to make our music together, there is a wide range of opinions on theological issues, so we are a microcosm of the universal church. West Yorkshire Church Music Network: Next event Repertoire Sharing: Music for Advent Sunday, 18th October, 2.45 pm to 4.45pm A couple of hours to learn some new music or share hymns and service music with others. Come along! Venue: St Benedict`s Aberford Road Garforth Leeds LS25 1PX More information: http://www.westyorkshirechurchmusic.org.uk or tim.devereux@ssg.org.uk Musical Notes by Tim Devereux Parents’, Week 19th –, 25th October M onday marks the start of Parents’, Week, our annual national celebration of parents (www.familyand parenting.org Parents Weeks 2009: The Changing Face of Families). This is good news. Too often we only ever hear about parents in the media when things go horribly wrong. This week provides a special opportunity for us to say ‘,thank you’, to parents in our schools, parishes and organisations for all the unsung good they do. Every human being comes though a parent and the mother- child bond as our formative human relationship, is just one echo, or mirror, of our relationship with God. St Therese of Lisieux talked fondly of her own loving family background saying ‘,from my earliest memory I was surrounded by loving smiles’,. In January this year Pope Benedict finalised the sainthood of Therese’,s parents, Zelie and Louis Martin. By honouring Mr and Mrs Martin in this way the church once again emphasises the value of marriage and family life as a valid and worthy vocation. By using this week as an opportunity to celebrate parents we also help form our young in preparation for their own vocation, whatever that might be. So, go on, give a parent a ‘,pat on the back’, this week! Artist’,s impression of the Martin family at home with Therese, the youngest, on her mother’,s lap. Engaging Parents Training opportunities March 2010 A fter a very successful pilot year the second year of the nationally funded ‘,Parenting Project’, Engaging Parents is well underway. Places are already filling up fast for the nationally accredited (Level 4 Open College Network) Group Leadership Training planned for March 2010. This training is offered to volunteer parents through schools and parishes to equip them with all the skills and practice they will need to run fun and informal parenting support sessions with fellow parents. Schools benefit because children do better with good parental involvement. Also developing supportive partnership with parents in this practical way anticipates much of the vision of the government’,s 21st Century Schools report. Parishes benefit from maintained contact with families by offering parents practical support following, or in parallel with, regular sacramental preparation. Families benefit because parents are affirmed and develop confidence in a mutually supportive and enjoyable environment. They learn from each other as well as from the resources. “,The heart of a child does not seek after riches and glory. What this child asks for is love”, St Therese of Lisieux To see which parishes and schools are already offering parenting programmes see the website at www.flm.org.uk/parenting If your school or parish would like to find out more about how you can take advantage of this training initiative contact Anne Ruane, Parenting Support Worker on 0112 261 8050 or psw@flm.org.uk. Home is a Holy Place…, …,because God is present there as love’, Anne Ruane with the March 2009 training group

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Page 5

Oct 2009 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 5 Annual Ethos Day N otre Dame Catholic Sixth Form College held their annual ethos day on the 7th July 2009. The keynote speaker was David Wells, a member of the Adult Religious Education and Catechesis team in the Plymouth Diocese. The morning was devoted to him speaking about re-energizing ourselves in a thought provoking and hugely entertaining way. The gospel message became alive and palpable to all who listened as he explained afresh key spiritual and human aspects common to us all. Terry Coen, Vice Principal, said ‘,It was a wonderful combination of sparkling wit and wisdom. Everyone felt that he succeeded in raising our flagging spirits at the end of a long hard year by reminding us of the important things in life.’, Before lunch there was a prayer service in the chapel and then staff went off to their chosen ‘,break-out’, groups to try the holistic workshops. The day ended with a social event in the staffroom including a quiz which was won, as usual, by the science department. Walsingham 2009 A group of staff and students represented St. Mary’,s Menston on this year’,s Diocesan Pilgrimage to Walsingham. This year marks the 75th anniversary of the declaration of the Slipper Chapel as the National Shrine of the Blessed Virgin Mary. This beautiful, holy place is in Norfolk, quite a journey from our school but well worth it as Year 11 student Alessandra Valle-Metaxas said, “,Walsingham was an amazing experience and really confirmed my faith. It was very enjoyable, a day I will never forget. I felt comfort- able there and I would love to go again.”, Year 12 students Andrew Duxbury and Joe Thompson said of their day, “,We did- n’,t really know what to expect as we had never been before. Even so, the peaceful- ness and serenity of the place surprised us and there was a large turnout from our Christian communities.”, Diocese of Leeds Vicariate for Evangelisation A SHORT COURSE FOR CATECHISTS Sacramental &, Liturgical Catechesis The Vicariate for Evangelisation offers a five week introductory course covering the following: Infant Baptism: Parish Preparation and Celebration Christian Initiation of Children of Catechetical Age Eucharist &, Reconciliation: Parish Preparation &, Celebration Confirmation - The Challenge! Breaking Open the Word with Adults and Children The course runs from 7.15 –, 9.30 pm on the following dates in 2010: Tuesday 23rd February Tuesday 2nd March Tuesday 9th March Tuesday 16th March Tuesday 23rd March This is one of the specialist modules for the Catholic Certificate of Religious Studies (CCRS) but can be taken as an individual course. All sessions take place at Hinsley Hall and will be led by Linda Pennington Cost £,35 For further information or to book please contact Janine Garnett on 0113 261 8040 or janine.garnett@dioceseofleeds.org.uk

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Page 6

Oct 2009 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

T he news for Deacons in our diocese is that they have a new director for formation- Mgr Bernard Bickers, now Parish Priest of Selby, who will be known to many. Details of a meeting will be circulated shortly. Mgr Bickers will also be familiar to those who trained for the diaconate some years ago through his masterly discursion across church history. The National Deacons’, Assembly which was to be held in Hereford next February has been cancelled. A number of Deacons from this diocese had booked to go. These assemblies are usually of a high standard with good speakers, but as the diaconate becomes virtually national in England and Wales (only Salford diocese is now bereft of deacons), a different model may be needed. This assembly did not attract sufficient support: although this is an early stage, the organisers- who had expressed concerns at the 2008 National Meeting of Directors and Delegates at Hinsley Hall- decided that the signs were not good, and they could not have it underwritten in the present financial climate. This same climate may have made some delegates cautious: although parishes should pay the deacon’,s conference fee, parish finances may be suffering and there is still the fee for wives to be paid, costs of travelling and so on. It would still be good to have a central gathering for the long weekend- recent conferences have been in Lowestoft and Bournemouth- with the meeting focussed on some of the important issues that deacons now face in their ministries, from a national perspective. Occasionally people ask what is happening about the Diaconate in Ireland- well it is: training is under way in two dioceses and soon there will be deacons following in the foosteps of St Patrick’,s Father- said to be a deacon, too. Page 6 DEACONS NEWS Deacons Diary I n June of this year, the Bradford Boys` Choir embarked on its first ever foreign tour, to take part in the choral festival `Festivokal` in Ilbenstadt, in the Archdiocese of Mainz in Germany. Leaving Bradford in the early afternoon, they took the overnight ferry from Hull to Rotterdam and, due to traffic jams on the German autobahn, arrived at the `Haus St Gottfried` in the shadow of the Basilica of SS Peter and Paul, just in time to get changed into their concert clothes and get back on the coach to take them to their first concert venue. The rest of the week contained a good mix of choral workshops with conductors from all over Germany and beyond, concerts with the other choirs at the festival (including at the magnificent DOLCE-Theatre in nearby Bad Nauheim) and singing two motets at solemn Mass in the Basilica on Sunday morning. With a repertoire ranging from Schubert’,s Mass in G to Goodnight Sweetheart, the boys were worthy ambassadors for the Diocese of Leeds, drawing praise from the festival organisers and featuring on a documentary made for local radio, broadcast in August. Of course, there was time for relaxation, on the football field in the grounds of our accommodation, at the ice-cream parlour in Bad Nauheim and in the company of the ‘,Chickpeas’,, a group of six young female singers from Leipzig, whom some of our lower voices quickly befriended. All too soon though, the week was over and we returned to the UK exhausted, but looking forward to wherever our next tour might take us. Bradford boys in Germany T he ",Catholic Collection II", is the title of the latest CD recording from the Cathedral Choirs. It was released earlier this year by the premier Catholic recording company Herald AV, and supported by the Charity Aid to the Church in Need. The CD booklet contains a forward by Bishop Roche and pictures of the recordings taking place in the Cathedral with the boys’,, girls’, and adult choirs. The recording features many popular Catholic hymns such as Faith of our Fathers, God of mercy and compassions, and the two traditional Lourdes Hymns: Immaculate Mary and Holy Virgin by God’,s decree. The rest of the disc features Roman polyphony from Portugal, Italy and Germany interlaced with Gregorian chant. Gregorian chant, singled out in Vatican II as a form of music ",specially suited to the Roman liturgy",, is represented here by two Marian antiphons (the Lenten Ave regina caelorum and Salve regina, sung in ordinary time) and two hymns (St Thomas Aquinas`s Tantum ergo and Te lucis ante terminum, the authorship of which is uncertain). The other two Marian antiphons, Alma redemptoris mater (Advent to Candlemas) and Regina caeli (Easter) are sung to settings by Pedro de Cristo The remaining tracks offer a glimpse of the range of musical styles heard at Leeds. Charpentier`s intimate setting of another Aquinas text, Panis angelicus, and the two motets by Perosi contrast sharply with Haydn`s bombastic Insane et vanae curae and the resplendent majesty of Andriessen`s Tantum ergo. The Magnificat by Colin Mawby, a former Master of the Music at Westminster Cathedral, was commissioned for the reopening of Leeds Cathedral following its restoration in 2006 and is, of all the pieces presented here, the one that the choirs can most truly call their own. The CD has received many favourable reviews, including this one from Organists Review (August 2009): ",Their singing of polyphony...is sensitive and devotional...rise to the challenge with a terrifically focussed and contrasted reading. These are performances full of spirit and commitment. The recording has excellent clarity and breadth, placing voices and organ in true perspective, and it is a fine tribute to the consistent choral work undertaken by the Diocese of Leeds in recent decades - a shining example to other cities.", The CD “,Catholic Collection II”, is available by sending a cheque for £,12.99 (cost of CD plus postage and packing) payable to “,Leeds Cathedral Choir Support Group”, together with your name and address to: Mrs Claudine Tat Music Office Leeds Cathedral Great George Street Leeds LS2 8BE Tel 0113 244 8634 New Recording from the Choirs of Leeds Cathedral Diocese of Leeds Vicariate for Evangelisation A short course on LITURGY The Diocesan Liturgy Commission offers a five week course covering the following: What is liturgy? History of liturgy –, parts 1 &, 2 Liturgical Space and Time Liturgical celebration for schools and parishes The course runs from 7.15 –, 9.30 pm on the following dates in 2010: Tuesday 23rd February Tuesday 2nd March Tuesday 9th March Tuesday 16th March Tuesday 23rd March This is one of the specialist modules for the Catholic Certificate of Religious Studies (CCRS) but can be taken as an individual course. All sessions take place at Hinsley Hall and will be led by Fr Matthew Habron Cost £,35 For further information or to book please contact Janine Garnett on 0113 261 8040 or janine.garnett@dioceseofleeds.org.uk

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Page 7

Oct 2009 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

VOCATIONS Page 7 Classified Advertising NATURAL FAMILY PLANNING SERVICE (YORKSHIRE) For free, confidential tuition in the symptothermal method of natural family planning telephone: Leeds (0113) 260 0844 The N.F.P. Service is sponsored by the Diocese of Leeds C A HOLIC C ARE DIOCESE OF LEEDS Taking the Caring Church into the Community YOUR LEGACY WILL HELP US TO HELP THEM Catholic Care is working on behalf of the Diocese of Leeds. Since 1863 the Society has been helping and supporting local people. The needs of the children and families we serve are as pressing as ever. Please help us to help them by including Catholic Care in your Will. For more details about our work and how you can help, please contact: Catholic Care (Diocese of Leeds) 11 North Grange Road, Headingley, Leeds LS6 2BR Tel: 0113 3885 400 Fax 0113 3885 401 W eb S ite: www.catholic-care.org.uk Registered Charity: 513063 LEEDS CATHOLIC MARRIAGE CARE Marriage isn’,t always easy —, Counselling can help For an appointment in confidence, with an understanding and experienced listener, please telephone: LEEDS 0113 261 8045 HUDDERSFIELD 01484 422523 A Relationship Counselling Service For Advertising contact CathCom on 020 7112 6710 A beautiful vision of the service which the ordained priest gives to all the members of the Church through the celebration of the liturgy was provided by Fr Matthew Habron at the latest meeting of the adult discernment group. The priest is “,as it were, an ‘,icon of Christ’,”, he said, quoting the Catechism, and he is consecrated to act in Christ’,s person. Fr Habron explained that the word “,liturgy”, describes the worship of the Christian community, namely, the Mass, the sacraments, the Liturgy of the Hours, Blessings and celebrations of the liturgical year. It is such an important part of the Church’,s life because through worship grace is poured forth upon us. We are made holy in Christ and God is glorified. Fr Habron pointed out that the liturgy is an “,action of the whole Christ,”, in other words the Church, the Body of Christ, united with Christ, the Head of the Church. He went on to describe two interesting consequences of this. Firstly, it is the “,whole community”, which celebrates the liturgy, with its members doing so “,in different ways.”, Secondly, we join with the saints in heaven, who are also members of the Church, whenever we celebrate the liturgy. In closing, Fr Habron, who is the assistant priest at St Austin’,s, Wakefield, and a qualified liturgist, looked at the place where the liturgy is celebrated, namely the church. Whenever we enter a church we cross a symbolic threshold dividing the “,world wounded by sin”, to “,the world of new life in Christ,”, he said. Moreover, the church is “,a symbol of the Father’,s house to which we are journeying.”, The full text of Fr Habron’,s talk, entitled Why the liturgy is important, is available on the diocesan vocations website. It is one of a series which explore key teachings of the Catechism in keeping with this year’,s Come and See theme: Catechism and Commitment. The next meeting of the discernment group, which are always at Leeds Trinity University College in Horsforth, will take place on Friday 23rd October when Fr Peter Rosser will speak about The human community, a reflection on aspects of the third part of the Catechism. The evenings start at 7pm and comprise a Holy Hour, when there is the opportunity for confession, Evening Prayer, a talk and a meal. The group is for men aged 17 or over who wish to explore the priesthood and new members are always welcome. Lifts home are provided. St Thé,rè,se’,s night of grace St Thé,rè,se’,s autobiography provides us with a template for understanding our own vocations, Fr Paul Grogan told young people gathered at the Cathedral for the all-night vigil during the visit of the saint’,s relics. Speaking in the early hours, he recalled that it was at about that time of the night that St Thé,rè,se, at 13 the youngest in her family, experienced an extraordinary grace just after returning from Midnight Mass. She had been looking forward excitedly to opening her stocking when she overheard her father say that he hoped that this would be the last year when this family tradition would be observed. She was filled with confusion and embarrassment, because she felt babyish, but at the same time it was a moment of great personal maturation for her. From then onwards, Fr Grogan suggested, she emerged from the self- preoccupation that is a natural part of adolescence and sought means of serving others. A desire to enter Carmel quickly followed. He added that St Thé,rè,se’,s understanding of God’,s love was mediated through her parents love for her. The beatification last year of her father and mother, Louis and Zelie Martin, was a clear reminder by the Church that marriage offers a way to holiness. Young men and women who wish to become priests or religious perceive the beauty of married love and are inspired by it to live lives of love in service of others in the celibate state, he said. Fr Grogan is the diocesan Vocations Director. From bank cashier to religious sister Girls at St Joseph’,s Catholic College in Bradford were invited to consider how they wanted to spend the rest of their lives in a presentation by Sister Anne Hammersley, cp, shown with some of the students afterwards in the picture. Sister Anne, whose order, the Sisters of the Cross and Passion, founded the College told the girls how she became a religious sister after a number of years as a cashier in a bank. She felt drawn to make a life commitment while on a Church-run visit to Peru which was aimed at raising participants’, awareness of those in need. Sister Anne then described the life of the foundress of her order, Mother Elizabeth Prout, who devoted herself to educating girls in the slums of nineteenth century Manchester. She concluded by looking at the different ways in which her sisters were active in the world at the moment, from Bosnia to Papua New Guinea. Students at St John Fisher’,s Harrogate, Holy Family, Keighley and St Bede’,s Bradford have also had presentations on the priesthood and the religious life this month. Bowling fun for boys The first meeting of the youth discernment group this year is a free 10-pin bowling outing in Leeds on Saturday 17th October. Any young man aged 13 to 17 who is interested in finding out more about the priesthood is most welcome to join in the fun: the group will be meeting at Wheeler Hall next to the Cathedral at 2pm. For further information or to book a place, please contact Fr Grogan: dolvocs@aol.com . Change of day for vocations Mass The monthly Mass for Vocations which is celebrated at Mount St Joseph’,s Home in Headingley, run by the Little Sisters of the Poor, will now take place on the first Wednesday of each month, beginning at 11am. Participating in the heavenly liturgy

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Page 8

Oct 2009 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

PAGE 8 CAFOD CAFOD fears thousands dead from Indonesian earthquake C AFOD has pledged £,100,000 in emergency aid to its partners in Indonesia following the massive earthquake that struck the west coast of Sumatra on 30 September. The 7.6 magnitude earthquake has left hundreds dead and thousands more buried under rubble. Half the city of Padang on the west coast of Sumatra has been destroyed and the city of Pariaman 50km inland has been flattened. Hospitals, schools and shopping malls have all been brought down and triggered fires and landslides. Shock waves were felt as far as Singapore and Malaysia. A powerful second tremor shook West Sumatra a few hours later severely hampering rescue efforts. CAFOD partner Caritas Indonesia (Karina) is in Padang. CAFOD’,s programme manager for Indonesia, Dini Widiastuti, whose family has survived the earthquake in Padang, said: “,We fear the worst for the thousands of people trapped under tonnes of rubble. CAFOD’,s partner is on the ground working with the survivors and we’,ll be doing everything possible to alleviate the suffering of those affected.”, The devastation is absolute and from the pictures I’,ve seen the area is unrecognisable to me. CAFOD fears the devastation will be on the same scale, if not worse, than the earthquake in Yogyakarta, in Java, Indonesia in 2006, when over 5,000 people were killed. The rescue operation is paramount. Caritas Indonesia is in Padang assessing the number of casualties and the needs of survivors. Immediate medical attention, food, clean water and shelter are vital. “,There is no electricity and the phone lines are down. There is also the possibility of further tremors, all of which are severely restricting the rescue and aid effort. Two hospitals were affected and are out of action and the airport roof also collapsed, although it is open now and flights in and out are possible.”, Fr. Agustinus Mudjihartono is helping Caritas in Padang. He said: ”,While the situation in Padang for survivors is critical, the situation in Pariaman is much worse. The entire town, which has 80,000 residents, has been destroyed.”, Pariaman means ‘,safe haven’, in Indonesian. CAFOD has also pledged £,10,000 to support the work of its partners Caritas Australia and Caritas New Zealand following the tsunami in Samoa. Bishops call for Tamils to return home B ishops call for Tamils displaced by civil war to be allowed to return home after IDP camp visit. Two of our bishops have recently returned from Sri Lanka where they gained a rare insight into life in the post-conflict camps. Together with CAFOD, they are calling for the end of forced confinement of nearly 300,000 Tamil survivors of the country’,s long and bloody conflict and demanding that they be allowed to go home. Bishop John Rawsthorne of Sheffield and Bishop John Arnold of Westminster have just returned from an eight day tour of the country, where they were looking at the post- conflict and post-tsunami work of CAFOD and its partner Caritas Sri Lanka. They gained access to the camps in the north of the country, met people who have been released and also priests and nuns who have been allowed to work in the camps providing food, health and education. Bishop John Rawsthorne said: “,I was very distressed at the plight of the people in the camps. There is serious overcrowding and inadequate food and health services. The monsoon season will soon be upon them and could be disastrous for the hundreds of thousands of people stuck there. Even with the recent rains, some people lost the meagre possessions they had. “,CAFOD’,s partners are deeply involved in the humanitarian relief work in the camps and I was also greatly encouraged by the way in which the Church is responding both in a humanitarian way and in calling for people to be allowed to go home. This is a country which had had to deal with the dreadful consequences of the tsunami and is now in the aftermath of a conflict which has left about 300,000 people confined in camps. It is unacceptable and these people must be allowed to return to their villages as quickly as possible. The generosity of Catholics in England and Wales, through CAFOD, is producing heartfelt results and will continue to do so as people begin to return home and rebuild their lives”,. Bishop John Arnold said: “,People do not want to be in the camps. They want to be allowed home and to be reunited with their families. The Sri Lankan Government originally set a target for 80 per cent of people to be released within 180 days. 90 days have already passed and we must hold the Government to account on its promises. According to the commander of one of the camps we visited, what is stopping the people’,s release is the vast number of mines and unexploded ordnance in areas they want to go home to but also the Government’,s screening programme to check for Tamil Tigers combatants. “,There are some moves to release the most vulnerable, such as the elderly, orphans and pregnant women. The Church is working with the Sri Lankan Government to offer alternative solutions and allow early release. It is gloomy but there are chinks of light. Seeing the successful tsunami work that has taken place and where communities are rebuilding and looking to the future was inspiring. There are many hopeful signs for the building of peace. But is clear the journey to lasting peace will be a long one.”, CAFOD’,s International Director Geoff O’,Donoghue, who travelled with the Bishops said: “,The Sri Lankan Government has just announced that relatives or friends of those in the camps can now apply to accommodate them, but we’,re concerned about how this might work. If it meant an extension of the screening process to host families, that would be counter-productive. “,Through the work done by Caritas Sri Lanka, there have been some improvements to the camps, but the best way forward is for the Sri Lankan Government to stick to its original 180-day commitment to release 80 percent of the displaced people in the camps. Already this has slipped, and now President Rajapakse is saying only 60% may be possible within the stated time frame. “,CAFOD is honoured the Bishops were able to travel with us and see for themselves the plight of the people and what CAFOD, its partners and the Catholic Church are doing to bring lasting peace to this war-exhausted country,”, he said. Debbie Wainwright, CAFOD Young Tamil boys stand with other civilians behind a barbed-wire fence in the Menikfam Vanni refugee camp located near the town of Chettekulam in northern Sri Lanka REUTERS/Stringer, courtesy alertnet.org] Thank-you from CAFOD Leeds A huge thank-you to everyone who gave to this year’,s Harvest Fast Day. At this difficult time when we are all feeling the effects of the recession, the generosity of people in Leeds Diocese is deeply appreciated. Not only are you helping to fund our work, you are also sending a message of solidarity to the world’,s poorest that they are not alone. This autumn has been particularly demanding with so many natural disasters and peo- ple suffering because of conflict. In this month’,s Catholic Post the students from Bradford share their experience of our ongoing healthcare work in Nigeria. Reports from partners in Sri Lanka, the Philippines, Indonesia and Kenya illustrate the need for immediate humanitarian relief and how CAFOD is well placed to respond because of long-standing relationships with local partners. None of this vital, life-saving work could happen without your continuing support. Please remember our partners and the communities with whom they work in your prayer. Margaret Siberry and Joanne Taylor, CAFOD Leeds. CAFOD Mass of Thanksgiving and Remembrance November 6, 6.30pm Hinsley Hall Chapel Celebrant Fr. Michael O’,Reilly You are invited to join us for a special celebration of the Eucharist in thanksgiving for all our friends and supporters who have died. During mass we will remember, especially, families who have lost a loved one during the past year. There will also be an opportunity to commemorate those who have died by enrolling their names in our ‘,CAFOD Book of Remembrance’,. Refreshments will be served after mass with an opportunity to relax and meet friends. We hope you can be with us to honour the legacy of all the supporters who have gone before us. Flood-Hit Philippines C AFOD’,s partner in the Philippines is rushing aid to people affected by Typhoon Ketsana which struck the country on Saturday 26th September. Over 100 people have been killed and at least 1 million people left homeless. CAFOD’,s head of Asia programmes Colette Fearon said: “,The intensity of the storm has affected hundreds of thousands of people and the situation is chaotic and desperate. It’,s vital that people are able to reach shelter and get basic supplies. Our partners, who are very experienced in emergencies, are doing everything humanly possible to ensure this happens. The scale of the typhoon was greater than anything experienced in nearly half a century suggesting that it could be linked to climate change. The worrying issue is that some scientists predict this type of event will become more common in a warmer world. World leaders must take serious steps to ensure action is taken on climate change.”, For further information, please contact Margaret or Joanne on 0113 275 9302 or email leeds@cafod.org.uk

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Page 9

Oct 2009 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

INTERFAITH Page 9 Celebrating an interfaith pioneer S t Francis of Assisi is well known as the source of the Franciscan community, an advocate for the environment and as the inventor of the Christmas crib. One of the parts of his life less frequently celebrated is his relationship with Islam. In 1219 he accompanied the Crusaders to Egypt, and attempted reconciliation between them and the Muslims. He was received by Sultan Melek-el-Kamel, and made such an impression that his followers were appointed guardians of the Christians sites in the Holy Land, which they continue to this day. St. Francis’, feast day, October 4th, fell on a Sunday this year and it was celebrated in a Keighley Mosque by a gathering of Christians, Muslims &, Buddhists. As is customary at the Keighley Interfaith Group’,s regular Gatherings for Peace &, Reconciliation, each tradition present offered prayers and read a fragment of scripture in turn. “,If we can’,t pray together, at least we are together to pray.”, Spirit of Assisi descends on Auschwitz From Zenit, 8th September 2009 At the beginning of September religious representatives from all over the world met in the former concentration camp of Auschwitz-Birkenau as part of the closing events of an inter- religious meeting in “,the spirit of Assisi.”, Convened by Cardinal Dziwisz of Krakow it was a continuation of the first interreligious and intercultural meeting called in Assisi in 1986 by Pope John Paul II. During the three days of this congress, attended by Christians of all denominations, Muslims, Hindus, Buddhist and others, there was talk of peace, the development of peoples, the economic crisis and interreligious dialogue. The legacy of Pope John Paul ll was warmly remembered also. Grand Rabbi David Rosen quoted Isaiah on peace and reminded the meeting that, “,It was (John Paul) a son of Krakow who brought us so close to this vision.”, Eid Mubarak Ramadan ended on or about the 21st September. Cardinal Taurin, of the Vatican’,s Interreligious Council sent the usual greeting to the Muslims of the world. This year he spoke of the common battle against poverty. If you have Muslim friends visit the diocesan interfaith website www.dioceseofleeds.org/interfaith to download a copy and share it with them. Put a note in your diary (the date of Eid moves forward by 8 or so days every year) for next year to visit the Vatican website in good time - www.vatican.va, look under Latest Updates. Upcoming feasts &, festivals 20 October Anniversary of the Birth of the Bab (Gate) Baha’,i.. The Bab was born in Shiraz, Persia in 1819. He announced the coming of Baha’,u’,llah who would bring renewal to the world –, the new messiah. 2 November Birthday of Guru Nanak (1469) Sikh. The first Sikh Guru. An uninterrupted reading of the Guru Granth Sahib (“,Akhand path”,) is begun about two days before and finished on the morning of the feast. Sikhs gather at the Gurdwara to hear sermons and sing hymns about his life. The congregation share a meal (langar) from the free kitchen. There are lights and fireworks. 12 November Anniversary of the Birth of Baha’,u’,llah Baha’,i. –, founder of the Baha’,i faith born in Tehran, Persia in 1817. BRADFORD COURT CHAPLAINCY SERVICE (BCCS) Are you prepared to go to Court and stay for a year? Would you be able to talk to someone who has been living on the street and is in court for theft? How would you talk to parents who are at their wits end and are in court to support their child who is in court for a serious offence? These are just a few examples of what the Court Chaplains at Bradford Magistrates’, Court, Latif Mir and Barry Barton, are dealing with on a daily basis since 1st July. The Trustees are now looking to recruit volunteers to assist Barry and Latif in meeting these clients urgent needs. The work they do is highly confidential, interesting, challenging, and sensitive. Both Chaplains recognize that, for some women, it may be difficult talking to a man so, for that reason alone, it is essential that female volunteers are recruited as well as male as soon as possible. “,We now need a team of committed volunteers to enhance our multi-faith project.”, says Bryan Rulton, Support and Development Officer. We are seeking suitable volunteers from all faiths and none to enroll on our comprehensive induction and training programme. Those accepted onto the programme will begin training for this demanding but rewarding work on 23rd September 2009. The programme will run until16th December. It is anticipated that those who successfully complete the training course will start work in January 2010. On-going support and professional development opportunities will be offered along with the chance to meet with an interesting group of people and begin to make a real difference in people’,s lives. Volunteers will need to successfully clear enhanced CRB check and are expected to commit a morning or an afternoon each week for 12 months. If you think you would like to be a part of this unique and exciting project please contact Bryan Rulton the Support and Development Officer on 01274 722422 for further details and an appointment to talk with one of our Trustees. BCCS is a charitable company limited by guarantee Company Number 6592288 incorporated 14th May 2008 Registered Address: Bradford Magistrates’, Court, PO Box 187, The Tyrls, Bradford West Yorkshire, BD1 1JL School make harvest sheaf Father Gerard led the Year 2 children at St. Benedict’,s Catholic Primary School in making a harvest sheaf which formed the central piece of the harvest display. Year 2 have been exploring the topic Food and looking at why we need to eat. Knowing that bread was carbohydrate and gave us energy, a child remarked how Holy Communion must give you energy. The children were asked to think about this idea and decided that it gives you the energy to be kind and caring like Jesus!

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Page 10

Oct 2009 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 10 ‘, A Pack for Mums and Babies’, Students make Life-Changing visit to Primary Health Care Clinics in Nigeria C atholic Post readers will be aware that last Christmas the ‘,Pack for Mums and Babies’, was piloted in Leeds Diocese. Thanks to the huge support from parishioners and schools the four students from St. Joseph’,s Catholic College in Bradford raised £,17,000 to support CAFOD’,s Primary Health Care work in Africa. So impressed was CAFOD with these dedicated young leaders that they were invited to witness first hand the difference such basic provision can make. On 5th September they set off to Nigeria as ambassadors not only for CAFOD but for all young people and for our diocese. They certainly exceeded all expectations and hopes for the visit and since returning have appeared on BBC Look North and YTV Calendar, BBC Radio Leeds as well as BBC Radio Four’,s ‘,Woman’,s Hour’,, determined to raise even more funds. Read below the impact of the visit made on the girls. It is only fair to say that they made an equally profound impression on all who met them! One highlight was to hand over a letter of greeting from Bishop Arthur to Archbishop Ignatius Kaigama of Jos, who was delighted to receive them and very grateful to Bishop Arthur for his personal support for the girls’, work. Archbishop Kaigama pointed out that the very fact we were able to visit projects indicated that they were actually not the worst situations. We were witnessing the difference that CAFOD`s help provides. Before the Primary Health Clinics these people had absolutely nothing! He asked that his thanks be conveyed to all in our diocese who have supported the girls’, project. W e were overwhelmed by the kindness, the smiles, the hugs and the love of these people. I kept asking myself, why? and quickly realised that a very small thing that we can do here in the UK means so very much to people in Ankpa and thousands of places like it. If I tell you that £,17000 equals 4.5 million Nira and Sister Bridget needs 20 million Nira to complete the building of a Delivery Clinic at Ankpa it starts to put things into perspective. Before Mass in celebration of the arrival of the girls we were summoned to the Palace of the local King, His Royal Highness the Ejah of Ankpa. In addition we were also invited to meet the Chairman of the Local Government equivalent to the local Mayor. Two levels of government in a day, both important and both key in supporting health care programmes. The fact that the girls had come up with their idea and actioned it via CAFOD had led to such attention. Protocol is very important in Nigerian culture and we all had to quickly learn how to adapt to the demands of etiquette. This is a tough enough call for adults but when it is required of four 15 year olds one might have cause for concern. The girls have ownership of their idea and this has proved to be crucial on so many occasions not least in the presence of his Royal Highness the Ejah and other dignitaries. They never try to be anything other than what they are, 4 young people who have worked hard to make a dream a reality. The next day we visited one of the five outreach clinics run from Ankpa, called Akpapa. The same warm welcome met us, the smiles were almost as wide but the conditions were alarming. Here we witnessed absolute rather than relative poverty. The clinic was held in a room made of mud at the back of the church, it has one wooden bench and Sister Bridget took her own plastic chair where the nurse/birthing attendant would sit while she examined the expectant mother. There were great celebrations at our arrival but this was the place where we truly realised why we have to continue with this work. The girls spoke to 24 women and girls, all expectant mothers and some aged only 15. The eldest at 35 was having her 7th child. 8 out the 24 women had lost a baby, a frightening statistic and they all knew someone who had died in childbirth. Most deaths were from haemorrhage or sepsis caused by unclean conditions, birthing at home and complications with the placenta. These girls and women were scared, the joy of pregnancy eluded them because of their poverty. They were poorly nourished especially in the dry season, they had no clean water supply and no funds that would allow them to reach a clinic or hospital. These women knew exactly what they needed, they were brave, articulate and intelligent. Our belief that development will never occur unless women are empowered and can be mothers to their children was confirmed over and over again. The day ended with another celebration and more titles for us, my favourite being Megan’,s “, crusader for justice “, The village presented us with gifts, two live turkeys, 4 massive yams, half a banana tree and a gallon of palm oil. It was hard to accept them but vital that we did and we were content that somehow via Sister Bridget these valuable items would go back into this community and the clinic. On the journey back it was another time for deep reflection and time to give thanks for this privilege. When we got back to the hotel it was good to see the girls playing, chasing lizards with Samson who looked after us and fixed everything that didn’,t work in our rooms. Further light relief was provided by the amazing Father Simeon who understood that these 4 young girls were coping with life changing experiences. We went to join friends of his at the Kogi State University where professors of Geography, Jurisprudence and a lecturer in Sociology joined Peter, Tim, Margaret, Amadu the girls and I at the Staff Social Club. I admit freely that the adults especially this one needed a bit of frivolity too. The dress code was relaxed and after a lovely dinner that included chips, we let our hair down and had a singing and dancing session where we shared our European and African moves. Africa won the dance contest and the girls showed a great affinity for African rhythms. It was right and proper to have some fun. I must say that we laughed and cried in equal measure on this trip. My thanks go to four ordinary girls who had an extraordinary idea and the tenacity, passion and work ethic to make it a reality. They are truly inspirational to me and to everyone they meet. They delight and affirm me, they represent why we have Catholic schools and why I have the best job in the world. Elaine M Barker, Leader of Vocational, Work Related and Community Education Assistant Head Teacher St. Joseph’,s Catholic College, Bradford Katie Dearden T he trip to Nigeria has made me realise a lot of things about life and my life. I have realised what doesn’,t matter and what I need to appreciate more. The people in the communities we visited were so welcoming and loved us being in their presence. It made me feel so important. I think British people would learn a lot from the Nigerian people I met. We have all the material things, but where’,s the love and appreciation of life? The highlight of the trip was speaking to the mothers and hearing their opinions and thoughts. I enjoyed the whole experience, especially the third day at Ankpa, and the day at Akpakpa although it was the most emotional day. A moment I will never forget there was when a mother had a 1 week old baby that had a cough and fever, it looked so unhealthy and upset, along with the mother. Their faces are always on my mind and it really upsets me that even though we were similar human beings in so many ways, the conditions in her life are incredible hard compared to mine. I realized this when I arrived home in England, stepped into my house and said to my mum that it didn’,t feel right. I felt so guilty for having what I have, also a bit selfish. I will never take electricity or clean water for granted ever again! You can look in textbooks at school, look at images on Google or see the adverts about the less fortunate in places like Nigeria, but I believe you will never understand how much help they do need and feel the emotions I felt until you go there and see it for yourself. I would love to go back to Nigeria and hopefully stay longer. A life changing experience I will never forget. Seeing how our dedication to our idea is helping the mothers and babies in places like Nigeria has made me more determined to help people like the mother I spoke to in Akpakpa and give their babies a better chance in life This Christmas instead of buying makeup, a new phone or any other items that are not necessary, buy a Pack for Mums and Babies. Give a mother the best present they could have, a healthier start for her and her child. Kimi Omolokun G oing to Nigeria was a real eye-opener for me. Even though I am half Nigerian I have only ever been to the city where things are much better then the places we visited. The hardest day for me was when we were at Akpakpa and we saw the room where the pregnant mothers have their check ups. When we spoke to the mothers, some of them looked frightened to talk to us. We really just wanted to talk to them one on one but we were attracting so much attention everywhere we went. The highlight of my trip was in the clinic at Ankpa on the Wednesday. We spoke to some mothers. The mothers Megan and I spoke to were all 24+, married and healthy. Although the mothers at Akpakpa were in more need than those in Ankpa, the day was less emotional and the mothers were happy and relaxed talking to us. We could see the real benefits of having a clinic. The whole experience has made me feel 100% more determined to raise funds and awareness of our packs. We now know you need to see it to believe it. If you hear about all the poverty and the statistics you can get a rough idea but the people you’,re helping are mere numbers. There is no other way to get the full picture without seeing first hand the degree of help these people need. All the children that were hugging us and shaking our hands were happier than the children here at Christmas! I have never seen anyone as happy to see me and I have never met these people before! We can do so little to give them so much and the gratitude they showed was tear jerking. I will never forget the smiles on their faces and the conditions in which they live. The trip to Nigeria has opened my eyes and I wish people here would stop complaining about stupid things. I guess it’,s not their fault though because they have to complain about something even if they do have constant electricity, a clean toilet, available medicines, hot water, supermarket around the corner and a warm house! I hope one day the world will wake up and poverty will be eradicated because no one deserves to have to live like that. Welcome at Ankpa on first full day

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Page 11

Oct 2009 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 11 Megan Crowley A s soon as we got out of the car in the village of Ankpa, we were welcomed in the most delightful way. People came swarming out of the health care clinic to greet and show their appreciation for us. Everyone was just so happy to see four young English girls in their village. As we spent the day in the health clinic in Ankpa, we found out more about the young mothers and how they manage to look after themselves during pregnancy, as they don’,t get a lot of help to go through the emotional and physical help pregnant women need. The most emotional experience of the trip was the next day when we visited an outreach clinic in Akpapa. As soon as we arrived, we saw the level of poverty affecting the area. We had a massive welcome again and met some of the local people. Sister Bridget showed us the room where they check the mothers are fit and healthy and also listen to for the heartbeat of the unborn baby. The room was a tiny, simple cold hut with what I describe as a school P.E. bench as the antenatal couch. This really touched me as people in England have such comfort on the antenatal beds, and we take it for granted. We then spoke to some young women who were either pregnant or recently made mothers. We asked them the same type of questions as in Ankpa but we got completely different reactions. As we were talking to them, a large crowd appeared around us and the woman we were interviewing. The woman called Blessing, aged 22, told us she was happy about having her child but we could see she was not happy about it at all. She was so scared to tell us anything, almost like we would judge her because of her situation. It was awful to see but I think we needed to see that unhappiness to fully understand what the poor mothers are going through over there. The highlight of the whole trip for me was seeing how grateful the mothers were for us helping them and realising that young people in England do actually care about them. When people say to me now, what was Africa like? I can’,t explain, as there are no words in the world to sum up the whole experience of everything we did there. It was a once in a lifetime trip and I have gained so much from it. I have gained so many friends, faces and memories, which will stay with me for life. Isabella Ricordo W e all arrived at Abuja airport in Nigeria at about half past four in the morning after having a long night flight. I was so tired. I couldn’,t wait to get into a bed! I’,m not going to start rambling on about different things about our journey, I’,m just going to explain the things that we shared in Nigeria that mean a lot to me. First of all I’,m going to start off with Monday 7th September, when we went to a village called Ankpa which was a Mother and Child Primary Health Care Clinic. It was just the best thing ever! As soon as I got out of the car there seemed to be around about 40 women all coming at me hugging me, greeting me and saying, ‘,Welcome!’, - and yes it was the best welcome I’,ve ever had! The women were amazing people and so appreciative of all the work we have been doing over the last year to raise funds for projects like the one in Ankpa. The children there were so smiley and waving at us all the time and wanting to be near us. There were these two boys who I kept seeing around and they both looked quite similar so I thought they must be related. Then our driver Amadu from CAFOD told me that they were cousins and one of the little boys had lost his mother and father to AIDS, as soon as I heard this my eyes just started to fill up and I started thinking about my own family and how much they mean to me. There was plenty more filled into that day but that part will always stay in my mind. The next day Tuesday 8th September was one of the most emotional days especially to me. We went to an outreach centre also for mums and babies to a place called Akpapa. There again we were also greeted very openly and the people and children were smiling. I could see straight away that it was very different to the clinic at Akpapa had been before at Ankpa. After a prayer and a few traditional dances from the local people we went to talk with pregnant women or mums with new babies. I just lovechildren so I was in my element that day. After talking to a mixture of pregnant women and new mums I could tell that they were nervous to talk to us or open up about their situation. There was one lady who was about 5 months pregnant and the last one to talk to us, every time we tried to ask a question or make her feel more comfortable her eyes always filled up. I had to hold her hand because she nearly started crying and I just wanted to make things better for her but I couldn’,t. By that point I couldn’,t hold it any longer and I just had to let it all go out, I just kept thinking to myself this is really not fair how can people have to live this way when we all live in the same world. I believe I’,m a caring person and I always want other people to be happier than myself. I think that’,s why it got to me the most. If I had to go back and show my support it definitely would be Akpakpa. No one would understand the level of poverty there unless you see it for yourself.

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Page 12

Oct 2009 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 12 POLISH NEWS T he visit of the relics of St Therese to our Cathedral in Leeds has provided a focus for many- for their prayer, for their piety, for their deep fears and anxieties, even their uncertainties and inadequacies, laid before the relics of a simple Carmelite nun, asking for her sympathetic prayer and intercession: she did, after all, have no fear in addressing Popes directly. There was more to this Yorkshire visit- with its marvellous ecumenical gesture in York- than the sort of me-too crowd reaction that seems to follow a major celebrity event, whatever it may be. You can, after all, get from here to Lisieux, home of St Therese, by train well inside a day for less than £,100, so it is not for everyone only “,once in a lifetime”,. No, it was the realisation of solidarity and community- that which is the church, a communion: not the curiosity of relics but the communion of saints, the people of God gathered together in a common belief, a common cause: to simply share their faith, in hope and charity, just as Therese did. That is what Cathedrals and Minsters are for: not to be convenient assembly spaces, tourist venues, liturgical refuges, solemn places for funerals or civics: but the beating heart of dioceses which are alive. That is, we hope, one thing we may have discovered in those crowded days at the beginning of October. The Post Says …, Co Sie U Nas Dzieje W Parafii W Leeds? What’,s On In The Leeds Polish Parish? Pazdziernik/ October: 3ego/ 3rd Parafialna Zabawa Dozynkowa Harvest Festival Ball –, Organised by the Parish Council 11ego/ 11th Msza _w. i Walne Zebranie Polskiej Sekcji Royal British Legion Holy Mass and Annual General Meeting of the Polish Section of the Royal British Legion 17ego/ 17th Fredreum –, obchody 40-to lecia istnienia Czesc 1 Fredreum –, 40th Anniversary Celebrations –, Part 1 18ego/ 18th Fredreum –, obchody 40-to lecia istnienia Czesc 2 Fredreum –, 40th Anniversary Celebrations –, Part 2 31ego/ 31st Zaduszki - Procesja na cmentarzu Lawnswood Procession at Lawnswood Cemetery as part of the All Souls Day Commemorations Listopad/ November: 1ego/ 1st Zaduszki - Procesja na cmentarzu Killingbeck Procession at Lawnswood Cemetery as part of the All Souls Day Commemorations 7ego/ 7th Bonfire Night 16ego/ 16th Msza _w. i Akademia Niepodleg_o_ciowa organizowane przez Zjednoczenie Polskie Holy Mass and Show commemorating the gaining of Poland’,s Independence - Organised by the Federation of Poles 28ego/ 28th Zabawa Andrzejkowa St. Andrew’,s Day Ball Grudzie_/ December: 6ego/ 6th _wi_ty Miko_aj organizowane przez Polska Szko_e Sobotnia St. Nicholas –, Organised by the Polish Saturday School - Leeds 13ego/ 13th Kiermasz Szkolny Christmas Fair organised by the Polish Saturday School - Leeds 31ego/ 31st Parafialna Zabawa Sylwestrowa New Year’,s Eve Ball organised by the Parish Council Loreto Reunion T he course “,Loreto”, was the inspiration and product of Archbishop Szczepan Wesoly, the guardian of polish emigration for many years. It was initially started in 1967 and was run for 25 years tirelessly. Its final year was in 1991, the same year Pope John Paul II visited Czestochowa for the World Youth Day. It was then reinitiated at Archbishop Szczepan Wesoly’,s request by Father Krzysztof Tyliszczak, the Chancellor of the Polish Catholic Mission in England and Wales. The second wave of courses ran from 1995 to the year 2000. The courses aim was the spiritual and cultural upbringing of polish é,migré, youth and were worth every penny as they also taught life skills . The courses were started in Loreto in Italy and hence the course got its name but have been held in Spain and France as well as other locations in Italy. On the 11th of July in London, firstly in the church of St. Andrzej Bobola and then at the Polish Cultural Institute, course participants were able to meet again with Archbishop Szczepan Wesoly, the courses’, inspiring leader and remember the courses. Given the course ran for more than 30 years, there were a number of families who could boast two generations of participants. Holy Mass was consecrated by Archbishop Szczepan Wesoly and other priests who were linked to the course including Father Andrzej Marszewski who was a participant in his youth in 1991. During the Mass, participants from all the decades read either the lessons or the bidding prayers. The hymns sung were also very representative of those which were sung during the course. At the end of Mass, in order to commemorate the reunion there was a group photo taken. The festivities then moved to the Jazz Café, where there was a chance to recall memories with a sing along of course favourites and also sign a book of thanks and memories which is being given to Archbishop Wesoly. The celebrations were culminated in a ball where it was possible to look at various photos which represented all the years the course was run. The reunion gave people the opportunity to reacquaint themselves with lost friends. It also gave course participants a chance to thank the unique and remarkable man whose forethought and energy made these courses not only possible but also a huge success –, Archbishop Szczepan Wesoly. The Reunion was organised by Marysia Stenzel and Kasia Rafalat, who steered a committee to make his day special for everyone. People travelled from Yorkshire and beyond to take part in this day, especially as so many Leeds parishioners had been on the courses. In fact our current chairman of the Polish Parish Council was not only a participant on the courses but also an instructor in the second wave of courses. “,Kurs Loreto”, will never be forgotten and all those who had the wonderful opportunity to be part of this unique experience will be forever grateful to both his Excellency Archbishop Szczepan Wesoly and Father Krzysztof Tyliszczak. 100 Polish Children’,s Bulletins in Leeds and still going strong T he Polish Parish Children’,s Bulletin on the 4th of October reaches it’,s 100th edition. It was first initiated by one of the mother’,s in the parish in November 2007 at the beginning of the liturgical calendar. Its aim was to teach the children in the parish more about God and explain the liturgy and concepts of our faith in a simple and fun manner. In other words, lighten a spark in us to in our faith/ life hence the bulletin got its name Iskierka Wiary. The bulletin is published every Sunday and there are occasional supplementary bulletins such as a bulletin marking the presence of St. Theresa of Lisieux’,s relics in the diocese. It is now also distributed at polish masses in Harrogate and Pontefract as well as in Szczecin. The bulletin has been running since the beginning of the liturgical year and it is hoped will continue to thrive. It is so heart warming to see the children at the end of each of the Sunday Masses practically running up for their Iskierka. Father Jan, the polish parish priest often combines giving out the Iskierka with a children’,s song or a further explanation of either the gospel or icons within the church. Currently, there are easily 30-40 bulletins given out each week. It is lovely to think that the children are so eager to engage and learn about the Catholic faith. For Advertising contact CathCom on 020 7112 6710

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Page 13

Oct 2009 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

TRINITY NEWS Page 13 Funeral Services W. Lever Ltd BRADFORD 01274 547137 524 THORNTON ROAD, BRADFORD BD8 9NB FOR OVER 75 YEARS PROVIDING A COMPLETE PERSONAL &, CARING 24 HOUR FUNERAL SERVICE CHAPEL OF REST E.M.D. PARKINSON LTD Funeral Director For a Caring Service We Assure You Of Our Best Attention Any Time Day Or Night. FOR COMPLET PEACE OF MIND THE WHITEHOUSE 37 LOWER YORK STREET, WAKEFIELD WF1 3LH Pre-paid Funeral Plan Telephone: (01924) 373191 H UGHES F UNERAL S ERVICES (Catholic Funeral Directors) 180 YORK ROAD, LEEDS LS9 9NT. Tel 2480953/63 152 GREEN LANE, CROSSGATES. Tel 2326900 3 HOLLIN PARK PARADE, OAKWOOD ROUNDABOUT Tel 2499338 Web: wwww.hughesfuneralservices.co.uk Email: info@hughesfuneralservices.co.uk Family owned and managed. Fully Qualified in all aspects. 24 Hour Service Guaranteed Fixed Price Funeral Plans etc. “,At a time of bereavement we carry out our duties with dignity and respect”, In times of bereavement please contact: B. J. MELIA &, SONS (B. J. Melia Dip F.D.) F UNERAL D IRECTORS AND M ONUMENTAL M ASONS Private Chapel of Rest 64 GIBBET STREET, HALIFAX Telephone: 01422 354453 PRE-PAID FUNERAL SERVICE AVAILABLE DETAILS ON REQUEST Support for students is second to none E ach year Leeds Trinity welcomes over 450 new students into halls of residence. To help them settle in Senior Residents are on hand throughout the year. My name is Tim Brogan, I am in the final year of my Primary Education degree and I have been a Senior Resident for two years. The role requires me to live within the halls of residence and be available to provide support to the students should they need it. Being a Senior Resident is fun and rewarding, it’,s great getting to know all of the students and organising events for them to take part in. Leeds Trinity provides an excellent support system for all of its students and it’,s a wonderful feeling knowing that you have a positive impact on the residents’, experience. Helping the students to settle in is an important part of my role, and having lived the student lifestyle I can offer advice based on my experiences. Whatever the problem the students can come and see me for a chat and it’,s my job to refer them on to the appropriate member of staff to help them. Meeting the students on the first day is always exciting and each Senior Resident hosts a welcome meeting to tell them about life in halls. There are eight halls in total and ten Senior Residents - we all work together as a team to create a supportive community for the freshers. All ten of us get on really well and support each other in our work drawing on each other’,s strengths so that we can deal with any situation that is thrown our way. I have had an amazing experience as a student at Leeds Trinity and feel fortunate to be part of a team that has such a positive effect on the university community. 21st October 2009 at 7.30pm ‘,Icons, Sacred Images and Prayer, East and West’, Revd Stephen Platt, Fellowship of St Alban &, St Sergius, Oxford, will give a lecture as part of the Eastern Christian Studies Seminar Series at Leeds Trinity University College on 21st October starting at 7.30pm. The talk is free and open to the public. For more information contact Sylvia Simpson on s.simpson@leedstrinity.ac.uk or 0113 283 7126. 24th October 2009 Open Day Our Open Days are a great opportunity for prospective students to find out what Leeds Trinity has to offer. Talk to the staff, students and see the facilities for yourself - get an insight into the Leeds Trinity student experience! Our Open Day runs from 10.00am to 3.00pm and is on: Saturday 24 October To book go to www.leedstrinity.ac.uk/opendays, call 0113 283 7150 or email opendays@leedstrinity.ac.uk 30th October 2009 ‘,A Meditation on the essence of the Christian message’, Rev Robert Barron, Professor of Systematic Theology at University of St. Mary of the Lake, Illinois, will give the Leeds Trinity Patronal Feast Day Lecture at 10am in the Chapel. This will be followed by the Votive Mass of All Saints, celebrated by Rt Rev Arthur Roche, Bishop of Leeds, at 11.30am. All welcome. For more information contact Dominica Richmond on d.richmond@leedstrinity.ac.uk or 0113 283 7100. Events at Leeds Trinity Leeds Trinity Trainee Journalists Report for the BBC T hree Leeds Trinity trainees jumped at the chance to play a starring role in a BBC news programme and found themselves reporting on primetime television. The postgraduates were given the task of producing a report about overseas students in Leeds for the regional news show Look North to mark Freshers’, Week. Mama Janneh (pictured), Dave Edwards and Emily Kerr - who are in the final stages of the Postgraduate Diploma in Broadcast Journalism - directed, wrote, filmed and edited the story. The report focused on Mama’,s personal experience of leaving behind her family and friends in The Gambia to study at Leeds Trinity. Mama, a mother of six year old twin boys, said: “,This course is unique because it gives you the chance to do real life journalism. I have always wanted to work for the BBC, so this is a step in the right direction towards fulfilling that dream. It’,s so exciting to get our work on the air!”, Emily added: “,We’,ve produced lots of stories during our course but when you can say this one is actually going out on Look North, it’,s a real leap up, and it actually means something to people. It’,s been a really worthwhile experience.”, The report was transmitted to an estimated 800,000 viewers on Wednesday 30 September. A Fresh Start for First Year Students N ew students were welcomed to Leeds Trinity University College with an impressive programme of events to entertain and support them. During the first two weeks of term, the college, Students’, Union and Chaplaincy provided a variety of activities that offered something for everyone. By day, students were given the low- down on loans, educated on employability, attended ‘,Making the Grade’, study sessions and tasted sports- team life. Meanwhile the Chaplaincy and Students’, Union hosted activities centred around entertainment and friendship forming activities. The Chaplaincy Society enjoyed sporting activities such as virtual fencing at their Nintendo Wii evening, and the union put on films, pub quizzes, bowling trips and excursions into Leeds and back. The annual Freshers’, Week ended with a formal ball held at the Royal Armouries where attendees enjoyed a three-course meal followed by a disco. Students’, Union Vice President, Stephen Cranny, said: “,There was a great atmosphere and buzz at all of the events we hosted. The new students have really enjoyed themselves.”, The introduction was rounded off with a massive freshers’, fayre held in the sports hall, where students could sign up for sports teams, start their own societies or join existing ones and find out about volunteering opportunities. The fayre, on Wednesday 1 October, was packed with students hoping to get their hands on some of the many freebies on offer that included posters, stationery and even plants. The Vice President said: “,The fayre really went off with a bang. There was a lot of interest in the clubs and societies and some great support for charities like the National Blood Service.”, Wanted for the Missions Large Statues (Even damaged ones), old vestments, pictures, church fittings, rosaries, prayer books, etc. Please ring Mr. B. Ferris KSC, 102 Moor St, Earlsdon, Coventry CV5 6EY Tel: 02476 676986 For Advertising contact CathCom on 020 7112 6710

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Page 14

Oct 2009 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

In September Notre Dame were looking forward to the arrival of Father Thomas Rathappillil, a priest from the Leeds Diocese who is living in south India following a heart operation 12 years ago. Father Thomas was due to speak to the students about his work in St Joseph’,s Hospice in Tamil Nadu, but unfortunately he was unable to attend the scheduled assemblies because he was taken into hospital. College vice-principal Terry Coen who had heard Fr Thomas’,s moving account of his work, stepped in to describe the conditions at the hospice for the dying and destitute. Students and staff offered prayers for Fr. Thomas and his work and gave generously, collecting a total of £,277 in a simple bucket collection as they left the main hall. On Friday 2nd October Fr. Thomas came out of hospital and arrived at college in the afternoon to thank everyone. We continue to pray for his health and his courageous work. Page 14 HOME NEWS The Pastoral Commission for People with Disabilities Travels with My Wheelchair W hen about a dozen years ago it became necessary for me to use a wheelchair to travel any distance, we had to review how we would spend our family holidays. We soon realised that with careful planning of transport, accommodation and itinerary, most things are possible. Vital to the success of any trip is the patience and support of the family. Our first holiday was to London which started well with the excellent assistance we received from the railway both at Leeds and Kings Cross. This was a trip for the family to be introduced to the capital’,s main attractions so it involved some taxi and bus journeys but also a lot of walking and pushing, the latter being exubriantly shared with enthusiasm! I well remember how the wheelchair and I were lowered onto a boat for a trip on the Thames. As this was a high summer holiday, queues snaked outside every attraction but at Madame Tussard’,s and the Crown Jewels Exhibition we were whisked to the front, an embarrassment to which we soon became accustomed. When we have ventured abroad, the consideration and help we have received at airports have been wonderful. The airport staff are invariably cheerful. It is the aim of the staff to keep the family together, so two teenage boys were transported by buggy at Palma Airport whilst the majority of passengers were walking! Our trip of a lifetime was to Canada and the Rockies. The awesome grandeur of the mountains were both breathtaking and reflective. As we hired a car, we were able to view all the well known landmarks and the less accessible beauty spots not covered by the tour operators. I was especially pleased to be able to enjoy the panoramic view from the cable car at Sulphur Mountain, Emerald Lake, and the Takakkaw Falls in the Yoho National Park. I did not however mount the snowmobile on the Athabasla Glacier, nor cross the Capilano Bridge in Vancouver. I have learned always to have a novel in my pocket to read whilst the family tackle the most adventurous parts of the itinerary. Last year, Sue and I celebrated our Silver Wedding and enjoyed a fortnight in Italy. Our first week in Florence was wonderful. A feast of churches, art and history all undertaken by walking and pushing. Whilst everyone was helpful, negotiating through busy thoroughfares on narrow pavements which did not always have dropped curbs and where random bicycles chained to rubbish bins were suddenly encountered, took some effort and patience. Everywhere in Florence, wheelchair users are given priority, a fact we did not know until we arrived. At the Uffizi, Sue offered to lend me and the wheelchair to a voluble American lady who was complaining about the queues! Assistants were helpful and we experienced several cramped back stage lifts to reach our destinations. Each day we set out after breakfast with a plan. The highlight for me was the Convent of San Marco, a peaceful place with the wonderful frescoes of Fra Angelico on the walls of the monks’, cells. It was good to attend Mass on Trinity Sunday at Santa Maria Novella and a very quiet Mass during the week in the Baptistry of the Duomo. Each afternoon before returning to our hotel we would enjoy an ice cream from a small cafe in the corner of the piazza. Our second week was one of necessary relaxation at Bardolino on Lake Garda. I have written this article in the hope it may encourage others with mobility problems to explore what is possible, with help and planning. I feel very blessed to be able to enjoy such wonderful experiences. Robin Sanderson A day In The Country By Shirley Judge T he recently formed ",Out &, About", over 60’,S group at the Immaculate Heart of Mary Church in Moortown Leeds, got off to a flying start, on their first organized event. It was a beautiful sunny day, and spirits were high, as we drove though the beautiful scenery in North Yorkshire. We arrived at the Grantley Arms, an attractive country pub, where 47 parishioners were wined and dined, in the company of our 2 great priests, Fr, Nigel Polland and Fr. Stephen Webb. We all agreed that it was a happy and enjoyable day out and we are looking forward to our next two trips, to see the Christmas decorations at Tong garden centre and in November ,we`re going to the Alhambra Theatre in Bradford , to see the Catholic Players perform ",42nd Street", Franciscan Sisters Minoress - Discermnent Afternoons W e had a wonderful weekend 4-6 Sept. with 5 women joining our community for the Discernment Weekend. Next scheduled weekend is in January, but we are about to launch this year`s Discernment Afternoons Programme: We are a group of Franciscan Sisters and we meet once a month with young people to discern the call to religious life. Date of next meeting: 31st October 2009 October is the beginning of the 2009-2010 twelve month programme. There are residential discernment weekends built into the programme. If you cannot come to all the Saturday sessions you are welcome to come when you can. Time: 2.30pm -5.00pm These afternoons include:reflecting on The Call in Scripture and the Life of St Francis, some input from the Sisters, Eucharistic Adoration, opportunity for one-to-one with a Sister, tea with the community, Evening Prayer with the community. This programme is especially relevant for those people who are unsure about which path in life the Lord is leading them towards, and wish to explore the call to Religious Life to discover whether the Lord may be inviting them to discern about this call more deeply. http://www.franciscanvocations.o rg.uk/ http://www.stclaresconvent.fsnet. co.uk/ You can also contact Sr Marianne via this site or by email mariannelucchesi@hotmail.com Dedication Of The Annunciation Shrine Of The Mother Of Bradford T hursday, 24 September 2009, was a great day for not only the Catholic community in Bradford, but for the whole city. On the Feast of Our Lady of Walsingham, and in the presence of the Lord Mayor and Lady Mayoress, Councillor and Mrs John Godward, Bishop Arthur Roche went to St Joseph’,s Church in the city to solemnly dedicate a new Shrine. The focus of devotion is a beautiful image of the Mother of God, which was originally placed in St Mary’,s Church. She is standing and holding Our Lord, who is shown as a toddler with his arms outstretched. In this great sign of welcome and hope we place all the needs and aspirations of the entire city and pray that this beautiful shrine will increasingly become a centre for prayer and adoration of the mystery of the Incarnation, God become Man to lead man back to God. The Mass that accompanied the dedication of the Shrine was a joyful celebration. The music was led by the Bradford Boys’, Choir, whose home church is St Joseph’,s, under the able leadership of Dr Christopher Johns. Benjamin Saunders, Director of Music in the Diocese, accompanied them on the organ. In his homily, the Bishop linked the new Shrine with the national Shrine of Our Lady at Walsingham, giving a brief history of it and expressing his sadness at what had been lost at the Reformation, rejoicing at the new beginnings. He also prayed that there would be an increase in this year of prayer for priests in vocations to the priesthood and the religious life. As the conclusion of the Mass, the Lord Mayor said a few words in appreciation, expressing his hope that the prayers offered at the Shrine would bring blessings for everyone in Bradford. Standing in for Fr Tom

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Page 15

Oct 2009 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 15 FROM JUST £,299 R.G.R. MEMORIALS COLOUR CATALOGUE QUALITY MEMORIALS AT AFFORDABLE PRICES IN GRANITE, MARBLE &, STONE ALL PRICES INCLUDE DELIVERY &, FIXING Ogee top memorial 2’,6”, high Fully polished Black Granite, Delivered and Fixed for £,399 inc VAT FREE Tel: 0113 282 3888 43 High Ridge Park, Rothwell, Leeds LS26 0NL Cemetery Extension Given Bishop’,s Blessing T he sun was shining as Bishop Roche celebrated a service of blessing at Killingbeck Cemetery on September 18th at midday. Amongst the 40 or so worshippers who made up the “,congregation”, was Mr George Mudie (MP for East Leeds), who, as Bishop Roche pointed out in his opening welcome, was personally responsible for persuading the Local Authority and the NHS to give some of the former Killingbeck hospital land to the Diocese to enable our Catholic cemetery to be extended. Also present were family members of Margaret Kelly who is one of the first to be buried in the new land and so gave a very poignant reminder of the great need of local Catholics. The service began with an opening prayer followed by a Gospel reading read by Mgr Philip Moger, Cathedral Dean and Chairman of the Cemetery Board. The formal blessing of the land then took place when Bishop Roche walked round the whole site sprinkling Holy Water on the new ground and stopping especially at the four graves newly dug for burials during the week. Those present processed behind him saying the Rosary as they went. The service continued with General Intercessions read by David Herd, secretary to the Cemetery Board. After the final blessing the Bishop made a point of meeting all the worshippers who included Mrs Alice Burns, widow of the former Killingbeck Administrator and Mrs Ann Jones who had also worked in the office as administrator for many years. Bishop Roche then met the gravediggers who were on duty and was shown round the new building extension which now houses a much improved staff facility and public toilet. Nigel Moore from Pearce Bottomley, Architect for the whole project explained that they had tried to create a sympathetic extension to the now 100 year old building and which by general consensus they have achieved. If anyone has reserved a plot in the new section, they will now need to confirm their reservation with the cemetery.

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Page 16

Oct 2009 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 16 BATTLE John Battle KCSG T ragically this year according to West Yorkshire Police, deaths from illegal drugs have significantly increased. The main reason is that drugs sold on the street are too often dangerously contaminated. It is not pure heroin or cocaine that you are likely to be sold but cocaine with added and disguised substances blended in, and of course sold at the same price as the pure substance. The problem is that the substance blended in can be lethal, even ground glass has been known to enhance the weight of cocaine which if swallowed inevitably kills. So the issue is not simply addiction and supply and demand, at the local level it is a matter of the deliberate sale of a directly lethal concoction. Addiction is bad enough but presently the challenge is a form of drug poisoning. Part of the problem is the lower street value price which tempts dealers into short changing by contaminating the measures of drugs. You actually get less cocaine for your money and a deadly added ingredient. Access to heroin and cocaine, helped in recent years by organised mobile phone contacts, quicker distribution and lower prices for heroin and cocaine is now easier in Britain both in urban and rural areas than ever before. Drug dealing and possession are criminal offences backed up by police raiding homes, or arresting people on the street, often for other ‘,drug related’, offences such as burglary or robbery from cars, stealing in order to get resources to buy the drugs. Consequently a high proportion of regular burglaries are now drug related and a great proportion, as high as 70 % of those convicted and locked up in prison in Armley have drug and alcohol addition problems. As well as focussing on stopping drug dealing and arresting drug users what attention is paid to choking off the source , stopping the heroin and cocaine coming into Britain in the first place. The answer is a great deal of resources and effort goes into trying to interrupt the drugs trade , specialised boats (usually armed) to intercede cocaine boats from Colombia in South America and the Caribbean crossing to West Africa before transferring to vessels heading up the coast to Britain and Ireland. Occasionally as recently, cocaine haul intercepts by the authorities are reported. Whilst most of the world’,s cocaine comes from one country Columbia, most of the heroin (90%) in Britain comes from the Afghanistan poppy fields and gets here overland. So two countries, Columbia and Afghanistan supply the world’,s cocaine and heroin. In Columbia the government’,s army has for years fought with militants on the ground that are running drug factories and living off the drugs trade. A para-military force was introduced, which itself is enmeshed in benefiting from the huge profits to be squeezed out of the drug cultivation and trading. The efforts of American assistance to kill off all coca crops by aircraft spraying failed and simply alienated peasant farmers totally dependent on the coca crops . The drugs production and distribution chain is such a huge and lucrative business it easily engulfs the military sent to eradicate it and the politicians and governments claiming to stop the drugs trade. Columbia remains in violent turmoil after years of attempts to kill off the cocaine business. Similarly Afghanistan, as often described as the site of a war against terror is now the area of war on the heroin trade. Targeted as the hotbed of the Al Qaeda network and taken over by the Taliban (whose destruction of the great Buddha statues provoked outrage and demands for military intervention at the turn of the century) Afghanistan was listed by the World Bank for years as the world’,s poorest country. But it has always lived off poppy cultivation and opium production, as well as carpets and the stone lapis lazuli. During the first Taliban period, before the invasion, the Taliban repressed poppy production, but it crept back, particularly in Helmand the province where the British took responsibility for security and the Taliban have turned to the heroin trade as a lucrative resource. Whilst the British have attempted to cut back poppy production and replace the poppy crop through our aid effort with more useful and healthily sustainable crops. Despite this years reduction, the amount of opium is still more than double that cultivated in 2005, the year before the British forces entered the province. The Taliban are believed to generate more than $100 million a year from the trade. In other words, the heroin trade is now bankrolling the Taliban (enabling the Taliban to buy sophisticated weapons) and Al Qaeda. Like the revolutionary FARC in Columbia, the ideological Islamist Taliban is now deeply corrupted and dependent on the drugs trade. What is more this corruption, as in Columbia, is penetrating institutions of government, the military and the politicians. In other words, deaths on the streets of Leeds, or in the LGI are directly connected to the drugs businesses run from Columbia and Afghanistan. Cutting off the supply cannot be limited to interception at our coasts and borders, it need a new deep rooting strategy to offer local peasant farmers and their families viable alternative livelihoods. Development and fair trade matters are crucial to tackling drugs in our neighbourhoods. The Drugs Business Sylvia Wright Trust –, Christmas Cards This year our card has been designed by Kanniyan, a 14 year old boy, who is one of the 225 deaf children in Sylvia’,s School for the Deaf –, we hope you like it. These profoundly deaf children would be marginalised by society and have a very bleak future if it was not for Sylvia’,s school. The children are taught the normal Indian curriculum and they leave school with qualifications and a future. The school is a very happy place and parents are very happy for their children to be there. Many parents make huge efforts to visit their children on the monthly visiting day. They bring home-made goodies and picnic in the school grounds exchanging family news and sharing in school events. The school is funded by friends in the U.K. and the sale of cards supports the school for two whole months each year. In addition, they publicise and support Sylvia’,s message some 25,000 times. This year our card has been designed by Kanniyan, a 14 year old boy, who is one of the 225 deaf children in Sylvia’,s School for the Deaf –, we hope you like it. These profoundly deaf children would be marginalised by society and have a very bleak future if it was not for Sylvia’,s school. The children are taught the normal Indian curriculum and they leave school with qualifications and a future. The school is a very happy place and parents are very happy for their children to be there. Many parents make huge efforts to visit their children on the monthly visiting day. They bring home-made goodies and picnic in the school grounds exchanging family news and sharing in school events. The school is funded by friends in the U.K. and the sale of cards supports the school for two whole months each year. In addition, they publicise and support Sylvia’,s message some 25,000 times. Please send me (price includes postage and packing): 20 cards £,6.00  40 cards £,12.00  60 cards £,17.50  80 cards £,23.00  100 cards£,28.00  I enclose a cheque for £,…,…,…,…,.. made payable to “,The Sylvia Wright Trust”, Order from: ........................................................................................................... .............................................................................................................................. .............................................................................................................................. Postcode............................................................................................................... Email: .................................................................................................................. Please send orders to: Mr. Tony Allinson, 14 Kings Road, Leeds LS16 9JN Tel: 0113 267 5735 The Sylvia Wright Trust has launched its new website and invites read- ers of the Catholic Post to visit it at: www.sylviawright.org It is possible to view the ever popular Sylvia Wright Christmas card online and to download an order form from the website. Canonization of Jeanne Jugan A huge crowd of 40.000 people packed into a sunny St Peter’,s Square on Sunday October 11th to take part in a canonisation Mass for five new saints - a Belgian missionary, a French sister, a Polish archbishop and two Spanish priests. Bishop Arthur Roche and a group of pilgrims from the diocese of Leeds were among those who had travelled over to Rome for the Mass celebrated by Pope Benedict inside St Peter’,s Basilica and relayed on giant screens outside in the square. Belgium’,s King Albert II and Queen Paolo were also present to pay tribute to the work of Fr Jozef Damien De Veuster who went to the Hawaiian island of Molokai to care for lepers and died of the disease himself in 1889. Among the colourfully dressed pilgrims from Hawaii was an 81 year old retired school teacher, Audrey Toguchi, whose miraculous recovery from lung cancer a decade ago was attributed to the intercession of Fr Damien, now widely considered a saint for all outcast and incurably sick people, including those suffering from HIV and AIDS. The new U.S. ambassador to the Holy See, Miguel Diaz, brought a message from President Barack Obama who was born in Hawaii, recalling the stories he heard as a young boy about the dedicated work of Fr Damien on the former leper colony at Molokai. In his homily, Pope Benedict urged all those present to open their eyes to see what he described as ‘,the leprosies that disfigure the humanity of our brothers and sisters and that still call today for the charity of our serving presence’,. Another of the new saints, whom the Pope hailed as ‘,shining examples of Christian love’,, was French sister Jeanne Jugan, also known as Marie de la Croix, foundress of the Little Sisters of the Poor order which today runs over 200 care homes for the elderly in 32 different countries around the world. Pope Benedict hailed her as ‘,a beacon’, for modern societies ‘,which he said ‘,have still to rediscover the unique place and contribution’, of the aged. Her charism is relevant to us today, he added ‘,because so many older people suffer from fear and solitude, having sometimes been abandoned even by their families’,. The sisters opened their first English centre in Leeds in 1865 and are still very active in the diocese today, providing care for the elderly including many retired priests. Speaking after the Mass, Bishop Arthur Roche said he’,d been very moved by the huge crowds who came to take part in the canonisations, likening the widespread interest in the new saints to the huge crowds that the relics of St Therese of Lisieux had recently drawn in Leeds and elsewhere around the UK. He said he hoped that many people would be inspired by the example of St Jeanne Jugan and consider a vocation to the Little Sisters of the Poor. Bishop Arthur told the Leeds Catholic Post he had been strongly influenced by the story of Fr Damien after reading about the life of the saint as a very young boy. Later, as a student at the English college of Valladolid in Spain, he said he heard many stories about the spirituality of Br Rafael Arnaiz Baron, a Trappist monk who died in 1938, aged just 27, and was raised to sainthood by the Pope on Sunday. The other two men canonised during the Mass in St Peter’,s were 19th century Spanish Dominican Fr Francisco Coll Guitart, famed for his evangelical preaching, and a former archbishop of Warsaw, Zygmunt Felinski, who was deported to Russia and later founded the Franciscan Sisters of the Family of Mary. Bishop Roche enters St Peter`s for the Mass of Canonization of Jeanne Jugan.

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Oct 2009 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

F r. Firth, who is Parish Priest of Sowerby Bridge, writes: “,When I was first appointed parish priest of St. Patrick’,s, Sowerby Bridge, my predecessor, Mgr Sharp, told me something about the strange customs of the area. This included the Rushbearing Festival which was internationally famous (even though I had never heard of it whilst residing in Keighley). What was this strange event? Every year this festival is held on the first weekend in September and is the highlight of the Sowerby Bridge calendar. Many hundreds, in fact thousands, turn out to line the streets with numbers swelled by many visitors from around the country. They come to watch sixty men clad in white shirts, black trousers, panama hats and traditional clogs haul a sixteen foot high, one ton, thatched and decorated rush cart on its ten mile route through the spectacular Pennine scenery. Accompanied by a team of supporters in Edwardian dress together with some of the country’,s finest musicians and Morris dancing teams. Rush bearing dates back several centuries to the time when church floors consisted of stone flagged floors and rushes were used to cover the floors, with new layers added so they became stale. Once a year, the rotten rushes were cleared out of the church and new ones were taken to the church in carts. This gradually turned into a celebration and holiday involving much revelry, music and dancing, not to say, anything of drinking. Over the course of the modern day Festival weekend stops are made at the various churches and token rushes are presented at the church door in deference to the old custom. At all the stopping points, entertainments are laid on for the crowds. Teams of Morris dancers from all over the country perform in a variety of regional styles and the Bradshaw Mummers present one of their traditional plays. At preciously 1.10pm, on the Saturday afternoon the rush cart entered the extensive grounds of St. Patrick’,s church to be greeted by about three hundred people. Sheltering under the large oak tree, the ‘,Peace Artistes’, a funky jazz band welcomed the sixty man pulling the one ton Rush cart with a young lady astride the top of the sixteen foot high thatch. A handful of rushes were then presented to the church at the entrance in recognition of the tradition. Meanwhile, the loud church bell in the tower deafened the listeners so that parish priest splashed the cart and men with volumes of holy water followed by clouds of incense to drive away the hoards of flying insects! A short service followed inside the church attended by perhaps a quarter of the assembled people (perhaps the rest feared being touched by Christianity!) Clogs sound noisy on church floor but the singing was rousing. Then followed a brief (Catholic) sermon driving home the message that God is in the midst of all that we do, preached by our eloquent deacon, the Reverend David Marshall. Afterwards, two hundred and fifty pie and pea meals, one hundred and fifty tea-cake sandwiches were consumed and the parish bar quickly ran dry of beer and lager. Meanwhile, the Bradshaw Mummers entertained the crowds in the grounds with a play involving the Devil. Sword dancing followed on with no miss- haps or blood stained feet. At 2pm, well refreshed, the sixty men pulled the cart away to its next port of call. The journey of the cart finally reaches Ripponden the next day, Sunday, with much eating and dancing on the way. ROME Page 17 S everal small but significant events are taking place around the city this October, all involving the English speaking community in Rome and all, I believe, showcasing the best of what is happening, far away from the media spotlight, on the ecumenical scene…,. One is a repeat performance of an extremely successful venture that began a couple of years ago when the New English Orchestra first came on tour to Rome to perform a series of what they call ‘,Recreatios’, or musical moments for spiritual reflection. (http://www.newenglishorchestra.org ) The first I heard of them was a lone trumpeter standing on the steps of a church opposite the Trevi Fountain on a warm September morning, calling the crowds of somewhat bemused tourists inside to take time out from their hectic sightseeing schedules and to enjoy a free musical interlude. Those who did wander in and take a pew were treated to an uplifting performance of classical, modern, gospel and folk music by the small but extremely professional orchestra and choir, led by founder and conductor Nigel Swinford. The performers are as eclectic as their repertoire, employed in all sorts of jobs including many full time musicians. They come from a variety of Christian Churches and intersperse the music with short bible readings, but their principle aim is simply “,to make a joyful noise unto the Lord”, and to share something of that joyful experience with others. And it’,s a highly contagious experience, ending with the choir and musicians moving back down through the central aisle of the church, drawing the audience into the outside world once again, refreshed, renewed and enriched. Interviewing some of those who dropped in to attend that first, memorable performance, I discovered people of all faiths and none, some drawn in by the music, others simply curious, a few just glad for an excuse to sit down in the shade for half an hour. After the music had ended, I walked around with my microphone again and found many still sitting in silent reflection, some moved almost to tears by the beauty of what they had heard in this awe-inspiring setting or by the way the music had spoken to their individual hopes or happiness or suffering. Since that first visit, the New English Orchestra has returned in September for the past two years, expanding their performances to other, even more impressive Roman churches and basilicas –, the Pantheon, Santa Maria Sopra Minerva, Sant’,Agnese in Piazza Navona and this year, for the first time, San Giovanni in Laterano. In mid- October they’,re also returning for a special performance at the Venerable English College, which is hosting a week of celebrations marking the re-opening of its newly restored church. As well as a series of lectures and recitals, the main attraction is an exhibition tracing the history of the college from its foundation as a hospice for pilgrims in the 1300’,s to its transformation into a seminary in 1579. (The exhibition runs until July 31st 2010, see http://www.angelisunt.it –, more on that in next month’,s edition!) Though its mission at that time was to train priests to return in secret to Elizabethan England to keep the Catholic faith alive (44 of them were martyred between 1581 and 1679), the college today has a strong ecumenical focus and welcomes a couple of trainee Anglican vicars for several months each year, while the current rector, Msg. Nick Hudson, is a popular preacher at the Anglican and other Christian Churches around the city. Another unusual initiative taking place at the Anglican Centre in Rome is a course on Ignatian Spirituality, offering a week-long programme of top quality lectures by a variety of Jesuit priests, a visit to the sites where St Ignatius began his ministry and a daily session of spiritual exercises, drawing on the best of each day’,s experiences. When I sat down with the director of the Anglican centre, Reverend David Richardson, to find out more, I discovered that he himself had been strongly influenced in his formative years by Jesuit spirituality –, so much so, he confessed he had once considered joining the Society of Jesus himself! He and the principle organiser of the course, Jesuit Father Gerry Whelan from the Gregorian University, explained how they hope to show something of the way in which Ignatius and his successors (especially Fr Arrupe in the years following the Second Vatican Council) have profoundly permeated Church history, theology, pastoral ministry, even the art and architecture of the Eternal City. There’,s a session dedicated to the Jesuit influence on the world of media and communications, another looking at the work of the Catholic convert and poet Gerald Manley Hopkins, a visit to the Jesuit run Vatican Observatory and an exclusive glimpse into the past led by the director of the Jesuit archives. Not surprisingly, there will also be a focus on ecumenism, plus Eucharists in both Catholic and Anglican churches. An added attraction is the final day spent out in the peaceful, wooded surroundings of the Palazzola retreat house, nestled in the Alban hills high above Lake Albano. (For details on that and other Anglican Centre courses see http://www.anglicancentreinrome.org/index.php?PageID=0910course ) Philippa M Hitchen Our Rome Correspondent The English In Rome Sowerby Bridge –, Rushbearing Festival 2009

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Page 18

Oct 2009 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 18 First Friday of the Month SINGLE CATHOLICS meet at 8.00pm for mass at our Lady of Lourdes, Leeds. We also a have a program of 4-8 events during the month, walks, meals, cinema and theatre trips, etc. Phone Malcolm McLean chairman ASC.on 01274 610817. Membership is open to all single Catholics who are free to marry within the church. Crusade Mass The crusade Mass and Rosary of Mary Immaculate is held at St Patrick`s Church, Bradford, on the first Saturday of the Month after 12.15pm Mass Second Sunday of Month 2pm Meeting of Bradford Fraternity of the Secular Franciscan Order at St. Anthony`s Convent, Clayton, Bradford.` Ampleforth Renewal Community Ampleforth Abbey, meet 1st Sunday each month, at Ampleforth. 11 .30am Praise, Speaker, Sharing Groups, Reconciliation, Exposition, Finishing with Mass and Healing at 4.00pm. All enquiries: Seamus McEneaney 01429 426181 Charismatic Renewal A charismatic prayer group meets at Trinity and All saints College Chapel, Brownberrie Lane, Horsforth on the first and third Wednesday each month (please note change of date) at 7.30 P.M, Groups also meet at Harrogate, Huddersfield, Halifax and Wakefield. For further information contact Pat, 01924371559 or Tony, 01274824203 Monthly Vocations Mass Mount St Joseph’,s Chapel 7.30pm First Friday of the Month. Helpers of Gods precious infants, prayer vigils Regular weekly prayer vigils at Marie Stopes Abortuary, 7 Barrack Road.LS7 4AB, next to Nissan car showrooms. Fridays 12-30 to 1-30, and Saturdays 9am- l1am. Other times variable. Further details Pat 0113 2582745 Diary - November Be Still a few moments for thought and prayer And now indeed we beseech you, O sweet Mother and Queen of the world. The world does not need victorious wars or defeated peoples but renewed and strengthened health of mind, and peace which brings prosperity and tranquility. This is what it needs and is crying out for: the beginning of salvation, and lasting peace. Amen, Amen. Blessed John XXIII Pastoral Letter My dear Brothers and Sisters in Christ, A t the beginning of October the relics of St Thé,rè,se of Lisieux, so well known as the Little Flower, will come to our Cathedral in Leeds and remain with us from Saturday the 3rd to Monday the 5th. I suspect that you will have read or seen in the papers something of the effect her visit is already having in other parts of the country. During her days with us in Leeds the Cathedral will become a “,little Lisieux,”, - a shrine to one of the most remarkable and well- loved saints in the history of the Church. St Thé,rè,se was born in France in 1873. She was the youngest of nine children. Her father and mother, Louis and Zelie Martin, whose cause for canonisation is presently under consideration, were loving parents and extremely devoted to their family. Sadly, four of their children died in childhood and, at the tender age of four, Thé,rè,se lost her mother from cancer. It was shortly after this tragedy that the family made their home in Lisieux, and it was there that Thé,rè,se received her vocation to dedicate her life to God as a Carmelite nun. You will realise that we are fortunate enough in this diocese to have these same Carmelite sisters with us at Wood Hall near Wetherby. As a young girl, Thé,rè,se was resolute about what God wanted of her. She pestered the local bishop and even the Pope and, eventually in 1888, she entered the Carmel in Lisieux at the youthful age of fifteen. It was there that Thé,rè,se climbed the ladder of holiness. She learned the importance of patience and perseverance and was captivated by the power of prayer and the beauty of the Gospel. Above all, she came to experience an intensely deep and personal relationship with Jesus. Her way of loving and following Jesus became known as the “,Little Way”, - a simple path of discipleship grounded in trustful surrender to God’,s mercy and love. In her own words, the Little Way”, means “,to recognise our nothingness, to expect everything from God as a little child expects everything from its father.”, Saint Thé,rè,se was so intensely in love with Jesus and the Gospel that she desired with all her heart and even dreamed about becoming a missionary like Saint Paul –, to travel throughout the world and tell everyone about the beauty and the greatness of God’,s love and mercy. On her deathbed, she promised to spend her time in heaven doing good on earth. The visit of her relics to many countries throughout the world has seen something of the fulfilment of that promise. She has become a modern day missionary - exercising a most amazing influence and speaking to the hearts of all who come into contact with her. No wonder she was declared by the Pope to be the Patron Saint of the Missions. In her passionate desire to be a missionary, and her frustration in not being able to be so, she came to realise that the special vocation God had given her was “,to be love at the heart of the Church.”, Many people are called in life to do all sorts of things that seem to be so important, but nothing is as important as being “,love at the heart of the Church.”, She wrote in her diary, “,I was still being tormented by this question of unfulfilled longings ... when I decided to consult Saint Paul’,s letters. The Apostle explains that all the gifts of heaven, even the most perfect of them, without love, are absolutely nothing, charity is the best way of all, because it leads straight to God. I cried out ‘, Jesus, my love! I have found my vocation... to be nothing else than love at the heart of Mother Church, that is to be everything at once –, my dream wasn’,t a dream after all.”, This “,being love at the heart of the Church”, was to cost her greatly. She began to struggle with grave doubts and found it difficult even to pray. She suffered poor health due to tuberculosis and had to endure excruciating pain, so much so that she was tempted to end her own life. But with great courage and faithfulness she gave herself over to Jesus, just as she was, believing that even in these terrible difficulties she was experiencing was a grace on offer that would achieve something even greater. Finally, after suffering with such love, united with Jesus on the Cross, she died at the age of twenty- four in 1897, her short life full of heavenly promise. Her fame rapidly spread across the world especially through the publication of her spiritual autobiography, “,The Story of a Soul.”, In that work we find that, despite her young age, she knew much of the difficulties of life and the destructive temptations that come our way, and she constantly points us toward the way of love. Her holiness and heroic virtue were quickly acknowledged by the Church in 1925 at her canonisation, and the importance of her spiritual teaching –, her little way - was confirmed when she was declared a Doctor of the Church by Pope John Paul II. She has become for countless people a sure guide towards the way of holiness, and vast numbers have found her to be a faithful companion in praying for them and helping them along their way through life towards God. The visit of St Thé,rè,se‘,s relics to the diocese is a special occasion and a very great honour. She comes as a modern day missionary to remind us of many things but, not least, that it is possible even for the most fragile human being, despite all the struggles, doubts and temptations - whatever they may be - to become a saint where we are. Her visit is a call to holiness - an invitation and a timely reminder to us all to seek and live for God. I tell you now that she will attract believer and un- believer alike and do the most remarkable things amongst us. Above all, as we come into her presence, she will pray for us and seek for us the things we most deeply desire, she will show us how to follow Jesus and how to become “,love at the heart of the Church.”, It is with great confidence in the power of this young but very great saint that I invite you to come to the Cathedral and venerate her relics, asking her intercession for yourself, for those you love, for the Church and for the world. I pray that she, together with her parents, will obtain for all of us abundant blessings. Devotedly yours in Christ, And with my blessing, + Arthur Roche Bishop of Leeds Bishops Engagements - November Deadline For receipt of material for next edition: October 30th 2009. Parishes receive their copies: November 15th 2009. Send letters, articles, reports &, pictures: Mr John Grady, Leeds Diocesan Curia, Hinsley Hall, 62 Headingley Lane, Leeds LS6 2BX. If at all possible, send words by e-mail to: john.grady@dioceseofleeds.org.uk, or, failing that, on a floppy disc in Word. Tel: 0113 261 8022. Advertising Deadline Please note All paid-for advertising is dealt with by: CathCom, L4 Blois Meadow Business Centre, Steeple Bumpstead, Haverhill, Suffolk, CB9 7BN. To advertise call 020 7112 6710 or email: ads@cathcom.org Your Catholic Post Sunday, 18 October Official Re-Opening of the Church of the Most Holy Trinity and St Thomas the Martyr, English College, Rome Monday, 19 October 10.30am Standing Committee Meeting, London Tuesday, 20-21 October 12 noon Ushaw Governors’, Meeting, Ushaw Thursday, 22 October 10am VGs’, Meeting, Bishop’,s House Tuesday, 27 October 10am Meeting with Diocesan Finance Board &, Trustee Directors, Hinsley Hall Thursday, 29 October 10.30am Clergy Study Day, Little Sisters of the Poor, Headingley, Leeds Friday, 30 October 11am Mass, Leeds Trinity &, All Saints’,, Horsforth, Leeds Saturday, 31 October 10am Launch of the 5th Year of Come and See, “, Mission &, Evangelisation”,, Cedar Court Hotel, Bradford

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Oct 2009 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 19 New Sisters for the Diocese Bishop Roche was pleased at the end of September to be able to celebrate Mass for a new group of nuns who had just arrived in the Diocese at his invitation. They are the Franciscan Sisters Of Renewal and this is their first foundation outside of New York. They have taken over the Convent in Hunslet and are at the moment settling in. The Diocese already has a group of the Franciscan Friars of Renewal living in Bradford and active throughout the Diocese. The Bishop is please to see them here and looks forward to working with them in their mission. S unday October 11th was indeed a true day of celebration for the Community of the Little Sisters of the Poor in Shire Oak Road, Leeds, like their other communities around the world they were celebrating the fact that their foundress Jeanne Jugan was declared a Saint at a special Mass in Rome. The day started with the residents and friends watching the Mass in Rome. This was followed by lunch, and then at 4.30pm Bishop Konstant celebrated the first Mass of St Jeanne Jugan. He started the Mass by wishing a happy feast day to all present on this happy occasion, not just those present in the Chapel at Shire Oak Road but to all the communities throughout the world that where celebrating the day. In his homily he outlined the real story of Jeanne Jugan pointing out the fact that soon after she had founded the order she really was side lined as the society grew. Still despite this the core of her apostolate was to do everything out of love. The celebration was followed by afternoon tea and a chance to see the ceremony that had been televised in the morning. A Day of Celebration Leeds Middlesbrough Hallam When Yorkshire Priests retire or fall sick they receive support from THE YORKSHIRE BRETHREN FUND Under the patronage of Blessed Nicholas Postgate (founded in 1660) A NYONE CAN HELP THEM BY BECOMING A BENEFACTOR Each Benefactor will have five Masses offered during life or after Death as requested, and share in over 400 monthly Masses offered by Priest Members. Apply to your Parish Priest or The Secretary: Fr Timothy Wiley, St Mary’,s Presbytery, Cross Bank Road, Batley, WF17 8PQ Contribute £,30.00 Registered Charity Number 511025 Bishop David along with The Reverend Mother and some of the Sisters from The Little sisters of the Poor in front of a painting of St Jeanne Jugan

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Page 20

Oct 2009 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 20 Designed and produced by CathCom, L4 Blois Meadow Business Centre, Steeple Bumpstead, Haverhill, Suffolk, CB9 7BN. To advertise call 020 7112 6710 or email: ads@cathcom.org Torches in Batley T his is now the third year that the revived torchlight procession has taken place in Batley –, setting out from the Town Square and making its way to the Parish Church of St Mary –, and it was, as the Bishop, said even bigger than ever –, in fact about 2,500 were there. The Bishop opened the service with a few words of welcome to everyone there and thanked The Mayor of Kirklees for being there and her Consort as well as the local MP, Mike Wood and Local Councillor Peter O’,Neill and Parishioner of St Mary’,s Parish. Fortunately it was a mild evening –, not like the evening twenty years ago that Fr Newman, the preacher for the evening –, remembers when the rain poured down. In his homily Fr Newman stressed that the greeting Mary used was ‘,Peace be with you’, –, she was and is, he said, a child of peace and we are her children of peace –, children of God. It was fitting he said that we had just had the relics of St Therese in the Diocese for she showed to us how to be ‘,Little Children’, - of Peace. The Statue of Our Lady was carried from the Town square to the Church as the rosary was said and hymns to Our Lady sung. In Church The Bishop celebrated Benediction. Then at the end he thanked everyone for coming and invited them to bring a friend next year. As people left there were pies and peas in St Mary’,s Social Club.

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Page 21

Oct 2009 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Visit of St Thé,rè,se of Lisieux Relics Though this very young and great woman is famous she is not always well understood. Some reduce her to the realms of mere sentimentality and others, wrongly, credit her with an unreal and superhuman level of virtue and innocence. Neither is true. We need to go beyond the painted image to discover what is the true greatness of this young woman who has captivated the minds and the hearts of countless millions and whose relics in recent days have been venerated in our country by overwhelming numbers of people. When looking at the many photographs that exist of her we cannot but be engaged by her childlike face, yet she was extremely robust, and although young (she died at the age of 24) she had the wisdom of a woman decades beyond her years, even though she looked innocent, she was capable of the most amusing pranks, and, though she was known as a comedian in the convent, she was one of the greatest mystics of our age. She is someone about whom we should be very cautious of over simplifying. She herself claimed that her life was very ordinary - and so did many others, even those among whom she lived, who did not see beyond what they saw. She was only a nun for nine of her twenty four years yet, today, she stands alongside some of the greatest thinkers and philosophers of her age, as one who wrestled with the deepest problems of human existence, the enigma of human suffering and the mystery of despair. And now she stands among the Doctors of the Church - those theological giants, and mystics, to whom has been revealed insights into the divine life that are important for Christian living. One of her greatest exponents, Mgr Vernon Johnson - an English priest who was really converted to Catholicism because of her influence - delighted in telling the story that at the end of her canonisation at St Peter`s in 1925, a priest who was present at it turned to his companions and said: today the Gospel has been canonised! For her life and her message is nothing more than a fresh and vigorous restatement of the Gospel and, more importantly, what lies at its heart: a God of love and compassion and mercy. What her life and her writings do for us is to draw back the veil that can sometimes create a distance and the feeling that surely Jesus wants nothing to do with the likes of us. How slow we can be to learn the lessons of the Incarnation: our God comes to live with us, not at a remote distance, but with us. Her secret, I think in part, was that like a restless explorer she burnt with an ardent desire and a deep love to know the true heart of God. And without being aware of it, she was like a great teacher revealing to the modern world the God of the Gospels who is the God of love and mercy. Where for many, these truths may be marginal to life, for her it was something to be lived as a central and dynamic principle of life: God is love, to be loved with all our hearts, who loves us passionately and whose love is made present in the world by the way we love our neighbour. As Pope John Paul II pointed out on the occasion when he raised her as the youngest Doctor of the Universal Church, he said, that despite her youthfulness: her ardent spiritual journey shows such maturity, and the insights of faith expressed in her writings are so vast and profound, that they deserve a place among the great spiritual masters. In the Apostolic Letter which I wrote for this occasion, he continued, I stressed several salient aspects of her doctrine. But how can we fail to recall here what can be considered its high point, starting with the account of the moving discovery of her special vocation in the Church? ",Charity",, she wrote, ",gave me the key to my vocation. I understood that if the Church had a body composed of different members, the most necessary and most noble of all could not be lacking to it, and so I understood that the Church had a heart and that this heart was burning with love. I understood that it was love alone that made the Church`s members act, that if love were ever extinguished, apostles would not proclaim the Gospel and martyrs would refuse to shed their blood. I understood that love includes all vocations.... Then in the excess of my delirious joy, I cried out: ",O Jesus, my Love ... at last I have found my vocation, my vocation is Love!`", (Ms B, 3vº,). This is a wonderful passage which suffices itself to show that one can apply to St Thé,rè,se the Gospel passage ...: ",I thank you Father, Lord of heaven and earth, that you have hidden these things from the wise and understanding and revealed them to babes", (Mt 11: 25). The heart of the Incarnation, for St Thé,rè,se, was the unfolding of the depths of God`s love and mercy, made visible in real life circumstances by Jesus, the Son of God. She called Him a beggar of love who from His poverty and lowliness, even His obscurity, made visible the loving heart of God our Father. She loved those scenes in the Gospel that most spoke to her of God`s love: the Samaritan woman at the well, Zachaeus, the good thief on the Cross and the accounts of Mary Magdalene, the prostitutes and the sinners who were despised by others but not by Jesus. In these stories love and mercy met and added a dimension to loving that was open-handed, never begrudging and full of hope. She knew that anyone who turned to Jesus in love, despite their fragility or sinfulness or weakness, would receive overwhelmingly more than they could ever humanly have expected. Even in the depths of her own terrible suffering and agony, the last words she spoke with great tenderness were my God I love you. For her, nothing in daily living was too small or insignificant to be the means of making this love present - even if that was not always appreciated by the eye of the beholder! Everything in life was an opportunity to love God. All it needed was a generous and humble spirit. She made the ordinary everyday opportunities in life - even the most mundane chores - into something very great and loving. She turned this doing of ordinary things in so loving a way into the stepladder of her Little Way to God: common place experiences of everyday human life: sadness, defeat, fear, disappointment even great trials - for many, stumbling blocks but for her stepping stones. Her weaknesses and her natural distaste for certain things and people were perfected by this grace. Difficult things were turned into the fresh and fragrant flowers of charity rather than the thorny dried up branches of selfishness. This was her path of conversion - turning everything and everyone towards God rather than towards me. She transformed the lowliness of her spirit into a rich conduit of love. She came before God with empty hands knowing, trusting very deeply, that He alone would fill them. Indeed, at the beginning of her autobiography which, she didn`t wish to write, but did so out of obedience to her Mother Prioress, she says, When you first asked me to do this I was frightened, it looked as if it meant wasting my spiritual energies on introspection. But since then, our Lord has made it clear to me that all he wanted of me was plain obedience. And in any case, what I shall be doing is only what will be my task in eternity - telling over and over again the stories of God`s mercies to me. There was no tomorrow, just today. Everything, she said, is grace - and she meant it. She prayed to see things as they were - which included the presence of God in those things - and that nothing would blind her to that. In the last weeks of her life, the straightforward and courageous way with which she confronted the disintegration of her own body and the desolation of her soul - facing as she did the humiliation of her physical suffering and, the more troubling experience, of the dark night of faith - often proved too much for her sisters in the convent as they looked on helplessly. If I did not have faith I should have killed myself without a moment`s hesitation, she said. But her faith was very real and very deep. Even when she felt nothing and saw nothing her faith in God and her love for Him remained constant. She believed the truth would set her free - free above all to be herself without any masks or any pretence before God or before others. This Little Way made her great and has since made innumerable other people who have followed it great in their turn. But there were also many other things that God asked of her in total darkness and sheer faith. He led her into the deeper trials of the spirit where the soul was purified because against all the odds, in the darkness and the sense of abandonment, and the questions that arose as to whether God was there, she remained faithful because she knew this was the ultimate test of love. She described this experience as a night of nonexistence where she mingled with the spirits of atheism and unbelief. Even if God kills me, she said, I will still trust Him ... I shall love Him to the point of recklessness. I will never put limits on my confidence. What deeper faith or love could there be when facing that real sense of darkness and nothingness - the feeling of nonexistence? He will get tired of making me wait for Him, she said, long before I get tired of waiting for Him! She found strength in weakness, victory in defeat and above all life in death. As she now travels around our country, indeed throughout the world as the missionary and the witness to the gospel she always wanted to be, she teaches us this lesson: there is nothing that can permanently separate us from God if we but turn to Him in His love and mercy, and there is nothing in our lives that cannot make us saints. Despite our weaknesses, all can be used to give God happiness and, because of that, to bring happiness to others through our love. Real love goes beyond the ordinary and through the pain. What greater example could there be for our modern age which itself experiences the darkness of disbelief and the sense of hopelessness in the face of suffering and death, and the increasing sense of a lack of real, genuine, enduring love. This modern tendency to seek the expedient, quick solution takes the heart out of love and mercy through which alone great dignity and respect is brought to bear on human existence. People have turned to her in their desperation, people have been cured by her, including the famous Edith Piaf, soldiers surrendered their medals of bravery to her in thanksgiving for her protection in war. But above all, in that ordinary everyday way of hers, people have become deeply holy and, by following her little way, have given vitality and life to the Church by themselves becoming Love at the heart of the Church. Let us then not hesitate, as St Paul says in our reading today, to strive for the greater gifts - and the greatest of these is love! A young and great woman S t Thé,rè,se of Lisieux is known to millions throughout the world. The story of her life and her inner journey towards God is now in its fortieth French edition and is available in more than fifty languages. Such facts as these alone indicate something not only of her popularity, but of the importance of what she has to say to us today and why the Holy Father declared her to be the youngest ever Doctor of the Universal Church - i.e. someone whose teaching is important for our lives as Christians. Her autobiography, The Story of a Soul, introduces us to a new school of spirituality known as The Little Way. Bishop Roche’,s Homily at opening ceremony

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Page 22

Oct 2009 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Day Two in Leeds S o enthusiastic were the people of the Diocese to see the relics of St Theresa that a queue formed outside the Cathedral Church at 5am on Sunday morning –, and the Cathedral was not due to open until 6.30am –, still they waited - for them this was a once in a lifetime opportunity and it was considered little hardship to be up so early in the morning! The Cathedral was full for the first Mass of the day at 9.30am –, in fact the doors were closed as soon as the mass started –, with 600 people inside. As soon as that mass finished the people were ready to pour into the Main Mass of the day 11am celebrated by the Bishop as chief concelebrant with a number of other priests concelebrating with him, including Bishop David. This time at least 700 were packed into the Cathedral and listened as Bishop Roche in his homily pointed out how St Theresa found a special relationship with God as one of his ‘,Little Children’,. They had come from far and wide across the Diocese for this Mass just to be present at this special occasion –, and to mark how special it was the Rector of the Cathedral of Lisieux in a special address at the end of the mass presented Bishop Roche with a relic of the parents of St Theresa and the Dean of the Cathedral with a medal from Lisieux. Like the Mass before it the doors had again been closed as this mass started and a queue of over 1,000 soon build up during the Mass –, the Bishop aware of this fact went out to greet them all once the Mass was over. Bishop Roche with Mgr Bernard La Gooutts The Rector of Liseux Cathedral.

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Page 23

Oct 2009 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

‘,The one who makes himself as little as this little child is the greatest in the Kingdom’, (Matthew 18: 1-4) O n the afternoon of Sunday 4th October this Gospel came alive at the Cathedral in Leeds during the visit of the relics of St Therese of Lisieux. Known as the ‘,little flower’, because of her unique insight into the holiness of the ordinary, Therese continues to inspire people all over the world to live a life of love enriched by her insight into the importance of the ‘,little way’, - in which all our most common everyday acts can become grace filled moments of love and service for Our Lord. After much pain, soul searching and thwarted ambition, Therese’,s startling, liberating and deliriously joyful discovery of her vocation ‘,to be love at the heart of the church’, makes her the perfect saint for families whose mission it is ‘,to guard, reveal and communicate love’, (John Paul II Familiaris Consortio). Leeds Cathedral welcomed families with special activities to help children engage in practical and positive ways with the visit of her relics. Therese had spoken positively about her real missionary work, which she prophesied would only begin after her death (aged 24): ‘,I will spend my heaven doing good upon earth’, and ‘,I will let fall a shower of roses’, she said. Therese’,s words literally came true in Leeds as families with little children were busily engaged making Rosary beads, chaplets and mobile phone beads with Anne and Marjorie. At another table Angela, Ali and Molly showed children how to make tissue roses with names, prayers, petitions and offerings on brightly coloured tissue paper squares to hang on two tall rose bushes down in the main Cathedral. With Jo children coloured in pictures courtesy of Angela Hilton and used heart and flower shaped post it notes to contribute thoughts, prayers and offerings around a beautiful cruciform rose tree painted specially for this occasion by David Barry. Angela had also made special prayer cards for children to take away as a memento of the occasion. Meanwhile, in all this busy-ness, harassed parents had a moment to catch their breath after their long journey and queue, have a cup of tea and enjoy each others company before setting off again for the home. One family had made the pilgrimage from Cambridge to meet another family of Catholic ‘,home schoolers’, from Todmorden. A small group of 13 year olds from Ampleforth prep school arrived and immediately got busily engaged in the activities. As children small and large got stuck in to the activities adults, including the 88 year old monk and friend of the late great Cardinal Basil Hume, browsed at the Family Life Ministry display of photos and quotes showing glimpses of Therese’,s childhood and family life where her passionate nature had been nurtured in the heart of a loving and devoted family into the person who in her ‘,littleness’, has become Patron of Missions and a Doctor of the Church. The tissue roses and prayers will be dug into the soil when the rose trees are planted so that they become a permanent reminder of this very special occasion when the ‘,little flower’,s’, relics, having already been in orbit around the earth in the space shuttle, visited Leeds Diocese. Therese’,s parents Zelie and Louis, had both been refused entry to the religious life (he couldn’,t do Latin and she was deemed to have ‘,no vocation’,) and they turned that initial disappointment into grace by following God’,s will for them to marry and bring children and love into the world. In creating a loving family home they made a saint who is still fresh for us today. Their true vocation to marriage and family life was honoured when they were beatified by Pope Benedict. As Maureen O’,Riorden said when reporting on this, they did not become saints because of Therese, she became a saint because of them: ‘,they created an environment that invited her to holiness’,. The importance of family in faith formation cannot be underestimated. We are in effect ‘,in loco parentis’, for God! ‘,Anyone who welcomes a little child like this in my name welcomes me’, (Matthew 18:5)

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Page 24

Oct 2009 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

A sad farewell to a Lady we love B ishop Roche, on Monday morning, led the farewell service to the Relics of St Theresa of Lisieux amid a certain amount of sadness. The last three days, he said, had been unique for the City, for the county and for the Diocese. There had been a great outpouring of love and happiness and many blessing had been showered on the Diocese. The Cathedral was full –, mainly with children from all over the Diocese –, and yet again people had been queuing from 5am in the morning to venerate the relics. In his homily Mgr Baltrop, organiser of the national tour, directed his words to the children in the Cathedral and told them that they could be saints as well –, because like them St Theresa was an ordinary person who did everything for God ex-ordinarily well Bishop Roche made sure that he thanked all those people who had made sure everything went so well and promised that he would lead a pilgrimage to Lisieux in the future. As the relics were carried out applause rang out across the Cathedral and it was with some skill that Fr John Wilson, who had organised all the events in Leeds, managed to eventually clear room for the relics to be escorted away with police out –, riders.

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