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Leeds Catholic Post History

Newspaper for the Diocese of Leeds

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Jul/Aug 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 1

Jul/Aug 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

CATHOLIC POST THE NEWSPAPER FOR THE DIOCESE OF LEEDS JULY 2011 www.dioceseofleeds.org.uk www.catholicpost.org.uk Whats inside A thousand People Celebrate New Parish Lourdes Page 10 Big Sing Page 9 Corpus Christi Procession Page 8 Year Of Catholic Education Pages 2/3 A t least a thousand people flocked to the ruins of Kirkstall Abbey, Leeds, last Sunday July 10th to celebrate a years work of forming their New Parish. Over the last year three Parishes in Leeds, Holy Name, Assumption and St Mary’,s have been working together to become one Parish served by two priests as part of the reorganisation of resources in the Leeds Area. This is part of the plan that the Bishop published called providing Priests for the People. The name this New Parish was given by the Bishop was Our Lady of Kirstall. To mark the end of this first years work it was decided that a Mass celebrated at Kirkstall Abbey would be a fitting sign. Added to that the Bishop was asked to preside and to preach. In Conclusion he urged the people who were gathered: ‘,Today, we gather not as numerous as the 60 or 20 thousand Catholics from the 1950s - for the ravages of these latter years have altered the focus and attention of many from the voice of Christ - but, nonetheless, we gather, as did the monks before us, as the faithful remnant of those who still profess the ancient faith, and now under the patronage of this great woman,( Our Lady of Kirkstall) the Lord’,s fist disciple who was so loved by the monks in this place, to bear witness to her Son. It is to all of us, but not least of all to all of you who are now under this special patronage, that what lay at the heart of this impressive heritage has now come. And there is nothing that will speak more volubly or more strikingly to the world in which we live than the beauty of the lives of those whose hearts have not grown coarse, whose ears have not become dull and whose eyes are not shut to the reality of Christ, the word of life, the sower and the seed of faith. Amen.’, FROM JUST £,299 R.G.R. MEMORIALS COLOUR CATALOGUE QUALITY MEMORIALS AT AFFORDABLE PRICES IN GRANITE, MARBLE &, STONE ALL PRICES INCLUDE DELIVERY &, FIXING Ogee top memorial 2’,6”, high Fully polished Black Granite, Delivered and Fixed for £,399 inc VAT FREE Tel: 0113 282 3888 43 High Ridge Park, Rothwell, Leeds LS26 0NL

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Page 2

Jul/Aug 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 2 Leeds Catholic Post YEAR OF CATHOLIC EDUCATION T he 2010-2011 academic year started with the visit of Pope Benedict XVI and a very special gathering at St Mary’,s University College, Twickenham on 17 September 2010.The Holy Father joined 3,000 children at the celebration of Catholic education. 180 school children with their staff attended the day whilst many others watched it live in their schools on television. The day marked the start of the Year of Catholic Education. The schools in the Diocese are an important part of the mission of the Church and as they reach the end of the current academic year, the celebrations reflected many different aspects of school life. All Saints Catholic College celebrated 50 years of education on their site, the diversity of talent of pupils in the Bradford Catholic Schools Partnership was celebrated in music and dance at St George’,s Hall, the valuable contribution of governors across the Diocese was celebrated at a Mass at the Cathedral. Finally for those Headteachers retiring or moving on to new opportunities there have been events in their schools and parishes. We wish all retiring staff a long and healthy retirement with their families and thank them for their generous contribution to Catholic education. CELEBRATIONS! A Cathedral Gathering for Governors T he latest event marking the Year of Catholic Education was a Mass for Governors held at the Cathedral on the evening of 20th July. Bishop Roche had originally issued an invitation to representatives of every school in the diocese but he found himself unable to be present for the occasion, having had to travel to Norwich for the funeral of Bishop Michael Evans of East Anglia. In his place the chief concelebrant was Mgr John Wilson, the Episcopal Vicar for Evangelisation. Mgr Wilson welcomed governors from across the diocese with a brief message from the Bishop and said the Mass was an opportunity to thank all those who exercised responsibility for the governance of schools and colleges in the diocese. They were, he said, an example of modern-day ‘,Good Shepherds’, looking after the welfare of the educational communities in their care. After Mass the congregation made their way to Wheeler Hall for a different kind of gathering where governors were able to meet colleagues from different parts of the diocese, members of the Diocesan Council for Education and staff from the diocesan Office for Education and Schools. School sports Achievement Celebration H oly Family Catholic Primary School in Armley held a special assembly at the end of term to celebrate the considerable sporting success the children had achieved this year. Chelsea Ladies footballer Gemma Bonner visited the school to present awards and sign autographs. Gemma, who is a former pupil of head teacher Peter McQuillen Strong at Immaculate Heart of Mary Primary School where she began her footballing career. She took up the game from a young age and Mr Strong said “,I was hearing about a girl who could play football while Gemma was in KS1. As soon as she was old enough she became a vital part of the school and girls football teams. Helping us to win many trophies, I am so proud she has continued playing and is having such a great career.”, Gemma was recruited by Leeds United academy from the age of 9 and developed through their system to play for the senior team. She has also represented England at U17, U19 and U23 level. In March this year Chelsea Ladies secured Gemmas signature as they began their campaign in the Women’,s Premier League. Her Chelsea team are currently 3rd in the league. Gemma presented prizes to children for winning the Leeds Schools FA North West League, The Adam Chadwick Trophy and the Leeds Schools FA Girls League. School teams had also achieved runners up spots in the Bishop Roche Netball Trophy and St Bart’,s Girls Football Cup. PE coordinator Mr Antoni Biedka said, “,We have had an exceptional year, the children have been very enthusiastic and committed to training and playing in many sports, we are lucky to have so many dedicated children and staff who give up their time to put on extra curricular activities. The final awards presented were to two children who have shown particular skill, team work, enthusiasm and dedication, Michael Hamill won the Sports Boy of the year award and Daniella Breen the Sports Girl of the Year. Pictured is Gemma Bonner presenting the awards to Michael Hamill and Daniella Breen. Gemma Bonner in centre with two winners

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Jul/Aug 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Leeds Catholic Post Page 3 S t Georges Hall was packed on Wednesday 13 July to celebrate Catholic education in Bradford. The successful evening was planned by staff from the Bradford Catholic Schools Partnership with special thanks to those from St Bede’,s Grammar School and St Joseph’,s Catholic College. Pupils from across the Bradford primary and secondary schools sang and danced the evening away demonstrating amazing musical talents. Bishop Arthur and the audience were entertained by energetic Ukrainian dancing, rock bands, brass bands, contemporary dance, a salsa band, cheerleaders and many more acts that took everyone’,s breath away. It was certainly a true showcase for the immense talent that there is in our schools. The concert featured over 350 young singers from the Catholic schools of Bradford, all of whom are members of the Diocese of Leeds Schools Singing Programme. The concert opened with the Bradford Boys’, Choir singing an exciting arrangement of ‘,Chattanooga Choo Choo’, . The Bradford Girls’, Choir (45 strong, age 11-18) fresh from their recent performances at the National Festival of Music for Youth and Llangollen Eisteddfod brought the first half to a close with a vibrant performance of ‘,The Rhythm of Life.’, The concert concluded with a rendition of Mama Mia sung by the combined choirs of over 350 voices, before the Bishop of Leeds, the Rt. Rev Arthur Roche thanked everyone for coming, and noted what excellence was to be found in the young people of Bradford! 50 Not Out –, A Legacy for the Future O n a beautiful July morning the community of All Saints Catholic College, Huddersfield came together to celebrate fifty years of Catholic education on the Bradley Bar site. Miss Anita Bodurka, headteacher welcomed all those gathered and said that the school was delighted to have Bishop Arthur as the Principal Celebrant of the celebration Mass. She briefly outlined the history of education on the site -in 1961 St Gregory’,s Catholic Grammar School and St Augustine’,s Catholic Secondary School opened and were eventually amalgamated in 1973 to become All Saints Catholic College. In his homily the Bishop said that he was delighted to see so many yellow shirts in the congregation and took the opportunity to thank those pupils who had recently been to Lourdes for the generosity of spirit they had shown. He added that this celebration was a great occasion for the school and remembered with gratitude all those who, throughout the past fifty years, had made the school what it is today –, the headteachers, staff, governing bodies and, most importantly, all the young people that had come through the doors of All Saints and had gone on to give back to society what they had received. Bishop Arthur said that at times of celebration it was good to take time for reflection. He said that education is more than facts and figures but gives us the ability to ask the important question such as the true meaning of all things. Bishop Arthur reminded the students that last September during the ‘,Big Assembly’, Pope Benedict had said that they were all created for greatness and that second best won’,t do. Throughout the Mass the Leeds Diocesan Huddersfield Choir led the singing and students of the school took part in the readings, the prayers and the offertory. At the end of Mass Bishop Arthur thanked everyone for participating in the Mass and said that it had been a fitting celebration. He particularly thanked Miss Bodurka for inviting him to lead the Mass and said that he was delighted that all that had taken place during the past fifty years had led to a sturdy foundation for Catholic education in the future to serve the Huddersfield and Halifax deaneries. Miss Bodurka thanked the Bishop and presented him with a cheque for the Peru Missions. The All Saints Gospel Choir sang a rousing selection of songs to the congregation before everyone moved on to enjoy the lunch provided. Staff and students continued enjoying the occasion throughout the afternoon with a selection of fun activities taking place such as tug-o-war, rounders, high-slide fun, football, cricket and many many more. St Augustine’,s headteacher retires A fter 38 years of dedicated service to Catholic Education, Michael Teggart is retiring from his role as Headteacher of St. Augustine’,s Catholic Primary School in Leeds, the post he has held for the last 16 years. Michael has led and inspired staff and children through obvious love for his faith, the way he lives out this faith and in the way he treats and interacts with everyone in the school and Parish community. His wish has always been to create and maintain a “,happy and holy”, school and he has, most certainly, achieved this! Chair of Governors, Terry Lyons says of Michael, “,During my 9 years as Chair of Governors, I have seen a wonderful atmosphere created under his outstanding leadership and continuous academic improvement.”, Michael’,s contribution to the Catholic community in Leeds is immeasurable and this will, no doubt, continue to be the case in the years to come. His boundless energy has enabled him to use his musical talents in school and within the Assumption Ceili Band in supporting many charity fundraising events, all of this whilst calmly dealing with the demands of leading a large Inner-city Primary School. Michael is a devoted family man and soon- to-be Grandfather, a happy coincidence for his retirement –, babysitting may soon compete with his love of golf and the hours he can spend on the golf course! Children, Staff, Governors and parents along with family and friends celebrated Mass at St. Augustine’,s School followed by a celebratory Assembly and lunch. The children and staff dedicated the recent school production of “,Joseph and his Amazing Technicolour Dreamcoat”, to Michael, a show which he loved. Celebrations were completed with a Mass for the whole school and Parish community in St Augustine’,s Church and a great night in the Irish Centre where Michael was joined by family, friends and colleagues, past and present. Our prayer for Michael is that he will receive many blessings in retirement and enjoy great health and happiness with his family and friends over the years to come. Thank you Mike and God bless you. Super Learning Day T uesday 5th July saw the introduction of the first St Thomas a Becket Catholic College ‘,Super Learning Day’,. Normal timetable was suspended and uniform abandoned, as each year group in lower school spent the day involved in a series of activities based on a specific theme. Year Seven investigated ‘,Urban Fusion’, and included events such as Trash fashion, Plants in your pants, Graffiti art and Pod casting. Year Eight were ‘,Globetrotters’, for the day and were able to try African drumming, Indian dancing, Mandarin Chinese, building mega-structures and Continental cookery. Year Nine had a more serious theme with their CSI day. Students investigated a grisly crime scene following the ‘,murder’, of a member of the History department . Staff suspects were eliminated after finger print analysis, stomach content tests and ballistic analysis supported by Wakefield Police scene of crimes officers, who were on hand all day to add authenticity to the plot. Overall it was a thoroughly enjoyable day, presenting students with the opportunities to develop skills such as group work, communication, problem solving and literacy within totally different contexts but above all it was fun! It was all that is super about learning . Bradford Schools Partnership Harrogate Sixth Former Heads To Harvard A gifted maths and science student from the St Aidan’,s and St John Fisher Associated Sixth Form in Harrogate has been awarded a £,250K scholarship to embark on a four-year Bachelor of Arts and Science degree course at Harvard University, USA. Ewan Foster, who lives in Tadcaster, has also received offers from Oxford and Yale Universities. Ewan attended All Saints RC School in York from years 7 - 11, and moved to the St Aidan’,s and St John Fisher Associated Sixth Form in Harrogate on recommendation from his younger sister, who has attended St John Fisher Catholic High School since Year 7. In the school’,s Associated Sixth Form, he has studied economics at AS level and mathematics, chemistry and biology at A level. Having already passed Harvard’,s entrance exams, Ewan will already be on the US campus by the time he receives his A level results in August. “,Neither of my parents went to University,”, he says, “,so I wanted to work as hard as I could through school so that I could be the first in the family to get a degree. My dad actually dared me to apply abroad for a University place at the same time as I applied for the Oxbridge courses. The University paid for me to attend two interviews, and will be sponsoring my tuition fees and full board for the whole four years. I will pick twenty subjects over the four years and will probably major in Science in the first year. Even though I was offeredplaces at Oxford and Yale Universities, I liked the idea of a Harvard degree. I’,m really looking forward to it and feel extremely fortunate to be given this opportunity. It will be a great adventure.”, Paul Jackson, Head Teacher at St John Fisher Catholic High School commented, “,We are absolutely thrilled that Ewan’,s academic achievements have been recognised by three of the world’,s top universities. It is testament to the fact that a good education and a combination of focus, hard work and individual spirit can present extraordinary opportunities. Ewan is a very gifted, sociable and highly regarded student and we wish him all the best. We are sure that he will immensely enjoy his time at Harvard and are convinced that he will achieve great things in his future career.”,

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Jul/Aug 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 4 Leeds Catholic Post F amiliaris Consortio is a short and beautiful document which is a rich treasure trove of wisdom on what it means to be human, to be family and to be Christian in the modern world. This month’,s quote was chosen by Laura to help us to reflect on the Transfiguration (6th August) and marriage: “,The Holy Spirit who is poured out in the sacramental celebration offers Christian couples the gift of a new communion of love that is the living and real image of that unique unity which makes of the Church the indivisible Mystical Body of the Lord Jesus.”, (FC 19) A ‘,new communion’, is a wonderful way to think of marriage and family life. Here is what Dean Perry writes about communion: “,The concept of communion lies at the heart of the Church’,s self-understanding. This communion is a gift from God, which is a fruit of the Paschal mystery. Also this communion is directed towards its eschatological end—, Union between the Trinity and each human person and mankind with itself. It is not a univocal idea, but it needs to be understood in light of the Biblical and Patristic traditions. There are two dimensions that considered among these traditions: Vertical- -- -- -- -- -- -communion with the Trinity Horizontal- -- -- -- --communion among men The vertical and horizontal dimensions come together on the Cross of Jesus Christ, in whom both divinity and humanity are united. sacraments and creates a spiritual solidarity among men and women as the mystical body of Christ, i.e. the ‘,People of God’, This ecclesial communion is at the same time both visible and invisible. As an invisible reality, the communion among human beings is through the indwelling of Holy Spirit(also by relation to the Father and Son) by which we partake in the divine life”, (www.cfpeople.org/seminarianwritings) So, in the beginning God made man in his own image, male and female he made them. At the same time God instituted the very first sacrament of Marriage when he said ‘,it is not good for man to live alone’, and be ‘,fruitful and multiply’,. Thus the faithful lifelong union of one man and one woman is transfigured as the visible, horizontal, (because both banal and beautiful, and bound to earth), expression of the invisible reality of God’,s covenant with us, in the vertical reach that pierces our lives at their core and in our communion with each other, and connects us, mystically to the God of Heaven and earth. The cross which bore Jesus becomes the sign and symbol of the mystery of God in the world, and marriage, as sign and symbol of the horizontal, holds Jesus’, arms out in the ultimate embrace of love. What does all this mean? In short, that the marriage bed, bathroom, kitchen and living room are the sacred spaces in which we live out our vocation to love, to be fruitful and to multiply. Marriage and family life looks ordinary. Jesus looked ordinary before and after the transfiguration, but our daily lives, loves and wranglings hide a deeper, truer reality that we rarely glimpse, but is nevertheless always with us: Home is a Holy Place not because it is perfect (no home is, see review of the Tree of Life) but because God is present there as love. Breda Theakston , Blessed John Paul II wrote Familiaris Consortio in 1981 following the Synod on the Family in 1980. It is still a rewarding read. For the thirtieth anniversary of publication why not have a look yourself at www.vatican.va or available to buy from St Paul’,s Bookshop Hinsley Hall Open 10am –, 4pm Mon –, Sat. Tel: 0113 275 4043 Familiaris Consortio On Christian Families in the Modern World (1981) Living with Loss T his year’,s Family Life Ministry Day of Renewal focused on loss in our lives and in our ministries. We began with Fr Daniel O`Leary`s reflections on different types of loss, the importance of allowing ourselves and others to feel the pain, and the potential for loss to be a `gateway to heaven` when understood as an aspect of the Incarnation. A period of quiet reflection, sharing, the Sacrament of Reconciliation and Adoration of the Blessed Sacrament followed. Helen Bassirat from the Diocese of Shrewsbury and a member of the Domestic Abuse Working Group (DAWG) of the Catholic Bishops` Conference presented insights into the prevalence of domestic abuse, and the importance of being aware and knowing how (not) to respond to keep the victim from further, perhaps fatal, harm. The CEDAR (Catholics Experiencing Domestic Abuse Resource) website was explored. The Church does not expect married people to stay within an abusive relationship. The site is at www.cedar.uk.net and is a must for all people in ministry. Marjorie Parker took us through the importance of memories in the grieving process. There are many ways of remembering and Marjorie focussed on just one: Memory boxes are now used and advocated for use in families where a parent or child is dying and as a way of helping grandparents to capture what is important to them in a way that makes is easier to share with others. What might go in a memory box? Anything important to the person...photos, diaries, letters, objects, CDs, DVD, tapes of favourite songs, films....just make sure that each item is labelled so people know what mattered to you when you are no longer able to tell them. Memory boxes are helpful for people who have dementia as it gives visitors something to talk about from their lives that might help engage them when superficial conversation gets more and more difficult. Mass followed, to which people brought their own precious objects and photos signifying a person, a memory, a loss to them. Kelly Wright, formerly of Cardinal Heenan Catholic High School and Madrigal Group, now a newly qualified teacher in Leeds, led the singing for the day and throughout Mass. Angela Fieldhouse and Anne Pennock provided the essential organisational and backup support without which such a day cannot run as smoothly as this one did (I hope you`ll all agree). The day was considerably enriched by everyone`s presence. Pictured here are the ones who could stay for the final photo of the day. Marjorie is hiding behind Bev, in lilac top, at the back, Helen is in a blue cardigan, Fr Daniel in white shirt, Anne and Angela smiling towards the right on the back row and Kelly is front left, bottom row. Our star of the day was Saliem, pictured centre with mum and dad Elsa and Adhanom, Marriage Preparation Presenters from the Eritrean Community in the parish of Our Lady of Unfailing Help. Thanks to all for all your gifts and talents and for your willingness to share them. For a full text of Fr Daniel’,s talk go to www.flm.org.uk Parenting News Over 30 people gathered at the Diocesan Pastoral Centre at Hinsley Hall in Leeds to celebrate parenthood. From as far afield as Wetherby and as close as Chapeltown moms, grandparents, babes in arms and toddlers explored the centre and enjoyed the delicious cakes made by Molly Fieldhouse. It was a squeeze but we got over thirty people, mums, grandparents and Parenting Facilitators into this picture in the Library at Hinsley Hall Leeds after our lunch. A Parable of Amazing Grace Film Review by Breda Theakston T he Tree of Life, a new film by Terrence Malick is amazing. It does for film what ‘,War and Peace’, did for the novel. In fact here is a new genre in search of a name. For now I’,ll call it metaphilmology (metaphysics, film and theology) or theometaphilm (theology metaphysics and film), an unwieldy word but one worthy of the cosmic capacity of this big baggy film about a very small and very ordinary family. The O’, Brien’,s are an average conservative church- going family in1950s suburban Waco, Texas. Their daily domestic life is mystically interweaved with, set against the backdrop of, the story of life, the universe, everything. The death of one of their sons prompts the faithful parents to cry out of the depths ‘,where the hell is God?’, God, who was/is always there, God who breathed over the waters, God who created the universe and everything therein, whispers softly in a still small luminously mysterious voice ",Where were you when I laid the earth’,s foundation...while the morning stars sang together…,and all the sons of God shouted for joy?”, (Job 38 4-7). In the O’,Brien’,s family life God reveals himself most powerfully and poignantly in their suffering, in the pain of the human heart, bleeding, broken, torn tragically from all that it loves and depends upon here on earth. The biblical resonances abound. This is Genesis for the scientific generation. Is upright dad (‘,sir’, to his children), played stolidly by Brad Pitt, a modern day Job? Is gentle, loving, ‘,naï,ve’, (according to dad) mom a latter day Mary? How you read this film will depend completely on where you come from, your own worldview. Without a good grounding in scripture it will, in my view, be an impoverished reading. I can see it being scorned and I can see it playing in the mind long after the stunning visuals of creation and curved time give way to the credits. As a study of loss and why bad things happen to good people this is a visual and sensory masterpiece. It will be criticised for being artful, ponderous, cliché,d but it is also painterly, poetic, post modern in its attempt to wrestle with the meaning of life and our rightful ‘,trinity’, of relationships: to God, to each other and to ourselves. One message of the film, for me, seems to be about putting ‘,man’, in his place. And where is man’,s place? Man’,s place, in a word, is not at the head of the family but at the service of the family and ever mindful of his dependence on God. Without God the universe, which we see boiling in one great act of creation, Waco, and their dead child, would never have been. A human father will be honoured by his children only in so far as he honours Our Father who art in Heaven by bowing to the creator’,s wisdom. When a man (it could be ‘,woman’, but this film is located in a place and time as well as being outside place and time) forgets God he unwittingly dishonours his wife, his sons and himself. ‘,Brace yourself like a man’, (Job 38: 3) is God’,s message. Here, man’,s relationship to God (or not) has a clear impact on his marriage. The unity of husband and wife is thwarted when the father arrogates to himself the power and authority of God, believing himself and his own efforts to be sufficient for all things. His disdain for the gentle wife and mother and his attempts to knock some macho into his sons is subtle but clear and it stands uneasily alongside his passionate love of music and beauty. This wonderful slice of filmic faction shows a place and a people who are religious but Godless. As such it can be read as a devastating critique of the limits of individualism and the American way. For that reason alone the genius of the Tree of Life may well be overlooked or dismissed by those who seek to distract us from truth by shaping our illusions of our own ‘,place’,: what is it that the ads try to tell us we are worth? A bottle of shampoo!? When the parents cry out ‘,where is God?’, they invite the answer (Job 38): Then the LORD spoke to Job out of the storm. He said: “,Who is this that obscures my plans with words without knowledge? Brace yourself like a man, I will question you, and you shall answer me”, This film is a dramatically dazzling display of celluloid virtuosity heralding a brave new world of film (can you tell I liked it). It is the ‘,War and Peace’, of 21st century film, and as written by Proust, produced by Brian Cox and David Attenborough, and narrated by God, Father, Son and Holy Spirit. As such it deserves our attention telling a parable of amazing grace in the language of a new generation, who not knowing scripture may yet, paradoxically, be led to it by this odd film.

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Jul/Aug 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Leeds Catholic Post Page 5 There are rumblings. There- I’,ve said it. Most of us feel an intense loyalty to our church and would be upset by some recitation of what these rum- blings may be. Nevertheless, the 369 Austrian Clerics who have recently published a sort of manifesto are a surprise.They offer, like the Australian Bishop Morris, or the American Catholic Council, other thoughts on church disciplines and organization. My point is not the merits or demerits of what they say or the way they say it, but that in the- say- 1950’,s, little would have been heard of such events “,in a far off country and people about which we know nothing”, (to misquote Neville Chamberlain) - any country really. Now, we hear every- thing, immediately. News travels by so many different routes that it proves almost impossible to prevent it. Events like the NewsCorp deba- cle seem to follow at the same breakneck speed. This paper, if the Editor will forgive me, belongs to a declining medium- print- which cannot keep up with the internet, the world wide web in its many manifestations. These days we could expect- wholly unrealistically- Catholic Post to maintain a website with daily updates on news around the diocese, be- cause monthly papers like this are only now journals of record, of pride and achievement. British Catholics are slow to catch on: looking around the web, the Uni- verse and Catholic Times share a very limited site. The Catholic Herald admits that there is a lot more in the printed paper than it will show you online. Only The Tablet runs a full and updated version, only partly free, but at least with the whole thing readable online (even the pages go click as you “,turn”, them) to subscribers. We could do better, and do in places with online news services like Independent Catholic News. We have just heard- unfortunately- reports on past abuse from Ireland, and new linked revelations from the English Midlands and Tanzania in the 1950’,s. Those lay to rest any idea that this sort of thing all started in the swinging sixties, and by association, as some extremists may have it- with the Second Vatican Council: some complainants spoke of physical punishment and threats of punishment taking over their young lives: they were isolated in the school and could only communicate fleetingly with visiting parents: phone or internet were unavailable and outgoing letters checked. Significantly though, the complainants met up and realised they were not alone over fifty years later, courtesy of the internet. That’,s something very new. It was a Catholic who became the prophet of such happenings, and a favourite of this column. The Canadian Marshall McLuhan predicted a Global Village, and warned of the power of communications and the media. Those days are here and can be for good or bad: telling us not only what we want to hear, but what we should hear, too. Are we ready for such- to use a fashionable word- “,transparency”,? Benchmark Sidelines I write this having just returned from a lovely Mass to celebrate the retirement of Mrs Angela Rushall, the Head Teacher of St Joseph`s here in Pudsey. The church was packed, the school choir sang, and the folk group shared the musical duties with one of our organists, Peter Siney, and all in all it was excellent –, and on a Thursday too. So expect the rest of this to be suitably upbeat! First, more information about the next West Yorkshire Church Music Network afternoon –, it is `Songs of Glory!` and will be an exploration of hymns glorifying God, including some of the new Gloria settings - Sunday September 18th, from 2pm, at English Martyrs Church, Dewsbury Road, Wakefield WF2 9DD (take A638 from M1 J40 towards Wakefield). Refreshments available, and the occasion will provide a good opportunity to meet other musicians/singers coming to grips with the New Translation. Have a look at the website or email me for more details. I am also looking forward to the Society of St Gregory`s Summer School in August, where the topic will be `Not shouting but love sings in God`s ear` (it is the society`s motto: `Non clamor sed amor cantat in aure Dei` and I think it sounds better in Latin –, hmm, that`s not a phrase that I often use!!!) To quote from the SSG website, “,Liturgy takes people on a journey into the heart of their faith, the paschal mystery. Liturgy should be inclusive and welcoming, it must also be challenging. We have a unique liturgical and musical heritage in the West, yet we should also explore the genius of other cultures, non- western and contemporary western. These can have a place in the liturgy, provided we follow some liturgical, pastoral and musical guidelines that allow the liturgy to be the ritual work of the people of God.”, It promises to be an interesting week. I’,ve been looking at some of the new missal. As a teacher, I worry when I see that sentence length and word length are both increased –, I know that means fewer people will understand it. But the aspect which puzzles me is this use of exclusive language –, `for us men and for our salvation`. Once upon a time I was a social worker, and in social work text books, `her` and `she` are used about the worker - when the tables were turned on me, I wasn’,t very happy! Tim Devereux tim.devereux@ssg.org.uk Links: West Yorkshire Pastoral Music Network: http://www.westyorkshirechurchmusic.org.uk/ Society of St Gregory: http://www.ssg.org.uk/ National Network of Pastoral Musicians: http://nnpm.org/ Independent Catholic News: http://www.indcatholicnews.com/ Musical Notes by Tim Devereux St Bartholomew’,s Girls 6-a-side Cup brings a hat-trick of success for Catholic Schools W ednesday 22nd saw the 7th running of the St Bartholomew’,s Cup, a 6-a-side football competition for primary school girls. The event was held at The John Charles Centre for Sport and a record 37 teams took part. The Leeds Catholic Primary schools were well represented with teams from: Holy Family, St Nicolas’,s, St Anthony’,s, St Joesph’,s Pudsey, Immaculate Heart of Mary, Our Lady of Good Counsel, St Edward’,s and Rothwell St Mary’,s taking part. Six of the 8 schools had the success of teams reaching the knock out stage of the competition. After hard fought games, Holy Family met Our Lady of Good Counsel in one semi final and Immaculate Heart of Mary met Woodlesford. Close games saw Holy Family and Immaculate Heart of Mary achieve 2-0 wins to set up an all Catholic school final. Our Lady of Good Counsel took on Woodlesford in the 3rd/4th place play off and after a stale mate after extra time Our Lady’,s won the play off to achieve 3rd spot on penalties. The final between last year’,s champions Immaculate Heart and Holy Family was set to be very close affair with both teams unbeaten in the competition to this point and Holy Family having not conceded a goal on their way to the final. There was a large crowd cheering on the teams and it was Immaculate Heart who gained an early breakthrough. A rare mistake in the Holy Family defense allowed the Immaculate forward in on goal and an accomplished finish gave Immaculate Heart a 1-0 lead. Holy Family were clearly riled and the team began camping in the opposition half. Great defending and some wonderful goalkeeping by the Immaculate Heart players frustrated the creative Holy Family team and the equalizer just would not come. The manager changed things tactically and went with 3 up front, but the Immaculate Heart team refused to concede. With just a minute of time to play Immaculate Heart broke away and slotted home their second of the game to ensure victory and retention of the trophy. A great advert for sport in our Catholic Primary schools with A: one, two, three being achieved. Pictured below from left to right are 3rd placed Our Lady of Good Counsel, Champions Immaculate Heart of Mary and Runners up Holy Family. The Bishop`s Cup had a fitting final game again this year. St Patrick`s, Leeds, played Rothwell St Mary`s on Monday 20th June at St Theresa`s in Crossgates. It was a nail biting match with both teams playing attacking football throughout the match with plenty of goals! In the end St Pat’,s came out on top - the final score was 3-2. Nail Biting Final

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Jul/Aug 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 6 Leeds Catholic Post St Mary’,s University College, Strawberry Hill provides an architectural timeline from Walpole’,s pioneering Gothick frivolity to Sir Albert Richardson’,s solemn conclusion to an early twentieth century style in the lofty, multi-stepped chapel. The Fifth National Assembly of Deacons in England and Wales met here from 24th- 26th June, marking 40 years since the first permanent deacons were ordained in England and Wales. 170 delegates attended, including nine members of the our Diocese’,s Deacon Family . It was also the first International Study Conference of the North European Network of the International Diaconate Centre. Key Speakers included Professor William Cavanaugh of DePaul University, Chicago, and Mrs Nelleke Wijngaards Serrarens of the IDC, together with senior members of the University. The theme of the Conference was “,The Deacon in the Body of Christ.”, The Saturday Vespers and Benediction were celebrated by Bishop Paul Hendricks, auxiliary Bishop of Southwark and the two conference Masses by Cardinal Keith O’,Brien and Archbishop Vincent Nichols. In his homily, Archbishop Nichols took the words Ite Missa Est - the Deacon’,s words of dismissal- and spoke of this facilitating of “,mission”, through the deacon’,s ministry of the word, the altar and charity- and how the Deacon’,s special bond with his Bishop can fulfil the Bishop’,s own mandate for charity and diakonia- service. The indissoluble bond between Eucharist and Charity means that the deacon is, at his Bishop’,s bidding, carrying Christ to others. Professor Cavanaugh is one of those people whose work you think you ought to get to know better. He described the deacon as “,service, sacramentalised.”, He too seemed to remove any “,either or”, requirement that deacons should concentrate only on charity rather than altar and word- “,sacred social workers”,: the rooting of of service in eucharist, in altar and word, prevents the deacon being seen only as the one who “,does”, service. Nelleke Wijngaards Serrarens looked at widowhood- of wives and husbands in the diaconate: the need to include and serve them, and to examine again the remarriage of widowed deacons, an issue which has eased and tightened under successive Popes. In response to a questioner, she agreed that we were being guided by Orthodox practice, but not in the parallel matter of the priestly ordination of married men. Fr Ashley Beck, of Southwark Diocese, chair of the organising conference, triumphed through more than the usual conference adversities as the weekend progressed, so delegates could return to their parishes, their “,Body of Christ”,, with a strengthened idea of who and why they are. Deacons Diary Dear Readers, Those of you who have been following this column since November last year will know that this is the last of eight articles summarising the Bishops’, teaching document on interreligious relations. So now we ask: how are we trying to follow its teachings? Pope Benedict spoke about dialogue between members of the different religions during his visit last September. He quoted the Bishops: “,The effort to reach out in friendship to followers of other religions is becoming a familiar part of the mission of the local Church, a characteristic feature of the religious landscape of this country.”, How true is this? A recent diocesan survey shows that at deanery and parish level, amongst priests and people –, relations with members of other religions remains “,below the radar”,. Dialogue has not yet become a “,familiar part of the mission”, of our local Church. It is not yet recognised to be a natural part of our identity as Catholic Christians. Parish worship and community life do not yet consciously and naturally prompt us to “,reach out in friendship to followers of other religions”,. In parish and school catechesis and formation do not routinely reflect the rich teaching of the Bishops’, statement. As a community we are still not able to say that we do “,meet God in friend and stranger”,. Opportunities to come closer to the mystery of God we can find in dialogue with those who seek God as Muslims or Jews or Hindus or Sikhs are being sadly passed by. Why is this? In a sense it is only natural. We like the familiar and the comfortable. To come out of our “,comfort zone”, is difficult –, by definition uncomfortable. Muslims, according to a Muslim friend, have exactly the same attitude –, compounded by the fact that they are easily identified as “,strangers”, by dint of colour (attracting racism), custom and origin. The experience of migration from the Indian subcontinent parallels the experience of Irish Catholics in the 19th century. When times are fraught with global inter-religious antagonisms and violence, the temptation faced by Catholics and members of all other religions is to turn inwards, to allow weakness of heart to harden our skins, to “,circle the wagons”, and concentrate on defending our own identity, spirituality and community. Important elements of the climate both socially and within our church, inhabit dialogue. What we find instinctively difficult, is made the more so by circumstances. Lastly dialogue is a new path for Catholics. We were taught to be suspicious of other religions. Now we are asked to dialogue with them. We need to be reassured that this really is the teaching of our Church –, a new direction for old truths. Yet, and yet there are signs of hope represented by individual Catholics and fellow Christians who have made dialogue part of their identity and hence mission as followers of Christ. Some 70 of these met in June at Wheeler Hall under the banner “,The Call to Dialogue”,. They heard Bishop Arthur welcome Archbishop Kevin McDonald (Chair of the Bishops’, Conference Committee which helped to produce the Bishops’, statement), Rev Tony Robinson, Anglican Bishop of Pontefract and Fakhara Rehman, Community Faiths Coordinator of the Kirklees Faiths Forum. These speakers explored the meaning of dialogue and how we can engage with it locally. Participants spoke of their own efforts to “,reach out in friendship to followers of other religions”,…,.so that dialogue…, “, is becoming a familiar part of the mission of the local Church, a characteristic feature of the religious landscape of this country.”, The paths of virtue are created by walking them. Some are walking the way of dialogue in parish, school and community and our hope must be that this path widens so that it ceases to be a path and becomes part of the great way of our following of Christ. A PERSONAL NOTE I am to retire as Interreligious Relations Coordinator for the diocese in September –, and hence as writer of “,Interfaith News”, –, a column written every month for the Catholic Post since the summer of 2000. It has been a great and joyful privilege to serve the priests and people of the diocese in this way for the last 11 years. So I say a big thank you to all those who have followed the column and who have, in all the ways they alone know, aided the work of dialogue and so supported the Interreligious Relations Commission. They know instinctively what I have come to appreciate: the work of dialogue is so close to the heart of the Gospel and so central to the work of the Holy Spirit that we must not think it is ours as much as God’,s! We do what we do and the Holy Spirit will work the usual miracles which underpin all the work of the Church’,s mission. In the end ‘,the effort to reach out in friendship to followers of other religions’, will become ‘,a familiar part of the mission of our local Church’,. One last word. My efforts to reach out in friendship to followers of other religions over the last near 40 years has convinced me of that truth which I think is the main underlying message of the Bishops’, statement and which it voices in different ways: , The saving grace of Christ is present in other religions –, outside the visible confines of the Church. , The Holy Spirit of Christ is present in society, in history, peoples, cultures and religions. The same Spirit is at work in both the Church and the religions. , “,For the first time in history a general Council of the Catholic Church (Vatican II) recognised elements of truth and holiness in other religions as the work of the one God of salvation.”, When I was a lad growing up in the Church, the impression I too often got was that the Church had a monopoly on God and the work of the Holy Spirit –, though my theology taught me that “,God and His grace were not confined to the sacraments”,. Effectively the Church came across as the sole “,possessor”, of God whose mystery it had somehow contained and fully explained. Indeed the perception was fostered in me that the Church loomed larger than the God it was meant to reveal! This was despite the goodness and holiness of individuals who did point me to God. Now there is a dawning realisation recognised by the Church, that there are elements of truth and holiness in other religions and that these are “,the work of the one God of salvation.”, I do not now simply know this to be true intellectually but from my experience with members of other religions over the last 40 years who are now my friends. I thank them that not only have I met God in friends within the Church, but also in those who were strangers outside it. All helped me to “,grasp at the fringes of the mystery of God”,. Getting God, Father, Son and Holy Spirit in right proportion to the Church as the “,sacrament of the world’,s salvation”, is one of the themes of the document. One last, last word! If you want examples of how “,the one God of salvation”, is at work in other religions –, just take a look at the “,Feasts and Festivals”, below. These are illustrations of what we mean by saying that the elements of truth and holiness to be found in members of other religions are a “,ray of the one Truth”, and seeds of the Word”,. The work of interreligious relations will go on. More and more of us will continue to meet God in friend but also in stranger. For information about the work of Interreligious Relations in the Diocese see the diocesan website and follow the links under ‘,Pastoral’,. MEETING GOD IN FRIEND AND STRANGER IN OUR OWN DIOCESE FEASTS AND FESTIVALS 1 to 30 August: Ramadan (Muslim) The holiest month for Muslims when they fast each day from dawn to dusk so as to draw nearer to God (Allah), to be reminded of the poor and hungry and their obligations to them and to practice self-discipline. This is the month when the Prophet Muhammad received the first revelations of the Qur’,an. Fasting (sawm) is one of the five pillars of Islam. The fast is traditionally broken by eating a date and drinking some water. 6 August: Ch’,i Hou Chieh (Chinese) “,Herd Boy and Weaving Maid”, festival. According to an ancient folk tale a herd boy and a heavenly maid (represented by two stars on each side of the heavenly river - the Milky Way) were married but separated when she returned to heaven. They were allowed a reunion on the 7th day of the 7th month when a flock of magpies form a bridge over the Heavenly River. But if it rains on that day the bridge is swept away and they cannot meet until the next year. Women traditionally pray for clear skies this night so that the married couple can meet. 9 August: Tisha B’,Av (Jewish) A full fast day mourning the destruction of the 1st and 2nd Temples in Jerusalem. The book of Lamentations is read. 9 –, 18 August: Fravardigan / Muktad.( Zoroastrian) Immortal souls of the dead with their fravashis (guardian spirits) are welcomed by the priests and reside in the place of worship for 10 days. They hover round vases of white flowers (one for each family). After 10 days the water is poured away, the vases upturned and the immortal souls with their guardians return to the spirit world. Zoroastrians take time off work, visit the places of worship, take food especially favoured by their dear departed and pray to remember them. 13 August: Raksha Bandan (Hindu) Raksha means ‘,protection’, and bhandan means ‘,to tie’,. Girls and married women tie a rakhi (amulet) round the right wrist of their brothers, wishing them protection from evil of all kinds. 13 –, 16 August: O-Bon (Japanese) The spirits of dead ancestors are welcomed back home with feasting and dancing –, fires are lit to welcome their arrival and departure. 14 August: Chung Yuan (Chinese) The Festival of Hungry Ghosts. Paper objects for use in the spirit world are made and offered to aid all those who have no resting place or descendants. Large paper boats are made and burnt at Temples to help souls make their journey across the sea of torment to Nirvana. 19 August: Navroze (Zoroastrian) New Year’,s day. In the 10th century some Zoroastrians fled from Iran and were given sanctuary by Hindus in Western India where they become known as Parsis (Persians). 95% of Zoroastrians in UK are Parsis –, this is their New Year’,s day. 22 August: Janmashtami (Hindu) The birthday of Krishna the very popular incarnation of Vishnu. Many Hindus will fast to midnight, the time of his birth. In the Temples Krishna is welcomed with singing, dancing and sweets. His image is placed in a cradle and special sweets are given and distributed. 23 / 27 August: Lailat-Ul-Qadr (Shia / Sunni Muslim) The Night of Power. This feast marks the night in 610 CE when Muhammad received his first visit from the angel Jibril (Gabriel) and the first revelation of the Qur’,an. Many believe the exact date is hidden by God, but that they can seek it in the odd nights of the last ten days of Ramadan. So many Muslims spend the last ten days of the fast in the mosque, praying and studying the Qur’,an to ensure they receive the special benefits promised. If they cannot, Sunnis favour the 27th day and Shi’,a the 23rd day. The Qur’,an says “,This night is better than a thousand months.”, The Editor would like to thank David Jackson for all the hard work he has put in to writing the pieces on interfaith matters over the years and for all the support he has given the Editor in this area. We wish him well as he steps down from this task.

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Jul/Aug 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

New deacon for the diocese Michael Doody was ordained deacon recently in the beautiful chapel of Palazzola in the Alban Hills above Rome. A parishioner of St Walburga`s in Shipley, he was joined by his father, brothers, sisters and other family members for the Mass, which was celebrated by Rt Rev Peter Doyle, the Bishop of Northampton. A number of clergy from the diocese also went out for the event (see picture). This was the first ordination of a transitional deacon - one who in time is due to be ordained a priest - for the diocese in five years. Deacon Doody, 30, is currently half-way through a two-year licence in moral theology at the Redemptorist-run Pontifical Academy, the Alphonsianum, in Rome, having already completed a theology degree and a licence in philosophy at the city`s Pontifical Gregorian University. He is one of six Leeds students at the Venerable English College in Rome. Before starting at this college, he completed a one-year propaedeutic year at St Alban`s College, Valladolid, Spain. Deacon Doody, who also has a philosophy degree from Dundee University, attended St Bede`s College in Bradford as a boy. Bishop encourages seminarians in their vocation Our seminarians met with Bishop Roche last week at Hinsley Hall on the anniversary of his priestly ordination. He celebrated the Mass of the Feast of St John Plessington, one of the forty martyrs, who like Bishop Roche, was a student at St Alban’,s College, Valladolid Spain and who ministered in Cheshire (where the Bishop as a boy attended a junior seminary) before his apprehension and execution in 1679. Most of our seminarians in recent years have participated in a one-year pre-seminary course at the College in Valladolid. In his homily, Bishop Roche drew a parallel between the overt persecution of Catholic priests during penal times and the varied ways in which contempt is expressed for priests in our own time. He assured them that the Church, the “,house of the Father,”, was their home, the family in which they would discover their true identity and to which they would always belong. Before the Mass, Mr David Herd, the Diocesan Director of Finance, gave the seminarians a presentation about the current financial state of the diocese and principles of parish financial management. After lunch with the Bishop, and a three-and-half-mile walk, the seminarians took afternoon tea with Bishop Konstant and some of the retired clergy, including Canon Denis Tangney (pictured), at Hinsley Hall. School children pepper seminarians with questions Three Leeds students gave generously of themselves in multiple acts of service during the recent pilgrimage to Lourdes. The three, who have just completed a propaedeutic year at St Alban`s College in Valladolid, formed part of the diocesan youth team and were each allocated to particular school groups. During the six-day event, the seminarians had plenty of opportunities to give testimomies about their choice of vocation and many of the young people in their charge peppered them with questions. As well as looking after school students, the seminarians assisted in other ways: for example, they led the stations of the cross for groups of sick pilgrims and they served at Mass and during processions. The three, Jonathan Byfield, Patrick Milner and Matthew Sanderson, are pictured with Bishop Roche and vocations director Fr Paul Grogan just outside the Rosary Basilica. Seminarians prepare for summer pastoral work Most of our seminarians will be engaging in demanding pastoral placements during August and September in parishes and institutions throughout the diocese. The three institutions are Mount St Joseph’,s Home for the Elderly in Headingley, which is run by the Little Sisters of the Poor, whose Superior is Mother Miriam (pictured), St George’,s Crypt, which is a night-shelter for the homeless, and St Gemma’,s Hospice. Six parishes are hosting seminarians, namely: the Parishes of St Cuthbert and First Martyrs and of Mary Mother of God, in Bradford, St Benedict’,s, Garforth, the Parish of the Holy Redeemer in Huddersfield, and the Parishes of St John Vianney and of Christ the King in Leeds. National vocations festival enjoyed by Leeds youth A number of young men and women from our diocese recently took part in Invocation 2011 - a festival aimed at helping young people to draw closer to Christ and to begin to discern their vocation in the Church. They listened to keynote addresses from Fr John Hemer, mhm, and Mgr John Armitage and took part in a variety of workshops on the spirituality of different orders and the evangelisation of youth culture. They also participated in a night-time Eucharistic procession and a penance service. Masses were celebrated by Archbishop Bernard Longley of Birmingham and Bishop Mark Davies of Shrewsbury. The festival, the second of its kind in consecutive years, took place at Oscott College, Birmingham. The picture shows, among young people from the diocese, Sister Anne Hammersley, Vocations Director of the Cross and Passion Sisters, and Fr Stephen Langridge, Chairman of the National Conference of Vocation Directors. Vibrant youth group is source of hope in Leeds The vocations preaching mission drew towards its close for summer last week when vocations director Fr Paul Grogan celebrated Masses at St Theresa’,s Church in Cross Gates, Leeds. The evening Mass was animated by a sizeable number of young people from the parish led by youth ministry coordinator Hannah Zafar, who is to participate in a course at the Emmanuel School for Mission in Rome next year. Members of the youth group are pictured at a social evening afterwards with Hannah (left) and Rachel Webster, who is the new Lay Chaplain at Mount St Mary’,s High School, Leeds. Leeds Catholic Post Page 7 Vocations In Britain today we are surrounded by, some would say bombarded with, instructions about how we should live, what we should eat and drink and weigh, even what we should think about any given issue ... Remembering that we are living in Christ is more important, and putting first our life in him will help us to find balance in all the other areas of our life, too. Susan Hibbins, Light for our Path

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Jul/Aug 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 8 Leeds Catholic Post C orpus Christi pupils raised just short of £,10,000 during Lent this year for good causes and had great fun doing it. With Y8 having a fancy dress egg and spoon championship, Y11 a fancy dress sponsored walk and a host of other great fundraising activities including sponsored silences (popular with teachers), sponsored spelling, leg waxing and in the case of Y10, a raft of small enterprises that made big returns on the capital they invested. Mr Brian Griffiths’, Year 7 form raised a truly astounding £,1100 –, never been done before by just one class. The funds raised went to support our link school at Issenye, Tanzania, HCPT and £,3000 to the Good Shepherd Catholic Care –, which the pupils gave to Bishop Arthur at Kirstall Abbey. UNBELIEVABLE!! T he rain stopped in time for this year’,s Corpus Christi Procession which took place on Sunday 19th June, beginning in the chapel at Mount St Joseph’,s Home and concluding at Hinsley Hall. Bishop Arthur carried Our Lord in the Blessed Sacrament at the rear of the procession. The lively marches played by St John Fisher Harrogate High School’,s Concert Band set a celebratory tone to the afternoon’,s proceedings. Those gathered prayed the Rosary and sang as they walked. The people gathered on the lawns as Bishop Arthur approached the steps of Hinsley Hall. There were a number of groups who carried colourful banners and children who had recently made their first Holy Communion were dressed in their smart outfits. It was some of these children who reverently scattered rose petals along the path as Bishop Arthur carried the Blessed Sacrament towards the altar. Fr Tim Wiley gave a short address. He spoke of the joy and blessing of having the Lord with us in the Blessed Sacrament and reminded those gathered of the words of Blessed John Paul, “,For the faithful who have understood the meaning of what they have done, the Eucharistic celebration doesn’,t stop at the door of the Church.”, He encouraged all present that what they had just taken part in was exactly that, “,taking our Lord with us as we journey”,, and to continue to share our joy with those who encounter us throughout our lives. After Benediction Bishop Arthur gave a word of thanks to all who had been involved in the planning and organisation of the event and to everyone who had taken part and witnessed to their faith in Christ. The afternoon concluded with refreshments and entertainment by the musicians from St John Fisher’,s Concert Band. Mrs Linda Pennington and Fr John Wilson wish to thank all who served so generously on the day. TAKING THE LORD WITH US AS WE JOURNEY St Joseph’,s ‘,Cas’, win after 25 Years O n Saturday 25th June Holy Family &, St Michael’,s Pontefract again hosted the Wakefield Partnership Catholic Junior Schools’, Football Tournament which includes St. Benedict’,s Garforth as a Feeder School to St. Wilfrid’,s. This year the eight Catholic schools from across the Wakefield Partnership that entered were St Joseph’,s Pontefract, St Benedict’,s Garforth, St John’,s Normanton, Holy Family &, St Michael’,s Pontefract, St Joseph’,s Castleford, St Austin’,s Wakefield, St Ignatius Ossett and St Joseph’,s Moorthorpe. It was a very keenly fought tournament full of very tight games. The parents and supporters were all in agreement that, once again, the tournament showed what a high standard of footballer is being produced within the area. After the group stages, the two thrilling semi-finals saw St Benedict’,s Garforth beat St Austin’,s Wakefield 1 –, 0 while St Joseph’,s Castleford beat Holy Family 2 –, 1. The third/fourth place final saw Holy Family &, St. Michael’,s eventually beat St Austin’,s 3 –, 1 but only after extra time. The tournament ended with probably the most closely fought and exciting game with St Joseph’,s Castleford playing St Benedict’,s. The two teams matched each other goal for goal and even the addition of extra time couldn’,t separate them. For the first time in a number of years the final went to a 6 a-side penalty shoot out. Eventually St Joseph’,s Castleford triumphed 5 –, 3 on penalties and took the cup as 2011 champions. Finally, the referees from the Castleford and District Association, who once again ensured that the games were played in the correct spirit, unanimously selected Joey Thompson from St Benedict’,s as their player of the tournament. After another very successful tournament the participants departed saying how much they had enjoyed the day and looked forward to taking part again next year. Special thanks were given to the all the helpers who included the referees, Pat Slater, Administrative Officer of St. Joseph’,s Castleford, for the score-keeping, to staff and family members who supported and to Julie Walker, the School Kitchen Manager who provided refreshments, helped by staff and volunteers and also to Paul Blackburn (the teacher who previously organised the Tournament from 1990- 2003 )and to Kevin Jordan, Assistant Headteacher, for the organisation of the day. O ver a hundred talented St John Fisher Catholic High School music students will represent the Harrogate school at the National Music for Youth Festival, in Birmingham in July. “,Three of our ensembles have been selected from the regional festivals to appear in the national finals, “,explains Rachel Brooks, Head of Music at the school. “,We take part in the festival every year. The standard of the competition is very high, so it’,s exceptionally rare for any school in the country to have more than two ensembles go through to the final stage. It’,s testament to the talent, hard work and dedication of our students that we have been awarded this opportunity, and we are all very proud and excited.”, The three St John Fisher ensembles taking part in the national event are the Concert Band, a massed, combined choir featuring students from years 7 –, 13, and the Senior Jazz Orchestra. Nigel Beetles, Assistant Head and Head of Performing Arts at St John Fisher, added, “,We encourage all our pupils to get involved in the opportunities that music and the arts offer, both in and outside of school. This includes participation in a number of regional, national and international performance related events. The National Music for Youth Festival is one of the major highlights in the music education calendar and brings together 12,000 of the country`s most exciting performers, so it will be a valuable experience for everyone.”, Students to fly the flag for Harrogate’,s Musical Youth

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Jul/Aug 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Leeds Catholic Post Page 9 I n a unique moment of connection on July 1st, children across Leeds Diocese joined in CAFOD’,s ‘,Big Sing’, Assembly. The choir at Holy Rosary and St. Anne’,s sent a flim- clip invitation to children in Glory School, Kibera, Nairobi. In response, children from Standard 6 in Glory school sent us a video of them singing their favourite song ‘, Jambo Bwana’,. With the support and expertise of media students from Leeds Trinity University College, the choir from Holy Rosary and St. Anne’,s recorded the Big Sing assembly that included the Kibera children singing. Leeds Trinity students created a DVD that was used by schools to join the Big Sing on July 1st. As well as the assembly, the children watched video clips of Lucky, a ten year old girls from Kibera who explained how important the ‘,Peace clubs are’,. CAFOD supports the ‘,Youth Building Bridges for Peace’, programme in Kibera. Over the years thousands of people have been coming in from the countryside to Nairobi to look for work and food for their families so that now, all around the capital city, people have built houses on empty land they don’,t own with any scrap material they can find. Kibera is the biggest of these ‘,makeshift’, slums and over one million people live there, including many young people who have little chance of finding employment. The Peace clubs teach skills, offer sport and recreational facilities that wouldn’,t be available otherwise and also encourage the young people to play an active role in building community rather than getting involved in violent situations. CAFOD’,s Big Sing Assembly Children from Glory School, Kibera, Kenya sing with children in our Diocese Children in Standard 6 watch the Holy Rosary and St. Anne’,s Greeting St Patrick’,s Huddersfield enjoy the Big Sing Lucky, aged 10, outside her school

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Jul/Aug 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 10 Leeds Catholic Post B y land and by air six hundred pilgrims made their way to Lourdes for the annual diocesan pilgrimage at the start of July. The four hundred young people arrived ahead of everyone else and gathered at the Cathedral of the Trees in the City of the Poor for an opening Mass with Bishop Arthur. The following day they connected with the sick and other pilgrims and the whole pilgrimage spent five days in prayer and service reflecting on the Lourdes theme for 2011 “,With Bernadette, we say the Our Father”,. As always the sick pilgrims stayed in a number of hotels with the most dependant staying at the Hotel Padoue. An energetic team of doctors, nurses and carers looked after them and ensured that they were able to take part fully in the programme of daily Masses, Processions and gatherings. There were light hearted moments too with concerts arranged and an afternoon garden party in the sun. Bishop Arthur presided at one of the international afternoon Processions of the Blessed Sacrament which incorporates a special Benediction for the sick pilgrims. The newly refurbished Rosary Basilica provided a marvellous venue for the Mass of Anointing providing a perfect acoustic for the robust singing. Our Mass at the Grotto also had an international character as we were joined by pilgrims from the Diocese of Paisley in Scotland whose Bishop, Bishop Phillip Tartaglia, preached the homily. This year was a special year for one pilgrim as Joanna Jackson of St. Joseph’,s College, Bradford marked her twenty fifth pilgrimage with the Youth Section. At the closing Mass the Bishop presented her with the Diocesan Silver Medal. We also left a reflection on the Lord’,s Prayer, now displayed on the walls of the Underground Basilica with many others, for pilgrims who will travel to Lourdes later in the year. With Bernadette, we say the ‘,Our Father’, Welcome to Alexandra Court! We are a small private family orientated residential home for the elderly, where standards of care and cleanliness are our priority. Together with my three children, a dedicated and conscientious manager and our wonderful team of staff members, some of which have been with us since we opened in 1992, we have ensured Alexandra Court continues to exceed expectations. We have home cooked meals and desserts, tailored care plans to meet each resident’,s individual needs and activities galore including entertainers, fitness instructors, beauty and cinema afternoons and two little dogs visit regularly who bring a lot of happiness to our residents. Most rooms are en-suite complete with television and telephone points, nurse call systems and they are decorated regularly to ensure the Alexandra Court stays fresh, clean and always smells nice! In order to experience life at Alexandra Court please feel free to contact my daughter Marilouise, to arrange a viewing or alternatively have a look at our website for more information. We look forward to welcoming you soon. 333 Spen Lane, Leeds LS16 5BB Tel: 0113 274 3661 Email: court_alexandra@yahoo.co.uk www.alexandracourtcarehome.co.uk Family orientated residential home for the elderly

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Jul/Aug 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Leeds Catholic Post Page 11 Specialists in wedding photography 01977 556088 07716728109 Your wedding is a unique day which involves considerable thought, planning, time and effort. Once your special day is over you will be left with many lovely memories some of which will inevitably fade over time. Investing in good photography can ensure that the mood and emotion of your day is captured to form a permanent reminder to enable you to relive your memories for years to come.

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Jul/Aug 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 12 Leeds Catholic Post F ive coaches of school students from England travelled to the the Taizé, Community in France in mid July. It was a pilot week for Taize’,s ",School Weeks", in July 2012, a new initiative for young people in the UK. Taizé, is the international and ecumenical monastic community in Burgundy in south-eastern France, founded in 1940 by the late Brother Roger. Each year, about 80,000 young people from all over the world participate in weekly meetings for young adults. This year there were British students from 3 Catholic and 7 Church of England schools, and 2 schools with no religious affiliation. The visitors were from years 10-13 in their schools. Whilst in Taizé,, they met with school groups from Germany, Holland, Hungary, Serbia, and Sweden and elsewhere. Overall, young people from 15 different countries were registered for these school groups. The meetings include community life and prayer, international discussion groups, and workshops on a wide variety of topics covering questions of faith and life, social involvement for justice and peace, and artistic expression. Before travelling to Taize this time, Russell Jones, head of 6th form at Bishop Challoner School, a Catholic School in south-east London, said: ",Bishop Challoner have been taking groups of 15-18 year olds to Taizé, for 10 years and every time there is a newness to the experience as young people come closer to God, and to each other as they learn about others` lives. We hope for another time of discovery in the peaceful and Spirit- filled environment of Taizé,.", Further details of these School Weeks are at www.taize.fr/schools -or contact UK Co-ordinator of Taizé, School Weeks 2012, Jane Shields who is based in Wakefield- jane@laloge.co.uk or 01924377921 -or contact in Taizé,- Brother Paolo- at brpaolo@taize.fr Taize Weeks for UK Schools Pilgrimage of Solidarity a Great Success S tudents from Leeds Catholic High Schools helped take up the Leeds Diocese leg of a pilgrimage of solidarity that began in Sheffield, was taken up by Middlesbrough and Hexham and Newcastle pilgrims and end in Holy Island. The week-long walk across our diocese marks fifty years of support for global justice by parishes, schools and religious communities through involvement with CAFOD. Students from St. Thomas a Becket school collected the symbolic St. Cuthbert’,s Cross from Bishop John Rawsthorne of Hallam and walked with it from Heath Common into Leeds on Monday 20th June. As they walked they were mindful of the thousands of young people who have to walk long distances every day to get to school. They were welcomed into the Leeds area at Methley Cricket Club by the Lord Mayor of Leeds, Councillor Reverend Alan Taylor, who handed on the Cross to parishioners who walked with it into the centre of Leeds on Tuesday. At 10.00 on Wednesday 22nd June 50 students and around 15 CAFOD supporters set off from Granary Wharf to walk to Kirkstall Abbey. They were accompanied by John Battle, former MP for West Leeds and long-standing campaigner for justice. The pilgrims were mindful of those whose daily walk for water is a matter of life or death. They were greeted at Kirkstall Abbey by Bishop Arthur who led them into the Abbey to celebrate the commitment of Leeds Diocese to global justice with a short service of prayer and thanksgiving. Bishop Arthur commended the students for their commitment and reflected with them the message Jesus left with the disciples on the road to Emmaus. John Battle then encouraged the students to appreciate the long Christian tradition of pilgrimage and also the importance of Yorkshire monasteries like Kirkstall to our history and our faith journey. The walk continued north through Pool and Harrogate where on Thursday 23rd June Vanessa Chang spoke at St Robert’,s on CAFOD’,s work in Rwanda. Finally on Saturday 25th June walkers arrive for a service at Ripon cathedral celebrated by Bishop John Packer, Bishop of Ripon and Leeds, during which the St. Cuthbert’,s Cross will be handed over to Middlesbrough pilgrims to continue the journey. On the 9th July, the last day of the month long pilgrimage across the four northern dioceses, 50 parishioners from Leeds joined hundreds of fellow pilgrims who walked St Cuthbert’,s Way across the sand to Holy Island . . . . with lots of rain! Mass was be celebrated by Bishop Cunningham and CAFOD partners from Brazil and Rwanda shared their stories. Many thanks to all who shared this wonderful pilgrimage with us. Br Alois, Prior of Taize, leading Evening Prayer in the Church of Rec- onciliation, Taize. Gabby Logan Gymnastics Cup S taff and pupils at St John’,s Catholic School for the Deaf in Boston Spa were delighted to welcome their patron TV and Sports Presenter Gabby Logan to school last week. Gabby, a former international gymnast and Ambassador for Lloyds TSB National School Sports Week, called in to school to talk to Head Teacher Ann Bradbury about the introduction of a new sports award for pupils at St John’,s. To be known as the Gabby Logan Gymnastics Cup, the trophy will be awarded each year to the pupil making the most progress in gymnastics. “,Gabby is very popular with our pupils”, said Ann Bradbury “, and they are very excited about the new trophy which we will be awarding for the first time in July”, Sudan Independence Celebrated in Horsforth S aturday, July 9, 2011 will be remembered as the day when God`s words came true to the people of the newest country in the world: the Historic Celebration of the Independence of the Republic of South Sudan. After years of conflict and bloodshed and for many, martyrdom, freedom was proclaimed for South Sudan. Many of the friends of the Comboni Missionaries gathered in Horsforth, Leeds, coming from, Preston, York, Huddersfield and Leeds, to mark this occasion, but what made this day so special was an African Music Group of Ugandans and South Sudanese from London, who not only joined in prayer for the missionary work of the Fathers but also celebrated in true colourful African style, in song and dance, this marvellous day in the history of the Church in Africa! The Key Note address given by Sr. Maureen McBride, the Congregational Leader of the Sisters of Our Lady of the Missions, who together with many religious men and women responded to the initiative of the Sudanese Bishop`s Conference in Juba to work towards rebuilding the infrastructure mainly in areas of education, health care and pastoral administration. Centres, since 2009 have been built to accommodate new teachers and health-workers along with local catechists to work for the new South Sudan, independent now of the north and the rest of the world! It was heart warming as a Comboni missionary to hear first hand of the work undertaken by so many religious congregations and lay people dedicating themselves and sharing their resources and skills for the people of South Sudan and to see the response of the people themselves to work towards rebuilding their new country. Fr Pasquino Panato in his homily said: ‘,that July 9 was like a dream come true, to see this day dawning was for all the Comboni fathers and sisters the fulfilment of many years of struggle, and at last a chance to see the aspirations of Daniel Comboni and those of the early missionaries who for years have sustained their presence among the people, fulfilled!’, You are cordially invited to our ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING Thursday, 22nd September 2011 at 2 p.m. at Wheeler Hall, St Anne’,s Street Leeds LS2 8BE Guest Speaker: The Rt Rev AW Robinson, Anglican Bishop of Pontefract

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Jul/Aug 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

A round 550 graduates from Leeds Trinity University College celebrated their success with family and friends at graduation ceremonies in July. Whilst the majority were undergraduates receiving their Bachelors degrees, a number had taken a different route into higher education by taking a foundation degree whilst continuing to work full-time. Three employees of City Healthcare Partnership (formerly NHS Hull) were the first to graduate from Leeds Trinity’,s new foundation degree in Workplace Wellbeing. They are Health Trainer Gary Jennison, and his colleagues Thaká, Naá,ma and Kathryn Robertson, both Health Development Workers. Gary said, “,It was hard work getting back into studying, especially whilst working full- time, and achieving the balance between work and family life. However the course has equipped us with the skills to become workplace wellbeing champions, working alongside colleagues to secure workplace wellbeing, address lifestyle issues and develop policy.”, Following a Foundation Degree, a candidate can progress to an honours degree with one further year of study. Maxine Addison achieved a First Class degree in Professional Practice: Education having entered higher education via the Foundation Degree route. Originally a nursery nurse, Maxine has been working as a Special Educational Needs Coordinator (SENCO) at Cardinal Heenan High School in Leeds since completing her Foundation Degree in Childhood and Youth in 2006. She said, “,The one year ‘,top-up’, for an honours degree has given me greater understanding and more knowledge to inform my work, as well as Qualified Teacher Status, and I now teach health and social care in addition to my SENCO role.”, Louise Priestley, Foundation Degree Programme Leader, said, “,Professional Practice students have achieved top institutional grades, a celebration of their commitment and capacity and also verification of the value of the work-based route to higher education qualifications.”, Professor Freda Bridge, Leeds Trinity’,s Principal and Chief Executive, said, “,The value of foundation degrees is that you can study and work at the same time, and our programmes reflect the excellent partnerships between employers and Leeds Trinity.”, “,We are committed to preparing graduates well for work, and while anecdotal evidence suggests that many here today already have jobs or further study in place, we have confirmation this week of the success of last year’,s cohort from the Destination of Leavers from Higher Education survey.”, Pictured are Maxine Addison, and l-r Foundation Degree Programme Leader Dr Ian Kenvyn, Thaká, Naá,ma, Gary Jennison, Kathryn Robertson, Professor Freda Bridge. NEWS FROM LEEDS TRINITY UNIVERSITY COLLEGE Leeds Catholic Post Page 13 Graduates celebrate as they lay the foundation for career success Events at Leeds Trinity University College Please visit our website at www.leedstrinity.ac.uk for more details and a full events listing. Open days for prospective students Saturday 10 September Saturday 22 October Our Open Days are a great opportunity to find out about studying at Leeds Trinity as an undergraduate, postgraduate or foundation degree student. The events run from 11.00am to 3.00pm at our campus on Brownberrie Lane, Horsforth, LS18 5HD. Call 0113 283 7150 or visit www.leedstrinity.ac.uk for information and to book. Vatican II 50 Years On: The New Evangelization 26 to 29 June 2012 In order to reflect on the impact of Council and deepen understanding of the New Evangelization, Leeds Trinity University College is hosting an international Catholic theological conference. The conference is jointly organised with the Centre for Catholic Studies at Durham University and is the first in a series to celebrate Catholic higher education in the UK. For further information contact Kathy Stenton, by email to k.stenton@leedstrinity.ac.uk or call 0113 2837102. S choolchildren in The Gambia can look forward to a brighter future in class thanks to the hard work of final year Primary Education students from Leeds Trinity University College. 26 newly qualified teachers flew to The Gambia after their exams, continuing a link between the university college and the charity Friends of Gambian Schools (FROGS) which started with the first student visit in 2009. Over a period of three weeks two groups of students transformed the learning environment of primary age children who attend Bijilo Lower Basic School, by painting classrooms and adding bright artwork, as well as helping local labourers with essential plumbing work to provide clean water. New graduate Beth Webster will be teaching Year 2 children in Clayton, Bradford, from September and is looking forward to drawing on the experience in topics with her class. She said, “,For children who don’,t get the chance to travel it will show them another world.”, “,Bijilo Lower Basic School really is basic, and the people there are so resourceful and creative with what they have. It was fantastic to be able to help improve the school environment.”, Sally Reader, founder of the FROGS charity and the charity’,s coordinator in the Gambia, said, “,These students have been an absolute joy to work with. I as FROGS representative here and advisor to incoming groups have been most impressed by the calibre of both groups.”, “,They did Leeds Trinity University College proud. I shall miss their enthusiasm and am sure the schools they will be teaching in next term will be all the richer for their presence. Thank you on behalf of all Gambian schoolchildren.”, Newly qualified teachers go back to school in The Gambia Survey shows Leeds Trinity graduates hold their own in the jobs market L eeds Trinity University College is among the best in the region at preparing its graduates for work, according to employability data released on 15 July by the Higher Education Statistics Agency. The Destinations of Leavers in Higher Education Survey reveals that 93.6% of Leeds Trinity’,s 2010 graduates were in work or further study six months after graduating. This places Leeds Trinity second for employability in the Yorkshire and Humber region, just 0.1% behind the University of Huddersfield, and 21st out of 123 higher education institutions in England. Leeds Trinity has consistently surpassed the national average for employability for a decade. The figure has climbed steadily since the economic downturn of 2008, showing that despite the challenging job market, graduates are leaving Leeds Trinity well prepared to enter employment or develop their studies at postgraduate level. Karen Howden, Careers Service Manager at Leeds Trinity, said “,We are proud of our consistent record of excellent employment figures at Leeds Trinity. Despite the challenging economic conditions faced by our graduates in 2010, close to 94% have succeeded in progressing to work or further study.”, “,We attribute this to the career focus of our courses, which have employability skills firmly embedded into the curriculum. The careers service and professional placement team work closely together to ensure that students gain work experience and access all the information and advice they need to secure and succeed in employment.”,

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Jul/Aug 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 14 Leeds Catholic Post Leeds Diocesan Youth Service ‘,All who are thirsty, come!’, (Rev 22:17) On the occasion of the 43rd Communications Day Pope Benedict encouraged young believers to bring the witness of our faith to the digital world. With this in mind, the Leeds Diocesan Youth Service have taken up Pope Benedict’,s call and are now on Twitter. Follow us atLeedsDYS. WYD COUNTDOWN…, PROCESSING IN PREPARATION WYD pilgrims processed with banners and as stewards for the diocesan Corpus Christi Procession in June. The pilgrims met earlier in the day for Mass and for a catechesis session which used the National Symbol for Youth Ministry as its focus. This candle stand was blessed by Pope Benedict outside of Westminster during the Papal Visit to England in September 2010. MUSIC FOR MADRID Talented, musical pilgrims gathered together on Friday 24th June to practice and pray. The musicians will help with our liturgical celebrations and catechetical session in Madrid …, on top of a few inevitable coach sing-alongs! THE NORTH UNITES Young pilgrims from Leeds met up with pilgrims from Lancaster Diocese and Middlesbrough Diocese on Saturday 25th June for a joint retreat day. After an afternoon of catechesis and workshops preparing us for what to expect in Madrid, Bishop Arthur celebrated Mass for us. DOUBLE PILGRIMAGE A number of WYD pilgrims were actually on the diocesan pilgrimage to Lourdes at the beginning of July. We took this opportunity to meet together to reflect on our pilgrimage experience and to go to the Grotto to pray for our WYD pilgrims and all the preparation both in Leeds and in Madrid. For more information about how to register for Leeds Diocesan Youth Service events, check out: www.leedsyouth.org.uk, contact Anna at the Youth Office: 0113 261 8058 / abcleedsdiocese@hotmail.com or join the “,Leeds Diocesan Youth Service”, Facebook group. 23rd July WYD Final Meeting 9.45am –, &, Pre-Departure Mass 1pm Leeds Cathedral 10th –, 23rd August World Youth Day Pilgrimage - -- Madrid 25th –, 29th August Youth 2000 Festival - -- Walsingham 8th September LDYS &, Parish Youth 10.30 –, Ministry Meeting 3.30pm Hinsley Hall 8th September Youth Ministry Holy Hour Praying for young people in 2.30 –, the Diocese of Leeds 3.30pm Hinsley Hall Chapel 17th September Diocesan Pilgrimage Walsingham - -- Walsingham 21st September REVELATION 7 –, 9pm Cathedral Hall, Leeds 3rd October Batley Torchlight Procession TBC Batley For more information about how to register for Leeds Diocesan Youth Service events, check out: www.leedsyouth.org.uk, contact Anna at the Youth Office: 0113 261 8058 / abcleedsdiocese@hotmail.com or join the “,Leeds Diocesan Youth Service”, Facebook group. Leeds Diocesan Youth Service Calendar With less than a month to go until 80 pilgrims depart from Leeds to join over 1 million young Catholics in Madrid for the World Youth Day celebrations, preparations have stepped up a gear with Leeds Diocesan Youth Service. GOLFING ANTICS WITH A VERY SPECIAL GUEST! The LDYS annual Charity Golf Day took place on Friday 15th July. In preparation for the day, WYD pilgrims made a promo. film which would explain to the golfers what WYD is, what our past WYD experiences were and what we’,re most looking forward to at WYD 2011. The video included a number of very special interviews between Leeds Pope Benedict (well a cardboard cut out of him!!!) Look out on “,Leeds Diocesan Youth Service”, Facebook group to watch the video! The Golf Day was supported by businessmen from Leeds, who enjoyed the gorgeous weather, the beautiful course at Sandmoor, comedy banter and a lush dinner in the evening at Sandmoor Club House.

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Jul/Aug 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

l Tuesday night saw a unique event take place in Leeds Civic Hall. Refugees city councillors, journalists, artists and school children from across the city all came together to celebrate Refugee Week. Each year, Refugee Week is the opportunity to look at the contribution of people who have come to our city seeking safety and to recognise the achievements and contribution they have made. This year, a civic celebration was held to mark the contribution of individuals and groups who help to make Leeds a welcoming place for refugees. Three schools were awarded “,School of Sanctuary”, status in recognition of the work they do to make their schools welcoming to children seeking safety. One of those schools was St Mary’,s RC Primary School in Horsforth. St Mary’,s School in Horsforth doesn’,t have large numbers of international new arrivals - so they could easily have been forgiven for not seeing that welcoming asylum seekers and refugees was relevant to their school. Nevertheless, through its Catholic ethos and values the whole school community cares and prides itself on welcoming and including people seeking sanctuary in their activities. For the past eight years the school and parish have been passing on baby clothes, toys and equipment to families seeking sanctuary in other parts of Leeds and every year the pupils have been encouraged to give one of their own toys as a Christmas present to children seeking sanctuary. When they heard about the possibility of becoming a School of Sanctuary they were keen to get involved. Teacher Sue Leonard arranged for staff training, pupil awareness raising, and an assembly and talk for parents. The school has even promoted the whole City of Sanctuary movement to other schools and parishes. One of the highlights for the school has been the involvement in school life of people from different countries and cultures, including story telling and dancing from other parts of the world. To receive the certificate, Sue Leonard and pupils from St Mary’,s presented a rap they had written for the occasion. Rachael Loftus, manager of the Harmonious Communities programme said: “,We were delighted to have St. Mary’,s apply and achieve School of Sanctuary status. It is really encouraging to see pupils live up to the values of their school, and to represent their school and the diocese so well at a civic event.”, Bishop John Packer, Chair of Leeds Migration Partnership, the organisers of Tuesday’,s event, said: “,It’,s so important that we make time and space for people from different sides of stories to meet. It’,s easy to believe myths and half truths about people we don’,t take the time to know –, and it is great to see schools leading the way.”, Cllr Peter Gruen, Deputy Leader, Leeds City Council said: “,It was a great experience to host a Refugee Week event in the Civic Hall. To see people who came as refugees many years ago now contributing so much to life in Leeds, as well as more recent arrivals talking about the welcome they have received.”, Leeds Catholic Post Page 15 Classified Advertising LEEDS CATHOLIC MARRIAGE CARE Marriage isn’,t always easy —, Counselling can help For an appointment in confidence, with an understanding and experienced listener, please telephone: LEEDS 0113 261 8045 HUDDERSFIELD 01484 422523 A Relationship Counselling Service W. Lever Ltd BRADFORD 01274 547137 524 THORNTON ROAD, BRADFORD BD8 9NB FOR OVER 75 YEARS PROVIDING A COMPLETE PERSONAL &, CARING 24 HOUR FUNERAL SERVICE CHAPEL OF REST H UGHES F UNERAL S ERVICES (Catholic Funeral Directors) 180 YORK ROAD, LEEDS LS9 9NT. Tel 2480953/63 152 GREEN LANE, CROSSGATES. Tel 2326900 3 HOLLIN PARK PARADE, OAKWOOD ROUNDABOUT Tel 2499338 Web: wwww.hughesfuneralservices.co.uk Email: info@hughesfuneralservices.co.uk Family owned and managed. Fully Qualified in all aspects. 24 Hour Service Guaranteed Fixed Price Funeral Plans etc. “,At a time of bereavement we carry out our duties with dignity and respect”, In times of bereavement please contact: B. J. MELIA &, SONS (B. J. Melia Dip F.D.) F UNERAL D IRECTORS AND M ONUMENTAL M ASONS Private Chapel of Rest 64 GIBBET STREET, HALIFAX Telephone: 01422 354453 PRE-PAID FUNERAL SERVICE AVAILABLE DETAILS ON REQUEST Jennings Funeral Services (Catholic Funeral Directors) 13 Racca Green, Knottingley WF11 8AT Telephone: 01977 677715 •, Highest standards of care •, Family owned and managed •, Pre payment plans •, 24 hour service •, Personal attention of Barry and Elizabeth Jennings A Personal and Dignified Family Business that Cares S J F A fitting memorial tournament for Adam Chadwick who tragically died 3 years ago was played at Whingate Primary School. All teams took part in a minutes silence before the matches began which were played in the true spirit of the game. Parents and friends of the family said ‘,Adam would have been proud of the football which was played today’,. Greenhill, Grange Farm, Whingate, Armley and Holy Family Catholic Primary, Leeds, all took part in the second year of this fantastic tournament. Peter Lorimer, Ex-Leeds United, watched on and saw Holy Family yet again produce some fantastic football after a slow start. Holy Family forgot their shooting boots in the beginning of this tournament with goalless draw against Greenhill but saw them score for the first time with a one nil win against Whingate B. The next game against Armley Primary saw them dominate but struggle to finish with countless opportunities. The remaining two fixtures were crucial and required the team to win and by large margins. Greenhill Primary were also playing well and had not lost a game all tournament, both teams had the same points but Greenhill had the better goal difference. Holy Family were ready and determined to complete the task ahead. Their first opposition was Grange Farm and after two quick goals Holy Family seemed to be dominating the game, but they pulled one back with a long range effort. With the task in hand Holy family committed men forward and scored one more goal to seal the win. It all came down to the last game could they score more than Greenhill? Holy Family dominated the game once again and were inspired by the on looking Legend Peter Lorimer. They finished the tournament with a fantastic display of two touch football and beat Whingate A three nil. Holy Family were successful again by winning the tournament on goals scored and the football they played was a fitting tribute to football mad Adam Chadwick. The trophy was presented by Leeds United legend Peter Lorimer. A special mention has to be made to Daniella Breen of Holy Family who won the Female Player of the Tournament. Holy Family Primary ‘,do’, Adam Chadwick Proud! Pupils from St. Mary’,s, Horsforth take centre stage at Leeds Refugee Week Celebration

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Jul/Aug 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 16 Leeds Catholic Post TIME IN KIRKSTALL ABBEY A great joy of the location of our home is that it is just ten minutes away across the River Aire from the grounds of Kirkstall Abbey now managed as a heritage site and with an excellent new visitors centre and the Abbey House restaurant and coffee shop. For the last thirty one years the Kirkstall festival July saturday medieval style fair regularly attracts over 10,000 visitors each year. For the past two years part of the festival programme has included a well attended “,ecumenical service”, in the middle of the afternoon as the bands around continue to play and the jugglers entertain outside the main Abbey Church door.But there was some thing extra special in the air on Sunday10th July at the Celebratory Mass of the new combined parish of Our Lady of Kirkstall held in the main Kirkstall Abbey Church. The Abbey lost its lead roof (taken to make cannon balls to fire at the French by King Henry VIII’,s commissioners when he closed it down in 1537) but nearly a thousand Catholics had come back to celebrate the first Mass since the “,dissolution”, of the Abbey nearly 400 years ago. Yet the Cistercian monastery that was Kirkstall Abbey had been the centre of prayer, contemplation and celebration of the Mass for 400 years from 1132 when it was founded. The high ruined walls still echo to the daily routine of chanting the psalms , the “,Office”, now known as “,the Prayer of the Church”,. I walked into the Abbey Church just as the choir and orchestra were striking up the opening hymn, Blessed Cardinal Newman’,s uplifting “,Praise to the Holiest in the Height”,. The Abbey roof would have been lifted off if it had been there, such were the good acoustics and the enthusiastic volume. The singing of the Gloria “,Glory to God in the heights of the heavens”,, emphasized the theme. On a more mundane note you couldn’,t help raising your eyes to heaven to glance at the billowing clouds crossing the sky overhead and occasionally threatening a few rain drops. But as Bishop Arthur spelt out in his sermon it was a real experience of “,Eucharistic presence”, as a praising community, yes exposed a bit to the elements and the soaring sky, but regathered and in deep solidarity with those in the Church, including generations of Kirkstall monks and farmer workers who had stood there before us those hundreds of years ago. In his little known Encyclical “,Dies Domini”, Pope John Paul 11 wrote that “,The Eucharist is an event and a programme of true brotherhood. From Sunday Mass there flows a tide of charity destined to spread into the whole life of the faithful, beginning by inspiring the very way in which they live the rest of Sunday”,. From its start and practice in the early Church the Eucharist had a central place in the life of the community such that the fellowship gathered around that special meal table “,redounded upon their activities outside of worship’,. As the theologians put it “,if the Eucharist is meaningful in itself, it is also the most meaningful activity in which we can engage. Through the Eucharist we enjoy a privileged communion with God and one another as we partake of Christ’,s Body and Blood and thus are joined to his life”,. Therefore the Eucharist transforms the community more nearly into Christ, creating a people whose labours in the world should contribute to the development of God’,s kingdom. The continued celebration of the Mass from the earliest days of the Church right through to our day links us into a continuum of those of us living now with those dead who worshipped and lived lives of service to their communities and went before us whether last week or hundreds of years ago in buildings some of which are still standing as ruined monuments and places of great historical interest .It was not so much therefore as a return to a special place in the past Catholic life of Yorkshire and the fertile Aire Valley that made the Celebratory Mass special, nor any misplaced sense of triumphal reoccupation but rather a sense of responsibility for participation in a continuing “,presence”,. In other words as Catholics in Leeds celebrating Mass in our communities in the twenty first century we are invited and inspired by our predecessors to go out from the place of worship in which we gather wherever that may be temporarily or semi permanent and “,begin the service”,, confident that our mission goes on. John Battle KSG Rev John Elders F r John Elders came originally from the parish of St Mary of the Angels, Batley where he was born on 8th May 1941 to Willie and Hilda Elders. After leaving the parish primary school he became part of the Batley contingent which travelled daily to St Bede’,s Grammar School in Bradford where he became a pupil in 1953. Five years later he left St Bede’,s to join the ‘,Little Lads’, in the Junior House of the seminary at Ushaw in County Durham. He was ordained to the priesthood by Bishop Wheeler at Leeds Cathedral on 20th May 1967. The next day he returned to his home parish to say his first Mass in St Mary’,s church. Following his ordination Fr Elders undertook further studies, initially at St Edmund’,s House, Cambridge and then at the University of Bristol, from where he gained a Master of Arts degree in 1970. After two years of pastoral work in St William’,s parish, Bradford he was appointed to the staff of Ushaw College, as Lecturer in Communications, and in this capacity he took part in the formation of the first generation of post-Vatican II clergy. He returned to the diocese in 1977 and became assistant priest at St Robert’,s, Harrogate. In 1982 Fr Elders became a parish priest for the first time when he was appointed to St Peter’,s, Leeds Road, Bradford - and so began a long association with the second city of the diocese. In 1990 he moved to St Winefride’,s at Wibsey, a large and growing parish where he succeeded the late Fr Joe Knowles. Ten years later he moved across the city to Our Lady and First Martyrs at Heaton. During his time in Bradford Fr Elders was known as a hard working and caring pastor and he also gave great support to Catholic education in the city, serving on a number of primary and high school governing bodies, including that of his old school, St Bede’,s. For a time he was Chair of Governors at St Bede’,s, working with the school’,s first lay Headmaster, one of his former classmates, Dr. James Hagerty. He left Bradford in 2004 to become parish priest of St Brigid’,s, Churwell. In these later years Fr Elders did not enjoy the best of health and a few months after his Ruby Jubilee he retired from active ministry in September 2007. He went to live at Thornton, on the outskirts of Bradford and it was here that he died on Thursday 30th June 2011. His sister Mary predeceased him and her loss had affected him deeply, he is survived by his brother Joe. On the evening of Monday 11th July Fr Elders’, body was received into St Mary’,s, Batley where Bishop Roche celebrated the Funeral Mass the following day. Fr Elders was later buried in Batley Cemetery. The homily at his Funeral Mass was preached by another son of St Mary’,s, Mgr Michael McQuinn VG. He recalled the excitement in the parish at the time of Fr Elder’,s ordination and how his faith was rooted in Batley, in the timeless combination of home, school and parish. It was, he said, a faith that remained a strong presence in his life, sustaining him in the challenging times and enabling him to respond to his various priestly assignments with generosity and openness. Obituary Unity And Thanksgiving In Walsingham SUNDAY 26 JUNE 2011 A pilgrimage is a journey or search of great moral or spiritual significance. A Pilgrimage is in itself a moment of reflection and reparation and reconciliation with God and your brother. I remember something that Rev.(Mgr) Grogan Paul (director of vocation for the Diocese of Leeds) once told me, that Walsingham for us Roman Catholic of England is a significant third place of Pilgrimage. The first is obviously the Holy Land, the second place of pilgrimage is Holy See of Rome, then the third is Walsingham. We Africans and Caribbean and many other nationalities from London, Manchester, Leeds…, and other parts of UK, on 26 June 2011, we made a pilgrimage to Walsingham. In this pilgrimage there were more than 12 coaches from different parts of UK. This reminds me of the pilgrimage that we Eritreans make every year in our country to the Shrine of Mariam Dearit. This Shrine of Mariam Dearit is celebrated every year in the month of May, and people travel by coach from all over the country (Eritrea). Christians and non Christians are united, that is, they participate even from the Christian Orthodox Church. It is the same in Walsingham, I saw there is also a place of the Anglican Church dedicated to Our Lady. It is a visible sign of unity. From this we understand how Our Lady recommends the need of real unity. After the procession from the Friday market to the Shrine, which we did on the narrow road in hot weather and it was difficult walking especially for the elders, meditating and praying deeply the four mysteries of Rosary. We began our Holy Mass at 3:00pm, which was celebrated by Fr. Albert from Westminster London. In his homely he reminded us about Unity, by saying we are one in Christ, and we must stay united. As it was also a day dedicated to the Corpus Christi, Fr. Albert strongly explained the meaning of Communion. He said we must be in communion with Christ, in communion with the Church, and in communion with our brothers. After the Holy Mass Rev.(Mgr) Grogan Paul also explained to the pilgrims a brief concept about the vocation, and he asked everyone to pray for vocations for the priesthood and consecrated life. He invited all the African and Caribbean communities to necessarily think about their vocation and to say YES to the Lord, and particularly the Church looks forward for the future to have even more African or Caribbean priest and nuns in this nation. Finally the chaplain of the Eritrean Catholic community in Leeds, briefly said, “,For us Eritreans, today is a special day of thanksgiving to Our Lady of Walsingham because two years ago, that is, in 2009, at that time in this place there was an Eritrean lady her name is Amel, and there was on that particular day a pilgrim Bishop Arthur Roche. This lady said to the Most Rev.Bishop Arthur Roche, “,We need a priest for our community.”, The Bishop recommended to all the pilgrims of Walsingham to pray for their need. We strongly believe it is through the intercession of Our Lady of Walsingham in January 2010, the Eritrean Catholic Community of Leeds they get a priest. Many Thanks to Our Lady of Walsingham. We enjoyed this blessed day and we thank those who are responsible for the shrine of Walsingham for their wonderful hospitality. Thanks also to the coordinators of the pilgrimage. A date for your Diary Leeds Catholic History Day Wheeler Hall, LeedsSaturday, 22nd October Further details in the September edition of the Catholic Post

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Page 17

Jul/Aug 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Leeds Catholic Post Page 17 Sixth Form leavers set off for adventure S ixth Formers who had been at The Holy Family Catholic School for the last seven years gathered as a body for the last time (on Friday 27th May). Just as their membership of The Holy Family community was marked by the celebration of Mass, their leaving as sealed with another celebration of Mass. Led by Fr Mike, the school chaplain and Sally Layas, Head of Sixth Form, the theme was one of adventure. Follow your heart and seek your adventures, use your head by all means but do not miss opportunities. After Mass there was time to examine displays of photographs collected over the last seven years in and around school. ”,Gosh! Don’,t I look young there?”, Bob, staff photographer at Keighley News, called in to add one last photo to the collection before the morning concluded with a late breakfast together. Our Lady’,s Take the Title! Report by Peter McQuillen Strong T he inaugural Bishop Roche Netball Trophy was won in thrilling style by Our Lady of Good Counsel Catholic Primary School from Seacroft, Leeds. The new competition was the brain child of the Leeds Catholic Headteachers group who wanted to provide a sporting competition for the girls in their catholic primary schools. The headteachers approached Bishop Roche with their idea and he was delighted to sponsor the event and put his name to the competition. All catholic Primary schools in the Leeds City Council area were invited to enter and 18 out of the 27 schools joined the event. It was hoped the completion would be an event that encompassed the whole family of Catholic Education in the city and soon three High Schools and the Six Form College signed up to support. The first heat was hosted by Corpus Christi Catholic College where Holy Family, St Nicholas’,s, St Peter and Paul, Our Lady of Good Counsel and St Josephs- Wetherby came together to play the first ever game in the competition. Some wonderful netball and competitive spirit saw Holy Family and Our Lady of Good Counsel quality for the finals, Holy Family edging the top spot on goal difference from Our Lady’,s. The second heat was held at Cardinal Heenan High School where St Anthony’,s, St Paul’,s, St Urban’,s, Holy Name, St Mary’,s-Horsforth and St Joseph’,s- Pudsey took on the challenge of qualifying for the finals. Again games were very close and competitive. At the end of the evening St Anthony’,s qualified first with a 100% winning record and St Joseph’,s-Pudsey were close behind in second place. The final heat took place at St Mary’,s High School. At this event St Peter and Paul, St Joseph’,s- Otley, St Theresa’,s, St Augustine’,s and Immaculate Heart of Mary competed to qualify for the last 2 places in the final line up. On a showery afternoon Immaculate Heart edged top spot, closely followed by St Theresa’,s in second. Notre Dame Six Form College hosted the tournament finals on Wednesday 29th June. The six qualifying schools arrived well practised, well dressed, highly motivated and enthusiastic at the prospect of being the first winners of the prestigious cup. The netball was bound to be of a high quality and the players did not disappoint the considerable watching crowd. The passion, commitment and skill level would have graced any professional sporting fixture, winners and losers were going to be made by the narrowest of margins. The games were played over a 10 minute duration and games were end to end with shots raining down on the posts. Each team would play each other once to decide who would top the league and become the Catholic Primary Schools champion netball team. After 11 of the 15 games 4 of the 6 schools could still become the champions. The last four matches of the tournament would decide the ‘,Singing for their supper’, by Richard Constantine Calder Valley parishioners attending Mass for the, Feast of the Holy Eucharist on the last weekend in June enjoyed a unique and memorable experience. Chamber choir,”, Ars Nova Sacra “,from Hungary took time out from their busy schedule of engagements at the Hebden Bridge music festival to enhance the liturgy at the Church of the Good Shepherd Mytholmroyd Fr John Gott thanked the choir on behalf of the parish for their outstanding, polyphonic and multi- layered vocal contribution to this special feast day. He said it was real joy to hear again the works 16th century renaissance, sacred music composer, Giovanni Palestrina. Afterwards, the choir , who are guests of the Hepton singers met members of the parish in the church centre and delighted everyone by, “,singing for their supper.“, As the Post was going to press, we were moving from the closure of the News of the World to the arrest of Rebekah Brooks and resignation of Sir Paul Stephenson of the Met. By the time you read this, more may well have happened. It is another scenario which has shaken the structures upon which we seem to depend and which may refuse to go quickly away. The missing word in much of this is that most Christian of words: “,trust”,. We cannot trust journalists and their informers not to abuse advanced communications: we cannot trust their management to regulate them properly, to ask where a story has come from: we cannot trust government to keep a professional distance from journalists: and worst of all- and this is only just emerging- we cannot trust some police officers not to become involved or accept payments in return for information. In each case, this does not attach to all, but even a few is too many. Ed Milliband, the Labour leader and a Yorkshire MP has made a statement that acts as a warning to us all. “,For too long”, he says “,political leaders have been too concerned about what people in the press would think and too fearful of speaking out about these issues. “,If one section of the media is allowed to grow so powerful that it becomes insulated from political criticism and scrutiny of its behaviour, the proper system of checks and balances breaks down and abuses of power are likely to follow.”, The Church of England’,s Ethics Committee, weighed in too, threatening to withdraw its £,4 million investment in News Corp unless `senior managers` were dealt with over the scandal. This scandal broke when the takeover of the whole of the Sky TV company, BSkyB, by News Corp, the Murdoch’,s company, was imminent. People asked whether they could be held to be fit and proper owners of a major part of our TV. Whatever the ultimate answer to that question- and the proposal has been shelved- we must ask ourselves, once again, questions about this latest failure of trust and virtue in public life, over which the churches in this country must themselves be able to speak out. The Post Says top four places, the league was ultra tight. The thrilling final games saw great nervous tension from the benches of all teams. In the final game Our Lady’,s held their nerve and saw off the challenging of Immaculate Heart winning a high scoring match 5-4, sealing their place at the top of the table. A sense of ecstasy broke out in the Our Lady’,s camp as the final whistle sounded. Monsignor McQuinn attended the final event on behalf of Bishop Roche and he was highly entertained by the skill and passion of the girls. He commented on how he had played the game once and found it very difficult to master. He was amazed how these primary school children made it look so easy. Monsignor presented medallions to every competitor for winning or being runners up in their heats. He then presented Holy Family players with runners up commemorative trophies and Our Lady of Good Counsel with the winner’,s trophies. The sparkling new Bishop Roche Netball Trophy was presented to the victorious team captain. Monsignor told the crowd that he was delighted to see an event that included the Catholic education family from Primary to secondary to six form. He thought it had been ‘, a great competition and he hoped it would now be a permanent fixture on the primary school calendar.’, Next year I hope we may get all primary school taking part.

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Page 18

Jul/Aug 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 18 Leeds Catholic Post First Friday of the Month SINGLE CATHOLICS meet at 8.00pm for mass at our Lady of Lourdes, Leeds. We also a have a program of 4-8 events during the month, walks, meals, cinema and theatre trips, etc. Phone David Easterbrook Chairman LDSC on 0113 2289468 evenings between 6 and 7.30pm only. Membership is open to all single Catholics who are free to marry within the church. Leeds Cathedral 20-35 Group Young people (20-35 years old) who attend St. Anne`s Cathedral in Leeds meet regularly every Thursday for spiritual, social and charitable activities. For further details search Facebook for “,Leeds Cathedral 20-35 Group”,, phone 07816 891872 or 07759 591233 or email leedscathedral20-35@hotmail.co.uk Crusade Mass The crusade Mass and Rosary of Mary Immaculate is held at St Patrick`s Church, Bradford, on the first Saturday of the Month after 12.15pm Mass , Second Sunday of Month 2pm Meeting of Bradford Fraternity of the Secular Franciscan Order at St. Anthony`s Convent, Clayton, Bradford.` `Third Sunday of Month 2.30pm Meeting of Leeds Fraternity of the Secular Franciscan Order at the Cathedral. Ampleforth Renewal Community Ampleforth Abbey, meet 1st Sunday each month, at Ampleforth. 11 .30am Praise, Speaker, Sharing Groups, Reconciliation, Exposition, Finishing with Mass and Healing at 4.00pm. All enquiries: Seamus McEneaney 01429 426181 Monthly Vocations Mass Mount St Joseph’,s Chapel 11am First Wednesday of Month. Calix: An organisation for those recovering from addiction and working the 12 Step Programme of AA so that they can develop and deepen their relationship with Jesus as their Higher Power. Meets on the First Sunday of every month at Corpus Christi Church, Neville Rd. Osmondthorpe. Leeds. Mass at 4.30pm followed by meeting. Contact: Fr. Michael on 01977 510266 Helpers of Gods precious infants, prayer vigils, regular weekly prayer vigils at Marie Stopes Abortuary, 7 Barrack Road.LS7 4AB, next to Jaguar car showrooms. Fridays 12-30 to 1-30, and Saturdays 9am-l1am. Monthly all night vigil of reparation in St Marys Horsforth 12th of every month, 9-30pm to 6am . Other times variable. Further details Pat 0113 2582745 Rosary rally Sat Oct 9th 2010 12-30pm Leeds cenotaph, outside art gallery, Headrow. Contact 07747698553/ or 0113 2582745 Leeds Schola Gregoriana The Schola meets on the 2nd Saturday of each month (except August), at 2.00 p.m., for rehearsal, followed by sung Latin (Vigil) Mass in the Ordinary Form, fulfilling the Sunday Obligation. An opportunity to learn and sing Gregorian Chant on a regular basis. Contact Michael Murphy (Director) on 07810 808 530, or Peter Lawley (01423 884274), or Rev. G.M. Parfitt (01756 793794). Diary A few moments for thought and prayer Let everyone who is thirsty come. Let anyone who wishes take the water of life as a gift. Revelation 22:17 Be Still Deadline: For receipt of material for next edition: September 2nd 2011 Parishes receive their copies: September 18th 2011 Send articles, reports &, pictures: Mr John Grady, Hinsley Hall, 62 Headingley Lane, Leeds LS6 2BX. Send text as word doc, pictures as jpeg, e-mail to: john.grady@dioceseofleeds.org.uk Tel: 0113 261 8022. Advertising Deadline June 20th Please note All paid-for advertising is dealt with by: Louise Ward Leeds Diocesan Curia, Hinsley Hall, 62 Headingley Lane, Leeds LS6 2BX Telephone: 0113 261 8028 Email: louise.ward@dioceseofleeds.org.uk Your Cath Post Tuesday 2 August Installation of Bishop Hlib Lonchyna MSU as Apostolic Exarch for the Ukrainians, London Wednesday 10 - Sunday 21 August World Youth Day, Madrid, Spain Bishops Engagements –, August Appointment of Four New Monsignors Pope Benedict has appointed four new Monsignors in the Diocese as Chaplains Of His Holiness. Three of them are Episcopal Vicars and the fourth is the Vocations Director, Bishop Roche said he was glad that they had been marked out in this way because of th e Public roles they fulfil. They are Mgr Paul Grogan, Vocations Director, Mgr John Wilson, Episcopal Vicar for Evangelisation, Mg r David Smith, Episcopal Vicar for the Clergy, and Mgr Paul Fisher, Episcopal Vicar for Outreach. Spirituality and Dementia A round thirty people met recently at Hinsley Hall, at the invitation of Growing Old Grace-fully, to hear Rev. Dr. Albert Jewell, an active retired Methodist Minister, talk about his most recent book, ‘,Spirituality and Personhood in Dementia’,. The book includes personal stories, from Christians and Buddists, as well as research and theoretical perspectives on dementia. Albert highlighted that people with dementia continue to have the right to dignity and respect, and that many people with dementia contribute to others’, wellbeing and learn new things. Each of us is a unique individual and our spirituality lies in what is deeply meaningful to us as we relate to others and to God. People with dementia need to have care which is centred on them as a person, not centred on their problem. Many of those present were caring for loved ones with dementia and they were able to contribute their experience, to bring up their questions and share ideas. One useful practical idea is to make a memory box of objects that have meaning for us: something to feel and hold, something to smell, something to hear and something to see and look at. These objects will help to stimulate our memories as we age and help others to understand something of our uniqueness should we develop dementia ourselves. Growing Old Grace-fully (GOG) is a joint project between the Leeds and Hallam Dioceses to raise awareness of the needs and contributions of older people, including those who are frail, and to help parishes and others to respond positively to older people. GOG will be organising more information sessions on dementia and other aspects of ageing. For more information, contact Cath Mahoney (cath.mahoney@dioceseofleeds.org.uk or 07739975019) New Choral Director at Bradford T he Diocese has recently welcomed another Choral Director to the Music Department to replace Dr Christopher Johns who was appointed Director of Music at Leicester Cathedral. Justin Doyle was a chorister at Westminster Cathedral and studied at King`s College, Cambridge. He won second prize in the prestigious Cadaqué,s Orchestra Conducting Competition from over 180 conductors worldwide and was awarded the first Conductor Fellowship with the BBC Singers. Recent engagements have included concerts with the Orchestra of Opera North, Northern Sinfonia, Johannesburg Philharmonic Orchestra, New London Orchestra, Manchester Camerata, Kensington Chamber Orchestra, the Harmony of Nations period instrument ensemble, Rodolfus Choir, EXAUDI vocal ensemble, regular broadcasts for BBC Radio 3 and a cover CD for BBC Music Magazine. Justin has been Artistic Director of Ryedale Festival and Swaledale Festival and is Musical Director of the King`s Camerata and Da Chiesa baroque ensemble. Justin will be working in schools in primary schools in Bradford, in addition to directing the Bradford Boys’, Choir and Cathedral Boys’, Choir.

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Page 19

Jul/Aug 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Leeds Catholic Post Page 19 CORPUS CHRISTI PROCESSION REVIVED I t was on the Feast of Corpus Christi, Sunday June 26th, a beautiful and sunny afternoon that the Parishioners of Our Lady Immaculate and St Francis Parish, Bradford, had their Corpus Christi Procession from St Francis Church in Eccleshill to Immaculate Conception Church in Idle. Fr Pat Wall Parish Priest and Fr Philip Jamang a Student from Nigeria, led the Procession with the Blessed Sacrament in Procession down Bradford Road in the Parish as a Pilgrimage of Prayer for the Intentions and needs of Our World, Our Country, Our Community, Our Parish Family, for Our own family and friends and for the petitions and needs of our own lives too. Fr Pat said that they were trying this procession to see if the people of the Parish would support it. Many Parishioners walked the mere 1.2 miles including this years First Communion Children and their parents and families and members of the groups of the Parish Community too. Fr Pat spoke saying: ‘,Our time together in this procession is a pilgrimage of faith bringing a renewal heart and mind to all of us in our prayerful devotion and heartfelt adoration for the Body and Blood To advertise in the next issue of Leeds Catholic Post contact Louise on 0113 261 8028 Keeping their Promise C onfirmed by Bishop Arthur at St Joseph’,s Keighley on 21 June 2011, five young people of St Stephen’,s, Skipton kept an undertaking to serve their Parish community by tidying the Parish graveyard and cleaning up one of the grottoes in the grounds of the Church. Pictured here (l to r) Austen, Andrew, Edwin, Brian and Toby spent part of the celebration of their confirmation removing bags full of debris and litter from the steeply sloping cemetery before settling down to lunch in the Parish garden and being presented with their confirmation certificates. Parish catechist Hazel Hornsby, lay chaplain at Holy Family School Keighley, told the Catholic Post that part of the preparation for receiving the sacrament had been for the candidates to consider how to put their gifts and talents to good use. “,The whole group settled quickly on giving their time to tidy up the grounds around the Church, so we got right on with it the week after they had been confirmed”,. of Christ in the Blessed Sacrament. In this way we can continue to recognise and celebrate the loving presence of Christ Jesus as part of our lives and bring that love and giftedness of the Lord to all God`s Family everywhere.’, Helping Hand From The Catenians W illiam Miller from Ilkely is pictured receiving a grant from the Catenian Bursary Fund from Paul Kennedy, President of Wharfedale Circle of the Catenian Association at a recent meeting. William is to spend some weeks in Rio de Janeiro with ",Volunteer in Brazil",, working with families in favelas there, teaching conversational English and providing music and sport classes for the children. The Catenian Bursary Fund helps Catholics aged 16 to 24 take part in community-based projects at home and abroad, which have a clear benefit for others as well as for the participant. Applicants for grants do not need to have any connection to a member of the Catenian Association. This charitable fund administered by Trustees on behalf of the Catenian Association fulfils one of its original core aims: ",to advance the interests of young Catholics and to assist them in their choice or pursuit of their career`. Grants are made to contribute to necessary travel and living costs, which may be incurred by taking part in a voluntary project. Grants are never made to cover the whole cost. Details of the Fund may be found at www.thecatenians.com B lessed Henry Newman’,s prayer I am a Link in a Chain formed the inspiration for the Year 11 Leavers’, Mass at Mount St Mary’,s High School, where parents, teachers and staff assembled with Fr Eamon in the beautifully decorated hall. The technology department provided links on which the pupils wrote their cherished memories of the previous five years at the school. The opening procession was very poignant. Holding the form prayer candle, each form tutor led in pupils carrying the chain of links while the congregation sang ‘,Bind us Together’,. Three aspects of the Prayer were highlighted by Fr Eamon during the Liturgy, each of us is called to be an Angel of Peace, a Preacher of Truth and a Bond of Connection between persons. Naomi Dundo’,s rendering of ‘,On Eagle’,s Wings’, was very moving and we were all assured by the refrain ‘,I hold you in the palm of my hand’,. Mr Floyd, Head of Year 11, read a sincere post communion reflection on God’,s unique plan for each person. The young people were left with a thought from Pope Benedict to take with them as they joined their parents and staff for refreshments under the evening sunset: ‘,Our lives are involved with one another. They are linked together. No one lives alone’, Links in a Chain

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Page 20

Jul/Aug 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 20 Leeds Catholic Post Remembering a European Saint O ver 500 people made the journey from all over the Diocese and beyond to celebrate along with Bishop Roche the feast of St Benedict at Fountains Abbey on his feast day Monday July 11th. Along with a special group who had made the journey from Scunthorpe in the Nottingham there were people from nearer home, namely the Primary school choir from St Joseph’,s Harrogate and the children from St Joseph’,s school in Bishop Thornton, which as the Bishop remarked is the Parish that Fountains Abbey is in. The Bishop opened the Celebration by welcoming everyone, and saying what a privilege it was to be gathered once again in the Abbey ruins, especially on this day the Feast of St Benedict. In his homily the Bishop pointed out that there were more monasteries per square mile in Yorkshire, before the Reformation, than in any other part of Christendom. With them came The Faith and Education along with welfare work and hospitality –, with the coming of the reformation all these things disappeared, but it was this that had forged Western Civilization. We now have the task of keeping that Faith alive and countering secularism. Benedict is rightly the Patron of Europe –, His Christianity formed Europe, and we must for a return of that Faith, which is shown in our Love of God and Our Neighbour. At the end of the Mass the Bishop thanked everyone for coming, and also those who had put in the hard work. He thanked the choir for their singing and then presented a small moment to John Hough, who had organised this event for the last ten years. To advertise in the next issue of Leeds Catholic Post contact Louise on 0113 261 8028 Bishop Roche with all of the students from St Joseph’,s Catholic Primary School, Bishop Thornton Choir from St Joseph’,s School, Harrogate.

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