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Leeds Catholic Post History

Newspaper for the Diocese of Leeds

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Oct 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

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Oct 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

CATHOLIC POST THE NEWSPAPER FOR THE DIOCESE OF LEEDS OCTOBER 2012 www.dioceseofleeds.org.uk awww.catholicpost.org.uk FREE ‘,Lift up your hearts’, The Mass on Thursday October 11th –, served to cover two events for the Diocese. First it was the day chosen by the Pope to start the Year of Faith and as it so turned out it started a new era in the Diocese because it was the day that Mgr John Wilson officially presented himself to the people of the Diocese as the Administrator and as he said in his opening words: ‘,As the newly elected Diocesan Administrator, I will, during this Mass, make a Profession of Faith before the College of Consultors and all of you. And I invite you to join with me in mind and heart as I do so.’, …,he went on to add ‘,We are a people of faith, we trust in God’,s promises, we believe in His word.’, In his homily Mgr Wilson set out what the Year of Faith was –, why the Pope had called it - and just what our response should be. It was a moving and powerful declaration of the Faith and a clear statement and direction for the Diocese, probably best summed up by –,‘,If you confess with your lips and believe in your heart... you will be saved’, to quote St Paul. At the end of the Mass Mgr Wilson thanked all who had made the journey to the Cathedral- all those who had taken part - all those who had been there to share –, then added that like them he too was surprised to be the man chosen to lead the Diocese but ‘,Lift up your hearts…,…,‘,lift them up to the Lord’, were his parting words. Doors of Faith at St John Fisher W hen is a door not a door? When it’,s a sign of faith. St John Fisher Catholic High School, Dewsbury marked this week the start of the worldwide Year of Faith by blessing the school front door. Kevin Higgins, Headteacher, explained. “,Pope Benedict has called all Catholics to celebrate a Year of Faith, and used the image of a door standing open, inviting us to enter. Our Catholic Faith is all about God meeting us through things we can touch and see. Following a suggestion for the Year of Faith made by Monsignor Wilson, Diocesan Administrator, we determined to make every door in our school –, and particularly the front door –, a symbolic “,Door of Faith”,.”, Each major door in the school will be marked with a quotation from the Bible or from other Church documents. In this way, says Mr Higgins, staff and students will be reminded that the Door of Faith lies open to us all. The Year of Faith was launched on Thursday 11th October by a Mass in the Vatican. Each diocese has its own launching Mass, and local parishes will also be celebrating the start of this Year of Faith. Fr Michael Hall, Deputy Headteacher, celebrated a special Mass in the school chapel as well. After the Mass the congregation processed to the front of the school, where Fr Hall blessed the front door.

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Oct 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 2 Leeds Catholic Post “,Christianity has not been tried and found wanting . It has been found difficult and not tried”,. Those words of G.K. Chesterton could perhaps be applied to some of the outcomes of the Second Vatican council, which this new Year of Faith now celebrates. You could say go on to say that the four great constitutions of the council may be added to the list of the church`s best kept secrets. Both these statements would be considerable exaggerations, because so much progress has been made over the last fifty years and perhaps taken for granted. Look back to 1962. We now have better relations with other churches and other faiths, despite occasional setbacks: the Archbishop of Canterbury gave a memorable address to the recent Synod of Bishops, pointing to shared mission in todayʼ,s world. We now have the Mass available and understandable in our own local languages- and we no longer “,hear”, mass but celebrate it, together. Scripture, the word of God can and should play a greater part in our lives. Our relationship with the world is one of engagement, a pilgrim people called to holiness. The laity is now involved- or should be involved- in so much more in the life of the church There are some who will look always backwards, negatively, in a way that the council fathers rejected. There are some who portray the Council as some sort of victory of “,liberals”, over “,conservatives”,- whoever they were- without remembering that these constitutions are not some plan for radical change, but originated in the work of great theologians and were approved by overwhelming majorities of the worldʼ,s Bishops in every case. Those who reject the Council reject the work of the Holy Spirit amongst us. Instead, it is for us to recognise this presence in each of us, and as Mgr Wilson said in his homily at the Cathedral to launch this special year: “,Let this Year of Faith encourage you to dare to hope and believe again and anew. It is Christ Himself who is calling and sending us today, and He will never abandon us.”, The Post Says FROM JUST £,299 R.G.R. MEMORIALS COLOUR CATALOGUE QUALITY MEMORIALS AT AFFORDABLE PRICES IN GRANITE, MARBLE &, STONE ALL PRICES INCLUDE DELIVERY &, FIXING Ogee top memorial 2’,6”, high Fully polished Black Granite, Delivered and Fixed for £,399 inc VAT FREE Tel: 0113 282 3888 43 High Ridge Park, Rothwell, Leeds LS26 0NL St. Mary’,s students reach new heights D uring the summer of 2012, 51 pupils and six staff from St. Mary’,s Catholic High School, Menston set off in four teams on a World Challenge Expedition bound for Tanzania. After landing in Nairobi, Kenya an overland journey took them over the border to Arusha and Moshi in Tanzania. The month long expedition consisted of four phases: •, Acclimatisation phase - this included climbs in the Usambaras mountain range and Mount Longido (8,625ft) •, Challenge phase - main trek taking in either Mount Meru (14,977ft) or Mount Kilimanjaro (19,341ft) •, Project phase - two teams each worked on building and maintenance work at a primary school. Some challengers also got involved in teaching classes to local children •, Rest and relaxation phase - tourism activities such as sightseeing kayaking, snorkelling, sailing and a wonderful safari. Summit success rates for the group were spectacularly high with only two challengers failing to summit due to altitude sickness. DIOCESE OF LEEDS VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITY Would you like to support and develop safeguarding practice within the Catholic Diocese of Leeds? We are looking for a suitably qualified, skilled and knowledgeable individual who can provide leadership as the Independent Chairperson for the Diocese of Leeds Safeguarding Commission. For an informal discussion about this role please contact Suzanne Mitchell, Safeguarding Coordinator on 0113 261 8069 or Rev Canon John Aveyard, Clergy Advisor for Safeguarding on 01924 465638. Application packs can be requested by contacting Stephen Hanslip, Safeguarding Administrator on 0113 261 8046 or email safeguarding@dioceseofleeds.org.uk. Closing Date : 12 November 2012 St Mary’,s Children Support Smartmove L ast week we celebrated the harvest with a wonderful service and our children here at St Mary`s Catholic Primary School in Halifax donated more than 70 bags of food and household goods. For the last two years our donations have helped to support the Padre Pio Franciscan Brothers’, soup kitchen in Bradford and the local charity, Smartmove, which helps homeless people by providing shelter and support. The group photograph shows Smartmove worker, Ken, collecting the goods, “,This generosity is just wonderful. Itʼ,ll make a genuine difference to peopleʼ,s lives.”, Brothers from the Friary plan to visit in a few weeks to thank the children and explain more about their work, lives and devotion to their Order.

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Oct 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

I was still in the Seminary when the Council opened on 11th October 1962. Of course we had had loads of news about it as well as speculation about what its agenda might be. We were even asked to write essays about what we thought might be on the agenda, or ought to be on the agenda. Pope John XXIII had called the Council three years before this, and had set down so clearly why he had done so. That started off and guided our thoughts and made us read what was available, although there was very little of that in the earliest days. As the months went by towards the opening of the Council there was more and more excitement and enthusiasm about it, as was to be expected, I suppose, amongst a large group of young men preparing for Ordination to the priesthood. What Pope John made so clear was his vision for the renewal of the whole Church as a necessary preliminary to the task of rebuilding the unity between Christians –, the will of Jesus himself. The word that everyone remembered was aggiornamento –, the Italian word he used several times to explain his intention –, best translated, perhaps, as “,bringing-up-to-date”,. We certainly caught his message: that the renewal of the Church was a means to an end, not an end in itself. His ultimate vision was for rebuilding the unity of the Church, so that it would become a much more effective instrument for preaching the message of the Gospel in the modern world. To achieve that, he believed, the Church had to journey through a major overhaul. I remember reading and absorbing a hugely exciting book, which was described publicly by the then archbishop of Canterbury, Lord Fisher, as a work in a million. He said: I have never read such a book in my life! Thatʼ,s the way almost everyone who read it felt about it. It was by a young German theologian, Hans Kung, now in his eighties, and it had the title: The Council and Reunion. It had not one but two fine introductions –, by heavyweight cardinals: Konig of Vienna in Austria and Lienart of Lille in France. Kung had caught the major purpose of the forthcoming Council and explained it to his vast readership. It was a book that promoted enthusiasm and great expectation. When the Council opened, bishops could take with them some periti –, real experts in one or another aspect of Church life and learning. One of our professors in the seminary was chosen as a peritus: Monsignor McCreavy, renowned throughout the country then for his learned articles on the moral issues of the day. When he went off to the Council, our interest and enthusiasm was all the greater. And when he returned after each session, he was wonderfully effusive about what he had experienced, and we were all very much aware of the way that it had changed him. We all knew that the first major item on the agenda of the Council “,Fathers”, (the bishops) was the renewal of the Churchʼ,s worship, and there was a great deal of speculation about what reforms would be coming. No document was published at the end of the first Session (Autumn 1962), but that only enhanced our expectations. Then Pope John died, and for a couple of months the whole Church was in a state of what seemed like suspended animation –, wondering whether the new pope would recall the Council. We should not have doubted. Pope Paul VI proved to have an even greater enthusiasm for the work of the Council. Because of the death of Pope John, the opening of the second Session was delayed. So our excitement was all the greater when it eventually got underway again (October 1963). At the end of it on 4th December, 1963, the first document was published: the Consti-tution on the Sacred Liturgy. We couldnʼ,t get hold of copies of it soon enough. One of the Council periti was a well known English Jesuit priest, Father Clifford Howell. He set to work immediately and translated the document into English, and had it published within a matter of four or five weeks. Very shortly after returning to college at the end of the Christmas holiday (January 1964), copies were available. We all absolutely devoured it. Here was a new vision of what we are as Church and how we would worship together in the future. But, more important, it gave us a wonderfully uplifting ideal and vision of the whole Church, bishops, priests and laypeople, being renewed, edified and motivated by and through our worship together, to equip us each to take our part in the apostolic work of the Church. It was to be the first step in the renewal of the whole Church. That was the Councilʼ,s vision of liturgical renewal. So enthralled was I by all the events surrounding the Council that I wanted to be there. Still a student preparing for my final year in the seminary, I arranged a holiday in Rome to coincide with the start of the second Session. It didnʼ,t work out because of the delay. But two years later my first holiday as a priest was another trip to Rome. This time I was there for the start of the fourth and last Session. I was thrilled to be given a place in St Peterʼ,s in the apse behind the high altar. Sharing in the wonderful atmosphere of that great occasion is one of the things that has driven me throughout my life as a priest, particularly in all my work in promoting the renewal of the Churchʼ,s liturgy. Revd Mgr Anthony B Boylan Leeds Catholic Post Page 3 Aggiornamento “,bringing-up-to-date”, Vatican II Fifty Years On This October it will be 50 years since the opening of Vatican II –, over the months from now until the end of the Year there will be an article reflecting on the Council. These articles are not offered as deep reflections on the Council or the Documents from it, rather they are written from the point of view of those who experienced the Council in its time –, some are from people who were there, some are about people who were there –, some are by people who were the first to try and put into action the documents as they came out. They are all from a personal point of view and try to capture at least a little of that ‘,freshness of the Spirit’, as it blew through a church thrust into a modern World trying to find a Rock to hold fast to. St Bede’,s Catholic Grammar School Annual Mass of Remembrance E very year, in November, St. Bede’,s Old Boys and Sixth Form students gather to celebrate Mass in memory of the 120 men from St Bede’,s who gave their lives for their country in the wars. It is our privilege to celebrate this Remembrance Mass in company with surviving relatives of the Old Boys who died. This year, the Remembrance Mass will be held on Friday 9 November at the school. The ceremony will start at 10.30 with laying of wreaths at the schoolʼ,s war memorial and then be followed by Mass. The Annual Mass of Remembrance is open to all St Bedeʼ,s Old Boys, to anyone who is linked to St Bedeʼ,s and to anyone wishing to avail themselves of the opportunity to remember other men and women who have given their lives in war. It will help in catering for numbers if those intending to participate would inform the school (01274 541221) or email admin@stbedes.net

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Oct 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 4 Leeds Catholic Post T his is how Monsignor John Wilson, in one of his first engagements since being appointed Diocesan Administrator for this time of Sede vacante described what parents do. Referring both to the root of the word ‘,parent’, and also to the task of parents as leaders of the family, through which the future of humanity is brought forth (Blessed Pope John II Familiarias Consortia) Fr John applauded the hard work, determination, dedication and sense of lively fun that the nineteen new Parenting Facilitators in the Wakefield Deanery had shown throughout the Parenting Facilitators Course they had all successfully completed. The success of all nineteen new Parenting Facilitators, 16 of whom have achieved a Level 3 qualification accredited with Open College Network, was celebrated at a Mass at St John the Baptist Church Normanton presided by Canon Maguire concelebrated with Mgr Wilson and Fr Tim Swinglehurst, Dean of Wakefield. A warm and joyful occasion the celebration also marked an unusual role reversal. We are used to seeing proud parents applauding their children as they are called to receive their awards and certificates. On this occasion it was the other way around as children watched wide eyed as their mom was the one called up for the certificate and photograph, and to receive the two bulging Portfolios representing their yearʼ,s hard work. In his homily Mgr Wilson said that all parents are engaged in Purposefully, Artfully, Respectfully, Enthusiastically Nurturing Talent. This is challenging but we work in faith believing that every person, every member of the human race, every member of our homes, our schools, our parish communities is talented. The root of the word ʻ,parentʼ, is an ancient one meaning ʻ,to bring forthʼ,. Parents bring forth their children and their talents. Fr John said “,a big thank you to the Parenting Facilitators “,for being prepared to support the work of parenting wherever you find it”, for “,to be a parent, in its broadest and in its particular sense is to be like God”,. To ʻ,bring forthʼ, is what God does: life from nothing, light from dark, Jesus from humanity, and from Jesusʼ, death he brought forth resurrection. Fr John reminded us on this feast of St Francis, that we too are il pverinos (poor people), called in our homes and our schools and our parishes to preach the gospel always in the way we live with and respect each other (and to use words when we have to). The task of bringing forth talent is everyoneʼ,s whether we are parents of physical children or spiritual children. The first reading from Ephesians identified the different talents of teachers and preachers. In our prayers we remembered the catechism identity of parents as the first teachers and heralds of the gospel for their children. We also remembered parents in all their different difficulties, however large or small and especially on this fifth day that 5 year old Aprilʼ,s parents wait for news of her since she went missing while playing with friends near their home. The Gospel of the day could not have been more apt: Jesus commissioning the 72 to go out in twos preaching the good news. The new Parenting Facilitators have already, in pairs and in small teams gone into their schools and parishes and run the practical, family friendly and fun universal parenting courses from the Family Caring Trust. These courses are for all parents, and for all ages from birth (and before birth) through primary school, high school, teens and beyond. All are very practically rooted in the reality of our daily lives at home. It is here at home, in how we listen to each other, communicate, problem solve, manage conflict and share our joys and sorrows that parents literally bring forth the church and the world of the future as co creators and in the image of God. Before the certificates were presented by Fr John to the parents, governors, teaching assistants, social workers, catechists and parishioners who had said yes to the request to train to become Parenting Facilitators, Breda Theakston, Coordinator for Family Life Ministry and Project Manager of the celebrating Family Funded Parenting Support Project under which the accredited training course was delivered, thanked everyone who had supported the Parenting Facilitators to reach this moment of celebration. Especially she thanked the Wakefield Deanery for its vision and practical support in taking up the training opportunity, and the priests and head teachers who support the new volunteer Parenting Facilitators with time and resources. It was a delightful occasion and a joy to see the hard work of so many being acknowledged and celebrated. Parenting is not easy for any of us and the parents in the Wakefield Deanery are now in a position to benefit from the parenting groups and courses run in the parishes and schools of the deanery by the Parenting Facilitators. “,It is wonderful to see how it has brought people together, they are getting to know one another”, said Canon Maguire “,getting to know each other and the school and the parish, it is breaking down barriers”,. Wakefield Deanery is a beacon of the visionary teamwork that involves people to make a practical difference. Never before has a local church invested so completely in this way to ensuring that each school and parish has a qualified and dedicated team to engage with parents. Training teams of Parenting Facilitators is just one very practical way to realise the home school parish ideal of our local church. It works because it acknowledges parents as the leaders of the home that they are, and, parents, supported in that role by the newly qualified Parenting Facilitators, become more confident bringers forth of the future. Because of course joy is the sign of the Christian we were welcomed after Mass to the parish rooms where we were regaled with a delicious parish buffet, courtesy of Canon Maguire and the parishioners of St John the Baptist Normanton. Lesley Darren, Head Teacher of St John the Baptist Normanton was presented with a memento for school to say thank you for hosting the training through ten weeks last autumn. Thanks and Congratulations to all Parenting Facilitators who answered the call and saw the course through: Bernadette Ahson, Margaret Birkenshaw, Lynne Blackburn, Anna Crossley, Kath Daley, Angela Deevey, Lucy Dillon, Mandy Dwyer, Paula Fealy, Therese Hunter, Linda Needham, Carmen Pearce, Rachel Pickard, Jennifer Reid, Faye Robinson, Gillian Shelton, Maria Tyson, Michelle Watson and Dawn Workman. FOR INFORMATION ABOUT ONE DAY INITIAL TRAINING, ACCREDITED TRAINING AND NON ACCREDITED TRAINING FOR PARENTING FACILITATORS CONTACT BREDA THEAKSTON AT breda.familylifeministry@dioceseofleeds.org.uk Parents ‘,bring forth’, the future of humanity LECTURES 2012 Wheeler Hall, St Anne Street Wednesdays at 7.00pm Admission free, retiring collection Wednesday 7th November 2012 Pravin Thevathasan Consultant psychiatrist. Editor of the Catholic Medical Quarterly. Author of The Catholic Church and the Sex Abuse Crisis . “,The Church and the Problem of Sexual Abuse”, (An examination of the nature and extent of clerical sexual abuse, its prevalence, likely causes and consequences. The position, teaching and pastoral response of the Church) Wednesday 5th December 2012 Anthony McCarthy Education and Publications Manager for the Society for the Protection of Unborn Children. Author of Cloning and Stem Cell Research “,The Church and ‘,Same-Sex Marriage’,”, ( Neither the church nor the state has the right to redefine marriage. To try to change the heterosexual nature of marriage is to undermine an institution which protects children and society ) Wednesday 9th January 2013 : Speaker to be announced later (Note that this last talk will be on the second Wednesday of the month. The first three will take place as usual on the first Wednesday of the month)

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Oct 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Leeds Catholic Post Page 5 The decision to ask the Kinharvie Institute to review parish changes in this diocese was a brave one. Anyone who attended their public meeting will know that this was by no stretch a whitewash, but an incisive and accurate summary of the present situation. A desire for transparency has also been shown in the decision to release and distribute copies of the report to all the people of the diocese. Someone wondered why Kinharvie were not called in before we started, presumably to advise on procedures, and then ongoing monitoring. Everyone seems to be agreed that something had to be done with our parish structures, although there was little debate over the model used. Calculating the needs of the diocese on the basis of one priest per so many people at Mass assumes that priests and parishes are entirely uniform, without any special needs, human or otherwise. Parishes of different sizes can accommodate different types and ages of priest. There is no doubt, now, that priests are dealing with megaparishes which not so long ago may have had three times as many priests. Whether the fall in numbers of Mass attenders matches this reduction in priestpower may provide some massage to the figures, but people still, often, look for the church at the beginnings and ends of their lives, lapsed or not. Should the diocese have looked at other models- leaving the larger communities in place under the leadership of people other than priests- laity, religious, deacons? Kinharvie highlight a problem with the whole approach. The process, it says, was based on “,a deficit model of change”,. In other words, the main motivation for the change was the declining number of priests. Change becomes a negative thing, without a thought for the old idea that every problem is an opportunity. Closure, merging becomes a sign of defeat, not a regrouping for different challenges in a more mobile society with different ideas of “,church”,. More topically, what can be done to line up our structures with Vatican II rather than Vatican I, around a hundred years before? Another recurring topic is the position of the overwhelming majority in all this- the laity. It would seem that the people of the diocese were not sufficiently involved in the process, beyond a “,consultation”, which some thought ineffective as a means of getting everyone to “,own the plan”,. The idea that priests, worthy though they are, are inherently possessed of the skills for the management of change may not be right, as many will admit. It is not too late: there is time to revisit what has been done and do it right: to fulfil promises made and build on those successes already achieved. More importantly the report suggests that there is time for reconciliation, for the people of God in these changed deaneries to come together in trust. BENCHMARK Sidelines I am pleased to report that the West Yorkshire Church Music Network had a successful repertoire-sharing afternoon recently –, more than a dozen musicians and singers spent a pleasant couple of hours at St Joseph`s, Pudsey. Our main focus was alternative hymns to `old favourites` for Offertory and the Eucharist. I was intrigued to learn that these latter, like Gaul, are divided into three: Processional, Thanksgiving and Adoration. If you are thinking, `where have I seen this before?` the answer is probably in the Laudate Hymn book, where the music is organised by topic. The first two are for use during the Mass, while the third are for use on other occasions, such as Benediction. Ironically, a number of what I think of as highly traditional `Communion hymns` are in this last category –, `O Godhead hid`, `O Bread of Heaven` and `Sweet Sacrament Divine` for example. I can never hear `Sweet Sacrament...` without being transported back to the 1950s processions in my childhood –, Corpus Christi, I think –, sedately stepping around the extensive grounds of a South London hospital, where all the nurses were nuns. Meanwhile, back to our afternoon: People do not want the encumbrance of a hymn book as they process to receive the Eucharist, so Processional hymns should have few words, or feature a refrain. We noted that some congregations, normally vocal, are reluctant to sing once they have left their pew. Perhaps then, the Processional of the day might be played before Mass, to make sure it is familiar, and maybe a musician could reassure the congregation that their singing is welcomed! Thanksgiving hymns are post-Communion, at least for much of the congregation, so hymnbooks/lyric sheets can be available. Towards the end of the afternoon, we surveyed the Mass settings our parishes use, Storrington, Gathering, Celtic, Mass of Peace, Mass of Christ the Saviour, and Mass of Light all received favourable comments, but the revised Duffy Gloria was not viewed so positively. Quite possibly by the time you read this, links to these will be on the WYCM network website, so you can hear the various settings. A more detailed report of the afternoon is also posted there. (Web address below) Two “,and finally`s”,: First, an unsolicited comment `very useful, interesting and enjoyable. The afternoon passed all too quickly.` Second, a joke, culled from a trawl of internet church music blogs. At least, I presume the erudite author intended it as a joke... `All I can say is thank God for the EF Missa Cantata where you do not have to endure this dumming (sic!) down ie guitars and clapping.` Tim Devereux tim.devereux@ssg.org.uk If you`d like to add your name to the email list to receive information about WYCM Network events, I`d be happy to hear from you. West Yorkshire Church Music Network: http://www.westyorkshirechurchmusic.org.uk/ National Network of Pastoral Musicians: http://nnpm.org/ Society of Saint Gregory: http://www.ssg.org.uk/ Musical Notes by Tim Devereux OFFICE FOR EVANGELISATION &, CATECHESIS The Year of Faith On Sunday 16th October 2011 Pope Benedict XVI announced a YEAR OF FAITH for the whole Church, to run from the 50th anniversary of the opening of the Second Vatican Council on 11 October 2012 until the Solemnity of Christ the King on 24 November 2013. Pope Benedict outlined the purpose of the year of faith: `to give fresh impetus to the mission of the whole Church to lead human beings out of the wilderness in which they often find themselves to the place of life, friendship with Christ that gives us life in fullness.` The YEAR of Faith is an invitation to everyone in the Church to celebrate and renew their faith - individually, in families, in parishes and schools, in our Diocese, country and across our global Catholic community. The Vicariate for Evangelisation will be holding a variety of courses and events as part of the Year of Faith –, check this page for details. Introduction to Catholic Foundation Stones –, Choice of dates &, venues Catholic Foundation Stones is a basic introduction to the Catholic faith. It is simple and straightforward and can be used with all kinds of different groups and individuals. As part of the Year of Faith the Vicariate for Evangelisation is holding evening sessions around the Diocese to offer an introduction to Catholic Foundation Stones and to discuss how it can be used in many different areas of parish and school catechesis and faith formation. Time: 7:00pm –, 9:00pm –, refreshments from 6:45pm. There is no charge but booking is essential. Please choose ONE of the following evenings: •, St Austinʼ,s Church Rooms, Wakefield, WF1 3QN Thursday 8th November 2012 •, St Maryʼ,s Church, Selby, YO8 4HS Thursday 7th February, 2013 •, Holy Redeemer, 34 New North Road, Huddersfield, HD1 5JY Thursday 25th April, 2013 •, St Josephʼ,s Church Hall, Harrogate, HG1 3HD Thursday 16th May, 2013 Catechist Forum –, Saturday 17th November –, Wheeler Hall All catechists in the Leeds Diocese are invited to meet at Wheeler Hall, St Anneʼ,s Cathedral from 10:30am –, 2.30pm (tea &, coffee will be available from 10:00am). There will be the opportunity to meet with other catechists, to explore ideas and resources and to celebrate the lunchtime mass at the cathedral. Drinks are provided but please bring a packed lunch. There is no charge for the day but booking is essential. New Media in Youth Ministry - Saturday 10th November - Doncaster Exploring positive, creative, safe and excellent ways of communicating online with young people. This day is for anyone of any age and technical ability who works with young people. Be inspired! Discover new and emerging media approaches. Venue: The Salvation Army Lakeside Community Church, Booth Avenue, Lakeside, Doncaster, DN4 5JN Date: Saturday 10 November 2012 Time: 10:00 –, 16:00 Fee: £,10 –, bring lunch, drinks provided. Booking essential Leaders: Youth Officers from the Anglican, Methodist, Roman Catholic, Salvation Army, &, United Reformed Churches in Yorkshire Booking &, further details: Trish Stafford: trish.stafford@sheffield.anglican.org or 01709 309147 or check the website –, www.weusenewmedia.com Advent Retreat Day –, LTUC, Chaplaincy, Saturday 1st December Everyone is welcome to the Advent Retreat Day, in the Chaplaincy at Leeds Trinity University College, Brownberrie Lane, Horsforth, LS18 5HD. Time: 10:00 –, 16:00. Leaders: Fr Chris Angel &, Mrs Linda Pennington. Cost: £,20 includes lunch. Booking essential. A Starter Course for Catechists –, March &, April 2013 The next starter course for catechists and leaders of the liturgy of the word with children will take place at Hinsley Hall on the following Saturdays from 9:30 am –, 4:00pm: March 9, March 23 and April 20 2013. WHO TO CONTACT AT HINSLEY HALL There are many courses and events organised by the Office for Evangelisation and Catechesis throughout the year which help to support formation in faith and training for catechists, leaders of the liturgy of the word with children and other parish ministries. Check this page in future editions and also the website: www.dioceseofleeds.org.uk/evangelisation - see Forthcoming Events. For further information or booking for any of the above events please contact Catherine Green on 0113 261 8040 or evangelisation.admin@dioceseofleeds.org.uk F riday 5th October was a day of great celebration at St John’,s School for the Deaf in Boston Spa. After 5 years of fundraising to build a Performing Arts Suite, staff and pupils were finally able to welcome to the school many of the people who had supported them, for the official opening and service of dedication of the centre by Monsignor John Wilson, Administrator of the Diocese. After welcoming everyone, Head Teacher Ann Bradbury explained how back in 2007, the school had launched the EAR appeal to raise money for the project and began to access grants from local and national charitable trusts and to raise funds from a host of events such as a Champagne tasting, a sponsored cycle ride to Paris by Mr Shaun Connelly (father of year 7 pupil Scarlet) and 2 valiant entries in the Great North Run by Ms Ros Ives a friend of the school. Later, when speaking to staff, pupils and guests gathered in the auditorium, Monsignor Wilson said how delighted he was that the building had been completed and he hoped that pupils would enjoy using such a wonderful resource. After blessing the Performing Arts Suite, Monsignor Wilson went on to unveil a plaque at the entrance before joining the guests for light refreshments in the schoolʼ,s dining room Performing Arts Suite opening

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Oct 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 6 Leeds Catholic Post One thing we should do in this Year of Faith is to look at the lives of the saints- so here are some thoughts about some saintly deacons. The proto- first- martyr was of course a deacon. St Stephen exercised the deaconʼ,s charism of preaching and, as still happens in lesser and more symbolic ways, was stoned for his trouble. St Philip the deacon (not the apostle) is the central character in the story of the baptism of the Eunuch in the chariot. We start with teaching- perhaps RCIA today- and finish with a new baptism: Philip is ministering to someone who was physically disqualified from taking a full part in his chosen faith, but who could be accepted there and then as a follower of Christ. Laurence was another deacon who was martyred: he cared for the poor of his parish and regarded them as his treasures: so much so that he offered them as such to those trying to seize the churchʼ,s reserves. For this he was martyred and- it is said- showed diaconal qualities of humour when under attack. Alcuin of York was an eighth century deacon, an orphan educated at the Minster who rose to be religious adviser to the Emperor Charlemagne: even then he was anxious that people should understand the meaning of the prayers and words of the Mass- a diaconal function. St Francis of Assisi was a deacon who needs little introduction. He was a “,holy fool”, for God, but a shining example of trust: someone who lived out the Gospels: “,Preach the Good News always: when necessary, use words”, Advice for every deacon. Reginald Pole was different: a sixteenth century deacon, associate of Henry VIII, he never wavered in his loyalty to the papacy and opposition to the kingʼ,s divorces, even though this led to the execution of his mother. Seeking reconciliation, he associated with reformers and felt a conversion to living the scriptures. Although appointed a presider at the Council of Trent, he again sought reform rather than retrenchment. Later, he was almost elected Pope himself. He returned to England under the reign of Catholic Queen Mary but was not in favour of her repression of Protestants. Finally after all this time a deacon, he was ordained Priest and finally the last Catholic Archbishop of Canterbury. He died within hours of Mary. Finally, Nicholas Farrar lived out his life as a deacon- an Anglican deacon. He and others founded the Little Gidding Community, in many ways,a contemplative monastic community with a charism of service. He influenced, amongst many others, the poet- theologian George Herbert. These few deacons are models, in different ways, for our deacon community: they show us that the diaconate is a deeply fulfilling vocation in its own right: most of these men chose to remain deacons, and entered fully into the ways of service. This article draws from “,Saintly Deacons”, by Deacon Owen F Cummings, published by Paulist Press, which has full accounts of these lives. Deacons Diary W e have just begun the Year of Faith to mark the 50th anniversary of the Second Vatican Council. Nostra Aetate (In Our Age) was one of the documents that arose from the Council. This was the guide which set the Church on a new path in its relationships with faiths other than Christianity Pope John XXIII led from the front particularly in the field of relationship with the Jewish people. He personally met Jewish leaders using the greeting, “,I am Joseph your brother.”, which combined his baptismal name with a quotation from a story of reconciliation in the Old Testament. Pope John Paul II continued the work of engagement. He was the first Pope to eneter a synagogue and a mosque. In 1986, 1993 and 2002 he was joined by leaders of the world faiths at events in Assisi to pray for world peace Pope Benedict XVI is no less committed to dialogue. In his first public address he said clearly that while his first priority was dialogue with other Christians hi second would be interreligious dialogue. What does Nostra Aetate say? The key extract reads “,The Church therefore urges her sons and daughters to enter with prudence and charity into discussion and collaboration with members of other religions. let Christians, while witnessing to their own faith and way of life, acknowledge, preserve and encourage the spiritual and moral truths found among non-Christians, also their social life and culture”, In 2006 Pope Benedict, during a visit to Turkey affirmed that dialogue was not an option but a necessity. “,Following the biblical tradition, the (Second Vatican) Council teaches that the entire human race shares a common origin and a common destiny: God, our creator and goal of our earthly pilgrimage. Christians and Muslims belong to the family of those who believe in the one God and who, according to their respective traditions, trace their ancestry to Abraham. The human and spiritual unity in our origins and our destiny impels us to seek a common path, as we play our part in the quests for fundamental values so characteristic of the people of our time.”, The interfaith adventure has not been straight forward. We have seen great progress from simply meeting to acknowledge each others existence through exploration of agreement and common views to looking at difficult areas where the faiths diverge. It is a tortuous and winding path with many dead ends but there is no doubt that we would be greatly diminished in these times without Nostra Aetate. Further reading: Interfaith Dialogue. The teaching of the Church: Catholic Bishops Conference of England &, Wales. ISBN0 905241 22 3 Meeting God in Friend &, Stranger. Catholic Bishops Conference of England &, Wales. CTS Do 827 INTERFAITH Events Saturday 10th November. Interfaith Forest Gardening 10.45am –, 2pm. Meet at Parkwood Springs Forest Garden car park, Shirecliffe Road, Sheffield S5 8XB. Wear appropriate clothes and footwear. Bring food and drink. Join a diversity of people to experience the diversity of nature in this ‘,infant’, woodland. Plants, people, faiths growing together –, beautiful and productive. Further detailsl sheffieldinterfaith@hotmail.co.uk or Nirmal curlsu@hotmail.com 07932017929 Thursday 15th November. Hook Memorial Lecture Dr Mona Siddique to talk on Faith in Public Life at 7.30pm in Leeds Minster, Kirkgate LS2 7DJ. Admission free but by ticket only. Contact LCI on 0113 2454700 or general@leedschurchinstitute.org Tuesday 20th November Bringing Communities Together Promoting greater cultural awareness, 9am-4pm at the Hamara Healthy Living Centre, Tempest Road, Beeston LS11 6RD. Different faiths and cultures will have displays and activities to help young people see the value of working together. Thursday 22nd November. Multi Faith Exhibition An all day event at the Merrion Centre where different faiths join together in putting on a multi faith exhibition. . For further details contact cdobbin@aol.com Festivals November 2nd Coronation of Emperor Haile Selassie I (Rastafari ) Haile Selassie was the Emperor of Ethiopia. Rastas believe Haile Selassie is God, and that he will return to Africa members of the black community who are living in exile. November 12th Birth of Baha`u`llah (Bahai ) Celebrates the birth in 1817 of the founder of the Baha`i faith. November 13th Diwali (Hindu, Sikh &, Jain) Festival of light celebrating the triumph of good over evil November 15th. Al-Hijira (Muslim ) Al Hijira marks the journey of the Prophet Mohammad and his followers from Mecca to Medina. It is also the Islamic new year Mitzvah Day –, 18th November 2012 M itzvah Day is a Jewish led day of social action. On Mitzvah Day, around the world, thousands of people take part in hands on projects, without fundraising, to support charities and to build stronger communities. The goal is to reduce hardship and poverty, to help our environment and to bring a little joy - hands on –, no fundraising. It is a way for all of us to make our mark regardless of our affiliation, wealth, age, sex or nationality. Mitzvah Day is based on the Jewish values of tikkun olam (repairing the world), tzedek (righteousness) and gemilut chassadim (acts of lovingkindness). Mitzvah Day 2012 will be a part of A Year of Service, a new initiative to encourage people of all faiths to take part in 12 days of volunteering throughout the year. Each day of volunteering is being run by a different faith group, but everyone (of any faith or none) is welcome to join in the social action projects being run on these days across the country. See www.mitzvahday.org.uk for further information and to register an event. Ministerial appointments Following the recent Ministerial reshuffle, Rt Hon Baroness Warsi moves from being Chair of the Conservative Party to take up two new positions: Minister of State for Faith and Communities in the Department for Communities and Local Government (DCLG) and Senior Minister of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs at the Foreign Office. She will continue to attend Cabinet meetings. Andrew Stunell who was the Parliamentary Under Secretary of State at DCLG with the community cohesion brief has stepped down and has been replaced by Rt Hon Don Foster whose portfolio includes ʻ,Integration and race equalityʼ, and ʻ,Localism, decentralisation and community rightsʼ,. Rt Hon Theresa May, who continues in her role as Home Secretary, has relinquished her Equalities role. Taking on Equalities roles are Maria Miller, the new Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS), who is also Minister for Women and Equalities, Helen Grant, who is a Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State in both DCMS and the Ministry of Justice, and Jo Swinson who is a Parliamentary Under Secretary of State in both DCMS and the Department of Business Innovation and Skills. It is anticipated that the Government Equalities Office will move from the Home Office to DCMS. 12 Muslim Artists Express Esteem and Affection for the Holy Father At the end of the Holy Father`s General Audience on recently, 12 young artists of the Muslim faith from Kosovo, gave Benedict XVI a painting. The painting, titled ",Universal Face,", was created by Fatos Kabashi. The painting also contained a message to the Pope from the 12 artists saying, ",With affection, to his Holiness Benedict XVI.", The 12 Kosovar artists are in Rome as authors of paintings in a collective exhibition commemorating the 15th anniversary of the death of Mother Teresa of Calcutta. Inter-Religious Meeting Held to Gather First Fruits of Pope’,s Historic Visit to Lebanon From the Vatican news service: An inter-religious meeting was held at the headquarters of the Maronite Church in Lebanon. The gathering was attended by representatives of the various religious realities of the country to discuss the effect, fruits and challenges stemming from Benedict XVIʼ,s visit, which took place recently. Attending the meeting were the heads of the major religious communities, Muslim and Christian, present in Lebanon. The participants focussed their attention at the meeting on the “,historic visit”, of Pope Benedict XVI to Lebanon. Those present agreed on the opportuneness of the visit which brought immediate positive fruits to the Lebanese scene and highlighted the quality of the Lebanese nation as a country “,secure and open to all cultures and religions, and as the best place to sign the Apostolic Exhortation “,The Church in the Middle East.”, In the final communique, the Christian and Muslim participants expressed their approval of the contents of the Exhortation, given that the Holy Fatherʼ,s insistence on the necessary coexistence between cultures and religions is “,an expression of renewed confidence in Lebanonʼ,s mission, already confirmed by Blessed John Paul II”, in his apostolic visit to the country in 1997. The principal message that the Pope wished to give was to confirm Lebanon as a land of dialogue and peaceful interaction among the different cultures that live “,the richness of diversity.”, The communique confirmed the willingness of the various religious heads to commit themselves to “,spread the fraternal message”, of the Holy Father and to “,reflect further on its content in families, in schools and in society”, and to transmit the message to religious heads in the other Arab countries. In tune with the Popeʼ,s appeal to young people not to yield to the temptation to taste “,the bitter honey of emigration,”, the prelates exhorted the Lebanese to stay in their land and not allow themselves to be drawn by the “,wave of emigration that impoverishes the East and deprives it of its best children and dynamic forces and weakens the Lebanese national fabric, putting at risk the Republicʼ,s identity.”, Benedict XVIʼ,s visit to the Lebanon was long prepared by the countryʼ,s Christians. A few days before the visit, the Maronite bishops hoped that the visit would be “,a real and proper Arab Spring”, marked by peace and peaceful coexistence and respectful of otherness. Numerically, participation in the visit was powerful, involving several components of the Lebanese society, including representatives of the Muslim communities. And the subsequent echoes on the visit were highly positive both in the secular press as well as in the interventions of several Catholic, Orthodox and Muslim religious heads. Nostra Aetate

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Oct 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Leeds Catholic Post Page 7 Bishop Says Good-bye A rchbishop Roche took leave of the Diocese of Leeds on Thursday September 27th and set out to Rome in order to take up his new role in the direct service of the Holy Father. It was announced at the end of June that Pope Benedict had appointed Bishop Roche to the position of Secretary in the Congregation of Divine Worship and the Discipline of the Sacraments and at the same time given him the dignity of an Archbishop. Archbishop Roche is a son of the Diocese, a priest of the Diocese and latterly its ninth Bishop. He was appointed as Co-adjutor Bishop to Bishop David Konstant in July 2002 and became the Diocesan Ordinary on 20th April 2004. During his time as Bishop Archbishop Roche served as Chairman of the International Commission for English in the Liturgy (ICEL) which produced the new English Translation of the Roman Missal. He has also served as Chair of the Bishop`s Conference Liturgy Committee and on the Bishops` Conference Steering Group as well as an Overseas` Seminaries Inspector. We thank Archbishop Roche for his ministry amongst us and for the generosity he has shown in giving of his time: many of the things he has done, the parishes and schools he has visited, the homilies and speeches he has given are recorded on the website both in previous news and the section dedicated to him as Bishop. We assure him of our prayers and good wishes for the future. Archbishop Arthur will return for a special celebration which is to be organised later in the autumn when there will be an appr opriate opportunity to celebrate his ministry and take our leave of him. Josh Kirby, Successful Trialist in Rugby &, Hockey J osh Petts, a Yr 11 pupil, is proving to be an all round superstar sportsman. After playing Rugby Union for 4 years, Josh has been selected to represent Yorkshire U16s. If that achievement was not impressive enough, he has also had successful trials for the U16 North Yorkshire Hockey team. What is truly outstanding in this achievement is he has only been playing hockey for 4 months. His dad encouraged him to take up hockey, so he joined the Saint John Fisher, Harrogate hockey team. He discovered he enjoyed the sport and began playing with the Harrogate Hockey Club, which led to the North Yorkshire trials. Josh is currently able to play and enjoy both sports but eventually, time constraints will mean he will probably have to concentrate on one discipline or the other. For now though, Josh states, ”,I thoroughly enjoy playing both sports and have no particular preference at this time. It is something I will have to consider in the future.”, Sports teacher Aidan Pass added, “,Itʼ,s remarkable Josh has achieved such a high standard in two sports in such a short time. To be playing to such a level can only good for his sporting development.”, St. Mary’,s, Menston celebrate Year of Faith T he entire staff and student community of St. Mary’,s Catholic High School, Menston are proud to respond to Pope Benedict XVI’,s announcement that a Year of Faith will began on 11 October 2012, ending on 24 November 2013, the feast of Christ the King. To celebrate the Year of Faith, St. Maryʼ,s have planned a special Mass to celebrate the start of this event. The schoolʼ,s new intake of Year 7 pupils are currently wearing ʻ,Faith in Actionʼ, badges, linking each member of every form to their named saint or martyr. It is the mission of the school to mirror the example of these ordinary people living out extraordinary lives through true dedication to their Faith and the Gospel teachings. Throughout the year there will be whole school activities, celebrations and challenges enabling both students and staff to explore, expand and to be enlightened by their faith. Mr Pritchard (Headteacher) said: ",We are proud to respond to the Year of Faith, and this outward sign which celebrates the forthcoming year has been embraced by our students. We are looking forward to the year ahead and we have many more developments planned.", To advertise contact Louise Ward Leeds Diocesan Curia, Hinsley Hall, 62 Headingley Lane, Leeds LS6 2BX Telephone: 0113 261 8028

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Oct 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 8 Leeds Catholic Post NEWS FROM LEEDS TRINITY UNIVERSITY COLLEGE New Teacher Training Implemented Standards L eeds Trinity’,s Primary Education Department has been working in partnership with the Department for Education to implement its new Teachers’, Standards, which were introduced from 1 September 2012. The standards set a clear baseline of expectations for the professional practice and conduct of teachers from the point of qualification. They replace the existing standards for Qualified Teacher Status (QTS) and Core and the GTCE’,s Code of Conduct and Practice for Registered Teachers in England. This change has meant Leeds Trinity has had to redesign training materials for its students and partners. Primary Education works with a large number of partnership schools who support our trainee teachers. Leeds Trinity hosted a training day to update them about the changes. There was a fantastic response from Partnership Schools, with 78 staff from 48 schools in attendance. The new materials were received positively, and Leeds Trinity will be completing further training with on-going outreach meetings, which a further 16 schools are expected to send representatives to. B uilding on the successful development of Leeds Trinity’,s state-of-the-art Media Centre, the Centre for Journalism has developed two additional multimedia newsrooms –, one for undergraduate and one for postgraduate studies. The areas have open plan flexible teaching and learning space, with easy access to studios, equipment and edit suites. There are also new HD Cameras in TV studio 2, and 30 new small, portable HD tapeless camcorders. Catherine Oʼ,Connor, Head of Journalism, Media and Business said: “,The newsrooms are a fabulous development for our journalism and sports journalism students. Itʼ,s been great to see them taking shape over the summer but now weʼ,re already looking forward to teaching in them. Along with the TV studio and Media Centre work which took place earlier this year, theyʼ,re another great example of how hard Leeds Trinity is working to ensure that students have access to industry standard kit and are able to work in ways which replicates industry.”, Leeds Trinity above national average for student satisfaction L eeds Trinity’,s graduates are becoming increasingly more satisfied with our academic provision each year, according to the latest results from the National Student Survey. Overall satisfaction on the part of our graduates has increased by 3% since 2011 against a national rise of 2%. This keeps Leeds Trinityʼ,s overall satisfaction above the national average at 86%. Two courses –, English and Writing and Early Years –, have scored 100% for overall satisfaction, with many other courses scoring well above the national average. These results reinforce our reputation for high quality learning and teaching, which is the product of a strong, student-centred commitment towards high quality learning and teaching. Over the last year, there has been continued investment in Leeds Trinityʼ,s Learning Centre, giving students access to more resources than ever with a range of new specialist databases now available for particular subject areas. 2012 English and Writing graduate, Elle Reece, explains why she thinks the course, and Leeds Trinity, deserve full marks for the student experience. She said: “,My third year spent at Leeds Trinity was the year I pestered my Writing tutors pretty much every day, but they were all exceptionally helpful! I decided to choose the Writing Project as my final, big piece of work and I couldnʼ,t be happier with my decision. My tutors were constantly at hand to help out and I am so glad they were involved with my work. Iʼ,ve learnt so much from both of them and I canʼ,t thank them enough for helping me get through my third year, I couldnʼ,t have done it without them! Iʼ,d happily do the course all over again!”, Leeds Trinity has also been recognised for its excellent teaching and is now placed in the top 10% in the UK for Teaching Excellence according to the 2013 Sunday Times University Guide. Judy Donnelly, Leeds Trinityʼ,s Director of Academic Enhancement (Learning and Teaching), commented: “,We are incredibly proud that teaching, academic support and personal development continue to be areas of strength at Leeds Trinity. Our strong commitment to each individual student as well as staff development to enhance the student experience works, with our students not only achieving their goals for academic qualifications, but also becoming highly employable after graduating due to the personal and professional skills we help them to develop.”, Events Open Days 3 November For more information visit www.leedstrinity.ac.uk Postgraduate Open Evening 30 October 5.30 –, 7.30pm For more information visit www.leedstrinity.ac.uk All Saints Day Mass 1 November For more information contact k.stenton@leedstrinity.ac.uk One Community Month 1 –, 30 November A programme of events celebrating equality and diversity. To find out more visit www.leedstrinity.ac.uk New developments in the Centre for Journalism

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Oct 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Leeds Catholic Post Page 9 Torchlight in Batley –, An Evening of Devotion to Mary Mother of God M any parishes and schools from across the diocese were present at the annual Batley Torchlight Procession in honour of Mary Mother of God which took place on the evening of Monday 1st October. The gathering congregation were welcomed by Mgr Michael McQuinn who also extended a warm welcome to Mr Mike Wood MP and his wife and Cllr and Mrs O’,Neill. In his opening comments Mgr McQuinn said that it was 61 years since the first Batley Procession had been instigated and he thanked the current parish priest, Fr Patrick Mungovin, for continuing this annual devotion to Mary. The service began with the choir of St Maryʼ,s Catholic Primary School singing Cuncti Smius Concanentes which was followed by the Gospel read by Rev Deacon Philip Hall. Mgr McQuinn then invited Fr Paul Redmond to give the homily. In his homily Fr Redmond spoke eloquently about the five Mosaics depicting Maryʼ,s journey from annunciation to ascension which have been a feature of St Maryʼ,s Church for the last sixty years. Following the homily Mgr McQuinn began the procession with a decade of the Rosary and then the gathered people set-off on the journey to St Maryʼ,s Church singing and praying to Our Lady. On reaching the Church Benediction was held. At the end of the service Mgr McQuinn thanked everyone for attending and making the procession such a prayerful occasion, he also thanked all those who had made the evening possible. CELEBRATION FOR LONG SERVICE W ednesday October 10th was chosen by the Diocesan Tribunal for a very special celebration in honour of two very hard working people. Mr and Mrs W Hopkins have between them worked for 52 years for the tribunal and that is only part of the work they have done for the Church. The Mass to celebrate the occasion was celebrated by Mgr Hennessy the Judicial Vicar, along with Mgr Holroyd, their present Parish Priest, Canon Tagney, their former Parish Priest, Mgr Sharp, Mgr Summersgill and Fr Parsons. In his Homily Mgr Hennessy linked the Saint of the day, St Paulinus, the great Northern missionary with the work they had done in spreading the word of God among the people of their day. Quoting from the letter of recommendation to the Holy Father that Mgr Holroyd had supplied he pointed to the work done by Mr Hopkins 80 years an altar boy, in charge of their training –, still serving today, the work done by Mrs Hopkins looking after the altar and all the linen, her involvement in the Parish liturgy, her role in setting up the SVP and the Womenʼ,s League, he went on to add how 50 years ago they had been involved in planning the new church of St Theresaʼ,s- involvement in the Parish Council, advisor to numerous Parish Priests, founding of the Life Movement –, as well as School governors –,work on the admissions panel and a lasting interest in the support of St Gemmaʼ,s. For all this and much more they had been awarded entry to The Pontifical Equestrian Order of St. Sylvester Pope and Martyr as Dame and Knight. Following the Mass there was a small reception in the dining room at Hinsley Hall.

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Oct 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 10 Leeds Catholic Post A Day Of Pilgrimage E very year, at the end of September, groups and individuals travel from around the Diocese to the National Shrine of Our Lady at Walsingham, in Norfolk. Walsingham became a shrine in the year 1061, when the Lady of the Manor, Richeldis de Faverches, was taken in her dreams to Nazareth, and shown the Holy House of the Annunciation by Our Blessed Lady. Richeldis was told to build a copy of that Holy House in her Manor of Walsingham and to encourage people to come and pray there. From that time, pilgrims came in their millions, and Walsingham became one of the principal Christian Shrines in medieval Europe, ranking alongside Rome and Santiago de Compostela. A fine Augustinian Priory was built around that Holy House. The Franciscans also established a house in the village in the fourteenth century. All the Kings of England from Henry III to Henry VIII were regular visitors to the shrine. At the Reformation, this all came to an end. The Holy House was destroyed. The statue of Our Lady of Walsingham was taken to Smithfield in London and burnt. Prior Nicholas Mileham, was taken from the Priory and executed in what has since become known as Martyrs Field within sight of his Priory, and all in the village who knew him. Walsingham slept for centuries, becoming a rural backwater in North Norfolk. All this began to change in 1897, when the Slipper Chapel, one of the last surviving chapels of the medieval pilgrimage returned to Catholic hands. The first post-reformation pilgrimage took place that year. Finally, in 1934, the shrine was declared to be the National Shrine of Our Lady. Some six years later, Bishop William Gordon Wheeler celebrated his First Mass in the Slipper Chapel after his ordination to the priesthood. Our Diocese travelled, on what turned out to be a bright sunny day on September 29th. Coaches arrived from Leeds, Bradford, Huddersfield and Selby. In recent years groups have travelled from several of our High Schools. This year we had groups from All Saints Huddersfield, St Mary`s Menston and Holy Family Carlton. A large group of children, including many altar servers came from Immaculate Heart Parish in Huddersfield. As usual Fr Benjamin Griffiths was the organiser, and as in recent years, Fr Duane Reilly worked to involve the schools in the pilgrimage. The Pilgrim Theme at Walsingham this year is ",Mary, Mother of the Word and Mother of Joy.", Mgr Heskin was the Principal Celebrant and Preacher at the Mass celebrated at 12.00 noon. The readings and prayers of the Mass recalled the great joy experienced by Our Lady in her submission to the will of God. At the end of the Mass presentations were made to those who had organised the coaches from around the Diocese. A special presentation was made to Anne Milton, who was retiring as the Pilgrimage Secretary at the Shrine, and has been a great servant to the shrine and the pilgrims for many years. After Mass, there was time to socialise and share lunch, before we gathered in front of the Chapel of Reconciliation for devotions and prayers, including the Litany of Our Lady of Walsingham. We then set off in procession along the Pilgrim Way into the village. Young people from the schools helped to carry the statue of Our Lady along the processional route. During the procession the Rosary was. Prayed and hymns to Our Lady sung. The day finished with Evening Prayer and Benediction of the Most Holy Eucharist in the grounds of Elmham House, the Catholic Pilgrim Centre, in the village. Next year, the Diocesan Pilgrimage to Walsingham will take place on Saturday 28th September 2013. For more information contact the Pilgrimage Organiser, Fr Benjamin Griffiths on 0113 258 7093.

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Oct 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Leeds Catholic Post Page 11

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Oct 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 14 Leeds Catholic Post Vocations –, News Mgr Paul Grogan 1. Faith walks Days after the launch of the Year of Faith in the diocese the vocations service organised a pilgrimage for young people to the Shrine of our Lady of the Crag in Knaresborough. They also visited the Cave of St Robert, a thirteenth century contemporary of St Francis, on the River Nidd, and enjoyed rowing on the river. The aim of such walks - there will be a total of five during the course of the year –, is to help young people connect with the Catholic heritage of Yorkshire as they seek to discern what role they will play in the Church in the future. They are open to young men and women aged 14 to 19. The walks, which will be of four to six milesʼ, length, will help young people to rediscover the value of the pilgrimage experience. Pope Benedictʼ,s letter proclaiming the Year of Faith, “,Porta Fidei,”, proposes pilgrimages as an indispensable means of igniting faith. Future pilgrimages will be to Ripon, Whitby, Nidderdale, and Osmotherley. The walks are being organised in liaison with the diocesan youth service and the Diocese of Middlesbrough. 2. Discerning the call to the priesthood Two diocesan priests have kindly agreed to appear on a poster which is advertising the meetings of this yearʼ,s discernment group for men who are considering the priesthood. Fr Ian Smith, who is the parish priest of the Parish of the Holy Redeemer, Huddersfield, was photographed as he entered St Patrickʼ,s Church in Huddersfield to celebrate the Mass for his silver jubilee. Fr Christopher Angel, the assistant priest in the same parish and the second youngest priest in the diocese, was photographed just after a meeting of clergy. Vocations Director Mgr Paul Grogan said: “,I am very grateful to these two priests for allowing us to use their pictures in this way. We wanted to convey a number of things. Firstly, the priesthood is about joy –, I think their faces in the photographs convey that. Secondly we wanted to show how we develop as priests during the course of our service in the diocese –, hence the value of juxtaposing a relatively recently ordained priest and one celebrating such a significant jubilee. Thirdly, we wanted to indicate that the priesthood is about brotherhood and community: the fact that Fr Ian and Fr Christopher live and work together illustrates that point well.”, The discernment evenings are held on Wednesdays at Leeds Trinity University College. They comprise a holy hour with the opportunity for confession, beginning at 6.30pm, a half-hour talk –, this year the talks draw on themes from the Year of Faith –, and a shared meal. The meetings during the autumn will take place 17th October, 21st November and 12th December. 3. Fostering a culture of vocations About ten people from the diocese are heading up to Newcastle on Saturday 27th October to take part in a unique consultation exercise which is designed to foster a sense of vocation among Catholics in the north of England. The day, which is the brainchild of Fr Christopher Jamison, OSB, who is the National Officer for Vocations, will look at ways in which the National Vocations Framework which was recently approved by the Bishopsʼ, Conference of England and Wales, can be effectively implemented on the ground. It will include a talk by Fr Jamison, entitled “,The Churchʼ,s preferential option for the young”, and workshops on how to set up discernment groups, such as a Samuel Group and formation groups, such as Quo Vadis. Discussion will also centre on the possibility of setting up a network of deanery discernment groups. The group from the diocese comprises clergy, religious and interested lay people. There are still some spare places and interested people are invited to contact the Vocations Office. 4. Photograph of the Month Rev Phillip Hall is pictured with members of his family just after his ordination to the diaconate in the Basilica of St Paul-outside-the-walls in Rome during the summer. The photograph was taken in the garden of the Pontifical Beda College where he has studied for the last three years. Rev Hall, who is a parishioner of St Maryʼ,s, Batley and who recently served as deacon during Exposition of the Blessed Sacrament in that church at the end of the annual Torchlight Procession, completed a pastoral placement at St Robertʼ,s Parish, Harrogate, during September and has now returned to Rome to complete his studies. He is due to be ordained priest next July. 5. Invocation 2013 The date for a ground-breaking discernment festival in the north has been fixed: Invocation 2013 will take place on Friday 14th to Sunday 16th June at Ampleforth Abbey in the North York Moors. The weekend will include talks from Rt Rev Michael Campbell osa, Bishop of Lancaster and Rt Rev Terry Drainey, Bishop of Middlesbrough, will celebrate Mass. Activities will include a nocturnal procession of the Blessed Sacrament, workshops on a series of religious traditions and a talk on the diocesan priesthood. The programme is still being finalised. The Invocation festivals have run at Oscott College, Birmingham for the last three years. It was decided that they should be run on a regional basis in 2013. Vocations Director, Fr Paul Grogan, said: “,The north of England has been the heartland of Catholicism since the restoration of the hierarchy in 1850. In recent years congregations have decreased and they have not been boosted by large numbers of immigrants, as has happened in the south. We want to reclaim the north for Christ. We want practising young Catholics to come to this festival in a spirit of openness. God will be calling many to marriage and careers in the world. Heʼ,ll be calling others to priesthood and religious life. Heʼ,s calling all of them to generosity of heart.”,

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Page 13

Oct 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Leeds Catholic Post Page 15 Classified Advertising MARRIAGE CARE Marriage isn’,t always easy —, Counselling can help For an appointment in confidence, with an understanding and experienced listener, please telephone: 0800 389 3801 A Relationship Counselling Service W. Lever Ltd BRADFORD 01274 547137 524 THORNTON ROAD, BRADFORD BD8 9NB FOR OVER 75 YEARS PROVIDING A COMPLETE PERSONAL &, CARING 24 HOUR FUNERAL SERVICE CHAPEL OF REST H UGHES F UNERAL S ERVICES (Catholic Funeral Directors) 180 YORK ROAD, LEEDS LS9 9NT. Tel 2480953/63 152 GREEN LANE, CROSSGATES. Tel 2326900 3 HOLLIN PARK PARADE, OAKWOOD ROUNDABOUT Tel 2499338 Web: wwww.hughesfuneralservices.co.uk Email: info@hughesfuneralservices.co.uk Family owned and managed. Fully Qualified in all aspects. 24 Hour Service Guaranteed Fixed Price Funeral Plans etc. “,At a time of bereavement we carry out our duties with dignity and respect”, In times of bereavement please contact: B. J. MELIA &, SONS (B. J. Melia Dip F.D.) F UNERAL D IRECTORS AND M ONUMENTAL M ASONS Private Chapel of Rest 64 GIBBET STREET, HALIFAX Telephone: 01422 354453 PRE-PAID FUNERAL SERVICE AVAILABLE DETAILS ON REQUEST Looking to advertise a company or an event –, why not advertise in the Leeds Catholic Post This space could be yours! We have good rates for adverts, reaching a local population of 15,000 Contact: Louise Ward, Catholic Post, Hinsley Hall, 62 Headingley Lane, Leeds LS6 2BX Tel: 0113 261 8028 louise.ward@ dioceseofleeds.org.uk On This House Your Blessing Lord! I n his last public engagement before heading to Rome to take up his new position in the Congregation for Divine Worship and the Sacraments, Archbishop Roche, blessed and formally opened two new facilities in Otley. In doing so he recalled how previous Parish Priests of Otley and Bishops of Leeds have struggled for thirty-eight years to find an appropriate and suitable use for the Manor House and its neighbour, Clitherow House, which sits between the Church of Our Lady of All Saints and its primary school. Now in a joint venture between the Diocese and the Parish, the Manor House has been converted into six retirement flats for clergy and Clitherow House has been converted into excellent, versatille and much needed parish facilities. Three priests are already in the porcess of moving into the flats in the Manor House situated close to the town centre`s amenities, one of those priests is Canon Tom O`Connor who has just retired as Parish Priest of Our Lady and All Saints and was one of the project leaders. Some work remains to be completed on Clitherow House and the facilities will become available for use in the next couple of months. Archbishop Roche thanked the team from the parish led by Canon O`Connor and Tim Morgan and diocesan agents and contractors on their excellent collaboration and the marvellous facilities they have created.

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Page 14

Oct 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 14 Leeds Catholic Post Vocations –, News Mgr Paul Grogan 1. Faith walks Days after the launch of the Year of Faith in the diocese the vocations service organised a pilgrimage for young people to the Shrine of our Lady of the Crag in Knaresborough. They also visited the Cave of St Robert, a thirteenth century contemporary of St Francis, on the River Nidd, and enjoyed rowing on the river. The aim of such walks - there will be a total of five during the course of the year –, is to help young people connect with the Catholic heritage of Yorkshire as they seek to discern what role they will play in the Church in the future. They are open to young men and women aged 14 to 19. The walks, which will be of four to six milesʼ, length, will help young people to rediscover the value of the pilgrimage experience. Pope Benedictʼ,s letter proclaiming the Year of Faith, “,Porta Fidei,”, proposes pilgrimages as an indispensable means of igniting faith. Future pilgrimages will be to Ripon, Whitby, Nidderdale, and Osmotherley. The walks are being organised in liaison with the diocesan youth service and the Diocese of Middlesbrough. 2. Discerning the call to the priesthood Two diocesan priests have kindly agreed to appear on a poster which is advertising the meetings of this yearʼ,s discernment group for men who are considering the priesthood. Fr Ian Smith, who is the parish priest of the Parish of the Holy Redeemer, Huddersfield, was photographed as he entered St Patrickʼ,s Church in Huddersfield to celebrate the Mass for his silver jubilee. Fr Christopher Angel, the assistant priest in the same parish and the second youngest priest in the diocese, was photographed just after a meeting of clergy. Vocations Director Mgr Paul Grogan said: “,I am very grateful to these two priests for allowing us to use their pictures in this way. We wanted to convey a number of things. Firstly, the priesthood is about joy –, I think their faces in the photographs convey that. Secondly we wanted to show how we develop as priests during the course of our service in the diocese –, hence the value of juxtaposing a relatively recently ordained priest and one celebrating such a significant jubilee. Thirdly, we wanted to indicate that the priesthood is about brotherhood and community: the fact that Fr Ian and Fr Christopher live and work together illustrates that point well.”, The discernment evenings are held on Wednesdays at Leeds Trinity University College. They comprise a holy hour with the opportunity for confession, beginning at 6.30pm, a half-hour talk –, this year the talks draw on themes from the Year of Faith –, and a shared meal. The meetings during the autumn will take place 17th October, 21st November and 12th December. 3. Fostering a culture of vocations About ten people from the diocese are heading up to Newcastle on Saturday 27th October to take part in a unique consultation exercise which is designed to foster a sense of vocation among Catholics in the north of England. The day, which is the brainchild of Fr Christopher Jamison, OSB, who is the National Officer for Vocations, will look at ways in which the National Vocations Framework which was recently approved by the Bishopsʼ, Conference of England and Wales, can be effectively implemented on the ground. It will include a talk by Fr Jamison, entitled “,The Churchʼ,s preferential option for the young”, and workshops on how to set up discernment groups, such as a Samuel Group and formation groups, such as Quo Vadis. Discussion will also centre on the possibility of setting up a network of deanery discernment groups. The group from the diocese comprises clergy, religious and interested lay people. There are still some spare places and interested people are invited to contact the Vocations Office. 4. Photograph of the Month Rev Phillip Hall is pictured with members of his family just after his ordination to the diaconate in the Basilica of St Paul-outside-the-walls in Rome during the summer. The photograph was taken in the garden of the Pontifical Beda College where he has studied for the last three years. Rev Hall, who is a parishioner of St Maryʼ,s, Batley and who recently served as deacon during Exposition of the Blessed Sacrament in that church at the end of the annual Torchlight Procession, completed a pastoral placement at St Robertʼ,s Parish, Harrogate, during September and has now returned to Rome to complete his studies. He is due to be ordained priest next July. 5. Invocation 2013 The date for a ground-breaking discernment festival in the north has been fixed: Invocation 2013 will take place on Friday 14th to Sunday 16th June at Ampleforth Abbey in the North York Moors. The weekend will include talks from Rt Rev Michael Campbell osa, Bishop of Lancaster and Rt Rev Terry Drainey, Bishop of Middlesbrough, will celebrate Mass. Activities will include a nocturnal procession of the Blessed Sacrament, workshops on a series of religious traditions and a talk on the diocesan priesthood. The programme is still being finalised. The Invocation festivals have run at Oscott College, Birmingham for the last three years. It was decided that they should be run on a regional basis in 2013. Vocations Director, Fr Paul Grogan, said: “,The north of England has been the heartland of Catholicism since the restoration of the hierarchy in 1850. In recent years congregations have decreased and they have not been boosted by large numbers of immigrants, as has happened in the south. We want to reclaim the north for Christ. We want practising young Catholics to come to this festival in a spirit of openness. God will be calling many to marriage and careers in the world. Heʼ,ll be calling others to priesthood and religious life. Heʼ,s calling all of them to generosity of heart.”,

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Page 15

Oct 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Leeds Catholic Post Page 15 Classified Advertising MARRIAGE CARE Marriage isn’,t always easy —, Counselling can help For an appointment in confidence, with an understanding and experienced listener, please telephone: 0800 389 3801 A Relationship Counselling Service W. Lever Ltd BRADFORD 01274 547137 524 THORNTON ROAD, BRADFORD BD8 9NB FOR OVER 75 YEARS PROVIDING A COMPLETE PERSONAL &, CARING 24 HOUR FUNERAL SERVICE CHAPEL OF REST H UGHES F UNERAL S ERVICES (Catholic Funeral Directors) 180 YORK ROAD, LEEDS LS9 9NT. Tel 2480953/63 152 GREEN LANE, CROSSGATES. Tel 2326900 3 HOLLIN PARK PARADE, OAKWOOD ROUNDABOUT Tel 2499338 Web: wwww.hughesfuneralservices.co.uk Email: info@hughesfuneralservices.co.uk Family owned and managed. Fully Qualified in all aspects. 24 Hour Service Guaranteed Fixed Price Funeral Plans etc. “,At a time of bereavement we carry out our duties with dignity and respect”, In times of bereavement please contact: B. J. MELIA &, SONS (B. J. Melia Dip F.D.) F UNERAL D IRECTORS AND M ONUMENTAL M ASONS Private Chapel of Rest 64 GIBBET STREET, HALIFAX Telephone: 01422 354453 PRE-PAID FUNERAL SERVICE AVAILABLE DETAILS ON REQUEST Looking to advertise a company or an event –, why not advertise in the Leeds Catholic Post This space could be yours! We have good rates for adverts, reaching a local population of 15,000 Contact: Louise Ward, Catholic Post, Hinsley Hall, 62 Headingley Lane, Leeds LS6 2BX Tel: 0113 261 8028 louise.ward@ dioceseofleeds.org.uk On This House Your Blessing Lord! I n his last public engagement before heading to Rome to take up his new position in the Congregation for Divine Worship and the Sacraments, Archbishop Roche, blessed and formally opened two new facilities in Otley. In doing so he recalled how previous Parish Priests of Otley and Bishops of Leeds have struggled for thirty-eight years to find an appropriate and suitable use for the Manor House and its neighbour, Clitherow House, which sits between the Church of Our Lady of All Saints and its primary school. Now in a joint venture between the Diocese and the Parish, the Manor House has been converted into six retirement flats for clergy and Clitherow House has been converted into excellent, versatille and much needed parish facilities. Three priests are already in the porcess of moving into the flats in the Manor House situated close to the town centre`s amenities, one of those priests is Canon Tom O`Connor who has just retired as Parish Priest of Our Lady and All Saints and was one of the project leaders. Some work remains to be completed on Clitherow House and the facilities will become available for use in the next couple of months. Archbishop Roche thanked the team from the parish led by Canon O`Connor and Tim Morgan and diocesan agents and contractors on their excellent collaboration and the marvellous facilities they have created.

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Page 16

Oct 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 16 Leeds Catholic Post DEFENDING DEVELOPMENT AID There is a noticeable and strong opposition building up in the media to any more development aid going to tackle poverty overseas and as the political momentum develops there is an increasing danger now of throwing the baby out with the bath water. At times of economic crisis and enforced austerity here in Britain, indeed even more so in southern Europe more and more resentment to tax payers money going abroad is inevitable perhaps particularly if it is felt that it is wasted or squandered to no effect. When a headline question in a broadsheet asks “,Which do you think is a better use of British taxpayersʼ, money, buying drugs for cancer patients or helping India pay for its first manned space flight to the moon?”, it is hardly surprising that the carefully weighted rhetorical question gets a resounding response of “,Itʼ,s a no,ʼ,brainer. The problem is that the question does not reflect the reality of what the aid budget of Britain is and how it works. On the face of it India seems a wealthy country able to have a space programme but it is also by far the second most populus country in the world (of 1.3 billion people) twice the since of the whole of the larger Europe and though some are billionaires and there is economic growth fuelling a growing economy, still over half the worldʼ,s poorest live in India. To tell them to ensure that the Indian government should operate a fairer tax and redistribution system does not tackle the immediate problem of hundreds of thousands of children in families trying to survive on well below internationally accepted poverty lines. Moreover it is hardly becoming that one of the worldʼ,s richest countries which h has the second fastest growing divisions between its own rich and poor and which has turned the very idea of the redistribution of wealth through a pooled tax system into a taboo should suggest it is the way forward for other countries. In the meantime the second misinforming point is the notion that the money given in overseas aid goes to the Indian space programme. Much overseas aid does not go to or even through governments but through on the ground charitable partner organisations focussing on specific projects to tackle particular aspects of the causes of poverty, such as agricultural water and irrigation projects or health or education services. In other words there is a real effort to ensure that aid actually gets right through to those who need it and is not siphoned off by middle men. The £,280 million that goes to India on projects to tackle the huge scale of suffering as a result of poverty actually does not seem that great when contrasted with the recent compensation write of of £,40 million just for mishandling a rail allocation prgramme.More recently the whole aid programme was rubbished as funding “,foreign sexual health projects”, which is presumably a contemptuous way of describing desperately needed aids clinics, drugs and support for people usually suffering through no fault of their own condemned to die prematurely along with their children. The British governmentʼ,s aid programme is actually £,12 billion this year only 0.54 % of our total gross domestic product. Years ago in the 1970ʼ,s “,decade for development”, it was agreed at the United Nations that to tackle the scourge of world poverty each country should aim to contribute 0.7% of its GDP to an overseas aid programme. Only a couple of countries notably Norway and Sweden and for a time Ireland ever hit the target. Britain and the United States remained miles behind. The last Labour government built the commitment to get to the 0.7% target into the budget by law in order to reach it by 2015, and each year increased it from an incredible low rate of 0.32% in 1997. To their credit the Coalition government agreed from the outset to honour this commitment. David Cameron has personally stood by it and the previous Development Secretary Andrew Mitchell reinforced the government position that the banks should not be bailed out on the backs of the poorest 1 billion people in our world. Perhaps it is that commitment of his that has now drawn the sustained media criticism of his comments to police at the gates of Downing Street. Certainly his replacement, the former Transport Secretary Justine Greening, has far less empathy for any aid budget Talk of a “,moral obligation to the worldʼ,s poorest”, is being glibly trumped by claims that “,charity begins at home”,. Perhaps both “,mercy”, on the suffering poor and “,Justice”, should be the watchwords that structure our economics and budgets rather than an inward looking self preservation. Nor in our increasingly interdependent world will “,little Englander”, self preservation and isolation help. Our aid budget itself builds international bridges and can lead not only to better and effective emergency assistance in disasters but to foster fairer trade and commerce in our international relations. To turn away now would be an act of international suicide. Of course that is not to say that the aid programme should not be spent well. Again in the last Government we built it into law that it has to be spent as a priority on alleviating the poverty of the poorest . That is why the programme has to be checked and audited. Indeed there is a special House of Commons Aid and development Select Committee which meets weekly and scrutinises the aid programme. It call civil servants in to account for its spending and goes on field visits to check up that the projects are working effectively. And yes there is room for improvement and recent criticism of the excessive use of expensive “,consultants”, seems to me to be justified but it is not a reason to scrap the whole programme or axe our modest budget commitments.Project aid is increasing replacing “,government to government”, budget support. Ther is more work with aid agency partners such as Oxfam, Save the Children, Christian Aid and our own Cafod which themselves work with local development partners to ensure that the funds get to where they are most needed and most effectively used. Cafod needs our continued support but MPs also now need reminding that a government aid programme even in austere times is part of our commitment to tackling world hunger. John Battle KSG 60 Years of Service T he Briery Retreat Centre in Ilkley celebrated its 60th Anniversary on the 15th October, 2012 the feast of Our Lady of Sorrows. There were approximately 60 guests representing the people from the many different groups who regularly use The Briery. Mgr. Kieran Heskin, representing Archbishop Roche, celebrated Mass and summed up the celebration in a very erudite homily. Some of which is quoted below: ʻ,For the past sixty years, the Briery, which by any standards was an inspired choice for a Retreat Centre, has been a true alma mater, a nourishing mother, to countless pilgrims and retreatants who have come here. This is a house that is to some extent outside the world and yet the world is in this house. No one will ever tell, for no one will ever know, except the Lord himself, the full extent of what really happens here. This house, in this wonderful setting, in the midst of trees and hills, that are so conducive to reflection and prayer, has for sixty years been a Retreat Centre. As such, it has enabled the followers of Christ who have come here on retreat, to awaken their sense of wonder before the sacred mysteries of our faith. It has afforded them the opportunity to direct the light of the Gospel into their own lives, into the world in which they live and into the lives of those whom they serve. Today we celebrate the fact that those who work here and their predecessors have for sixty years been instrumental in directing peopleʼ,s gaze towards God and in impressing upon them their dependence on him. On behalf of Bishop Roche and the Diocese of Leeds, on behalf of all who are here and on behalf of Sacred Heart Parish, I would like to extend warmest congratulations to you Sisters of the Cross and Passion on your inspirational Briery ministry over the past sixty years and may you have the resources to continue to serve the church in this wonderful way far into the futureʼ,

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Page 17

Oct 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Leeds Catholic Post Page 17 Inside the Synod of Bishops: Philippa Hitchen was one of just a handful of journalists allowed into the Vatican’,s Synod Hall to watch as the bishops discussing their concerns, priorities and practical suggestions about how to become effective evangelisers in the 21st century…,. Silence, Humility and Simplicity 262 bishops from countries around the world. From Jerusalem, where it all began a couple of millennia ago, to South Sudan, which only became an independent nation one year ago. A hundred religious and lay experts, men and women from all walks of life with practical, grassroots experience in different areas of evangelisation. A handful of fraternal delegates –, or special guests –, from other Christian Churches, invited to share their insights into the best ways of combating secularism, hostility or widespread indifference towards the faith. The Synod of Bishops meeting from October 7th to 28th to discuss New Evangelisation is a feat of organisation, perfected over almost half a century since Pope Paul VI first started the practise of calling Church leaders to Rome to discuss the most pressing issues of the day. Almost all the delegates are given a few minutes to address the gathered assembly, which meets behind closed doors with just a few Vatican journalists and photographers present. Pope Benedict attends the majority of morning and afternoon sessions, which begin and end with prayers and a reflection on the psalms or readings of the day. Presentations are made in English, French, Spanish, Italian or German, though the introduction and summing up of all the interventions are always in Latin –, given this year by Cardinal Donald Wuerl of Washington D.C. Participants are then divided into smaller groups which draw up a series of propositions or suggestions to be included in a concluding message and a final synod document, which will be written by the Pope himself over the coming months. This particular Synod has been marked by the celebration, during the first weekʼ,s work, of the 50th anniversary of the start of the Second Vatican Council. That landmark meeting of the Church has been referred to on countless occasions as these Church leaders tackle the question of how to present the timeless message of Godʼ,s love for humanity with ʻ,new energy, new methods and new expressionsʼ, that will be understood by people with less and less education in the faith. First and foremost in this task, the bishops have been pointing to the need for personal conversion and a renewed relationship with Christ, so that each baptised person –, ordained, religious or lay - can be aware of his or her role and responsibility for evangelisation in everyday life. Mutual respect and dialogue with people of all cultures and religious traditions must be another characteristic of these new evangelisers, who are not afraid to engage with cutting edge issues of scientific research or the latest communications technology. The family and traditional parish settings are still seen as a focus for primary Catholic education, without forgetting the vital work of schools, hospitals, charitable centres and other places where non- believers can see Christian values in action in a very practical way. While mass attendance is dwindling in many countries, participants noted that shrines and other places of pilgrimage are drawing more people than ever before in search of some kind of spiritual experience. Throughout the first week and a half there were many interesting interventions about the effects of globalisation or the gifts of the Holy Spirit, about the impact of immigration or the importance of art in the liturgy, about the power of prayer and the availability of priests for the sacrament of Reconciliation, The importance of ecumenical cooperation and the challenges of interfaith dialogue, particularly in an Islamic context, were key issues which surfaced almost every day. But among the speakers who impressed me most were a couple of bishops from the Philippines who spoke eloquently from their experience in one of the most Catholic countries of the world. Three words struck me in particular from their presentations: silence, humility and simplicity. The value of silence was underlined by the young, yet authoritative and engaging Archbishop of Manila, Luis Antonio Tagle, who was already making waves at the last synod I covered on the Word of God back in 2008. To be an effective evangeliser, he said, the Church cannot and must not pretend to have easy answers to the dilemmas facing men and women today. Instead, it must be an attentive and listening Church –, only that way will people believe that God listens to them too. Secondly, he said, the Church must be a humble Church, modelling herself more on Jesus and being less preoccupied by her power, prestige and position in society. Another Filipino bishop, Socrates Villegas, echoed that striking call for a new humility of heart and simplicity of life. The Gospel, he said, cannot thrive in pride and our evangelisation has been harmed by the arrogance of its messengers. Just in case anyone hadnʼ,t been listening attentively, he reiterated we, the hierarchy, must “,shun arrogance, hypocrisy, bigotry, punishing the errant instead of covering up our own mistakes.”, In these increasingly difficult times, where families find it hard to make ends meet and hope is in increasingly short supply, bishops have been reminded of the need to be much closer to the lived experiences of their people. The Gospel, itʼ,s often said, canʼ,t be preached to people with empty stomachs. Not so, according to these two Filipino bishops: the Gospel can be preached to those with empty stomachs, but only if the stomach of the preacher is as empty as that of his parishioners. Philippa M Hitchen Our Rome Correspondent The Dudley Brothers S JF has it’,s very own sporting brothers on the way to emulating the successful Olympic triathlete medallists, the Browlee brothers. Thomas Dudley competes in the Biathle discipline. This event consists of a 500 metre run, followed by a 50 metre swim and finishes with another 500 metre run. Thomas has made it to the British Biathle Team and in 2011, managed a very creditable 4th in the World Championships in the Bulgarian capital of Sofia. Thomas missed out on a third place because he hadnʼ,t put his shoes on properly after the swim, which led to him losing concentration on the final leg. He will now move up a level to the U12s. Despite the increase in his competitors standards, Thomas is hopeful of a top 10 finish when he competes in Dubai in October. It is a fantastic achievement to be competing at World level. Thomas continues the family tradition in Biathle as his 6th Form brother Jonathan also competes for the Yorkshire team. Jonathan is competing to the national mens standard and trains with the successful Brownlee brothers, who came to national prominence when they achieved Gold and Bronze medals at the London 2012 Olympic Games. Thomas said, “,The Brownlee brothers are a real inspiration to me, especially when I watched them in the Olympics. I hope I can achieve the success they have achieved this year.”, First recipient of the Sonia McMahon Memorial Award I n September, Notre Dame Student Bethany Noble became the first recipient of the Sonia McMahon Memorial Award, given by Addleshaw Goddard a leading Leeds Law firm. The award is given in memory of a late partner at the firm who was committed to helping and mentoring young talented Law students. Bethany was not a member of Notre Dameʼ,s Law academy in her L6 year, but due to her exceptional engagement with opportunities offered by the Law department she was offered a place in the U6, and graduated in May along with the other students. To win the award Bethany had to fight off competition from a large number of applicants from schools and colleges in Leeds, Manchester and London. Richard Ryan who now works for Law firm Squire Saunders commented “,The quality of the applications was high, but Bethany Noble from Notre Dame College in Leeds was ultimately selected to be the first recipient of the award. Bethany also attended our Leeds Legal Access Week in August 2011.”, As part of the award, Bethany received £,2000 which she is using to buy a new laptop, text books and to help with student accommodation as she starts her Law degree at Northumbria University this year. She will also receive valuable mentoring and work experience placements at Addleshaw Goddard throughout her time at University. SVP fundraiser O n Sunday 21st October at Bramham Park, West Yorkshire, a group from the Leeds Universities SVP will be taking part in the Major Series Challenge. The challenge entails a 10-12km run through muddy bogs, rough off-road tracks, and thickly wooded areas with obstacles every 1km. The obstacles are kept as a surprise until the day, but in the past they have included climbing over hay bales, crawling underneath nets on the floor, and getting across large ponds. Amanda Stafford, Sarah Carpenter, Laura Mitcham, and Jacqueline Lavallee have been training for this event and now the weather has become very wet there are plenty of muddy areas for them to train in!! The girls are trying to raise money for SVP projects, any donations would be most welcome and the justgiving page is https://www.justgiving.com/leedsunisvp The SVP group at the Leeds Universities is very active and they try to raise awareness about SVP and the many projects that SVP can help with. At least once a semester an awareness evening is held at Leeds Universityʼ,s Catholic Chaplaincy after their 5pm mass where cakes are sold to raise money and lots of information is provided. As well as trying to raise awareness, members of the group also take sandwiches and hot drinks to the homeless in the city centre of Leeds, visit the elderly in a nearby care home, and write Christmas cards to prisoners.

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Page 18

Oct 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 18 Leeds Catholic Post First Friday of the Month SINGLE CATHOLICS (appeals mostly to over 35s) meet for mass at 7.30pm at Our Lady of Lourdes church, 130 Cardigan Rd, Headingley, Leeds LS6 3BJ, and a social afterwards. Events held during the month include walks, meals, cinema, theatre etc. For further details tel Sean (Chair) 07811 468939. Leeds Cathedral 20-35 Group Young people (20-35 years old) who attend St. Anne`s Cathedral in Leeds meet regularly every Thursday for spiritual, social and charitable activities. For further details search Facebook for “,Leeds Cathedral 20-35 Group”,, phone 07816 891872 or 07759 591233 or email leedscathedral20-35@hotmail.co.uk Crusade Mass The crusade Mass and Rosary of Mary Immaculate is held at St Patrick`s Church, Bradford, on the first Saturday of the Month after 12.15pm Mass , Second Sunday of Month 2pm Meeting of Bradford Fraternity of the Secular Franciscan Order at St. Anthony`s Convent, Clayton, Bradford.` `Third Sunday of Month 2.30pm Meeting of Leeds Fraternity of the Secular Franciscan Order at the Cathedral. Ampleforth Renewal Community Ampleforth Abbey, meet 1st Sunday each month, at Ampleforth. 11 .30am Praise, Speaker, Sharing Groups, Reconciliation, Exposition, Finishing with Mass and Healing at 4.00pm. All enquiries: Seamus McEneaney 01429 426181 Monthly Vocations Mass Mount St Josephʼ,s Chapel 11am First Wednesday of Month. Calix: An organisation for those recovering from addiction and working the 12 Step Programme of AA so that they can develop and deepen their relationship with Jesus as their Higher Power. Meets on the First Sunday of every month at Corpus Christi Church, Neville Rd. Osmondthorpe. Leeds. Mass at 4.30pm followed by meeting. Contact: Fr. Michael on 01977 510266 Helpers of Gods precious infants, prayer vigils, regular weekly prayer vigils at Marie Stopes Abortuary, 7 Barrack Road.LS7 4AB, next to Jaguar car showrooms. Fridays 12-30 to 1-30, and Saturdays 9am-l1am. Monthly all night vigil of reparation in St Marys Horsforth 12th of every month, 9-30pm to 6am . Other times variable. Further details Pat 0113 2582745 Rosary rally Sat Oct 9th 2010 12-30pm Leeds cenotaph, outside art gallery, Headrow. Contact 07747698553/ or 0113 2582745 Leeds Schola Gregoriana The Schola meets on the 2nd Saturday of each month (except August), at 2.00 p.m., for rehearsal, followed by sung Latin (Vigil) Mass in the Ordinary Form, fulfilling the Sunday Obligation. An opportunity to learn and sing Gregorian Chant on a regular basis. Contact Michael Murphy (Director) on 07810 808 530, or Peter Lawley (01423 884274), or Rev. G.M. Parfitt (01756 793794). Days Of Renewal St. Wilfid`s Deanery Day of Renewal led by Fr. Stephen Wright OSB. Second Saturday of the month beginning Sat. March 10th from 12 noon to 4pm. Venue St. Aelred`s Church hall, Woodlands Drive, Harrogate. Please bring a contribution for a shared table lunch. For more information ring Dolores Omand 01423870789 or visit the Diocesan web site www.ccrleeds.org Diary 20 –, 35 years group Email: leedscathedralgroup@gmail.com Facebook: Leeds Cathedral 20-35 Group Phone: 07810 291 154 Helpers of Gods precious infants/Leeds people for life. Regular weekly prayer vigils at Marie Stopes, to pray and offer help to women considering abortion and witness to the sanctity of life. Thurs 10am, Fri.12-30, sat 10am other days by arrangement. Monthly all-night Eucharistic vigil St Marys Horsforth, 12th of every month 9-30pm (Mass) till 4am. Rosary and divine mercy every 1st sat of month, Cenotaph, outside the art gallery the Headrow Leeds.10-30.am Enquiries Pat 07747698553/0113 2582745 Diary A few moments for thought and prayer Almighty God, we have no confidence in our own strength, all our trust is in you. Graciously look down on these Pastors of your Church: aid their counsels and their legislation with the light of your divine grace. Be pleased to hear the prayers we offer you, united in faith, in voice, in mind. Mary, help of Christians, help of bishops, prosper now this work of ours, and by your kindly aid bring it to a happy, successful conclusion. And do you, with Saint Joseph your spouse, the holy apostles Peter and Paul, Saint John the Baptist and Saint John the Evangelist, intercede for us before the throne of God. To Jesus Christ, our most loving Redeemer, the immortal King of all peoples and all ages, be love, power and glory for ever and ever. Amen. Blessed Pope Johnʼ,s Prayer in opening the Second Vatican Council Be Still Deadline: For receipt of material for next edition: November 2nd 2012 Parishes receive their copies: November 18th 2012 Send articles, reports &, pictures: Mr John Grady, Hinsley Hall, 62 Headingley Lane, Leeds LS6 2BX. Send text as word doc, pictures as jpeg, e-mail to: john.grady@dioceseofleeds.org.uk Tel: 0113 261 8022. Advertising Deadline November 12th Please note paid-for advertising is dealt with by: Louise Ward Hinsley Hall, 62 Headingley Lane, Leeds LS6 2BX Telephone: 0113 261 8028 Email: louise.ward@dioceseofleeds.org.uk Your Cath Post The community of Sacred Heart Catholic School, Ilkley celebrated CAFOD Fast Day (5th Oct) with a special assembly given by Year4 and by collecting eight large boxes of food. The children dramatised the parable of the Rich Fool and performed a very funny song which listed lots of vegetables. A highlight was when Robbie stepped forward and displayed his strong muscles. As part of the assembly the generous collection of food was presented to Mr Inglehearn and Mr Smith from the Ilkley Branch of the SVP society. They thanked the children and explained that their gifts would be given to needy families in Leeds. The assembly ended with the audience singing the funny song with great enthusiasm. CAFOD FAST DAY By Chris Copley (St Bede’,s Lay Chaplain) At St Bedeʼ,s, morning prayers during each week of the school year, follow a particular theme. At the start of the academic year the prayer themes for the week are based upon different lines of our School Prayer. During week 5, from Monday 1 October until Friday 5 October, the theme of the week for morning prayers was, ʻ,To reach out to those in need.ʼ, But how were we to put this prayer into practical action? It was decided to put this prayer into action in two ways: Firstly by donating food, (such as tins or packets of non-perishables such as Rice or Pasta) Once collected the donated food foods will be given to the Saint Vincent de Paul Society and to the Bradford Metropolitan Food Bank who will distribute it to families and individuals who are in need in the Bradford area. Secondly, on Thursday 4 October we had a Non-Uniform day, which raised nearly one thousand pounds to help support the developments at a school in Marigat in Kenya, where an extra classroom and Library are being built. So, in a practical way, the students of St Bedeʼ,s have ʻ,reached out to those in need,ʼ, both near and far! If you readers would like to help those who are in need in Bradford, by donating food for this appeal –, please send the food to the Reception at St Bedeʼ,s Catholic Grammar School and the food will be forwarded to the Saint Vincent de Paul Society and to the Bradford Metropolitan Food Bank. St Bede’,s ‘,Reach out to those in need’, in Prayer and Action A round two hundred people came along to the Cedar Court Hotel in Bradford on a miserably wet evening to receive the Kinharvie Institute`s report following their review of the ",Providing Priests for the People", programme. The review had been carried out over an eight month period and culminated in a series of individual interviews and public meetings in May. Many of those who had taken part in these interviews and meetings were there to hear the findings of the Kinharvie Institute. Ronnie McEwan and Paul Cummins, the lead facilitators in the May events, presented. In a foreword to the Report Archbishop Arthur wrote: ",When I embarked on this review I had no idea that I would be appointed by the Holy Father to take up a position of responsiblity in Rome and it is a matter of personal regret that I shall not be able to implement many of the recommendations this report contains. It is clear that not everything was done to everyone`s satisfaction and I readily acknowledge that. It is also clear that there has been some hurt and disappointment in the way some things were percevied to have been done and I accept responsibiity for that. It is important that lessons are learnt so that we can do things better. The challenges that the diocese identified in 2004 still remain as does the need to address them. The findings of this review should enrich and improve what now remains to be done.", Kinharvie Report

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Page 19

Oct 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Leeds Catholic Post Page 19 T he Catholic and local communities of Ss Peter &, Paul, Yeadon came together on Wednesday, 19th September, to witness the official opening and Blessing of the new school building. The ceremony was conducted by Archbishop Arthur Roche and began outside in the glorious sunshine by the unveiling of a plaque and the cutting of a ribbon. Everyone moved inside and the service began with the congregation singing the school hymn. During the service Archbishop Roche speaking to all present but focussing on the pupils, reiterated the Pope`s final message to pupils of Catholic Schools during his visit two years ago that they were called to be Saints. Archbishop Roche referred to the greatness achieved by the sports men and women at both the Olympics and the Paralympics and said that the children present should all strive to be great and not settle for second best. At the end of the service Mrs Diane Todd, Headteacher thanked all present for helping to make the celebration special, especially Archbishop Roche. She also thanked members of the local community schools for their understanding and patience during the building work and to the tireless efforts of all members of staff during the move into the new building. SCHOOL BLESSING T hese were the words that Mgr Heskin used to describe the day at St Malachy’,s school in Halifax. In fact it was the day chosen to celebrate the Diamond anniversary of the opening of the school, Mgr Heskin was there in place of Bishop Roche because the Bishop having been called to Rome by the Pope was busy prior to his leaving. The hall was decorated with flags and pictures –, the children were excited and waiting for the events to happen and parents grand-parents and visitors poured in to join the, including the wife of the first Headmaster and the son of the first Headmaster Fr Harrington. The liturgy for the Mass had been well prepared and the children took a full part in the readings and prayers as well as leading the adults in the singing. The Head, as Mgr Heskin pointed out, has only been in the school since the start of term –, but she must be well pleased that she has such a good base to build on. Also present was Fr Nealon the Parish Priest of St Malachyʼ,s. In his homily Mgr Heskin was surprised at the answers he got from the children as he spoke about the school and commented on the readings of the Mass –, he concluded his words by pointing out to the teachers the importance of their role as teachers –, they are the people the children will most remember. At the end of the Mass everyone was invited to stay and have a cup of tea and a bun!! A Real Royal Jubilee. A Royal Jubilee In 1982 at the age of 44, Sylvia Wright sold all her worldly goods in Leeds to go alone to care for poor, sick and disabled people in Tamil Nadu, Southern India. 30 years later at the age of 74, she runs a 220-bed hospital and cares for patients suffering with conditions ranging from TB and diabetes to HIV/AIDS. 80,000 outpatients are treated each year. Other projects include two day centres for 80 severely disabled children, a residential school for 210 profoundly deaf children and a Nursing College training 80 student nurses to the high standards Sylvia learned at Leeds General Infirmary. The Sylvia Wright Christmas Card for 2012, illustrated, is a unique and colourful design by Ramjayam, one of the deaf boys in Sylviaʼ,s school. His stunning Indian interpretation is entitled “,In search of Bethlehem”,. On the back is a first picture of the full complement of the 80 nursing students in Sylviaʼ,s Florence Nightingale School of Nursing –, all this achieved in just 3 years. The greeting inside the card is: “,With all good wishes for Christmas and a Happy New Year”,. To encourage sales, the price of the cards remains unchanged. Readers are invited to cut out and use the order form below. All proceeds go to support Sylviaʼ,s work. The Sylvia Wright Trust takes pride in sending 97 pence in every pound raised direct to Sylvia. Sylvia Wright’,s Indian Christmas Card “,In search of Bethlehem”, C ivic leaders from four Metropolitan Councils joined the Lord Lieutenant of West Yorkshire in the Cathedral for a celebration of Vespers in thanksgiving for the Diamond Jubilee of the Queen. The Lord Lieutenant, Dr. Ingrid Roscoe was joined by Cllr Anne Castle, Lord Mayor of Leeds, Cllr Dale Smith, Lord Mayor of Bradford, Cllr Richard Bolen, Mayor of Wakefield and Cllr John Hardy, Mayor of Calderdale. Representatives of Leeds Minister led by Canon Tony Bundock, Rector of Leeds also joined the celebration and the Choir of Leeds Minister joined our Cathedral Choirs for the occasion which was led by the Cathedral Dean, Mgr Philip Moger. In his homily, Mgr Michael McQuinn, recalled the greeting sent to Her Majesty by Pope Benedict in which he spoke of the Queen`s contribution to ecumenical and inter faith dialogue.as well as the Pope`s praise for the Queen: ",During the past sixty years", the Pope had said ",you have offered to your subjects and to the whole world an inspiring example of dedication to duty and a commitment to maintaining the principles of freedom, justice and democracy, in keeping with a noble vision of the role of a Christian monarch.", Mgr. McQuinn also recalled the Archbishop of Canterbury`s address at the National Service of Thanksgiving in which he reflected on the Queen`s dedication to public service: ",We are marking", said Dr. Williams ",six decades of living proof that public service is possible and that it is a place where happiness can be found.", At the end of Vespers the Blessing was given by Bishop David Konstant, Emeritus Bishop of Leeds. Vespers for the Queen’,s Diamond Jubilee Sylvia Wright Christmas Cards Please send me: 100 cards £,28 ❏, 80 cards £,23 ❏, 60 cards £,17.50 ❏, 40 cards £,12 ❏, 20 cards £,6 ❏, Postage per order £,2 Donation _____ To: Mrs Barbara Dodman, 13 Creskeld Drive, Bramhope, Leeds, LS16 9JE 0113 2619152 From: ...................................................................................................... (block capitals) ................................................................................................................ Phone: .................................................................................................... E-Mail: .................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................... I enclose a cheque for £, …,…,…,…,…, payable to the Sylvia Wright Trust

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Page 20

Oct 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 20 GOLDEN CELEBRATIONS FOR ST WALBURGA’,S, SHIPLEY T he church of St Walburga on Kirkgate in Shipley, now part of the new parish of St Teresa Benedicta of the Cross, has enjoyed a year of celebrations to mark the 50th anniversary of its opening in June, 1962. We discovered during our planning for these events that the church building had never been consecrated, so this omission was put right on Friday, October 5th when the parish was the setting for a solemn mass of dedication and consecration. As Archbishop Roche is now in Rome, the service was conducted by the Right Reverend Alan Hopes, Auxiliary Bishop tin the Archdiocese of Westminster. The large congregation of parishioners was augmented by many of the priests of the diocese, as well as invited guests from other churches, the local council and our schools. The service of dedication and consecration is a long and complex one, having many of its roots in the Old Testament and the establishment of Israel and the Jews as the Chosen People of God. It is full of symbolism, with the use of sacred oils, incense and candles. In some aspects, it is reminiscent of the Good Friday and Easter Vigil services. At the outset, the altar was bare and no candles were lit. We began with the Introductory Rites and the Liturgy of the Word, and during his homily, Bishop Hopes explained the importance of the service to us as a parish, and linked the use of symbols to specific events in the Old Testament such as the life of Jacob, and the building of the Temple in Jerusalem. The Consecration itself began with the anointing of the altar with oil of chrism, and then Bishop Hopes marked the walls of the church with the sign of the cross using the same oil. This was followed by the lighting of incense on the bare altar, and the incensing of the church and the congregation. Finally, all the candles were lit, including some new wall sconces which symbolise the new status of the church. The altar was then prepared for the continuation of the mass. This event will be seen as one of the highlights of our year, and was a truly joyous occasion. The service was enhanced by music from the organ, our instrumental group, the choir, and also the choir from St Walburgaʼ,s Primary School, who sang to a standard that belied their age! We concluded a very memorable evening with a party in the parish room, enjoying a shared supper and several glasses of wine. Not even the torrential rain could dampen our spirits! Jo Buck ST. BEDE’,S REUNION DINNER This year St. Bedeʼ,s Old Boys Annual Dinner is being held at the Bradford Club, Piece Hall Yard, Bradford, BD1 on Friday 23rd November. All former Old Boys are cordially invited but a special invitation goes to the Old Boys who started at the school in 1958 and 1959 to mark the occasion of them reaching or just about to reach the milestone of becoming OAPs and of course to renew acquaintances they may not have seen for many years. For further information and to order tickets contact: John Simpson (01274 676259 Mob: 07989842452) or Tony Verity 01274 617229 Mob:07951942485).

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