Church Papers Archive
Feb 2013 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Feb 2013 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Jan 2013 U edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Jan 2013 U edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Dec 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Dec 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Nov 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Nov 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Oct 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Oct 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Sept 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Sept 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Jul/Aug 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Jul/Aug 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Jun 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Jun 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
May 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
May 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Apr 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Apr 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Mar 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Mar 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Feb 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Feb 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Jan 2012 U edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Jan 2012 U edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Dec 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Dec 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Nov 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Nov 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Oct 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Oct 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Sept 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Sept 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Jul/Aug 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Jul/Aug 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Jun 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Jun 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
May 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
May 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Apr 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Apr 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Mar 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Mar 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Feb 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Feb 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Dec 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Dec 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Nov 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Nov 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Oct 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Oct 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Jun 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Jun 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
May 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
May 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Apr 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Apr 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Mar 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Mar 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Feb 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Feb 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Dec 2009 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Dec 2009 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Nov 2009 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Nov 2009 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Oct 2009 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Oct 2009 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Sep 2009 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Sep 2009 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Leeds Catholic Post History

Newspaper for the Diocese of Leeds

.

Mar 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 1

Mar 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

CATHOLIC POST THE NEWSPAPER FOR THE DIOCESE OF LEEDS MARCH 2011 www.dioceseofleeds.org.uk www.catholicpost.org.uk Whats inside Cardinal Offers a Vision of Christian Hope for the World’,s Poor Start Of Lent Page 9 Kioane Mihret Page 19 Rite Of Election Page 20 Bishop’,s Visit to Peru Pages 10 &, 11 B ishop Arthur gave a very warm welcome to His Eminence Peter, Cardinal Turkson when he visited Leeds on Friday 11th March. The Cardinal, who is President of the Pontifical Council for Justice and Peace, was in the UK at the invitation of CAFOD and Durham University, where he had given the Bishop Dunne Memorial lecture the evening before. Speaking to a packed Wheeler Hall audience, Cardinal Turkson emphasised that the Church’,s ministry for Justice and Peace is even more vital in these times of global economic crisis. Referring to Pope Benedict’,s encyclical ‘,Caritas in Veritate’,, Cardinal Turkson proclaimed that authentic human flourishing involves enabling each person to fulfil their potential as God created them to be. This means much more than mere progress according to the ‘,Human Development Index’, because it demands recognition of the deeper spiritual desires within every person. The challenge for Christians today is to articulate a vision of hope that encompasses this desire and is much deeper than working for human rights alone. As well as this, many would want to describe progress in human development solely as the capacity of human beings to be totally self- sufficient whereas Christian hope ‘,illuminates with a new light’, the fact that human flourishing involves the whole person and the common good. Our task in ‘,reading the signs of the times’, requires a ‘,seeing that is more than a glance’,. We need to look at our world with discernment, being ready to undertake the level of analysis necessary to identify the international structures and processes that keep people in poverty. To be able to fulfil this work we have to develop the ‘,competencies’, of ministry outlined by Pope Benedict in the encyclical. And, we cannot do this alone - we are called to work with fellow Christians, people of different faiths and indeed all people of good will in this gospel ministry of promoting justice, peace and human flourishing. Left to right: Rt Margaret Siberry, Bishop Roche, Cardinal Turkson, Shelagh Fawcett.

Read in full

Page 2

Mar 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 2 Leeds Catholic Post There is so much talk of “,cuts”,. Local politi- cians talk of trying to maintain services, try- ing to keep projects and facilities going in the face of savage reductions in their budg- ets. We are seeing the workings of a real “,stop-go”, economy: in times of plenty, we have initiatives, forums, job-creation schemes, new schools and much more: then the economy weakens, the govern- ment changes and the brakes are slammed on. Things are not as bad- we hope- as in the US, where in places like Wisconsin, the public service unions are under savage po- litical attack, but since the hey-day of Thatcher-Reaganite economic policies such ideas can so easily cross the Atlantic. Such things then bring reactions from unions, and the sufferers are not the protagonists, but the citizens, often the weakest. Some may think that local government and its sprawling organizations need reform: certainly people wonder about waste, the sheer time and attempts it takes to, say, mend roads: in many cities around here we have seen the privatisation of- of all things- street lights and road signs, with the whole- sale and very un-Yorkshire destruction of existing installations. Local Government has embraced the notion that you have to pay huge salaries to get the right people: yet there was always a gap between inse- cure, high risk, highly paid jobs in the pri- vate sector and secure and steady well-pensioned and perhaps more presti- gious jobs in the public. It is not those jobs that seem threatened today, but as ever, the poor old foot-soldiers doing day-to-day jobs in local government services, jobs their par- ents thought so secure. Our reminder of Lady Thatcher is a re- minder, too of that outstanding document from our Bishops’, Conference, “,The Com- mon Good”, published in 1996. It was rele- vant then and is relevant now: little of its content seems dated. It talks of solidarity and subsidiarity and other virtues of the workplace- even the parish- that we still neglect. We should ask every local authority in our diocese what it is doing to protect jobs, to maintain the dignity of employment and work amongst its staff? Are job cuts the last resort or the quickest? Before cutting jobs, are we cutting waste, perks, trips and and every sort of needless spending: looking in- stead at say job sharing, or voluntary hours reduction? One short extract from “,The Common Good”,…,. “,13. We believe each person possesses a basic dignity that comes from God, not from any human quality or accomplishment, not from race or gender, age or economic sta- tus. The test therefore of every institution or policy is whether it enhances or threatens human dignity and indeed human life itself. Policies which treat people as only eco- nomic units, or policies which reduce peo- ple to a passive state of dependency on welfare, do not do justice to the dignity of the human person.”, The Post Says Leeds Diocesan Youth Service ‘,All who are thirsty, come!’, (Rev 22:17) Called To A Noble Adventure Youth Ministry Training Day On the 12th February in the beautiful surroundings of Myddleton Grange there was a chance for people who are involved in youth ministry throughout the diocese to spend a day together sharing experiences, resources and encouraging one another in the work of youth ministry. This event, which was organised by the Vicariate for Evangelisation , gathered over 50 participants gathered from across the Diocese, with many varying roles and experience of Youth Ministry, parish youth workers, parish volunteers, confirmation catechists, school chaplains, and teachers. Called To A Noble Adventure The theme that was focused on throughout the day was ‘,Called to a Noble Adventure’,, which is a quotation from Pope John Paul II exhorting young people to fully participate in the Christian life. The main input for the day was led by Anna Cowell, the Diocesan Youth Officer, who led the participants through some interesting new research about young Catholics today. Using the research as a basis, the group then spent time looking at what it is that youth ministers are called to do in responding to the various groups of young people and how they engage young people in the mission of the Church. The day included testimonies from youth ministers from around the diocese who shared their differing youth ministry experiences. Participants had the opportunity to take part in workshops led by CAFOD, SVP, Hannah Zafar (on using music with young people), Josephine Stow (on leading small group discussions with young people) and David Jackson (on Inter-Religious issues). Times of prayer, including Mass and Adoration punctuated the day, allowing time for reflection. Here are some reflections from Youth Ministers who took part in the day…, “,Enjoyed networking with others in ministry”, “,I will take away and use the different styles and techniques on how to deal with young people”, “,The session on using music with young people was really helpful and gave us good practical advice”, “,The research information was really interesting and informative. I enjoyed discussing the different ‘,types’, of young people”, “,The speaker was very good and motivating”, “,Workshop on inter-religious issues was useful”, “,I will take away the small group leadership skills”, “,Perfect balance of prayer, reflecting and learning”, “,I’,ve taken away from the day a new enthusiasm for working with young people”, “,Next year again, please!”, Dust is amazing Inside your house around three quarters of it is made up of bits of you - we all lose about 6g of skin cells each week. Outside your house, the dust can have come from as far away as the Sahara desert - carried by the wind high up in the atmosphere. Dust even exists in the emptiest parts of outer space - flung out by long-dead stars. You could even say that each one of us is made of stardust. But did you know that on one important day of the year, the Church actually talks about dust? At the beginning of Lent, the sign of the cross is traced in ash on our foreheads, and the priest say, ",Remember you are dust, and to dust you shall return.", Life has its beginning and its end - even stars do not last for ever. But God - who created us from stardust - loves us with a love that will never end. What`s so amazing about dust? TESTIMONY TIME Name: Jennifer Nicholson Age: 16 Where are you from? Leeds, Crossgates Tell us a little bit about yourself and your faith journey? I’,ll admit I never really like attending church I have argued every Sunday for the past few years not to go as it seems we hear the same thing every year. But I still go. I like to celebrate my faith in other ways such as I have experienced it more since the Sion team came to my school. Who is your favourite Biblical character? I don’,t have one When is the time that you have felt closest to God? When my Great Nana died as she was always very religious and I just thought if she believes it she’,s going to finally see him If you could send a text to God, what would it say? Please look after my nana and granddad and do they watch over me? Who has been influential in your faith? My Great nana and my Granddad and dad as they take me to church every week. What’,s your favourite Biblical quotation? I don’,t have one How do you keep your faith alive in everyday life? I don’,t really know, I wear my faith in 5 wrist band everyday to remind me of it but then I just talk about it when it becomes a topic of conversation Finish this sentence, “,In heaven I bet there’,ll be…,”, …, family greeting me and God and everything I love like a party.

Read in full

Page 3

Mar 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Leeds Catholic Post Page 3 For more information about how to register for Leeds Diocesan Youth Service events, check out: www.leedsyouth.org.uk, contact Anna at the Youth Office: 0113 261 8058 / abcleedsdiocese@hotmail.com or join the “,Leeds Diocesan Youth Service”, Facebook group. Saturday 12th March CYMFed Congress National Youth Ministry www.cymfed.org 10-5pm, Friends’, Meeting House, London Wed 23rd March REVELATION : EXTRA 7-9pm, Cathedral Hall, Leeds Friday 15th April “,Handmaids”, Evening of prayer for young women aged 18 –, 30ish 7 –, 9pm St. Joseph’,s Convent, Hunslet Sunday 17th April Palm Sunday Retreat For pilgrims on the WYD Pilgrimage Myddelton Grange, Ilkley Leeds Diocesan Youth Service Calendar Youth2000 –, Lifted@Harrogate L ifted at Harrogate was a Youth 2000 weekend retreat that took place in St John Fisher Catholic High School Harrogate from 18th-20th February. There was lively music and inspiring talks with many opportunities to ask questions about the faith and discuss with peers what it means to be a Catholic today. It was a great opportunity for young people to encounter God in many different ways, particularly through Adoration of the Blessed Sacrament and the Sacrament of Reconciliation. Throughout the weekend many of the young people from across the Diocese of Leeds not only attended the weekend but also took an active part in presenting and delivering the retreat. Some helped with the music, whilst others presented speakers and coordinated workshops. It was also great to have with us throughout the retreat a number of priests and religious, many of whom again from the Diocese. Thank you to all who took part in this wonderful occasion, and a big thank you to the school for letting Youth2000 use the facilities. Leadership recognised L iam Hirst, a student at Green Meadows School in Guiseley, and a former student of St. Mary’,s Menston and Ss. Peter &, Paul Primary school, has been the recipient of a prestigious Sports Leader Award for his services to the community. Liam achieved his Junior Sports Leader award while in Year 10 at St. Mary’,s and was given the opportunity to put his skills into practice by supporting the School sport Partnership work at Green Meadows school. For 3 years he contributed to the teaching of PE to students with a wide range of disabilities. A natural and enthusiastic leader, Liam who has autism wanted to help in any way he could. It is a fitting testament to Liam to have his selfless contribution rewarded in such a public way. The Gala evening at LMU was attended by some of Leeds sporting heroes and indeed Olympic hopefuls. The evening also gathered together a huge number of people who deliver and encourage sport across the city. After the presentations Liam was able to meet his favourite team’,s manager Mr Simon Grayson of Leeds United. As Liam said “,this is one of the best days of my whole life”, Liam is a valued member of Ss. Peter &, Paul parish. He helps the Children’,s Liturgy catechists every Sunday morning. He thoroughly enjoys being part of the team especially when he is involved in role play! Liam also serves at evening mass every week –, that’,s dedication for you! After Liam was confirmed two years ago he said that he wanted to give back to God what he had been given by helping others to get to know God better too. This is what he does every week with his natural exuberance and loving manner and strong faith Well Done St Joseph’,s by James Phillips O n Wednesday March 2nd 5/6 children from St. Joseph`s Roman Catholic School in Goole travelled all the way to Catterick to compete against the best schools from North Yorkshire. The event was the North Yorkshire County Indoor Athletics. There have been several rounds of this event starting in October and running up until now. To get through to the North Yorkshire Finals we had to win two previous qualifying rounds. There are also two other factors that makes this achievement more impressive. Firstly, we are only a very small school of 100 children. In all of the rounds we have gone up against schools with many more children to choose from. Along with that, the rules for the final round changed and the events required teams of year 6 pupils. This put us at a disadvantage as we have only 20 year 6s in the whole school and the event required a team of 20. This meant that we were forced to put in year 5 children and year 4 children. Again putting us at a large disadvantage. However, through plenty of practice and hard work, we won. It is a huge event and includes just over 400 schools and 6,300 pupils have competed in this event!

Read in full

Page 4

Mar 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 4 Leeds Catholic Post ‘, The hand that rocks the cradle rules the world’,, my mum used to say. Hmmm. While I could see what she meant, up to a point, I also saw how relentless the struggle was to keep the `cradle` warm, upright, in shape, not squeaking too loud and the child inside warm, dry and fed. Everyone has an opinion on mothers and mothering. From the simplistic and judgmental ‘,it`s natural, what`s the big deal?` to the panic stricken ‘,you have to get a licence to drive a car or but not to have a baby!’, and any point in between, we all have a view. Parents, and especially mothers, whether married, single, divorced, poor, rich, seem to have the expectations of the whole of society on their shoulders. ‘,Breakdown Britain’, is a familiar phrase and the culprit, as well as the victim, seems to be the family. Laetare Sunday, the third Sunday of Lent and marked with pink vestments at Mass, gives us a rare chance to look again and celebrate the good that mothers do around the clock, usually unnoticed and un-thanked. This is one day we overtly appreciate our mums who have helped us to life and love by birth or by adoption, and sometimes in very difficult circumstances. All the cards and gifts given and received on Mothering Sunday are lovely signs of deep love and gratitude. We know, though, that actions speak louder than words. If you really value your mum, show her. She is the one who offered her body to say yes to your life as ably and joyfully as she could. Every mother wants the best for her children and we all know that it is not always easy. There is joy and pain in family life. Mothers, as the bearers of life, are at the heart of all that. Whatever her circumstances each mother need solid, reliable and encouraging support. Mary`s amazing ‘,yes’, to God was ably supported by Joseph’,s generous and faithful response and both must have been encouraged and supported by their families. Not everyone has that advantage. Like Mary, mothers are amazing because while what they do can appear, to any casual observer, to be very ordinary, easy or ‘,natural’,, it actually requires massive behind-the-scenes preparation, hard work and self-sacrifice, not to mention time, patience, energy, resilience and heaps of self doubt and good humour. On Mothering Sunday what about returning the favour and, as well as cards, treats and practical help (clean the cat litter without being asked) giving your mum some undivided time and attention? Listen to her. Ask her what she would like to do. You might learn something you did not know before about the woman, who, like Mary our redeemed Eve, holds treasures in her heart. And then when you rule the world you will remember and you will know how to make it a better world for those who make and rock the cradles of the future. Happy Mothering Sunday! I would love to hear your stories of how you celebrate the hidden contribution that mothers make 24/7 for the good of all. Send them to admin@flm.org.uk marked `celebrating mothers`. Send photos too making sure that you get permission from the subjects and give me permission to publish them on our website. Remember, a mother is for life not just Mothering Sunday. A Mother Is For Life Not Just Mothering Sunday Mothering Sunday (3rd April) “,God then manifests the dignity of women in the highest form possible, by assuming human flesh from the Virgin Mary, whom the C hurch honours as the Mother of God, calling her the new Eve and presenting her as the model of redeemed woman.”, (22) Every month during this anniversary year of Familiaris Consortio, published 22nd November 1981, your Catholic Post will carry a quote from this important document on the family. Roughly translated Familiaris Consortio means ‘,of family partnership’, but this document is usually called ‘,On the Role of the Christian Family in the Modern World’,. It is the most comprehensive statement, or ‘,exhortation’,, on the fam ily ever written and published by a Pope. His keen interest in the joys and the concerns of modern men and women means that it is no surprise th at this was written by John Paul II. Familiaris Consortio is based on the guidance he got from the Bishops Synod on the Family held in Rome in 1980. Laura Holmes, LTUC student intern at FLM during January and February, has chosen a quote relevant to each month. As March is th e month of Mothering Sunday, this quote suggests that all mothers can share in the reflected glory of Mary, ‘,whom the church honours as th e Mother of God’,. Watch this space for more! Bishop Commends the work of the school T he staff, children and governors of St William’,s Catholic Primary School, Bradford, were honoured to welcome Bishop Arthur Roche to their school Through their questioning the children not only learned more about his role as a Bishop, but also about the activities he enjoys in his spare time. On visiting the children in their classrooms, his lordship found the children to be bright, intelligent and confident. He commended the work undertaken by the staff of the school. The visit was a great success and enjoyed by all.

Read in full

Page 5

Mar 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

EVANGELISATION AND CATECHESIS Leeds Catholic Post Page 5 Do you remember those slogans that said “,Who rules Britain?”, They were used by the right against the left- the Trades Unions who sup- ported them- and the left against the right- the landed (and monied) classes who in turn supported them. I see that they are now both wrong. It’,s the banks- or rather the bankers. Even if the Government has felt obliged to bail them out, they are unmoved from their next bonus. There is a reward for success- although how this is measured is not clear- but no punishment for failure: is it all carrot and no stick? One bank, the rather bluecollar job which we used to call The Midland round here, made nearly £,12 billion profit last year: 89 UK staff, it is re- ported, earned more than £,1 million. Coincidentally, they are the dio- cese’,s bankers and parishes have found increases in bank charges lately. One subsidiary advertises interest rates to savers of 0.2 per cent (that’,s a fifth of one percent) but their mortgage rates are around 4 per- cent- quite a margin. It would be a mistake of course to measure the happiness or success of anyone purely by the amount of money that they earn. Some may even say that they are welcome to it, because it does not bring happiness, contentment or fulfilment. Nevertheless the story of Dives &, Lazarus can- not be overlooked, either: by all means be rich, feast, try to be happy, but are you passing too many Lazaruses as you enter your gated develop- ment? Is one man’,s bonus a few other men’,s (or women’,s) heart op? Does it work like that? I feel like asking a very naive question: How do you actually earn £,1m a year, around £,200,000 a week or over £,3,000 an hour for your (presumably) long 60-hour week? Do you make vital, critical life and death decisions every minute, relying on your expert- ise and knowledge, and the lightning speed of your thought processes and perception? Otherwise, a cynic may ask, just in the right place at the right time? Or is it something in between, well worth 60 or 70 grand a year? There are downsides, of course- if you earn these megasums, you are at the company’,s disposal. You could be moved to Hong Kong or Dubai tomorrow as these global companies orbit the earth- or suffer burnout be- fore that- and isn’,t the job rather boring? *** I hope you enjoyed St Patrick’,s Day. This well known Welsh saint did a good job on the Irish. Good old Hayes &, Finch, a Liverpool supplier of candles and much else sent me some special St Patrick’,s Day offers: for £,299 I can have a 2ft 4in statue of an enigmatic looking saint holding a huge shamrock and wearing a rather fetching pink cassock and gold slip- pers: I can get green cased votive lights and best of all, St Patrick’,s in- cense: if anyone is fortunate enough to obtain a supply of this, can they tell us what special emerald odour the great man’,s incense has? Sidelines This month, three topics: the new missal translation street evangelising and the latest WYPMN event- nearly. First, I have been looking at a catechetical resource about the new translations of the Roman missal, available in a church near you from this September. It is a DVD called `Become one body one spirit in Christ`, the first screen explains that it is a resource which `makes accessible the depth and richness of the layers of meaning of the new English translation of the Roman Missal`. So much for the words, what, I wondered, is going to happen about liturgical music? I clicked through to the video clip `Liturgical Musicians` (2:49) and was pleased to discern a balanced approach –, the clip featured three services, with music provided by organ with cantor and congregation, `folk` instruments and choir, and a `traditional` choir. Perhaps then, the folk group at my parish won`t be getting their P45`s just yet. (Tax Inspectors- only kidding!!). Another part of the DVD of interest to musicians is the clip, `The Chanting of Prayer` -the extra time `Chanting` receives is because it is more of a change to current practice. So, on a recent morning, I joined nine others to sing peace songs in the centre of Leeds –, a regular, `first Saturday` occurrence. We do not collect money, but just witness to our beliefs in song. We have expanded our repertoire, and generally get a good response from passers-by. Afterwards, wandering through the busy streets, I noticed a lone man telling all and sundry about the Good News of Jesus. Nearby, a group of people were handing out leaflets –, the Socialist Workers` Party. It occurred to me that if I was street evangelising for Catholicism, instead of peace, I`d probably want to use music –, it grabs people`s attention. But, I thought, what music would I want to play? Around Christmas, carols are fine, but, even the shops don`t think Christmas lasts all year! What would attract people? Is it played in your church? And if not, does that mean that your church uses music which puts people off ??? Due to copy deadlines and the date of the West Yorkshire Pastoral Music Network event, ",Washing the Feet of the World", with Philip Jakob (still in the future as I write), I cannot say with any accuracy how it went –, but will report next month! Tim Devereux tim.devereux@ssg.org.uk Useful links: West Yorkshire Pastoral Music Network: http://www.westyorkshirechurchmusic.org.uk/ Society of St Gregory: http://www.ssg.org.uk/ National Network of Pastoral Musicians: http://nnpm.org/ Musical Notes by Tim Devereux HOPE TOGETHER HOPE TOGETHER is a national, ecumenical initiative for local churches to serve their community. This exciting venture first took place in 2008, in a year long push to share the gospel through words and actions. This time there is a four year plan which includes the 2012 Olympics. HOPE TOGETHER have produced resources to support groups in reaching out to their local community. Could your parish or school community get involved? You can do as much or as little as you feel able. Find out more on the HOPE TOGETHER website: www.hopetogether.org.uk2 Evangelisation and Catechesis Calendar Direction in Prayer Saturday 9th April 2011 10:00 am - 4:00pmThe Briery Retreat Centre, Victoria Avenue, Ilkley, LS29 9BW Many the Gifts - RCIA Network Study Day Saturday 18 June 2011 9.30 am - 4.00pm West Wakefield Methodist Church, Thornes Road, Wakefield, WF2 8QR Corpus Christi Procession in Headingley Sunday 19th June 2011 2:00pm Starting at Mount St Josephs and walking from there to Hinsley Hall via Headingley Lane For more information or to book places, contact Mrs Janine Garnett 0113 2618040 janine.garnett@diocese- ofleeds.org.uk DIOCESE OF LEEDS LITURGY COMMISSION THE NEW TRANSLATION OF THE ROMAN MISSAL B efore leaving England, Pope Benedict XVI asked the Bishops of England &, Wales to prepare for the introduction of the new translation of the Roman Missal. The Missal contains the texts which are prayed by priest and people every time Catholics come to Mass. Work on the new translation has been ongoing since the publication of a new Latin edition of the Roman Missal in 2002. The Holy Father thanked the bishops for the contribution they had made, ‘,with such painstaking care, to the collegial exercise of reviewing and approving the texts. This has provided an immense service to Catholics throughout the English- speaking world’,. The translation of the Roman Missal is now complete and the Holy See has given its recognitio on the text. The bishops, following the Holy Father’,s encouragement that this new translation is an opportunity for ‘,in-depth catechesis on the Eucharist and renewed devotion in the manner of its celebration’,, have decided that from September 2011 the Order of Mass in the new translation will be used in parishes in England and Wales. The Order of Mass contains those texts of both priest and people which are constant at each celebration of Mass. Bishop Roche, bishop said: ‘,The new translation is a great gift to the Church. The Mass is at the heart of what the Church is, it is where we deepen our faith in Christ and are nourished by him so that we can glorify the Lord by our lives. In the new translation we find a text that is more faithful to the Latin text and therefore a text which is richer in its theological content and allusions to the scriptures but also a translation which, I believe, will move people’,s hearts and minds in prayer.’, TRAINING SESSIONS 2011 These sessions are for parish clergy, members of parish liturgy groups and anyone who will assist in the implementation of the new missal. The session will offer an overview of the preparation for and implementation of the new translation for use in our parishes including timetable, catechesis, resources, questions…,…, Time: 7.30 –, 9.30pm Refreshments from 7.15pm The same session will be delivered on each evening so please select one venue and book –, up to 5 places per parish Wednesday 27th April Hinsley Hall, Leeds, LS6 2BX Thursday, 28th April St Robert’,s Parish Centre, Harrogate, HG1 1HP Tuesday, 3rd May St Anthony’,s Parish Centre, Clayton, Bradford, BD14 6HW Thursday, 5th May SS Peter &, Paul Parish Centre, Wakefield, WF2 7NR There is no charge for the session but please book early as places are limited –, book with Fr Gerard Kearney email: Gerard.Kearney@dioceseofleeds.org.uk Or return the completed slip below to Rev Gerard Kearney, St Benedict’,s Presbytery, Aberford Road, Garforth, Leeds, LS25 1PX THE NEW TRANSLATION OF THE ROMAN MISSAL - TRAINING SESSIONS 2011 Please book ______ places on the training session at ____________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ Parish___________________________________________________________________________________ Names__________________________________________________________________________________

Read in full

Page 6

Mar 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 6 Leeds Catholic Post More good news- an Institute for the Study of The Diaconate will open in Rome in 2012. It has enthusiastic support from the Vatican and from the universities, with administrative details handled by the Gregorian University. The Institute will be international with professors from the United States, Italy, Spain, the Netherlands and Germany. Courses will range from biblical and patristic studies to systematic and canonical courses, and to spirituality and liturgy. Initially, courses will be taught in Italian and English probably expanding to German and Spanish. Students may be able to opt to take one course (one week), or three courses (if they stay for the whole three-week period). These will be designed for graduate or post-graduate students who will be expected to have read extensively before coming to Rome for the course, and then to pursue a serious research project. Courses would be open to any and all qualified and interested students. No doubt more will be circulated in die course, but we see again the increasing significance of the diaconate in the church, and the need to establish a core of study and research to enable it to be nourished and flourish. The new Directory for the Diaconate in the Diocese of Lancaster has been published: the report about it in The Tablet seemed wide of the mark, isolating rather than just emphasising the importance of a deacon’,s service amongst those in need, and not giving proper emphasis to the deacon’,s service of the altar and the Word. The Directory itself is a beautifully produced document and gives guidance and insights: it is of course produced for the deacons of the Diocese of Lancaster, not Leeds, but nevertheless treads a lot of common ground acknowledging other similar publications, such as the Birmingham Directory which itself has a noteworthy forward by the (now) Archbishop of Westminster. Bishop Campbell of Lancaster has judged that in his diocese he will take on the previously delegated role of Director of Deacons, an attractive reminder of the church’,s “,special relationship”, between Bishop and Deacon. His other notes are interesting, too, making reference to the need for a deacon to look beyond the boundaries of his parish. They also include this reflection: There is much confusion and ignorance, too, about what exactly a married, permanent deacon is! Single deacons are easier to place, because of their apparent similarity to priests, but the idea of married Catholic clergy is still difficult for many people to grasp. It’,s going to take longer than 30 years to bring about such a change in understanding. Having said this, the place to start is a catechesis that emphasises the fact that a permanent deacon, married or unmarried, is ordained through the imposition of hands and the prayer of consecration, just like a priest or bishop, and as a consequence is a sacred minister and a member of the hierarchy. It is not only important that laity and priests recognise that permanent deacons are members of the clergy, it is also essential that deacons personally and humbly make this truth their own, through the way they live and act. The whole directory can be found on the Lancaster Diocesan website. Deacons Diary MEETING GOD IN FRIEND AND STRANGER Summary Part 4 The Church’,s Call To Dialogue (Paras 84 –, 133) T he Church affirms the unity of all humanity and recognises the God-given presence of truth and holiness in other religions. As a result it calls its members to dialogue where we meet God in Friend and Stranger. This call by the Church reflects God’,s call to the Church through the signs of our times –, the greater closeness of peoples and global communications. Dialogue is part of our Christ-given mission as a sign and instrument of uniting all peoples to God and to one another. We do not understand the Church if we do not understand this. So dialogue is not in opposition to but is part of the Church’,s evangelising mission. This may puzzle many Catholics. But evangelisation does not simply mean converting people. It is much wider. Whenever we live according to Gospel values we evangelise –, we bring Christ to the world. The most direct form of this is proclamation. Its aim is to bring people to join the community of Christians. Dialogue is an example of this other aspect of evangelisation. “,Let Christians, while witnessing to their own faith…,acknowledge, preserve and encourage the spiritual and moral truths found among non-Christians, also their social life and culture.”,(Nostra Aetate) Dialogue is not a hidden way of converting people to Christ. Rather it is an honest witnessing to our beliefs and a sincere “,listening”, to the beliefs of others. Part of this is admitting to our prayer that Christ will be better known. Dialogue is dishonest without that. The entire love-story of God’,s relationship with us is a great “,dialogue”,. The church’,s mission is to make that accessible to all –, regardless of whether or not it is welcomed. Dialogue today is one of the main ways of being obedient to the command to love our neighbour. One motive for dialogue is: “,establishing a sure basis for peace and warding off the dread spectre of those wars of religion which have so often bloodied human history.”, (Pope John Paul 11). Pope Benedict said: “,Interreligious dialogue between Christians and Muslims…,is a vital necessity, on which in large measure our future depends.”, But our motive for dialogue goes much deeper into our faith and so to the heart of the Bishops’, statement. Dialogue is our entry into the costly love of Christ for humanity expressed in the story of his passion and death. God enters our story. The Father in Christ reconciles the world to Himself. The Holy Spirit given to the Church at Pentecost gives us the motivation and power to follow Christ and to strive for dialogue with members of other religions. We find the same Holy Spirit hidden in all that is true and holy there. Dialogue is not just about mutual understanding. It goes deeper and finds the Holy Spirit at work in others. We must expect to be surprised to find that the Holy Spirit and therefore Christ has gone before us with ‘,seeds of the Word’, We do not seek to hide our differences but must recognise that the same God, Father, Son and Holy Spirit is at work in the elements of truth and holiness within others. Of course we must reject what we believe to be false in other religions but admit also that we can there “,grasp at the fringes of God’,s unsearchable mystery.”, God is the Other, always greater than our thought of him. We may have been brought up effectively to think that God is restricted to the Church but the Church has always taught that God does not restrict himself to the visible Church. Dialogue helps us come to a better understanding of the Church as the ‘,sacrament’, or sign of the Kingdom of God with the task of announcing that Kingdom to all. So we enter into dialogue with prudence, charity and hope. We never water down our faith. We and our partners in dialogue have an obligation to know our beliefs. We need to be loving and humble to really listen to the other in the conviction that in so doing the God who is beyond our thoughts will come to us. We hope that God who is at work in others will bring all of us to His kingdom. Dialogue is best done with our ecumenical partners and best expressed in working together for justice, peace for all and the integrity of the creation which sustains us all. The Church calls us to the four forms of dialogue: of life –, being good neighbours, of action –, as we work together for the common good, of theology –, where we deepen understanding of one another’,s religious heritage, of spirituality –, when we share the riches of our life of prayer. Dialogue is: “,not so much an idea to be studied as a way of living in a positive relationship with others.”, (Pope John Paul 11) The Bishops conclude this section by asking: How new is this Teaching? No doubt that interreligious dialogue is a new path and departure for the Church. Yet it is ‘,quietly present’, in Scripture, in tradition and in its history. God now, through history, invites the Church to reconsider relations with religions seen previously as negative or distant. The people of the Old Covenant, as well as regarding themselves as the special recipients of God’,s revelation, also witnessed to the unity of all humanity, the universality of God’,s wish to save and believed that God was at work among the Gentiles. This culminated in the inclusive and universal nature of Christ’,s mission and the recognition of this in the early Church: “,I truly understand that God shows no partiality, but in every nation anyone who fears him and does what is right is acceptable to him.”, (Acts 10:34) A DATE FOR YOUR DIARY: “,THE CALL TO DIALOGUE”,. An opportunity to explore the Bishops’, statement on interreligious dialogue on Saturday June 25th 2011 at Wheeler Hall, from 9.30 to 1.00 pm with lunch. Bishop Arthur Roche will welcome speakers: Archbishop Kevin McDonald (Chair of the Bishops Committee for Other Religions), Bishop Tony Robinson (Anglican Bishop of Pontefract), Fakhara Rehman (Community Faiths Coordinator Kirklees Faiths Forum) There is no fee but please contact David Jackson for the booking form and all details: Tel 01274 or email: dandt55@btinternet.com See the advert in this and next month’,s Catholic Post. FEASTS AND FESTIVALS 5 April: Ch’,ing Ming. The Festival of Pure Brightness / Tomb Sweeping Day. Chinese. Families make a special effort to clean and sweep the family graves. Offerings are made to spirits and many picnic near the graces to ‘,join’, their ancestors in the feast. 8 April: Hanamatsuri. Japanese Buddhist. The birthday of the Buddha, fixed by Mahayana Buddhists in 565 BC. 15 April: Vaisakhi / Baisakhi. Sikh. The New Year festival. In 1699 the tenth Guru, Govind Singh founded the Order of the Khalsa –, the Sikh equivalent of the Church. 9 –, 16 April: Passover/ Pesach. Jewish. Commemorates the Exodus from slavery in Egypt. The festival begins with the telling of the story at the Seder meal in family homes. 21 April –, 2 May: Ridvan. Baha’,i. The most important Baha’,i festival. The day Baha’,ullah declared himself as the Promised One prophesied by the Bab. Baha’,is elect their local, national and international governing bodies during this period. 24 April: Adar Mah Parab: Zoroastrian, Shenshai, Persian. Birthday of the Divinity which protects the fire, going to the Temple fire to offer sandalwood and incense and to thank the holy fire for the warmth and light it has given through the year. The fire at home is given a rest. Spacious holiday apartment by the sea (Weston-super-Mare) Close to local shops, churches, golf course and parks. Sleeps 1-6. All faiths welcome. Come and ee the new pier! Bookings start mid march 2011 Tel 01934 631339 Rehearsals are underway for a major Northern premier production of Roquiem and Roll Back the Stone at St Robert’,s Catholic Church, Harrogate, on Wednesday 6th April. Andrew Jones MP and Councillor Bill Hoult, Mayor of Harrogate, will join an audience of several hundred from across the Harrogate region to enjoy this modern, musical interpretation of the Easter story, performed by hundreds of students from St John Fisher Catholic High School and its associated primary schools. The concert is a joint venture by St John Fisher’,s Music and Performing Arts Department and Fisher Arts, the school’,s community outreach programme. It will feature dramatic choral, orchestral, dance and drama presentations from 300 of the St John Fisher community, with choral support from associated primary schools in Harrogate, Wetherby, Barkston Ash, Knaresborough, Tadcaster, Ripon and Bishop Thornton. Darren Roberts, Creative Director and Head of Fisher Arts says, “,This is one of the largest, most exciting inter-school community productions that we have ever presented and will be a real showcase of what the schools and young people in our community have to offer. The level of talent is outstanding and the two-part programme is packed with inspirational and uplifting performances. It promises to be a great show.”, “,We envisage a full house at the 2pm concert and the 6pm concert is already sold out, so we have arranged full audio-visual capability to everyone will be able to experience the whole show without compromise. We are especially delighted to have support from our local government office. It will make for an even more memorable performance for the children and families who are involved.”, Tickets are priced at £,3.50 or £,2.00 for concessions and are available from Denise Ball on 01423 818408 or via email: dball@sjfchs.org.uk. A major musical interpreta tion of the Easter Story comes to Harrogate

Read in full

Page 7

Mar 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Leeds Catholic Post Page 7 Vocations Pope Benedict: Fostering vocations is a task for all Catholics Every member of the Church has a part to play in fostering vocations to the priesthood and the religious life, Pope Benedict wrote in his “,Message for the Day for Vocations”, which was published last month. “,Particularly in these times, when the voice of the Lord seems to be drowned out by ‘,other voices’, and his invitation to follow him by the gift of one’,s own life may seem too difficult, every Christian community, every member of the Church, needs consciously to feel responsibility for promoting vocations,”, he wrote. “,It is important to encourage and support those who show clear signs of a call to priestly life and religious consecration, and to enable them to feel the warmth of the whole community as they respond ‘,yes’, to God and the Church.”, The theme of the Message is “,Proposing Vocations in the Local Church.”, Vocations Sunday is on 15th May. Pope Benedict continued: “,It is essential that every local Church become more sensitive and attentive to the pastoral care of vocations, helping children and young people in particular at every level of family, parish and associations - as Jesus did with His disciples - to grow into a genuine and affectionate friendship with the Lord, cultivated through personal and liturgical prayer, to grow in familiarity with the sacred Scriptures and thus to listen attentively and fruitfully to the word of God, to understand that entering into God`s will does not crush or destroy a person, but instead leads to the discovery of the deepest truth about ourselves, and finally to be generous and fraternal in relationships with others, since it is only in being open to the love of God that we discover true joy and the fulfilment of our aspirations",. Pope Benedict concluded the Message by remarking: “,The ability to foster vocations is a hallmark of the vitality of a local Church.”, Young witnesses to the beauty of the Christian life Young people from the diocese will be heading off to Liverpool on Saturday 9th April to train to deliver presentations at the end of Masses in the diocese on Vocations Sunday (15th May). During that weekend, they will speak about their understanding of their own Christian vocation and about how they value the priesthood and the religious life. Parish priests and the diocesan youth service have been encouraging suitable young people to offer their services for this nationwide initiative, which is entitled Vocations Voices. Any young people aged between 18 and 35 who would like to be considered for this task are encouraged to contact Miss Celia Blackden at the Diocesan Vocations Office: celia.blackden@dioceseofleeds.org.uk . Transport to and from Liverpool is being provided free. Ground-breaking retreat for vocations directors Ten vocations directors –, eight Irish and two English, including Fr Grogan –, gathered at Dromantine Retreat Centre Newry last month for a five-day silent retreat based on the Sacred Heart of Jesus. The retreat was organised by Dublin Vocation Director Fr Eamonn Bourke (a Leeds United supporter) who is pictured (right) with the Retreat Father, Fr John Cippel, a retired pastor who works for the Institute for Priestly Formation which was established in the 1990s and is based in Creighton University, a Jesuit foundation in Omaha, Nebraska in the United States. This is the first time that the Irish vocations directors have organised such a retreat. Brave nineteenth century priests models for today The heroic story of five nineteenth century Catholic priests who contracted cholera and died whilst ministering to the Irish poor in the slums of Leeds was just one story told by Fr Nicholas Hird in a fascinating presentation to enquirers at last month’,s discernment group. Fr Hird, who is the Dean of Dewsbury Deanery and Parish Priest of St Paulinus’,, Dewsbury, told of how the priests volunteered for this hazardous work in the first half of the century in the full knowledge that it was likely to result in their deaths. Fr Hird, who has conducted extensive research into the history of the diocese, focused most of his attention on a slightly later period, that between the formation of the diocese in 1878 to the outbreak of the First World War in 1914. He noted how the priests who served here during these years came from a surprisingly large number of countries. He recounted how Leeds Seminary was established at the beginning of this period (it continued until 1939). He also recalled how two German priests had to be invited to teach in it as none of the clergy of the diocese possessed a doctorate of divinity. In an amusing aside, Fr Hird explained that one year the diocese was deemed to have too many priests. The then bishop sent three newly ordained men elsewhere because there was simply no room for them in any of the presbyteries. He is pictured after the talk with Fr Grogan: as boys the two men were in consecutive years at St Mary’,s High School, Menston. The speaker at the next discernment group, on Friday 18th March, will be Rt Rev David Konstant, Bishop Emeritus of Leeds. New initiative for altar servers and Confirmation candidates The Vocations Service is offering a 45- minute presentation on “,The Christian Vocation”, to groups of young people in parishes throughout the diocese. Parish priests have been invited book the presentation, which will be delivered by Vocations Director Fr Paul Grogan, for Confirmation groups, altar servers groups or parish youth groups. The session, which will include DVD footage and an interactive section, will focus on the lives of two notable young Catholics of the last century: Blessed Pier Giorgio Frassati and Blessed Chiara Luce Badano. The young people will be encouraged to imagine how they could witness to Christ as participants in the New Evangelisation of our society. They will reflect on the beauty of marriage, holy orders and religious life. Group leaders are invited to book a session by emailing Mrs Dominica Richmond: d.richmond@leedstrinity.ac.uk . Prospective seminarians interviewed by diocesan team Three men were interviewed by the Diocesan Selection Advisory Conference which took place at Leeds Trinity University College last month. The men, aged 17, 21 and 22, who hope to go to seminary in September, were asked a range of questions during two 45-minute interviews, covering such issues as their faith histories, their experience of relationships and their academic abilities. Fr David Smith, the Episcopal Vicar for Clergy, who chairs the panel, subsequently sent a report on each man to the Bishop to assist him in his assessment of them. The men will undergo psychological assessments next month. The picture shows Fr Smith with (from left to right), Mr Michael Carroll, a Catenian, a retired surgeon and a parishioner of St Joseph’,s, Pudsey, Mrs Linda Wardle, a retired headteacher of St Joseph’,s Catholic Primary School, Wetherby and a parishioner at St Joseph’,s, and Ms Ann O’,Brien, a trustee of the diocese, a retired lawyer and a parishioner of St John Mary Vianney Parish, Leeds. Bradford boys look to the future Boys from St Bede`s Catholic Grammar School in Bradford explored the idea of Christian vocation during an innovative day at Leeds Trinity University College earlier this month. During the day, which was entitled, ",The Christian life: called to serve others,", the 15-year-old students considered how they may carry their faith forward into adulthood.They participated in workshops on marriage and family life, led by one of the diocese`s marriage preparation coordinators, Mrs Rose McCarthy, and on the life of a priest working overseas, led by Comboni Missionary, Fr Donato Goffredo. Leeds Trinity`s Principal, Professor Freda Bridge, helped the boys reflect on how participating in higher education could equip them to serve others in society in their future careers. Diocesan Vocations Director, Fr Paul Grogan, who also contributed, said: ",I am glad that St Bede`s has devoted a whole day to allowing the lads to ponder the subject of Christian vocation. As Catholics, we believe that God is calling each of us to lives of service within his Church. Whether that be in Malawi or in Bradford, each of these young men has the exciting task of making the world more human.", The day was requested by Mr Chris Copley, the new Lay Chaplain at St Bede`s. Vocations Preaching Mission Sunday 2nd April: Leeds Cathedral

Read in full

Page 8

Mar 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 8 Leeds Catholic Post Walking in the footsteps of the monks Pilgrimage is an important part of spiritual life for many Christians who see life itself as a journey - coming from God and returning to God. A pilgrimage offers an opportunity to leave behind normal routines to focus on the presence of God in our lives and in the world. In the Middle Ages pilgrimages were very popular. Pilgrimage was long and very dangerous - not at all like a holiday! It may have taken many years. The pilgrims would usually travel in groups, and stay in monasteries or inns overnight. People went on pilgrimage for many reasons - perhaps to say sorry to God for something they had done wrong (penance), or because they were ill and wanted God to heal them. Parishioners from all four dioceses in the North of England (Hexham and Newcastle, Middlesbrough, Leeds and Hallam) will be making a walking pilgrimage of solidarity in their own diocese, to give thanks for three years of special CAFOD anniversaries. The three years from 2010 to 2012 are significant dates for CAFOD in the North East. The first and the third of those years, 2010 and 2012, mark the 50th anniversaries of the first Family Fast Day collection for overseas projects in 1960, and the foundation of the organisation CAFOD two years later in 1962. These anniversaries will be celebrated across England and Wales, but 2011 is a special date for us as it marks the 25th anniversary of the first CAFOD office in the North East. We finally came up with walking as something that can be a real act of solidarity. A walking pilgrimage allows us to be mindful of our sisters and brothers in the global south, many of whom have to walk long distances each day for water or children to go to school. There can be no doubt about it . . . Leeds diocese is blessed with abbeys and monasteries! We took inspiration from the monks and we‘,ll be walking in the footsteps of the monks from Kirkstall Abbey, via Fountains Abbey to Ripon Cathedral. For more information or to book a seat on the coach from Leeds to Holy Island on July 9th - cost £,10 return:- contact CAFOD Leeds 0113 275 9302 leeds@cafod.org.uk CAFOD’,s Walk of Solidarity , Do you have what it takes to help former street children (boys and some girls) improve their English sufficiently to gain/maintain access to local government schools and to improve their chance of finding employment? , Could you offer some extra-curricular activities that will help direct the energies of young people? , Would you be able to develop a programme of lessons and activities which could be used and developed by other volunteers? ‘,We were very excited to see the Abba Gabremichael Project and get a bit more information about exactly how our days would be structured, and of course to meet our classes. On our first day I imagined us just popping in, having a quick chat with Nougas the Project Director and then going home to start planning for the next day, so when the car pulled up to the gates we got quite a surprise. We walked through the gates to clapping, singing and children in traditional dress greeting us with flowers. The whole school had come to welcome us, and put on a fantastic welcome celebration with speeches, dancing, juggling and of course our first coffee ceremony. The school was split into 3 levels of ability: beginners, intermediate and advanced. I happily taught the advanced class, and had two fantastic classes. It was great getting to know the bubbly and cheeky personalities. The children were enthusiastic, committed and put so much effort into their work. I loved being creative with my lesson planning, and working off the feedback from the children to help them have fun whilst learning. Some of the best lessons included the debates, writing and performing songs, making maps and wanted posters plus many more. Whenever we saw any of the pupils we were always greeted with a huge smile and an offer to help us with whatever they could. If you are interested in this volunteer opportunity please complete an application form. Application forms can be found obtained from Phil at ptalman@cafod.org.uk tel. 020 7095 5297). Application forms should be sent either electronically to applications@cafod.org.uk (with subject reference “,DEV”,) or by post to: Human Resources, CAFOD, Romero House 55 Westminster Bridge Road, London SE1 7JB Applications must be received by midnight on Friday 1st April 2011. Interviews/assessments: Mid-April (to be confirmed). Would you like to teach English at a Summer School in Ethiopia? ‘,Give it up for Lent!’, L ent is a very special time for each of us as individuals but it is also an opportunity for our school and parish communities to come together in a special way. As communities, we are invited to make time for reflection and to take action, making changes that bring us closer together and closer to God. Once again faithful CAFOD supporters of all ages, from pre-school to parish groups, will be raising vital funds by giving up luxuries, spending time running fundraising events, and getting sponsored for going without daily essentials. We are really grateful for all these wonderful efforts and would like to thank everyone for wanting to journey with CAFOD again this Lent. Primary schools have already told us that they will be turning snacks into smiles for other children by devising all kinds of creative fundraising activities. Meanwhile our High School Students have been challenged to give up their time to create something enterprising that will raise funds. As well as this many of our schools and parishes are using the very popular and powerful ‘,Walk With Us Stations of the Cross’, –, (now available from the Leeds Office) Without all these efforts, without your compassion and generosity on Lent fast Day, hundreds of thousands of people would be worse off. CAFOD wouldn’,t be able to provide food or clean water, small business loans, healthcare and education, or speak out and change the systems that cause these injustices. The money you donate has saved lives and changed lives. Thank- You! Margaret, Joanne and the CAFOD Leeds Team Our Thoughts and Prayers Go to the People of Japan Following the massive earthquake that hit north-east Japan at 2.45pm on 11 March (Japanese time), a tsunami hit the country. The wave reached heights of between 7 and 10m as it hit the eastern coast of Japan, sweeping up to 7km inland and causing widespread destruction of towns, villages, farmland and infrastructure. Many hundreds have died and thousands are still missing. There were fears that the tsunami generated by the earthquake could gravely affect other countries in the Pacific region including Island Nations, South- East Asia and the Americas, though thankfully the tsunami weakened as it crossed the Pacific and these countries have been spared the major destruction which was inflicted on Japan. The response in Japan The response to the disaster is being led by the Japanese government, which is amongst the best prepared in the world for such emergencies. They are being supported by national organisations that have the resources and the know-how to deliver aid. Japan has not requested international humanitarian assistance. Our own expertise is primarily in responding to disasters in poorer developing countries, where the kind of help required is quite different from what is needed in Japan. In poorer countries, people are often at risk even before a disaster –, and when emergencies occur, governments often don’,t have the money or the ability to deal with them effectively. We were initially concerned that a potentially devastating tsunami could hit other countries in the Pacific region. While that doesn’,t appear to have happened, the wider effects of the disaster may not become clear for some time. With aftershocks continuing on the Pacific basin and a possible nuclear crisis developing, we are assessing the impact on poorer communities in the region, as well as on Japan. A continuing crisis The crisis in Japan is far from over, and, as with all major disasters, we will continue to monitor the situation over the coming weeks. In the meantime, we ask all our supporters to keep the Japanese people in their prayers. Bishop Isao Kikuchi from our sister agency Caritas Japan said: “,We have received so many emails from all continents, filled with words of compassion and prayer. We are very grateful for this solidarity.”,

Read in full

Page 9

Mar 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Leeds Catholic Post Page 9 The Cathedral Church of St Anne, Leeds, was full for the start of Lent again this year. As is the custom in the Diocese Bishop Roche was the main celebrant at the Mass that sees the start of the Lenten Season, and is also the custom in the Diocese the Cathedral was full as people start the great season of Lent. Lent Starts A lso on Ash Wednesday, Senior Church Leaders, in West Yorkshire, issued a joint Prayer for the most vulnerable people in society who will suffer in the cutbacks in public spending. It was a united expression of Christian responsibility for people in greatest need. In a specially written service at St Anne’,s Catholic Cathedral, Leeds, regional church leaders from ten major Christian denominations prayed for those with responsibility for making the cuts, and prayed that we may ‘,hear the cries of those deprived of work…, know the anger and the angst of people who feel pushed to the margins by those with wealth and power’,. Before the service, three leaders from the major churches presented a copy of the prayer to Tom Riordan, Chief Executive of Leeds City Council. [Leeds has to save £,150m, and up to one in six employees risks losing their jobs]. These Church Leaders were: - The Revd. Dr. Liz Smith, Chair of the Leeds Methodist District, - The Rt. Revd. John Packer, Bishop of Ripon and Leeds, - The Revd. Mgr. Michael McQuinn, Vicar General of the Catholic Diocese of Leeds. Speaking on behalf of the organisers, West Yorkshire Ecumenical Council, the Revd. Dr. Clive Barrett said, ‘,The churches share a concern for the most vulnerable people in our society. Children and elderly people will lose essential services, including from faith and voluntary sector charities reliant on public grants. This Ash Wednesday prayer is for the people who will lose vital services, people who will lose their jobs, and those who have the difficult task of deciding which cuts to make. ‘,In prayer and practice, the Church Leaders are showing we must take responsibility for people in greatest need, for these are the people who are being hit the hardest.’, Praying for the most vulnerable www.catholic-care.org.uk Since 1863 we have been meeting the needs of the most vulnerable children, adults and families in the Diocese of Leeds, by offering professional care, respect and individual support. Our services include: , Children’,s Residential Services , Services for Adults with Learning Disabilities , Supported Housing for Adults with Mental Health Issues , Schools Social Work and Family Services , Support Services for Older People How you can help? , Remember us in your will. Your legacy can bring new life to someone who needs our help. , Make a donation. , Become a volunteer. We have a variety of opportunities for those wishing to help. For more details about our work and how you can help please contact: Catholic Care 11 North Grange Road, Headingley, Leeds, LS6 2BR tel: 0113 388 5400 fax: 0113 388 5401 email: info@catholic-care.org.uk www.catholic-care.org.uk Taking the Caring Church into the Community Registered Charity: 513063

Read in full

Page 10

Mar 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 10 Leeds Catholic Post A s part of the 50th anniversary celebrations of the Leeds Diocesan Peru Mission, Bishop Arthur Roche, accompanied by Fr John Wilson, made a pastoral visit to the priests, sisters and communities in Peru linked to the Diocese from 12 to 21 February. This introductory article merely gives a snapshot of the trip, with more information about the Peru Mission set to appear in future editions of the Catholic Post. Fr John Wilson writes: Saturday 12 Feb - The visit got off to a shaky start with a delayed flight from Leeds/Bradford Airport to Amsterdam. We therefore missed the connecting flight to Lima and spent an unscheduled stopover near Schiphol Airport. Sunday 13 Feb - After Sunday Mass in the airport chapel, the 12 hour flight from Amsterdam brought us to Lima in the early evening where we were met by Fr Jonathan Hart, a priest of Leeds Diocese. We then travelled out of central Lima to the parish of Christ, the Light of the World where Fr Jonathan works as parish priest. After a very welcome supper, it was early to bed. (Photo 1). Monday 14 Feb - After celebrating Mass in Fr Jonathan’,s Church, he took us on a tour of his parish. It encompasses some of the poorest areas where people live and work in incredibly difficult surroundings. The dust of the desert area is all pervading, yet the spirit and faith of the people is both truly impressive and deeply humbling. Later that day we travelled back to the airport to fly north to Iquitos with Fr Jonathan. There were we met by Fr Gerry Hanlon, now semi-retired after 42 years working in Peru. After eating together we retired to the Bishop’,s residence. (Photo 2) Tuesday 15 Feb - The contrast between the desert of Lima and the tropical jungle of Iquitos was startling. Fr Gerry took us on a tour of his former parish, San Juan, where Bishop Roche gathered with parishioners to bless the foundation stone of a new chapel. We also briefly visited a children’,s comedor, a food kitchen where some of the poorer children receive a substantial lunch and also medical and dental care. (Photo 3) Wednesday 16 Feb –, Borrowing a boat from the parish of St Peter the Fisherman, we travelled up the river Momó,n, a tributary of the Amazon, visiting various communities and experiencing first hand the reality of missionary activity and the beauty of the jungle and its wildlife. Returning to Iquitos, Bishop Roche celebrated Mass in another small chapel where Fr Gerry worked, drawing a large crowd including a few local dogs! Thursday 17 Feb –, Returning to Lima with Fr Jonathan and Fr Gerry, we travelled to the Society of St James’, house on the other side of the city, breaking the journey on the way to more visits. Unfortunately, we were laid low by a bout of “,South American tummy.”, While Bishop Roche was well enough to visit the shrines of St Rose of Lima and St Martin de Porres on Friday, it was only by Saturday that we were able to get back on the road. Saturday 19 Feb –, We visited the different communities of sisters connected with the Diocese. The Cross and Passion Sisters in Villa el Salvador, the Sisters of Mercy who, supported by the Diocese, work in a parish and run a women’,s needlework co-operative, Sr Millie McNamara, another Mercy Sister supported by the Diocese, who has built and oversees a centre for the disabled and a fully functioning hospital in the Via Maria district. In different ways, they all had such inspiring apostolic ministries. (Photos 4,5,6) Sunday 20 Feb –, To celebrate the 50th anniversary of the Diocesan Mission in Peru, Bishop Roche, together with Bishop Lino Richero of Carabayllo, Fr Jonathan and Fr Gerry celebrated Mass in Fr Jonathan’,s Church in Lima. The large congregation offered tremendous hospitality and the celebration continued afterwards outside with traditional dancing. (Photo 7) Monday 21 Feb –, We left Lima having witnessed the truly remarkable work of priests and sisters, past and present, who belong to our Diocesan Peru Mission. The faith and joy we encountered was amazing, especially among so many people who have so very little. It falls to all of us in our Diocese to continue to support this wonderful apostolate in the service of justice and evangelisation. Bishop Roche will give an illustrated presentation about his visit to Peru at the meeting of the Diocesan Peru Commission on Saturday 16th April 2011. Full details of this will be sent to all parishes and everyone is welcome to attend. Bishop Roche Visits the Diocesan Peru Mission - 12 to 21 February 2011 1 5 6

Read in full

Page 11

Mar 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Leeds Catholic Post Page 11 Welcome to Alexandra Court! We are a small private family orientated residential home for the elderly, where standards of care and cleanliness are our priority. Together with my three children, a dedicated and conscientious manager and our wonderful team of staff members, some of which have been with us since we opened in 1992, we have ensured Alexandra Court continues to exceed expectations. We have home cooked meals and desserts, tailored care plans to meet each resident’,s individual needs and activities galore including entertainers, fitness instructors, beauty and cinema afternoons and two little dogs visit regularly who bring a lot of happiness to our residents. Most rooms are en-suite complete with television and telephone points, nurse call systems and they are decorated regularly to ensure the Alexandra Court stays fresh, clean and always smells nice! In order to experience life at Alexandra Court please feel free to contact my daughter Marilouise, to arrange a viewing or alternatively have a look at our website for more information. We look forward to welcoming you soon. 333 Spen Lane, Leeds LS16 5BB Tel: 0113 274 3661 Email: court_alexandra@yahoo.co.uk www.alexandracourtcarehome.co.uk Family orientated residential home for the elderly 2 4 7 3

Read in full

Page 12

Mar 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

This Year It Was Aladdin In February 2011, over 60 students took to the stage to perform this year’,s Annual College Production of Aladdin at All Saints Catholic College in Huddersfield. Aladdin is a street-urchin who lives in a large and busy town long ago with his faithful monkey friend Abu. When Princess Jasmine gets tired of being forced to remain in the palace that overlooks the city, she sneaks out to the marketplace, where she accidentally meets Aladdin. Under the orders of the evil Jafar (the sultan`s advisor), Aladdin is thrown in jail and becomes caught up in Jafar`s plot to rule the land with the aid of a mysterious lamp. Aladdin becomes trapped in the cave and accidentally discovers the resident of the lamp. Aladdin develops a relationship with the Genie and uses his wishes to become a prince to chase the affections of Princess Jasmine. When Jafar finally steals the lamp and gets three wishes of his own, Aladdin must rely on his intelligence to trick Jafar and save his friends and the Kingdom. Oscar Zito starred as Aladdin, Rachel Moore &, Ellen Cooney both played Princess Jasmin, Luke Hannay played the evil Villain Jafar and Sabbah Anjum played the comical Genie. This year we had a record number of students throughout the College who were involved in the performance, as well as numerous students helping out backstage, doing the lighting and sound in addition to front of house duties. We also had a team of set designers working in Art to create the scenery and props for the show. Over 500 people came to see the show, and were once again impressed by the talent and professionalism of everyone who participated. We will soon be releasing information about next year’,s College production, this busy school never sleeps! FROM JUST £,299 R.G.R. MEMORIALS COLOUR CATALOGUE QUALITY MEMORIALS AT AFFORDABLE PRICES IN GRANITE, MARBLE &, STONE ALL PRICES INCLUDE DELIVERY &, FIXING Ogee top memorial 2’,6”, high Fully polished Black Granite, Delivered and Fixed for £,399 inc VAT FREE Tel: 0113 282 3888 43 High Ridge Park, Rothwell, Leeds LS26 0NL From Far And Wide They Came The rain stopped and the sun came out on Sunday, 13th March 2011 for the 12th St. Patrick’,s Day Parade as it processed through the streets of Leeds, led by the Lord Mayor and his wife Cllr James McKenna and Cllr Andrea McKenna and members of the Dewsbury Celtic Football Club as well as members of the Yorkshire Gaelic Football Club carrying the Irish County flags. There were bands providing the music along the way with various dance groups. People had travelled from all over Yorkshire to come and celebrate, many wearing something “,green”,! There was even a group of ladies, with their green hats, who were from Finland and who were enjoying the music and dancing. The winning float was the Leeds Irish Health and Homes in their colourful costumes. In Millennium Square the entertainment didn’,t stop, it carried on well into the afternoon. There were many stalls selling everything from shamrock to books, cookies and crockery all with the Irish theme. There was even a stall promoting the game of Gaelic Football and a corner of the Square was used with some of the players showing other children how to play the game. Page 12 Leeds Catholic Post

Read in full

Page 13

Mar 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

NEWS FROM LEEDS TRINITY UNIVERSITY COLLEGE Leeds Catholic Post Page 13 The journalism jet set fly into Leeds Trinity A host of top names from the regional, national and international media have shared their experiences with journalism students at Leeds Trinity University College. Leeds Trinity’,s annual Journalism Week took place in March, giving students the opportunity to hear from journalists with diverse areas of expertise, and to hone their own skills by writing articles and conducting interviews. The week kicked off with discussions on online and digital media, followed by a focus on sport with Director of BBC Sport Barbara Slater, and journalists involved in planning for coverage of London 2012. BBC Look North’,s Christa Ackroyd and Yorkshire Evening Post editor Paul Napier looked at the role of regional media and its future challenges. Christa loves to meet the people who are making the news, and said, “,Regional news has a strong voice –, unlike the nationals we are not flown in for a particular story, we can return and follow up, building credibility with the public. I am part of the process of putting together the programme, I’,ve done the legwork.”, Thursday was One World Media Day, during which students took part in workshops exploring ethical and safety issues faced by foreign correspondents. Mark Byford, the BBC’,s Deputy Director General, wrapped up the week with a keynote speech praising the corporation and looking to the future for journalism. With an uncertain future for all media outlets, he stressed the importance of keeping up to date with the evolution of modern journalism. He said, “,Standing still would mean inevitable decline. Technology changes all the time and you must change to meet it, but your values remain the same.”, Tim Hood, a 26 year old journalism undergraduate, said, “,Everyone who has spoken has touched on every aspect of modern journalism available to them. Inspiration has been key this week and they have all given a positive message to students.”, Christa Ackroyd is pictured with journalism students at Leeds Trinity. Full coverage of the week can be found at www.leedstrinity.ac.uk on the Centre for Journalism pages. Student football coach is a winner at Leeds Sports Awards A volunteer football coach from Leeds Trinity University College has earned recognition for his dedication with a win at the Leeds Sports Awards. Student Chris Beckley, from Huddersfield, won the ‘,Leeds Trinity Sports Award for outstanding student contribution to community sport’, in recognition of his commitment to volunteering with young people in sport. Now in the final year of his degree in Sports Development and Physical Education at Leeds Trinity, Chris has found time to volunteer throughout, despite having to juggle his studies, travelling to campus, and caring for his two young children. After graduating he plans to train as a PE teacher. Chris gained a taste for volunteering in his first year by working with the local School Sports Partnership. Inspired by this experience he gained a football coaching qualification and now volunteers at Deighton Junior Football Club, West Yorkshire, managing the under 9s team. He said, “,I’,ve had one and a half seasons with this team as manager and enjoy a great relationship with the players and their parents. I am honoured and delighted to have won this award when there are hundreds of people like myself all volunteering in different sports.”, Sheila King, Community Sports Development Officer at Leeds Trinity, nominated Chris for the award. Sheila said, “,Chris has proved himself to be dynamic, hardworking, dedicated and organised. His clear enthusiasm for the sport and his work ethic has had a positive effect on the young people at Deighton as well as his fellow students.”, The Leeds Sports Awards are hosted by the Leeds Sports Federation, the representative body for voluntary sports organisations in the city. Student fundraisers help other young people to learn or earn L eeds Trinity University College and the Prince’,s Trust have teamed up to raise vital funds that will help the region’,s young people move into work, education or training. This is the fourth year of a partnership between the Prince’,s Trust and Leeds Trinity which sees a team of second year students spend their six week professional work placement on fundraising activities. The student team, all business undergraduates, hit the ground running after a motivational workshop with Yorkshire businesswoman and former Apprentice contestant Helene Speight, who is an ambassador for the Prince’,s Trust. The eight students were set a target of £,2000, which they exceeded thanks to support from the Trust and local businesses, and their own enthusiastic approach to the task in hand. A grand total of £,2,382 was raised - £,1,500 from three days of bag packing at Morrisons in Yeadon, and the remainder from events including a tea party on campus, a sponsored walk in the Dales, and a military style boot camp for student sports teams. Leanne Birch, Fundraising Manager for the Prince’,s Trust, said, “,We support the hardest to reach young people in society helping them gain the skills, confidence and motivation that they need to move into work, education or training.”, “,We couldn’,t do this crucial work without contributions such as this. It’,s been an absolute pleasure to work with the team and I have been touched by their passion and commitment to the project.”, Student Sam Redford said, “,The placement showed me how much satisfaction there is in helping people who haven’,t had the same opportunities as ourselves, and we were so pleased to exceed our fundraising target.”, Pictured left to right are Sam Redford, Will Flynn, Nick Wadsworth and Daniel Baldwin. Events at Leeds Trinity University College Please visit our website at www.leedstrinity.ac.uk for more details and a full events listing. Interfaith day conference 30 March 11.00am to 4.00pm Entitled “,Who is friend? Who is stranger?”, this conference aims to strengthen Leeds Trinity’,s links with local faith communities and interfaith groups, and will include a range of talks, seminar style discussions, and debates between a range of religious groups in the West Yorkshire area. All welcome –, free of charge with advance booking essential. For more information and to book email interfaith@leedstrinity.ac.uk Department for Children, Families and Young People Annual Lecture 31 March 6.30pm, with drinks reception at 5.45pm “,Towards a child friendly city?”, by Nigel Richardson, Director of Children’,s Services, Leeds City Council. All welcome. For more information and to book contact Diane Ainsley on d.ainsley@leedstrinity.ac.uk Catholic Partnership Day for schools 20 May 9.30am to 3.30pm The theme for this year is Music and Liturgy with CJM Music (www.cjmmusic.com). For more information and to book call the Education Partnership Office on 0113 2837100 ext 379. Course fee £,50.00 per school (including lunch and refreshments).

Read in full

Page 14

Mar 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 14 Leeds Catholic Post S taff and students at The Holy Family School hosted their annual celebration to mark the World Day of Prayer for the Sick which occurs on February 11th each year The impetus for the day came from the Vatican itself which designates February 11th, the feast of Our Lady of Lourdes as World Day of Prayer for the Sick. It comes with a strong recommendation that the seriously ill should, as far as possible, be brought to church for celebrations of anointing. As it happens, long before the identification of this distinctive day, the students and staff at The Holy Family School hosted a deanery- wide celebration of anointing the sick in October. So they decided to mark this day in February with special prayers for Carers. Hazel Hornsby, the lay chaplain, explained, “,We already had a reliable routine in which we hosted a special day of prayer for the sick on behalf of the parishes in Keighley but we did not want to ignore this call, especially on the feast day of one of our patrons so we elected to pray for those who care for the sick. We know of a small but significant number of students who may be the principal carers at home and it is one easy way of offering support without particularly highlighting that we do know. Often such people, whether students or staff, choose to keep home and school separate.”, She went on to explain that each year students from Year 10 make the Lourdes pilgrimage and it has become a recognised rite of passage in school life. This event formed part of their preparation and the students attended in force, proudly wearing their yellow uniforms for the first time. They were accompanied by students from Year 9 who will be making a pilgrimage to Croagh Patrick at Easter in preparation for confirmation The evening was led by Fr Michael, the school chaplain. He was assisted by Fr Andrew Summersgill, recently installed as parish priest at St Stephen’,s in Skipton, one of the partner parishes of The Holy Family School. World Day of Prayer celebrated at The Holy Family G overnments come and go and with them all their various policies for how schools are organised and what happens there by way of governance and management, teaching and learning, admissions, assessment and so on. This has been the case for the best part of 150 years and there are times no doubt when parents and professionals are inclined to wish for a bit more continuity and rather less change. One distinctive feature of our Catholic schools throughout all these comings and goings is that they have been and remain Catholic, in the sense that they exist to serve the mission of the Catholic Church in the society of their day. Today, perhaps more than ever, our schools are catholic in another sense: in the diversity of backgrounds shared by the pupils themselves. In the Leeds diocese its schools have a long history of what is nowadays called ‘,inclusion’,, drawing their pupils from a range of social and ethnic backgrounds. For example, as far back as 1851 the census of that year revealed that more than half the residents of Bradford had been born elsewhere. It was a town of migrants. Many of them, of course, were Irish and Catholic. Later generations were joined by settlers from Italy, Poland and other countries in Eastern Europe, as the admissions registers of Catholic schools in the city would testify. Over the years assimilation gradually reduced the numbers who could be clearly counted as ‘,hyphenated Catholics’, (although when the World Cup comes round this is usually an occasion for many of them to suddenly come to the surface). In more recent times globalisation and developments in the European Union have added to this diversity, especially with the arrival of Catholics from the Philippines. And what is true of Bradford is replicated in Leeds and elsewhere in the diocese at the present time, with the result that there are over 2,400 children on roll in diocesan schools whose families are first generation settlers in this country. A recent survey carried out by the Catholic Education Service calculated that for almost a quarter of the pupils in Catholic schools in England and Wales their ethnic origin lies somewhere beyond the British Isles, be it in other parts of Europe, Africa, the Americas, or Asia. Our schools’, diversity, both past and present, is one of their strengths. It gives lie to the claim that somehow Catholic schools are ‘,exclusive’, and it serves as a constant reminder that we need to lift our eyes from the merely local. Every parish and school –, and the diocese itself –, is but a building block in the Universal Church. In this context it is worth quoting something said recently by Cardinal Turkson, the President of the Pontifical Council for Justice and Peace, during his recent visit to Leeds. In a lecture given at the cathedral he argued that true human development is much more than an economic concept. It is about what the cardinal called ‘,human flourishing’, which means the enabling of each person to fulfil their potential as God created them to be. That, indeed, is the mission of all our schools, a truly Catholic mission, serving a rich diversity of children and young people every day and enabling them all to be what God created them to be. SCHOOLS OF DIVERSITY Harrogate students in regional final A dramatic anti-knife-crime community video made by Year 11 students at St John Fisher Catholic High School in Harrogate is one of three projects shortlisted to win North Yorkshire region’,s Crimebeat competition, part of a national initiative to make communities safer. Harrogate Community Police Officer Graham Wilson encouraged the 15-16 year old students to enter the competition after seeing an anti-knife crime music project they had been working on in school with Invizible Circle Education, a Leeds-based, grass roots organisation specialising in the provision of tailored multimedia education with a hip-hop theme. Seven St John Fisher students were involved in producing the video for Crimebeat. With a gritty audio and visual representation of the custodial implications of anti- social behaviour, the students aim to discourage teenagers from fighting, and encourage them to choose a more positive route through their teenage years. The team created the storyboard, wrote and performed the music and lyrics, acted, directed and produced the video, which Philip Ingham, High Sheriff of North Yorkshire shortlisted for the regional finals after his meeting with the boys. In the run-up to the regional Crimebeat finals, the St John Fisher boys have presented the video to around 2,100 Year 6 primary school children in Yorkshire as part of the 20th annual Crucial Crew initiative, hosted by North Yorkshire Police at Deverell Army Barracks in Ripon. Crucial Crew is a multi-agency event that, through the delivery of ten ten-minute, interactive workshops throughout the course of a day, gives Year 6 children from around 90 schools in the region memorable, hands-on experience of scenarios linked with behaviour, emergencies and safety - in a controlled and supervised environment. North Yorkshire Police Youth Matters Officer Paul Stephenson, said, “,The video has been very well received, the boys have been a credit to the school and we wish them luck in the regional Crimebeat competition in April.”,

Read in full

Page 15

Mar 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Leeds Catholic Post Page 15 Classified Advertising LEEDS CATHOLIC MARRIAGE CARE Marriage isn’,t always easy —, Counselling can help For an appointment in confidence, with an understanding and experienced listener, please telephone: LEEDS 0113 261 8045 HUDDERSFIELD 01484 422523 A Relationship Counselling Service W. Lever Ltd BRADFORD 01274 547137 524 THORNTON ROAD, BRADFORD BD8 9NB FOR OVER 75 YEARS PROVIDING A COMPLETE PERSONAL &, CARING 24 HOUR FUNERAL SERVICE CHAPEL OF REST H UGHES F UNERAL S ERVICES (Catholic Funeral Directors) 180 YORK ROAD, LEEDS LS9 9NT. Tel 2480953/63 152 GREEN LANE, CROSSGATES. Tel 2326900 3 HOLLIN PARK PARADE, OAKWOOD ROUNDABOUT Tel 2499338 Web: wwww.hughesfuneralservices.co.uk Email: info@hughesfuneralservices.co.uk Family owned and managed. Fully Qualified in all aspects. 24 Hour Service Guaranteed Fixed Price Funeral Plans etc. “,At a time of bereavement we carry out our duties with dignity and respect”, In times of bereavement please contact: B. J. MELIA &, SONS (B. J. Melia Dip F.D.) F UNERAL D IRECTORS AND M ONUMENTAL M ASONS Private Chapel of Rest 64 GIBBET STREET, HALIFAX Telephone: 01422 354453 PRE-PAID FUNERAL SERVICE AVAILABLE DETAILS ON REQUEST Jennings Funeral Services (Catholic Funeral Directors) 13 Racca Green, Knottingley WF11 8AT Telephone: 01977 677715 •, Highest standards of care •, Family owned and managed •, Pre payment plans •, 24 hour service •, Personal attention of Barry and Elizabeth Jennings A Personal and Dignified Family Business that Cares S J F S eeking a new model for making ash available to all on Ash Wednesday the Chaplaincy Team packed their bags and set off around the school. They were responding to invitations from teaching staff who were willing and able to set aside a few minutes out of their lesson for a short liturgy including imposition of ash. Hazel Hornsby, the lay chaplain at Holy Family explained, “,The “,right”, place to receive the ash is in your parish church rather than in school but we did not want to deny the opportunity to anyone who wished to receive the ash. Equally, with a mixed population, with many members of school who are not Catholic but are active members of other faith communities we sought an alternative to celebrating liturgy with large groups. There is an inherent problem about informed consent when, say, a whole year group is marshalled into a liturgy and told ‘,This is a voluntary activity’,. “,With the smaller groups we were able to chat about issues as we prepared for the liturgy. We were also able to reflect on Christian values, not assume that everyone present was Catholic or Christian but talk about shared concerns and values. All the great religions stress the same values although they do so in different ways. The symbolism of Ash Wednesday is about discarding the bad things that spoil life for us and for others and, if you are a believer, sadden God”, We were able to give personal reassurances that this special blessing, although Christian –, albeit acquired from Jewish tradition –, was available to all who wanted to use the next few weeks to improve their lives. Fr Michael Walsh celebrated the Ash Wednesday Mass and blessed the stock of ashes. Hazel and her assistant visited the classes they had been invited to during the remainder of the morning A simple 10 minute liturgy just interrupting a lesson was symbol of making ordinary things special, just as we sought to make ourselves better through Lenten observance. Working with class-groups meant that teachers could cue the Chaplaincy Team into to the children’,s prior knowledge and understanding. It also created a buzz that here was something special to be grasped rather than wasted and it provoked questions that could be responded to. Most of all it was close and personal, the liturgy was not overtaken by the bulkiness of a large group celebration. The students responded positively, even to the extent of discussing future chaplaincy work. Have ash, will travel Preparing for Ash Wednesday The children and staff of Christ the King School Bramley watch on as Fr. Paul Redmond burns the Palms to make ash to be used at the Ash Wednesday Mass. The Palms were blessed and used at last years Palm Sunday procession and then taken home by the parishioners to be placed on somewhere visible as a reminder of Christ`s Passion, Death and Resurrection. During the last couple of weeks they have been collected for burning.

Read in full

Page 16

Mar 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 16 Leeds Catholic Post Contemplation and Community It was a pleasant spring surprise to see a photograph of crocuses in Kirkstall Abbey grounds pop up on the national BBC news as the backdrop picture for the weather forecast. The grounds of Kirkstall Abbey incidentally wonderfully maintained by Leeds City Council –, were presented as the coming image of spring. The huge half-ruin of the great twelfth century Kirkstall Abbey is in the Aire Valley less than half a mile from my home on the other side of the river and it is now a space for recreation. Every year we have the Kirkstall Festival organised by the local Kirkstall Village Community Association run on the lines of a traditional medieval fair –, with stalls, sports and sometimes `jousting` from the Royal Armouries. On a good summers day Kirkstall Festival –, which is now a regular annual feature –, can attract over 20,000 people from all over Leeds. In recent years, as well as charity stalls juggling, music and a traditional fair, an ecumenical Christian service has been restored to the church –, again often with a packed naï,ve listening to the Salvation Army Band and the Scripture readings as the birds flit about the open space overhead. Putting the religious service back into the heart of the Abbey is now a popular feature of the Kirkstall Festival amidst the stalls, dancing and festivities. Before King Henry VIII enacted the “,dissolution of the monasteries”, in 1532 and sent his agents to expel the monks (or pension them off), sell off the estates and dismantle the buildings, the monks of Kirkstall Abbey were Cistercian monks following in the contemplative withdrawn tradition of St Bernard of Clairvaux. He wanted to reform the monastic tradition to a stricter Benedictine rule with a much greater emphasis on a monastic life of prayer and silence, fostering contemplation rather than active missionary services. Kirkstall itself was a “,daughter”, of the great Rievaux Abbey built in a time in the twelfth century when Yorkshire became the British centre of the revival of monasticism. The great Cistercian Abbeys Rievaux, Fountains, Bylands and Kirkstall centered around a great Norman Church kept themselves with sheep farming developing woollen cloth that was taken as far afield as the high quality markets of Florence in the fifteenth century. The Yorkshire Cistercian monks were the developers of the European woollen industry. But it was adherence to the strict Benedictine rule, reciting the Psalms in the church nine times a day –, starting in the early hours –, celebrating the Mass, observing the”,great silence”, from supper to the next morning,but generally living a life of contemplative prayer, study and manual work on the far. Benedict`s Rule stressed that the monastery should cultivate three great attitudes, stability, hospitality and community. But those attributes were not just for the internal practice of the monks in the monastery. The monastery itself was the centre of the local community. It was a place of employment for lay brothers on the farms and day labourers. It provided the only education and health care for the local community. It was a place of hospitality for strangers and travellers. But community or `social` service was not the main focus of the work of the monks. It was prayer, contemplative prayer. to be regarded as a kind of inward looking retreat from the problems of the world rather as Abbott Roger stressed `contemplation is a long loving look at reality` –, the opposite of running away from the mess and maelstrom of the everyday world. This year CAFOD is reintroducing “,a walking pilgrimage of solidarity”, in all four of the traditional Northumbrian church dioceses, Hexham and Newcastle, Middlesbrough (which covers York), Leeds and Hallam. The Leeds diocese part of the pilgrimage is “,in the footsteps of the monks”,from Kirkstall via Fountains Abbey to Ripon Cathedral carrying a specially designed replica of St Cuthbert`s Cross –, found in his wooden coffin that the monks carried around the North of England trying to avoid the invading Vikings. The diocesan pilgrimages set out in Leeds diocese on 20 June and end in a diocesan event on St Cuthbert`s Holy Island of Lindisfarne on 9 July. Parishes, CAFOD and community groups are invited to join in a day`s walking or to turn out to greet the pilgrims in the towns they pass through. The core group of a dozen pilgrims will include visitors from Cafod`s overseas projects to reinforce North-South solidarity. The monks regularly walked between the Yorkshire monasteries. There are great stone crosses marking the way through the hill fog on the Cleveland Hill and North York Moors. Many of the `sheep-trails` and `tracks` criss crossing the Dales were trodden out by the monks moving flocks and fleeces from one monastery to another. The monk`s life of service and prayer also expressed in stability, hospitality and community held to a strong sense of developing commonwealth and insisting on including and supporting the poor, the orphan and the widow. The CAFOD walking pilgrimage could reinstate a new focus and understanding of those great key words “,contemplation and community”,and the need to hold them together. John Battle KSG St. Mary’,s Students Dedicate National Award to their South African Friend S t. Mary’,s School, Menston is delighted to announce that twelve ex-students have been honoured with the Diana Certificate of Excellence. The Diana Certificate of Excellence recognises the outstanding contribution of young people, aged 12-18, who work together in groups to improve their communities, organisations or schools. The Certifcate rewards those who go above and beyond to benefit others, by raising money for charity, or campaigning on a local issue or mentoring younger children in their schools or youth groups. St. Mary’,s has gained international acclaim for its practical work with Mnyakanya School, Kwa Zulu Natal, South Africa. The ‘,Bambisanani’, Partnership - Zulu for ‘,working hand in hand’, - was launched by the Menston school in 2006 and has effectively used sport as a catalyst to promote education, health and leadership in one of South Africa’,s poorest communities which is severely affected by HIV/AIDS. The partnership has made a significant impact on the lives of young people in both countries. Maggie Turner, Chief Executive of the Diana Award said: “,The Diana Certificate of Excellence is for young people who make a positive change within their communities or schools. It identifies positive young role models that challenge negative stereotypes of young people, and encourages them to develop their full potential. There will be many more groups of young people working within communities and schools across the UK that deserve this award and we welcome nominations”,. Students, Rebecca Harrison, Thomas Loughlin, Lisa Melvin, Isabelle Scott, Lorna O’,Sullivan, Kate Shelly, Samuel Thomas, Alexander Threapleton, Phoebe Tyrie, Alexandra Jewell, Chris Whiteley and Kim Wu travelled to South Africa during the summer of 2010 and were involved in a wide range of community work. In South Africa the St. Mary’,s students had mentored twenty students from Mnyakanya School in Leadership skills. Sadly, one of the South African students, Sbonelo Magwaza died recently. He was an outstanding young leader with tremendous potential who had become a good friend of the St. Mary’,s students. On hearing of the Diana Award, the St. Mary’,s students decided to dedicate it to the memory of their friend Sbonelo. Speaking on behalf of the St. Mary’,s students, Sam Thomas said:- “,It is a great honour to receive this award and we would like to dedicate it to our friend and outstanding young leader, Sbonelo Magwaza who died recently”,. Mr David Geldart, Assistant Headteacher at St. Mary’,s said:- “,We at St. Mary’,s are very proud of our Diana Certificate of Excellence Award holders. This award will encourage them to continue their work and inspire others to get involved. The young people truly value this award and they are delighted to be recognised. It is so thoughtful and typical of these wonderful students that they would want to dedicate it to their friend Sbonelo”,. Greek is the word! I n February, Theatre Studies students at Notre Dame Sixth Form College directed, designed and performed a production of ‘,Greek’, by Steven Berkof The play is a retelling of the Oedipus story but transposed to a contemporary East End setting using graphic language in a lyrical style to give the story a poetic yet stark feel. The cast started rehearsing after the Christmas break giving them only four and a half weeks to mount a full scale production and rehearsals took place during lunchtimes and after college. The result was a stunning production which did credit to all those involved. The production was directed by Riana Duce and Joel Brogan who played Helena and Oberon in the college’,s Christmas production of ‘,A Midsummer Night’,s Dream.’, ‘,Greek’, was not without its problems though. After a student dropped out at the last minute, Riana had to step into the breech and take on the role of Waitress/Wife ‘,It was stressful having all those lines to learn’, said Riana ‘,but it’,s always nice to perform!’, This was the first time directing a show for both of them. ‘,I found it very insightful said Joel ‘,It was lots of hard work but well worth it in the end’, Joel has already had an offer from Goldsmith’,s college in London to study Drama and Riana is interested in writing and directing as well as acting and is hoping to study Performance at York University. For more information on Theatre productions at Notre Dame go to: www.notredamecoll.ac.uk/theatre

Read in full

Page 17

Mar 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Leeds Catholic Post Page 17 A cry for help from Christians in Cyprus Catholic Church leaders from across South- Eastern Europe met in Nicosia, Cyprus from March 3rd to 6th, under the auspices of the CCEE, the Council of European Bishops Conferences. Looking ahead to the mid-August celebration of World Youth Day in Madrid, the meeting focused on how to reach out and relate to young people –, a subject with a particularly poignancy for the small Maronite Church in Cyprus which was hosting the encounter... “,Please don’,t forget us and do whatever you can to save our Christian villages!”, That cry for help was left ringing in my ears as I returned to Rome from my five day visit to Cyprus in March, a trip which culminated with a tour of the Maronite villages in the northern part of the island. In the capital, Nicosia, where the bishops’, meeting was taking place, I’,d been somewhat surprised to discover the country’,s unique blend of Mediterranean, Middle Eastern and European cultures, a legacy of its turbulent history up until independence in 1960, but also of its entry into the European Union in 2004. In the busy, commercial sector, British high street shops and banks recall not just its colonial past, but also its continuing success as a modern day tourist destination, with elegant shopping malls, hotels and restaurants. In the old city centre with its 16th century Venetian stone walls, the Gothic Orthodox cathedral and adjacent museum with ancient Byzantine icons stands out amongst the narrow streets and abandoned buildings with beautiful ornate balconies, many of which are undergoing extensive renovation and repair. Running through the heart of the city is the so-called Green Line that stretches like an ugly great scar between the Greek and Turkish sides. Despite UN mediated attempts at reconciliation, 60.000 Turkish troops have occupied the northern part of Nicosia and the north of the island since an attempted coup by Greek nationalists in 1974. On the penultimate day of our visit, I boarded a bus, together with the visiting bishops and a handful of local Catholic clergy and lay people, handing over our passports as we were driven through a ghostly no-man’,s land, past deserted shells of houses with grass growing through the broken windows and scattered groups of soldiers standing idly by. Once on the Turkish side there is a large statue of Ataturk and dozens of red and white flags –, the largest flag is dug into the mountainside and lit up at night, making it visible as soon as you arrive at the main Larnaka airport almost an hour’,s drive away on the Greek side. From the windows of the bus I caught glimpses of long abandoned villages, a bombed out Orthodox monastery with crumbling cloisters and flocks of sheep grazing on the wide grassy plain. Following a narrow winding road, we arrived at the village of Karpasha which counts less than a dozen very elderly inhabitants, who refused to flee during the invasion and have remained there ever since. To pass the time, they cultivate a few vegetables and keep watch over the Holy Cross Church housing frescos on the walls and a 15th century painted wooden crucifix, a miraculous survivor of both the bombing and the looting that destroyed a large part of the cultural heritage of the region. A church bell rang out as we walked towards the whitewashed stone chapel and stepped inside for a shared moment of prayer. I could see the emotion on the weather beaten faces of the old men and women, as well as in the eyes of the younger priests and lay people who were returning for a rare visit to their ancestral lands. One by one, they stepped forward to kiss the precious icon before it was locked away again beside the altar until the next visit from behind the Green Line. After that we moved onto the village of Kormakitis where over a hundred people still live in renovated houses next to the church of St George, looked after lovingly by three elderly Franciscan sisters. There the Maronite Archbishop of Cyprus Yousef Soueif celebrated Mass for our group and for the local community in their ancient Oriental rite. We were unable to visit the two other surviving villages, used as military bases and thus off limits, except for three hours on Sundays when a priest is allowed in to say Mass. Archbishop Soueif is actively encouraging young families with children to accompany him over from the Greek side during that time and rediscover their roots here before it is too late. “,We are a minority of the verge of extinction,”, is how one local doctor described the situation to me –, he was born and grew up in Karpasha but now work in a Nicosia hospital, returning whenever he can to look after the elderly inhabitants of these villages. He also helps runs a website aimed at preserving the Cypriot Maronite culture and language which has characterised this part of the island since around the 8th century AD. He recalled with gratitude the visit of Pope Benedict in June last year which helped to put their drama under the international spotlight. Before that he said, aside from a few visits from Euro MPs, he feared that the old folk would simply die and his people would no longer be allowed back to their houses and lands. The Turkish soldiers, he added, “,are good people and treat us well so we have no problem with them. But these villages,”, he said, “,are the nucleus and the core of our existence and we’,ve struggled too long to lose them now. We’,re not interested in politics - we just want to co-exist with our Muslim neighbours and to live in peace here”,. Philippa M Hitchen Our Rome Correspondent Competition Success for the Huddersfield Boys and Girls Choirs T he Huddersfield Boys` Choir are celebrating success in this year`s Mrs. Sunderland Festival. The competition, held in Huddersfield Town Hall, attracts groups from all over West Yorkshire and beyond. The boys were the first winners of the new Year 8 and Under Novice class (for choirs who hadn`t yet won a competition), and were presented with a trophy for their performance of ",The Lion Sleeps Tonight", and the spiritual ",Chariot`s Comin`",. They also came third in the Year 8 and Open Class on the same day. Later in the evening, the Huddersfield Girls` Choir competed in the Under 19 competition against eight other choirs and were Commended (the same grade as the 3rd- placed choir). This was the first competitive performance for a choir less than a year old, winning praise from adjudicator and audience for their performance of John Rutter`s ",For The Beauty of the Earth", and Albrecht and Althouse`s ",I am a Small Part of the World.", Both the boys and girls choirs are based at St Patricks Church Huddersfield, in the parish of the Holy Redeemer, are members of the Dioceses acclaimed singing programme. They regularly sing for Mass in St Patricks in addition to singing in concerts, competitions and festivals. The choirs are directed by Keith Roberts, Choral Director for the Diocese of Leeds, and Director of Music at St Patricks Church, Huddersfield. Both boys and girls are looking forward to their next competitive appearance at the National Festival of Music for Youth regional heats on March 12th, and the boys to singing Vespers at Liverpool Metropolitan Cathedral with the cathedral choir the following week. Girls’, lead Daily Service on BBC T hursday 17th February was a very early start for young singers from Bradford and Keighley, who boarded a coach for Manchester before 6am in the morning! The reason for the early start was that the Bradford Girls’, Choir had been invited to lead the music on the Daily Service, which is broadcast daily on BBC R4 LW from Emmanuel Church, Didsbury. It is a great privilege for the girls to be invited to regularly take part in this act of worship, the BBC’,s longest running program, to share their singing talents with listeners around the country and the world via the internet. The theme of the service was ‘,sacrificial love,’, well summed up in the refrain of the well know opening hymn ‘,Lord of life, earth, sky and sea, King of Love on Calvary.’, The ultimate expression of sacrificial love is of course giving ones life, as Jesus did, and as so many martyrs have done so. The 17th February marked the remembrance of the martyrdom of Janani Luwum, Archbishop of Uganda, so the choir sang a traditional African song ‘,Freedom in coming/Hamba Vangeli Elisha!’, The service concluded with a setting of psalm 23 ‘,The King of Love my shepherd is.’, The choir was conducted by Christopher McElroy (Assistant Director of Music, Diocese of Leeds) and the organ was played by Benjamin Saunders (Director of Music, Diocese of Leeds.) Any Irish Roots? Tick the Irish Ethnicity Box…, T he Irish community is kick- starting a campaign to celebrate Irishness in the build up to the Census next year. Spearheaded by the Federation of Irish Societies (FIS), the campaign is designed to combat under-representation of the Irish in official figures and make the case for fair allocation and effective targeting of limited resources. Groups within the community see the Census as an opportunity to celebrate ‘,Irishness’, and highlight the historical and present day Irish contribution to modern Britain, such as the fantastic work done in the arts, education, health, construction and British business. The Federation of Irish Societies believes the best way to celebrate Irishness, is to tick the Irish ethnicity box in the Census. The next National Census will be held on 27 March, 2011. It will capture an accurate snapshot of information about every household in England and Wales. The Census is the only official count of the entire population and has been held every ten years since 1841, making it a unique source for historians. Census questionnaires provide information about the changing make up of the population, recording details of family life, occupation, religious belief, nationality and ethnicity that enable local authorities and service providers plan for the future. Just one person, or a group of people, making an incomplete return on their census form could mean thousands of pounds being spent elsewhere and not on your area’,s future budgets where the need may be greater. FIS is urging people to join the campaign online at www.howirishareyou.com. FIS is looking for as many Irish people as possible to back the campaign to help prepare for the launch on 26 January this year. The more people who join to show their support the more likely it will be that the campaign reaches 2, 3 and possibly later generations of Irish who do not currently identify with their Irish roots. Jennie McShannon, FIS CEO, stresses how important this is by saying: “,to make a considerable impact we need as many of the ‘,established Irish’, –, those who are likely to register their Irishness in the Census already –, to pull together and help spread the campaign message to 2 and 3 generations to get the representative count desired.”, If you would like to support the campaign then please go to www.howirishareyou.com to find out more.

Read in full

Page 18

Mar 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 18 Leeds Catholic Post First Friday of the Month SINGLE CATHOLICS meet at 8.00pm for mass at our Lady of Lourdes, Leeds. We also a have a program of 4-8 events during the month, walks, meals, cinema and theatre trips, etc. Phone David Easterbrook Chairman LDSC on 0113 2289468 evenings between 6 and 7.30pm only. Membership is open to all single Catholics who are free to marry within the church. Leeds Cathedral 20-35 Group Young people (20-35 years old) who attend St. Anne`s Cathedral in Leeds meet regularly every Thursday for spiritual, social and charitable activities. For further details search Facebook for “,Leeds Cathedral 20- 35 Group”,, phone 07816 891872 or 07759 591233 or email leedscathedral20- 35@hotmail.co.uk Crusade Mass The crusade Mass and Rosary of Mary Immaculate is held at St Patrick`s Church, Bradford, on the first Saturday of the Month after 12.15pm Mass , Second Sunday of Month 2pm Meeting of Bradford Fraternity of the Secular Franciscan Order at St. Anthony`s Convent, Clayton, Bradford.` `Third Sunday of Month 2.30pm Meeting of Leeds Fraternity of the Secular Franciscan Order at the Cathedral. Ampleforth Renewal Community Ampleforth Abbey, meet 1st Sunday each month, at Ampleforth. 11 .30am Praise, Speaker, Sharing Groups, Reconciliation, Exposition, Finishing with Mass and Healing at 4.00pm. All enquiries: Seamus McEneaney 01429 426181 Monthly Vocations Mass Mount St Joseph’,s Chapel 11am First Wednesday of Month. Calix: An organisation for those recovering from addiction and working the 12 Step Programme of AA so that they can develop and deepen their relationship with Jesus as their Higher Power. Meets on the First Sunday of every month at Corpus Christi Church, Neville Rd. Osmondthorpe. Leeds. Mass at 4.30pm followed by meeting. Contact: Fr. Michael on 01977 510266 Helpers of Gods precious infants, prayer vigils, regular weekly prayer vigils at Marie Stopes Abortuary, 7 Barrack Road.LS7 4AB, next to Jaguar car showrooms. Fridays 12-30 to 1-30, and Saturdays 9am- l1am. Monthly all night vigil of reparation in St Marys Horsforth 12th of every month, 9- 30pm to 6am . Other times variable. Further details Pat 0113 2582745 Rosary rally Sat Oct 9th 2010 12-30pm Leeds cenotaph, outside art gallery, Headrow. Contact 07747698553/ or 0113 2582745 Diary A few moments for thought and Prayer Lord, this world needs this marvellous wealth that is youth. Help young people! They possess the inexhaustible wealth of the future. Do not allow an easy life to corrupt them, Nor difficulties to quench their spirit. Amen. Dom Helder Camara Archbishop of Olinda &, Recife 1909-1999 Be Still Deadline: For receipt of material for next edition: April 8th 2011 Parishes receive their copies: April 24th 2011 Send articles, reports &, pictures: Mr John Grady, Hinsley Hall, 62 Headingley Lane, Leeds LS6 2BX. Send text as word doc, pictures as jpeg, e-mail to: john.grady@dioceseofleeds.org.uk Tel: 0113 261 8022. Advertising Deadline Please note All paid-for advertising is dealt with by: CathCom, L4 Blois Meadow Business Centre, Steeple Bumpstead, Haverhill, Suffolk, CB9 7BN. To advertise call 020 7112 6710 or email: ads@cathcom.org Your Cath Post Thursday 24 March 10am Visitation, St Matthew’,s School, Bradford. 2.30pm VGs’, Meeting, Bishop’,s House. 7pm Mass and Blessing of new Altar, Our Lady of Lourdes, Huddersfield Thursday 31 March 10am Visitation, St Anthony’,s Primary School, Bradford Friday 1 April 10am Governors’, Meeting, Leeds Trinity University College, Horsforth Sunday 3 April 10am Visitation, St Anthony’,s, Bradford Monday 4-Tuesday 5 April Meeting with Church of England House of Bishops, London Wednesday 6 April 10am Yorkshire Dioceses’, Trustees’, Meeting, Wheeler Hall, Leeds Cathedral 2pm VGs’, Meeting, Bishop’,s House Thursday 7 April 7.30pm Praying the Scriptures, Halifax Minster Wednesday 13 April 10am WYEC Meeting, Ackworth School, Pontefract Thursday 14 April 9am VGs’, Meeting, Bishop’,s House Northern Church Leaders’, Retreat, Hinsley Hall Friday 15 April Northern Church Leaders’, Retreat, Hinsley Hall Saturday 16 April 2pm Peru Commission, Hinsley Hall Sunday 17 April 10.40am Blessing of Palms &, Mass, Leeds Cathedral Wednesday 20 April 7pm Chrism Mass, Leeds Cathedral Thursday 21 April 7pm Mass of the Lord’,s Supper, Leeds Cathedral Friday 22 April 3pm Celebration of the Lord’,s Passion, Leeds Cathedral Saturday 23 April 8pm Easter Vigil, Leeds Cathedral Sunday 24 April 11am Solemn Easter Mass, Leeds Cathedral Bishops Engagements –, March/April +REGULAR EXTRAORDINARY RITE MASSES+ Sacred Triduum. EASTER 2011 Holy Thursday, April 21st. Notre Dame Chapel, St. Mark`s Avenue, Leeds. 7.30p.m. Good Friday, April 22nd. Notre Dame Chapel, St. Mark`s Avenue, Leeds. 3.00p.m. Holy Saturday, April 23rd. Notre Dame Chapel, St. Mark`s Avenue, Leeds. 7.30p.m. PASTORAL LETTER NINTH SUNDAY IN ORDINARY TIME My dear brothers and sisters in Christ, We often hear in Sacred Scripture the phrase harden not your hearts. We all know from experience how we can harden our hearts to certain things and sometimes, regrettably, to certain people. We can also, sadly, allow our hearts to be hardened to the reality of sin in our own lives. The attitude of ‘,it doesn’,t matter’,, or ‘,it’,s not all that serious anyway’,, or ‘,there’,s nothing I can do about it’,, or ‘,I don’,t need to go to Confession’,, is a sure indication of how our hearts can be hardened to the presence of sin in our personal lives. When I say such things, I am fast losing a grip on the reality of my Christian life and commitment which should be lived in the presence of God by following His ways and allowing Him to touch me with His mercy and forgiveness. There is within us all a desire to seek, in all honesty, an openness to God which brings about a release and a great freedom. But the choice is ours. See, I set before you today, says the Lord, a blessing and a curse. The choice is before us. Lent is a time for honesty, for facing our hardness of heart and for turning to God especially in the Sacrament of Confession. Jesus warns us not to build our lives on the shifting sands of values and opinions that do not have God at their heart, or of making gods out of the sins that rule us and curse us. Languishing in sin, and ignoring it, greatly damages our souls and produces a hardness of heart within us that is not only personally harmful but also harmful to everyone, even when our sins are only known to ourselves. But no secrets are hidden from God. As Jesus says: Everyone who listens to these words of mine and acts on them will be like someone who is wise and has built their house on rock. Rain came and floods rose and the winds howled and beat upon that house, but it did not fall because it was built on rock. I encourage all of us, without exception, to face the hardness and resistance there is within us during Lent and to bring it openly and courageously to the Lord in Confession for His healing touch. God, our Father, is never hard of heart. He is full of compassion and a deep love for us as He sees the costly price His Only Son paid for our sins on the Cross. So very often in the Gospels, Jesus tells us not to be afraid. We must not be frightened of opening our hearts to Him nor of confessing our sins in this sacrament. He loves us and, as we reach out to Him, He embraces us with great tenderness. Let the prayer which concludes today’,s Mass be ours as we begin Lent: Lord, guide us with your Spirit that we may honour you not only with our lips but also with the lives we lead. May the Good Lord bless us all this Lent, may He soften our hearts, and may we grow in grace and wisdom as we prepare to renew our promises of Baptism at Easter which are the hallmarks of our discipleship. Devotedly and with my blessing + Arthur Roche Bishop of Leeds Every Sunday 3.00p.m. St. Joseph`s, Pontefract Road, Castleford. Every Saturday (Vigil Mass) 6.00p.m. St. Marie`s, Gibbet Street, Halifax. Every first Sunday of the Month. 11.30 a.m. Sacred Heart, Broughton Hall, Skipton, Missa Cantata. Every Monday 6.45a.m. St. Mary of the Angels, Cross Bank Rd. Batley (term time) Low Mass. 9.30 a.m. Sacred Heart, Broughton Hall, Skipton, Low Mass. Every Tuesday (term time). 6.45a.m. St. Mary of the Angels, Cross Bank Rd. Batley. Low Mass. Every Wednesday. 6.45a.m. St. Mary of the Angels, Cross Bank Rd. Batley (term time) Low Mass. 9.30 a.m. Sacred Heart, Broughton Hall, Skipton, Low Mass. Every Thursday (term time). 6.45a.m. St. Mary of the Angels, Cross Bank Rd. Batley (term time) Every Friday (inc. first Fridays). 9.30 a.m. Sacred Heart, Broughton Hall, Skipton, Low Mass 7.30p.m. Holy Spirit, Bath Road, Heckmondwike, except last Fridays of the month. Every second Sunday of the month. 3.00p.m. St. Peter`s, Leeds Road, Laisterdyke, Bradford. Missa cantata. Every third Sunday of the month. 5.00p.m. St. Augustine`s, Harehills Rd. Harehills, Leeds. Every fourth Saturday. (Vigil Mass) 3.00p.m. St. Mary of the Angels, Crossbank Road, Batley. Every fifth Saturday. (Vigil Mass) 4.00p.m. Notre Dame chapel, Leeds University chaplaincy, St. Mark`s Avenue, Leeds. Every Saturday. 9.30a.m. Sacred Heart, Broughton Hall, Skipton. Please check the blog lmsleeds.blogspot.com for frequent postings giving details of other Masses outside of the regular schedule.

Read in full

Page 19

Mar 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Leeds Catholic Post Page 19 Church Pews Uncomfortable? Why not try top quality upholstered foam pew cushions? Safefoam, Green Lane, Riley Green, Hoghton, Preston PR5 0SN www.safefoam.co.uk Freephone 0800 015 44 33 Free Sample Pack of foam &, fabrics sent by first clss mail When phoning please quote UP101 ‘,KIDANE MIHRET’, By Fr. Gebreyesus Gebrezghgi W e, the Eritrean Catholic community, have celebrated officially the great feast of Our Lady of Perpetual Help, on the 26th of February 2011, at Holy Rosary Church. Our Mother of Perpetual Help is a title given to the Blessed Virgin Mary, associated with a Byzantine icon of the same name perhaps anytime between 13th and 15th century. The icon has been in Rome since at least the late 15th century, and is currently in the church of Sant`Alfonso di Liguori all`Esquilino. In the Eastern Orthodox Church this iconography is known as the Theotokos of the Passion. We inherited the tradition of Eastern Oriental Catholic Church. In the tradition of Eritrean Church Our Mother of Perpetual Help is widely celebrated as a great feast of the Church on the 24th of February every year. We worship this name of our Lady of Perpetual in order to guide us and protect us in our daily lives. We made a dedicated and concerted effort to celebrate this year at the Church of Holy Rosary here in Leeds on the 26th of February 2011 by attracting a wide and massive participation with a great spirit enthusiasm and zeal. The feast was celebrated by having pilgrimages from across UK: 120 Eritrean Catholics from London, Birmingham, Nottingham, Sheffield and Manchester. The congregation appeared to have shared the feast with a great blessing of the grace of Our Lady Perpetual Help. Fr. Ephrem, an Eritrean parish priest based in London, gave a wonderful homely focused blessing of Our Lady of Perpetual of Help. We are also encouraged to have invited guests such as Dr. Michael Mkpadi representing to all African and Caribbean community and Breda Theakston from the diocese of Leeds department of Preparation for Marriage as well as Anne Forbes and Antonieta Fill, from Holy Rosary Church, and Sisters from Holy Rosary Church other many invited guests. The Holy Mass started at 12:00pm and it was came to close at about 2:30pm and then followed by an attractive procession around the church compound. Members of the communities across all ages did not show any sign of tiredness or exhaustion whatsoever despite a long service. This has been attributed mainly due to the continuous singing and praising the Lord and Our Lady with a delighted spirit. The Eritrean Catholic establishment is originally started as a community in Leeds during the year of 2006. Few dedicated Eritrean Catholics started to meet initially at St. Adains Church, then they continued their gathering at the current location, Holy Rosary Church. During the early days of its existence the community was supported and guided by Abba Tesfamichael. He provided service by travelling all the way from London especially during Christmas and Easter feasts. To the delight of the community, however, a permanent Eritrean Priest is installed based in Leeds who provides his service every Sunday in the Holy Rosary Church according to the Oriental Ge’,ez tradition. It is very important that a warm gratitude has to be given to the Diocese of Leeds for realising the needs of the community. The 26th February will be remembered as our first official and annual celebration. We hope that with the grace of our Lord and with the intercession of Our Mother of Perpetual Help we will continue to celebrate this special day in the coming years, In mean time we would like to take this opportunity to extend our invitation to all those who are interested and have a good wish to the Oriental rite to join us in our weekly or annual events. Eritrean Catholic Community Leeds A GREAT IRISH WELCOME L eeds Irish Health and Homes used St Patrick’,s Day this year to have a party for all the people they work for, and with, at the Headingley Carnegie Stadium. Guests of Honour were the Lord Mayor and Lady Mayoress, which was fitting since this year this organisation, is the Lord Mayor Charity. Once everyone had been well fed with an excellent buffet, they were then entertain with some really top class Irish Dancing, which was well received by all. After a short time for speeches the afternoon was then filled with music.

Read in full

Page 20

Mar 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 20 Leeds Catholic Post Designed and produced by CathCom, L4 Blois Meadow Business Centre, Steeple Bumpstead, Haverhill, Suffolk, CB9 7BN. To advertise call 020 7112 6710 or email: ads@cathcom.org Rite of Election and Affirmation My dear brothers and sisters who are to be baptised and received into full communion, you have set out with us on the road that leads to the glory of Easter. Christ will be your way, your truth and your life. Exhortation, Concluding Rite On March 13th the First Sunday of Lent, more than three hundred people from thirty parishes, gathered with Bishop Arthur Roche at Leeds Cathedral for the Rite of Election and Affirmation. This liturgical celebration is for two groups of people: firstly the catechumens who are the adults and older children, who will be baptised, confirmed and who will receive the Eucharist for the first time at Easter, secondly the candidates who are already baptised and who will be received into full communion with the Catholic Church at Easter. More than 110 catechumens and candidates participated in the celebration and they were accompanied by their sponsors, families, parish priests and catechists. The Rite of Election &, Affirmation began with the Liturgy of the Word and the homily from Bishop Roche. Bishop Roche spoke about how the catechumens and candidates had responded to the Lord’,s call and were now entering the final stages of their preparation to receive the Easter sacraments. He emphasised how important it is for them to base their lives on what is solid and dependable, that is the teaching of Christ, and compared this to the wise man who builds his house on rock (Matt 7:21-27). The next part of the service was the Rite of Election when the catechumens were called individually by name and invited to come forward with their sponsor to meet Bishop Roche and to inscribe their name in the Book of the Elect. From this point the catechumens are known as The Elect. The next part of the Rite consisted of the candidates being presented to the Bishop. The sponsors were asked to affirm that the candidates are ready to be received into full communion with the Catholic Church. The candidates were called forward to meet Bishop Roche in parish groups. The celebration continued with the intercessions for the Elect and the Candidates and concluded with the blessing and dismissal. Throughout the celebration members of the cathedral choir led the singing of well known hymns and psalms. After the Rites had concluded refreshments were served in Wheeler Hall where people continued to reflect on their participation in this important and moving liturgy. To advertise in the next issue call the Advertising Team on 0870 228 4266

Read in full

Find your local Catholic Historical Church newspaper. Scroll to find yours.
Contact Us
Current Catholic Papers
Church Advertising
www.CatholicDirectory.org
© CathCom 1997 - 2021