Church Papers Archive
Feb 2013 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Feb 2013 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Jan 2013 U edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Jan 2013 U edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Dec 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Dec 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Nov 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Nov 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Oct 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Oct 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Sept 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Sept 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Jul/Aug 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Jul/Aug 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Jun 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Jun 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
May 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
May 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Apr 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Apr 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Mar 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Mar 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Feb 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Feb 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Jan 2012 U edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Jan 2012 U edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Dec 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Dec 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Nov 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Nov 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Oct 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Oct 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Sept 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Sept 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Jul/Aug 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Jul/Aug 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Jun 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Jun 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
May 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
May 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Apr 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Apr 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Mar 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Mar 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Feb 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Feb 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Dec 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Dec 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Nov 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Nov 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Oct 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Oct 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Jun 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Jun 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
May 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
May 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Apr 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Apr 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Mar 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Mar 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Feb 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Feb 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Dec 2009 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Dec 2009 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Nov 2009 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Nov 2009 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Oct 2009 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Oct 2009 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Sep 2009 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Sep 2009 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Leeds Catholic Post History

Newspaper for the Diocese of Leeds

.

May 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 1

May 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Whats inside Good Shepherd Celebration Pages 10/11 Celebration for the Pope Page 20 CATHOLIC POST THE NEWSPAPER FOR THE DIOCESE OF LEEDS MAY 2010 www.dioceseofleeds.org.uk www.catholicpost.org.uk A Gathering To Remember T he Cathedral Church of St Anne`s Leeds was full, leaving standing room only, with the Polish Community from all over the Diocese for a Solemn Mass on the evening of Thursday, April 22nd. In the presence of the Deputy Lord Mayor and his wife, Cllr Andrew and Diane Carter. Also present were Vice Consul Szymon Bialek from the Polish Consulate in Manchester and Bishop Walter Jagucki from the Lutheran Church in Great Britain. Bishop Arthur was the main celebrant along with Bishop David, all the Polish priests from the Diocese and a number of other priests from the Diocese. The Mass was to remember those who died in the crash at Smolensk on Saturday April 10th. ‘,The event was`, as the Bishop said, ‘,horrific and tragic news - ‘,Tragedies of this magnitude, which already add to the considerable suffering of the Polish nation, are not easy to comprehend and the hearts of so many and particularly your Christian brothers and sisters throughout the world not only share your sorrow and grief, but stand at your side in this difficult moment sharing with you that sense of numbness.` He mentioned Canon Bronislaw in particular a priest well known in the Leeds Diocese from his time working in Bradford and prayed for the stability of Poland at such a difficult time. In the congregation were members of the scouts, old comrades associations and children in national costume, these presented Bishop Arthur with a book at the end of the Mass and with flowers. More photos of A Gathering to Remeber can be found on page 13 CATHOLIC CARE (Diocese of Leeds) - Taking the Caring Church into the community

Read in full

Page 2

May 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 2 SCHOOLS NEWS S t Anthony’,s Catholic Primary School in Beeston was awash with colour as they gathered to celebrate the end of term. The day started with a visit from the Easter Bunny who helped to judge the annual Easter Bonnet and garden competition. Hats and gardens of all shapes and sizes were displayed in the school in this traditional Easter competition. The afternoon came to a close with the children contemplating the true meaning of Easter with a special Easter Liturgy. Different classes, through readings, song and liturgical dance represented each of the significant events in Holy Week. Through the thoughtful and reflective service, the Easter Story, from the last supper right up to the Resurrection was shared with the entire school as well as many parents and grandparents. Easter Celebrations at St Anthony’,s P upils and teachers are celebrating after Cardinal Heenan Catholic High School, Meanwood, Leeds, was given a glowing report by the inspection body Ofsted. Inspectors say that the attainment and progress of Cardinal Heenan pupils is “,significantly above the national average”,. 80% of Cardinal Heenan pupils passed five or more GCSE subjects at Grades A* to C in 2009. Inspectors praise standards of teaching in the school and congratulate pupils on their hard work and very good behaviour. The inspection report states that the school enjoys high levels of support from parents. Pupils’, spiritual and moral development is described by the inspectors as “,outstanding”,. Elizabeth Cox, Headteacher at Cardinal Heenan, is delighted. She said: “,This report is very pleasing. The inspectors recognise that high standards are achieved at Cardinal Heenan because pupils, teachers, parents and governors work together as a strong team.”, Glowing Report It is hardly surprising that the British Government of that time reacted with such haste when news of so-called “,Popegate”, was revealed, the mock-serious brainstormed suggestions for things that the Pope could do on his visit to Britain. Firstly, it showed at election time a hostility to Catholics beyond humour and that a lot of taxpayers’, time was being wasted on projects of doubtful use and merit: gone it seems are the almost military structures of the civil service. Secondly, it suggested that bubbling under the surface of the British establishment there is now a contempt for religious practice and belief, or an unwillingness to recognise it as a serious contribution to national public life. You may think that and you would not necessarily be paranoid if you did. Certainly the heavyweight reaction from the government suggests that someone had left the microphone on. But is it so bad? The suggestions for the Pope’,s visit were at schoolchild level, they were never going to be helpful and were not even witty. Beneath them lies not hostility towards Catholics but a fundamental lack of understanding about the deep significance to people of their religious faith, and of the essential differences in faiths. Faith to the brainstormers had become less a way of life, a motivation and a purpose, and more a hobby like Yoga or going to the gym, a reliable set of values, a quaint part of weddings- as that famous film showed- or a useful part of Theme Park UK Ltd. Faith must not impinge on the Government’,s agenda, nor ask awkward questions: if it does, then we must be reminded of the overriding need for an homogeneous equality. If this is a widespread attitude, not confined to “,junior civil servants”, who took the rap for it, then it is a timely warning for us. The Post Says …, Annual Pilgrimage to Croagh Patrick T he school, Holy Family departed on Maundy Thursday at 6am for its 17th annual pilgrimage to Croagh Patrick. 57 staff and students made their way across the Irish sea to a place called Westport in County Mayo. The students, who are in year 9, decided to take part in this fantastic school trip as part of the preparation for their Confirmation, the next stage of their catholic development. After the long journey the group attended the Mass of the last supper in their traditional green jumpers and were welcomed to Westport like old friends. After being told the story of St Patrick the group began their assent of the mountain on Good Friday. Croagh Patrick stands at 2553 feet high and takes approximately 2 -3 hours to climb. The aim was to assemble in the chapel at the top at 3pm. A wooden cross was carried by our strong boys all the way as a symbol of Jesus’, walk to his crucifixion. On Easter Saturday, as a further preparation for their confirmation, students took part in workshops and received the Sacrament of Reconciliation in Knock and visited the Holy Shrine to Our Lady. On Easter Sunday and Monday further Masses were attended in Ballintubber Abbey and Sligo Cathedral. There was also the opportunity for a visit to Ballina Town, an England vs Ireland football match (Holy Family vs Ballyglass) and a disco. Throughout the build up to the pilgrimage students have put time and effort into fitness training, bag packing and collecting sponsors. They gained a great deal during the Easter weekend including renewed friendships, personal reflection, spiritual growth and readiness for their forthcoming sacrament. Inspectors praised standards at Cardinal Heenan Catholic High School, Leeds. Our picture shows pupils, from left, Charlotte Columbine and Jamie Griffin.

Read in full

Page 3

May 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

YOUTH Page 3 Leeds Diocesan Youth Service ‘,All who are thirsty, come!’, (Rev 22:17) For more information about how to register for Leeds Diocesan Youth Service events, check out: www.leedsyouth.org.uk, contact Anna at the Youth Office: 0113 261 8058 / abcleedsdiocese@hotmail.com or join the “,Leeds Diocesan Youth Service”, Facebook group. Saturday 15th May St. Pio Day 1-6pm St. Pio Friary, Bradford Wednesday 19th May REVELATION For young people in Yrs 9-13 7-9pm Cathedral Hall, Leeds Friday 28th May WYD Payment Deadline Saturday 29th May Ceilidh World Youth Day Fundraiser Everyone Welcome! 7.30pm Immaculate Heart, Harrogate Road Friday 4th June “,Handmaids”, Evening of prayer for young women aged 18-30ish 7-9pm, St. Joseph’,s Convent, Hunslet Tuesday 8th June Lourdes Youth Section Staff Meeting 4.30pm TBC Wednesday 16th June REVELATION For young people in Yrs 9-13 7-9pm Cathedral Hall, Leeds Thursday 17th June Diocesan Youth Ministry Coordinator Meeting 10.30-12.30pm, Hinsley Hall Sunday 20th June Diocesan Corpus Christi Procession TBC Mount St Joseph Hinsley Hall Leeds Diocesan Youth Service Calendar YOUTH OFFICE NEWS ROUND-UP World Youth Price Drop Each parish received an encouraging email in the past few weeks informing everyone that the Leeds Diocesan pilgrimage to World Youth Day in Madrid has come down in price. The launch price for the pilgrimage was £,1200. We are now able to confirm that the price for the WYD 2011 pilgrimage is £,999! There are still places left on the pilgrimage so if you will be between the ages of 16 –, 30 in August 2011, then please contact the your parish priest, school chaplain or the Diocesan Youth Office for more information about how to sign up on the pilgrimage of a lifetime! Revelation –, Mission and Evangelisation Young people gathered in Cathedral Hall for the first post- Easter Revelation of 2010. Nicola Couttie led the evening which helped us to look further into the “,Come and See”, theme of Mission and Evangelisation. Both May and June’,s Revelation will take on these themes too. In May “,Rise Theatre Company”, will come and show us, through drama, what good and bad evangelisation can be, which will help us prepare for June’,s Revelation, when young people will take on the challenge of a mini mission in Leeds City Centre and in some of the diocesan schools. Young Leaders Move into Full Time Youth Ministry Leeds Diocesan Youth Service have been blessed over the years to watch many young people take on responsibility in their parishes, schools and universities. This year, however, we seem to have seen a record number of young adults who have decided to work in their Gap Year for youth ministry organisations. This coming September, young people from across the Diocese of Leeds will be joining Animate Youth Ministry Team (Liverpool), Castlerigg Manor Retreat House (Lancaster) to name but a few. There are still other young people who will be going to interview at these and other youth ministry centres across the UK. What a wonderful witness to the faith that has grown in them through their experience of Catholic schools, parish life, pilgrimages, diocesan events, retreats and ultimately the work of the Holy Spirit in this particular time of the Church in our country! sanctuary@waslingham sanctuary@waslingham is the title of the Youth 2000 Walsingham festival which will be held over the August bank Holiday weekend. For more information look on www,youth2000.org. There will be a group from the Diocese of Leeds travelling down to Walsingham for the festival, so if you and your friends are interested contact Anna at the Youth Office –, 0113 2618058. On the 28th May 2010 the church of the First Martyrs of Rome is celebrating it’, 75th anniversary. The First Martyrs Church has great historical/architectural significance in being the first round Catholic Church to be built in Great Britain. This was due to the founding parish priest, Mgr John O’,Connor. He was one of the great minds of his day and very forward thinking. The church was and continues to be quite controversial in style. We are delighted that to coincide with our Jubilee celebrations, for the first time, a biography of Mgr O’,Connor will be launched this May. This is the result of extensive research by the author Julia Smith and will be available in due course. This is a special time for us as a parish as we remember and celebrate the achievements of our fore-fathers and equally, as we look forward with hope to the future. A booklet is being prepared to mark the occasion reflecting the ever changing history of our parish. For example we are now very proud to be the joint parish of St Cuthbert and First Martyrs of Rome, something which would not have been envisaged in days gone by. A special Jubilee Mass has been arranged to mark the 75th Anniversary of the opening of the church on Friday 28th May at 7.30pm We are delighted that this Mass will be celebrated by our Bishop Emeritus Rt Rev David Konstant, and will be concelebrated by former parish priests. This Mass will mark the beginning of our Jubilee year for the parish. Many other events are being arranged to mark this occasion. Among the various events taking place are a series of ten monthly lectures, beginning in June this year and ending in March 2011. These lectures are designed to help us to reflect upon our Catholic faith enabling us to develop our own faith seeking as we seek ever greater understanding. I am delighted that I have been able to invite speakers entirely from our own Diocese of Leeds. We are very fortunate in having such gifted and committed priests and people who are able and willing to engage with us as we seek to grow in our faith. I am very grateful to all of our speakers who were very generous in responding to my request. I hope the series will prove to be a beneficial time of learning and faith reflection both for the parish and indeed the wider community. The series of lectures and dates are as follows, 75th Anniversary Celebrations - Jubilee Lectures FROM JUST £,299 R.G.R. MEMORIALS COLOUR CATALOGUE QUALITY MEMORIALS AT AFFORDABLE PRICES IN GRANITE, MARBLE &, STONE ALL PRICES INCLUDE DELIVERY &, FIXING Ogee top memorial 2’,6”, high Fully polished Black Granite, Delivered and Fixed for £,399 inc VAT FREE Tel: 0113 282 3888 43 High Ridge Park, Rothwell, Leeds LS26 0NL

Read in full

Page 4

May 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

‘,Home is a Holy Place’, is one of the themes of the Catholic Bishops’, Celebrating Family project (following Listening 2004). A Mass to mark the ‘,adoption’, into their new home of Family Life Ministry (FLM) by the Vicariate for Evangelisation, from the Vicariate for Christian Life, was concelebrated recently Mgr Peter Rosser Episcopal Vicar for Christian Life and Fr John Wilson Episcopal Vicar of Evangelisation in the chapel at the Diocesan Pastoral Centre. The ‘,move’, formalises existing practices and FLM work continues as before. The newly ‘,shaped’, Vicariate of Evangelisation was dedication to St Catherine of Siena, an excellent model, for all those in ministry, of faithfulness, humility and courage. The celebration was also a time of sadness at parting. Fr John reminded us that for Christians there is no good-bye (a quote from ‘,Monsieur Quixote). Coffee and home-made carrot cake was shared, bringing an appropriately homely touch to what was after all a family affair. We know home is a holy place because relationships in the family reflect God’,s relationship with us. This includes faithfulness, courage and humility as well as partings and new beginnings. ‘,For all that has been, thanks and praise, for all that will be, thanks and praise’, National Family Week begins on 31st May go to: www.nationalfamilyweek.co.uk Page 4 FAMILY LIFE / SIDELINES / MUSIC If I say that next Sunday’,s second reading is from the book of Revelation `I, John, saw a new heaven and a new earth ... the holy city, and the new Jerusalem...` you will know that I am writing before the election, so am unaware of which party (parties??) will gain power. Whether it is a country, a church or a choir, the issue of `who rules, and how` is always intriguing. `The Kingdom, the power and the glory` –, familiar words, and they took on a new meaning for me as I visited Westminster Cathedral on a sunny Sunday in April. It must be twenty years or more since I was last there, though of course, it appears depressingly often as a backdrop in TV news of abuse and cover- ups. As we walked into the plaza, I was struck by how much more imposing it seemed in real life. My wife and I arrived as the exit procession for the 10.30 High Mass was making its way down the aisle, and the vast building was filled with magnificent, powerful organ music. The congregation were standing until the celebrant passed them, then row on row, joining the throng surging towards the doors. And as the torrent of people swept out of the cathedral, there was also a flow of others coming in for the Mass at noon –, both congregations drawn from many nationalities. I felt it was a little glimpse of heaven –, one race, the human race. Regular readers will be wondering, OK, where`s the maggot in this particular apple? What musical faux pas upset me? None –, the music was spot on –, people joined in the responses, the organ played beautifully. But (you knew there would have to be a but...) while I could see why we heard the first reading in Spanish, and others in English, reflecting the languages of many worshippers, I could not quite see why the Mass parts were in a hotchpotch of English, Latin and Greek. Perhaps it was to assist the many foreign visitors, some grounded in London by the volcanic ash flying ban –, the `Latin is a universal language` line that I recall from primary school in the 1950s. I can imagine that there is a valid theological reason for it, and thus, my lurking suspicion that the Latin is merely a soothing souvenir from calmer times is entirely unworthy. Back in Leeds a week later, I joined a group singing peace songs to the Saturday shoppers. As a newcomer, I was struck by the instant creation of harmony and beauty –, aided by our practice setting, Holy Trinity Church, Boar Lane. The structure of the group is interesting –, there`s a leader, who had chosen the songs, distributed the sheets, and marshalled us through the practice beforehand, and the singers, who cheerfully accepted the imposed discipline, and in performance, kept to the plan quite a lot, but added their own harmonious variations. Did we do `Down by the river side`? Yes! Did we do `We shall overcome`? No! The leader thinks it`s a dirge, and I`m tempted to agree. The peace choir`s structure is quite different from the music group at St Joseph`s, where people take it in turns to choose the music, and rehearsals sometimes feature quite fierce discussions about what or how the hymns and Mass parts should be played. I am not sure all the members realise they are de facto members of an anarchist collective. By `anarchist`, I mean sensible, middle of the road anarchist, not those nasty Black Flag anarchists your mother warned you about, always being naughty at 1980`s peace demonstrations. The music group has no leader- each individual member is responsible for themselves, and if something needs doing, they do it. (Well, usually... I have apologised to the saint who did this week`s hymn-picking –, I was hanging back, hoping someone else would crack before I did....). Now this small exercise of self-responsibility, choice and power on some occasions fits uneasily in a hierarchical structure. At the end of today`s Mass, as we reached the middle of the exit hymn, `This is what Yahweh asks of you`, it was pointed out that the name Yahweh is not supposed to be in the Liturgy any more. (Google `Name of God CBCEW` for the 2008 press release). Ah well, we played it nicely, for the last time, possibly. I first voted in a general election in 1970, and throughout the subsequent 40 years, I have learnt that the less of my power and freedom I abdicate to the government, the better. By and large, they will do something silly or worse. Is this a precept to follow in church too? As we, in our small ways, work to build John`s `new Jerusalem`, should we follow our leaders blindly? Or perhaps, like the peace singers, should we add our own harmonious variations? Tim Devereux tim.devereux@ssg.org.uk For information about past and future WYCMN events, visit www.westyorkshirechurchmusic.org.uk Further reading, by the composer of `You are near`, Dan Schutte: http://www.danschutte.com/PDF_Files/No_More_Yahweh.pdf Musical Notes by Tim Devereux Family Life Ministry ‘,moves’, home S tarting recently in the upper room at St Patrick’,s church in Huddersfield, Linda Pennington and Breda Theakston delivere the new Home School Parish Workshop for the first time to a small but dedicated group from near and far (another diocese in two cases!) The workshop is to share ideas and resources that will help schools, parishes and parents in passing on the faith to our children. Developed from our earlier project but designed this time include new resources and national and other initiatives in evangelisation and faith formation, workshop participants are taken on a whirlwind tour of ideas and resources to help with baptism preparation, first reconciliation and first holy communion and confirmation as well as family relationship education and other programmes that support and help engage parents in our schools and parishes in between those special sacramental moments. We look at a range of ways of nurturing faith and relationships at every level, starting with Marriage Preparation, and including simple but effective faith formation resources like The Wednesday Word. This is designed from an original idea by Dannie Firth of St Austin’,s parish Wakefield and used now by Catholic Schools in many dioceses. Every week a Wednesday Word is sent home with pupils and helps their families stop for a few moments to think about the Gospel of the week in their own context. Also highlighted is the Home is a Holy Place DVD Resource Pack launched by the Catholic Bishops’, Committee for Marriage and Family Life and featuring Archbishop Vincent Nichols on the importance of learning to notice and appreciate how our homes really are holy places, even if they do not feel like it. Come along and see what we’,ve got and share your ideas too. Booking essential. Contact Angela Fieldhouse on admin@flm.org.uk for more information or to book your places. See Box for details of Workshop venues. Whatever Government is formed by the time this appears, its election will be remembered for the beginnings of leadership debates- in Presidential style.There is no doubt that Nick Clegg took to the format immediately and from the start did all the right things (that should be in capitals) such as looking at the camera, responding to the questioner rather than using the questions as spin-prompts and detaching himself from the Punch-and-Judy stuff. It took his rivals longer to latch on to this. Is it all a sign of a new approach to elections, sweeping away those costly rituals of leaflets and canvassing, and any sleepy local government which cannot organise…, a polling station in a primary school? Meanwhile, Bigotgate provided the chance for a feeding frenzy for the press, which seems to have made little difference to that election result. It is difficult not to have a little sympathy for Gordon Brown: instead of doing what he is paid for and running the country, he had to go through another ritual on the stump with the public: can this survive leadership debates? Selected people question him and he has to provide answers which show him in a soft focus as a caring yet strong leader, in touch with his public. It was hardly surprising that after days of this, he lost the will to deal with them, and is reduced- and there but for grace go we- to letting off steam when safely back in his car. Regrettably, Sky TV, cousin of the Sun, had failed to recover its expensive microphone after this visit, or at least turn it off, even when it was picking up a private conversation. Presumably the technician was reprimanded. So, it seems, we now must have parties working together. “,This is part of a world-wide trend,”, writes a Canadian friend where they are well used to this sort of thing: “,People are tired of government by those who forget they are public servants.”, +++++ Anyone who thinks a two-party system is a good thing just needs to look to the USA , where the whole process of deciding whether Democrats or Republicans shall do the next stint has become a long ritual, with huge funds as the price of entry. President Obama is seen by some Americans as neither of these options, but someone who is flirting with the horrors of socialism or even- I can hardly say it- a liberal. Such Americans do not seem entirely clear what a socialist really is, but don’,t want that sort around anyway. This seems to be the reaction in some quarters to President Obama’,s apparently reasonable ideas for introducing health care for all. It is really going too far, they suggest: the thought of paying, through taxes, for someone else’,s healthcare is too much, when those without it- they say- have clearly failed to grasp their opportunities in the land of the free, and pulled themselves up by their bootstraps- or so we must believe. Meanwhile, the Church in America finds itself in an ethical dilemma: whilst some groups like Daughter of Charity Sister Carol Keehan and the Catholic Health Association have supported the proposals, the US Bishops have become so anxious to secure guarantees over the question of abortion funding that they find themselves rejecting a measure which they would otherwise want to support. +++++ The Vatican has now moved very firmly over the scandals hitting the Legionaries of Christ, a large and powerful order founded in Mexico which has within its structures the Regnum Christi Movement and a number of other groups: it provided some early funding for the international Zenit News Agency and still provides some contributors: it operates schools, seminaries and universities in various countries, does youth work and runs websites like Catholic.net and newspapers. Now the Pope is to send a personal delegate to reform the organization. An interesting development and perhaps a decisive sign of the renewal that the Church is seeking. Benchmark Sidelines Home School Parish Workshop Marriage Preparation Presenters! Last chance to book your places for this day of reflection and refreshment at lovely Wentworth Castle. On Saturday 12th June, this day is for all Marriage Preparation Presenters in the Dioceses of Leeds and Hallam. Go to www.flm.org.uk for details.

Read in full

Page 5

May 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

COME AND SEE Page 5 COME AND SEE The evangelization of culture and inculturation of the Gospel O ur theme for this fifth year of Come &, See, is Mission and Evangelisation. Each month a quotation from a key document on Mission and Evangelisation will be included on this page, with a little information about the document it is taken from. The text below is taken from Ecclesia in Europa, written by Pope John Paul II in 2003. It is a Post- Synodal Apostolic Exhortation, written after the second synod of Bishops in Europe. The theme, which had emerged after the first synod in 1991, was that “,the Church has the urgent task of bringing the liberating message of the Gospel to the men and women of Europe”, and that the message is one of great hope. “,The proclamation of Jesus Christ must also reach contemporary European culture. The evangelization of culture must show that in today`s Europe too it is possible to live the Gospel fully as a path which gives meaning to existence. To this end, pastoral practice must undertake the task of shaping a Christian mentality in ordinary life: in families, in schools, in social communications, in cultural life, in the workplace and the economy, in politics, in leisure-time, in health and in sickness. What is needed is a calm critical assessment of the current cultural situation of Europe and an evaluation of the emerging trends and the more significant contemporary events and situations in the light of the centrality of Christ and of Christian anthropology. “,Today too, in recalling Christianity`s contributions to culture throughout the history of Europe, there is a need to demonstrate the Gospel approach, both theoretical and practical, to reality and to man himself. Furthermore, considering the great importance of the sciences and technological achievements in European culture and society, the Church, through both her institutes of study and in her practical pastoral initiatives, is called to be constructive in her approach to scientific knowledge and its applications, pointing out the insufficiency and inadequacy of notions inspired by a scientism which recognizes only experimental knowledge as objectively valid, and presenting ethical criteria which man possesses as inscribed in his very nature. “,An important part of any programme for the evangelization of culture is the service rendered by Catholic schools. There is a need to ensure the recognition of a genuine freedom of education and equal juridical standing between state schools and other schools. Catholic schools are sometimes the sole means by which the Christian tradition can be presented to those who are distant from it. I encourage the faithful involved in the field of primary and secondary education to persevere in their mission and to bring the light of Christ the Saviour to bear upon their specific educational, scientific and academic activities. In particular, greater recognition is due to the contribution made by Christians who conduct research and teach in universities: in their “,service to thought”, they hand down to the next generation the values of an intellectual tradition enriched by two thousand years of humanistic and Christian experience. Convinced of the importance of academic institutions, I also ask the various local Churches to promote an adequate pastoral care of the university community, favouring whatever corresponds to present cultural needs. “,Nor should we overlook the positive contribution made by the wise use of the cultural treasures of the Church. These can be a special element in the rekindling of a humanism of Christian inspiration. When properly preserved and intelligently used, these living testimonies of the faith as professed down the ages can prove a useful resource for the new evangelization and for catechesis, and lead to a rediscovery of the sense of mystery. “,At the same time new artistic expressions of the faith should be promoted through a constant dialogue with those engaged in the arts. The Church in fact needs art, literature, music, painting, sculpture and architecture, because she “,must make perceptible, and as far as possible attractive, the world of the spirit, of the invisible, of God”,, and because artistic beauty, as a sort of echo of the Spirit of God, is a symbol pointing to the mystery, an invitation to seek out the face of God made visible in Jesus of Nazareth.”, O n Tuesday 4th May the Watoto Children’,s Choir from Uganda, visited All Saints Catholic College, Huddersfiels to perform a concert. The performance was of African dance and traditional African songs. The event began at 11.30am and was followed by Fairtrade refreshments. The Mayor of Huddersfield, Councillor Julie Stewart –, Turner, local councilors and local primary and secondary heads in the area were also there. The Watoto Charity was set up by Gary and Marilyn Skinner in 1994 to try to make a difference in Uganda, Africa. Watoto is a non profit charity that provides holistic, residential care for orphaned and vulnerable children, with the core vision to rescue a child, raise a leader and rebuild a nation. Through the generosity of people from around the world, Watoto has given life and HOPE to many children. ‘,Villages of Hope’, with homes, schools and medical clinics have been built. Baby Watoto was introduced in 2007. Today, more than 1,400 children have hope and a future, growing up with families that love and value them. Some of them have already moved on and are leading productive, independent lives. Many of them are attending university. A select number of Year 7 pupils have formed a Watoto steering group, these made invitations for the event, posters and friendship bracelets for the 22 children that form the Watoto Choir. Year 7 –, 9 and the Humanities department have been busy raising funds to contribute the building of a new school and the purchase of equipment for a village of Hope in Gulu, Uganda. Fundraising has consisted of Disco’,s, raffles and bag packing. With A Song From Africa

Read in full

Page 6

May 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 6 DEACONS NEWS Deacons Diary F r Benjamin Griffiths, who is Parish Priest of Our Lady of Lourdes, Haworth, has written to the Post recently about the unfortunate Fire at St Mary’,s Community Centre in Halifax and the effect it has had on the Charity (Take) Hope Yorkshire, of which he is Chairman. The Administrator of the Charity writes: ‘, On Sunday 14 March 2010 at 10.45, a fire caused by an electrical fault in an upstairs room, was discovered to have broken out in our storage facility at St Mary’,s Community Centre in Halifax. On the same day, we had completed the loading list for our next aid lorry and had taken the list to the Ukrainian Club in Bradford for translation. The Trustees were excited at the prospect of 18 months hard work collecting, boxing, weighing and listing the items finally being on the way to our projects in Ukraine over the next few weeks. Unfortunately, the majority of the goods were destroyed in the fire on Sunday. This included the 400 boxes of clothes, shoes, toiletries, blankets, sheets, craft items, toys and cleaning products that had been donated to Take Hope by its many generous supporters. We also lost (among other things) baby prams, table tennis table, computers, sewing and knitting machines, electric organ and a range cooker. We have been in contact with the local media to spread an understanding of the deeper loss as a result of the fire and hope and trust that this exposure will result in a speedy response in our hour of need. In the mean time we remain positive in the knowledge that we have 100 bikes stored elsewhere and are already starting to receive offers of help in replacing the lost items. As a result of this support, we are already working to build something better from the ashes of the past.’, Take Hope (Yorkshire) formerly Convoy of Hope, was started by Andrew Mcveigh in 1995. With a small team of dedicated helpers this small organisation started taking aid to the former Yugoslavian states, Romania and the Ukraine. In 2000 major flooding occurred in the Ukraine and Andrew answered a call for help. While there, Andrew realised the plight of the people, particularly the old, handicapped and orphaned. Since then Take Hope has taken aid to these people on a regular basis. Seeing an ongoing need and with a small band of dedicated helpers Take Hope became a registered charity on the 25 March 2008. It Supports Perechrysta Orphanage (120 social and natural orphan children) by providing living necessities - clothing, shoes, toiletries, bedding, beds, and social interaction within their community. Provision of second hand computers for basic IT education. It Supports St Theresa Therapy Centre for disabled children with monetary donations and provision of basic therapy consumables - oils for massage, exercise bikes, second hand computers, etc. Wheel chairs are a luxury in Ukraine and our last consigment of wheel chairs were distributed within 3 months. If you have a wheel chair you no longer require, it will be gratefully accepted! This is the only centre of its type in the region. It Supports Caritas Soup Kitchen in Vinogradiv, to provide up to 200 meals daily to poor and needy families, delivered on a ‘,Meals on Wheels’, basis, by bicycle. It has Delivered and distributed Fire Fighting equipment kindly donated by West Yorkshire Fire and Rescue to the region’,s Fire Brigade in Vinogradiv, to help protect the local communities, as the existing equipment is very basic and scarce. To find out more about their work then visit www.take-hope.org.uk or contact Fr B Griffiths at benjamin895@btinternet.com or ring him on 01535 643240. They are always looking for supporters to help them in this important work. Charity donations destroyed in fire NEW PRINCIPAL CATHOLIC CHAPLAIN FOR RAF F ather Paul Owens has been inducted as Principal Roman Catholic Chaplain to the Royal Air Force. The ceremony took place at a Mass at RAF Halton in Buckinghamshire. The Principal Chaplain is the most senior Catholic Chaplain in the RAF and is also a Vicar General for eh Bishopric of the Forces. Fr Paul, who has the rank of Wing Commander, was inducted by Bishop Richard Moth, Bishop of the Forces who said “,At the present time, there has never been a greater need for forces chaplains”, Fr Paul, a native of Halifax and a priest of the Diocese of Leeds, joined the RAF as a chaplain in 1990. He has served in Germany, Cyprus, Saudi Arabia, Kuwait and the Falkland Islands as well as various RAF postings in the UK. Father Paul is a keen supporter of Leeds United and enjoys cooking, good food, good wine, travel and the opera. The Royal Air Force provides opportunities for recreation but there is one experience Fr Paul will not be repeating: “,Soon after I joined the RAF, I was almost put off flying for life when I went up for a glider flight with an experienced glider pilot. When the whether changed from beautiful clear skies to thunder and lightening, the pilot tried to settled me down by saying in all his time of gliding he had never experienced such an event. It did not have the effect of calming me down,…,.I was glad when we landed and have never been up in a glider since! Speaking of his RAF service, Fr Paul said “,It is hard to believe that it is some 20 years since I joined the Royal Air Force Chaplains Branch, the time seems to have gone so quickly. That is in some way due to the varied and diverse nature of the work. As chaplains we perform the same kind of pastoral and sacramental work as any other priest, but we do it in a very unique secular environment, that brings with it its own pressures and demands. I have thoroughly enjoyed that diverse nature of chaplaincy, whether it be in a parish type ministry on a main operating base or a training post with young trainees or on deployed operations. It is a lifestyle that I would recommend to any priest who might feel able to do it, and in the present climate and with a reducing number of catholic chaplains, it is a challenge I hope others will feel able and willing to take upon themselves.", When the time comes for Fr Paul to retire from the RAF he will return to the Diocese of Leeds “,I will look forward to returning to a parish and something I will have waited a long time for –, a black Labrador dog! N ews this month: the Bishop has appointed Fr Paul Fisher to be Director of Deacons. Fr Paul is at present Parish Priest of St Joseph Batley Carr and Episcopal Vicar for Outreach. Hopefully, Deacons will be getting together with him soon. People inside and outside the church often ask where the idea for the present diaconate- deacons- came from and how deacons came to be a part of the structure of the present-day church. The “,idea”, is of course very old, and there are references in the New Testament to the appointment of men to be deacons and the existence of deacons. There is that famous passage in the first letter to Timothy (probably from Paul) that begins “,Deacons, likewise, are to be men worthy of respect, sincere, not indulging in much wine, and not pursuing dishonest gain…,.”,. Over the coming hundreds of years the diaconate ebbed and flowed within the church: most recently it was a movement in Germany which gradually grew over a good many years and leads us, surprisingly, to Dachau Concentration Camp, where prisoners, including priests, were discussing not death but renewal within the church. How could the church be a better influence against the tragedies of the first half of the twentieth century: war, totalitarianism, economic depression- all feeding on each other? The model of the church as servant seemed so important, and a sacramental diaconate- ordained deacons- could be a constant reminder of this role of the church as servant, always promoting a sense of service in the church. These ideas survived the war and the camps in Germany and in the early 1950’,s diaconate circles of lay people were formed. This movement was in turn picked up by important theologians like Karl Rahner, and encouragement by Pope Pius XII and interest from many Bishops led to the renewal of the diaconate being firmly “,on the table”, at the deliberations of the Second Vatican Council The vital approval for the renewal of the diaconate to move forward came in 1964 and specifically in the Constitution on the Church Lumen Gentium of the second Vatican Council, a document well worth reading on its considerable merits, apart from here in paragraph 29 in which the Council expressed the desire to renew the diaconate: “,strengthened by sacramental grace they are dedicated to the people of God, in conjunction with the bishop and his body of priests, in the service of the liturgy, of the Gospel, and of works of charity”,. We can perhaps look a little further beyond that next time. Written with the valuable assistance of 101 Questions and Answers on Deacons (Dcn Dr William T Ditewig, Paulist Press) Fr James Caulfield, Fr Paul Owen, Bishop Richard, Fr Bob Halshaw.

Read in full

Page 7

May 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

VOCATIONS Page 7 Classified Advertising Vocations 1. Bradford Poles make special donation Parishioners of Our Lady of Czestochowa in Bradford have donated £,250 to the diocesan priests` training fund in memory of their former parish priest, Canon Bronislaw Gostomski, who was killed with Polish President Lech Kaczynski and 94 others in the air disaster at Smolensk airport on 10th April. Bishop Roche thanked them for their generosity at last month’,s special Mass at Leeds Cathedral to commemorate the crash victims. Their gift ",went to the heart of the life of the Church,", he told a packed congregation, which included civic dignitaries and members of the Polish community from throughout Yorkshire. Canon Gostomski, who was 61, was in Bradford between 1990 and 2003, during which time he became a much-loved figure among all catholics in the city. He was also well known for his interfaith work with local Muslims. Upon leaving Bradford, he became parish priest of St Andrew Bobola in Shepherds Bush, a post which he held until his death. He was Chaplain to the last Polish President-in-exile. He was also a keen fisherman. The plane which crashed was carrying key members of Polish society to an event to mark the 70th anniversary of the Katyn massacre, when Soviet troops killed 22,000 army officers, academics and others. 2. Responding to students’, needs At least a third of students in US seminaries have experienced a recent conversion to the faith, a leading expert on priestly formation told a conference in London, which was attended by representatives from Leeds Diocese. The majority of these had been baptised Catholics but had ceased practising before having a significant prayer experience, for example on a pilgrimage to Medjugorje, or meeting a charismatic priest. Sister Katarina Schuth osf, who has over 25 years experience in seminary formation and who has written extensively on the subject, contrasted this group with those who were “,deeply rooted in their faith.”, Members of this group had been raised in practising Catholic families and were highly motivated and were usually the most ready to embrace the routine of seminary life. About thirty years ago, most seminarians would have belonged to this group, but this was no longer the case, she told delegates at the conference “,Forming Priests for the Future”, at Allen Hall Seminary in London. Those who had experienced recent conversion had to confront particular challenges, she noted. “,One might expect that frequent transitions and moves would enhance flexibility and make change seem the order of the day. Instead it can lead to a kind of rigidity born of a desire for security and stability,”, she said. “,Their relative lack of religious background and knowledge of the Church’,s history can make them vulnerable, afraid of disturbing their newfound knowledge and losing the security they feel they have gained. This attitude turns into perfectionism, a sense of having things exactly the way they see it and want it kept.”, She added: “,The concern of most faculty is not these students are conservative, a characteristic common among many younger people, but rather that they tend to be rigid, overly scrupulous and fearful.”, Sister Schuth led a discussion among the 35 delegates, who included Leeds Diocesan Episcopal Vicar for Clergy, Fr David Smith, and Vocations Director, Fr Paul Grogan, on the best ways of encouraging the human, intellectual, spiritual and pastoral formation of students. The discussion focused in particular on ways of helping seminarians to grow in celibate chastity. 3. Holy Week in Valladolid PIC OF MICHAEL KUJACZ ATTACHED The stupendous Holy Week processions in Valladolid were enjoyed by Vocations Director Fr Paul Grogan last week during his annual visit to see the men from Leeds who are taking part in the propaedeutic year at the city`s Royal English College. As well as participating in the Sacred Triduum in the College, he went out with the three young men from our diocese to see exquisite statues borne aloft on large floats, accompanied by thousands of local people in striking costumes, with brass and percussion accompaniment. Bishop David McGough, auxiliary Bishop in Birmingham, presided at the liturgies during the week, which were also attended by the staff and students of Oscott College who were visiting the College. During an address at the end of Easter Sunday lunch, Mgr Michael Kujacz, the Rector of the Royal English College, held up to the students the example of the Jesuit priest, Fr Robert Persons, who founded the College and whose quattrocentenary is being celebrated this year. Fr Persons worked tirelessly during his era, travelling widely across the continent and in England to promote the Church`s mission in his homeland, Mgr Kujacz said. He noted that each generation of priests experienced particular challenges: when he was a curate, his first parish priest in Oldham had told him of how during his life as a priest some locals had thrown stones at Catholics when they had tried to process out of doors, but after some years the animosity vanished and the processions were greeted by applause instead. Christ who called men to priesthood always gave them the strength to do his work in the particular historical circumstances in which they lived, he said. 4. Keeping young enquirers safe Diocesan Safeguarding Coordinator, Suzanne Mitchell, has met with Vocations Director Fr Paul Grogan to audit current practice in the management of the youth discernment group. As a result new forms have been introduced and existing procedures have been made more thorough. In addition, they have agreed to meet annually so that Fr Grogan can give an account of all the activities which have taken place and receive appropriate advice. The next meeting of the youth discernment group is on Friday 14th to Saturday 15th May. It will be an overnight pilgrimage to the Shrine of Our Lady of Mount Grace, Osmotherley. A minibus will depart from Wheeler Hall at 6pm and return to Wheeler Hall at approximately 7pm on the Saturday. Participants will stay at the youth hostel in the village and attend the Vigil Mass at 4pm. The following event is an overnight trip to Scarborough on Friday 18th and Saturday19th June. Participants will have supper at St Peter’,s Rectory in Scarborough, stay in the town’,s youth hostel, the following day they will have Mass, a walk on the coast, a visit to the Sealife Centre and a fish and chips lunch. The group is open to any young Catholic man aged between 13 and 18 who wishes to find out more about the priesthood. Any young man who is interested should contact Fr Grogan who will then contact his parents. 5. Trip to Lindisfarne Men who feel that the Lord may be calling them to serve as priests are invited to make a first step in discernment by joining in a special weekend at St Cuthbert’,s College, Ushaw beginning on Friday 28th May. On the Saturday participants will go on a trip to Lindisfarne, the island off the coast of Northumberland which St Aidan used as his monastic base in his evangelisation of the north in the seventh century. During the weekend they will listen to some talks and pray and socialise with the seminarians. A minibus will leave from Wheeler Hall, Leeds at 4pm on the Friday and return on the Sunday for about 4pm. This weekend, which is free, would be ideal for somebody who was thinking of perhaps applying for entry into seminary in September 2011. Those who are interested are invited to contact Fr Grogan. 6. The importance of the Eucharist Mgr William Steele is to draw out the link between priestly life and the Eucharist in a talk to the next meeting of the discernment group on Friday 21st May at the Chaplaincy of Leeds Trinity in Horsforth. He will be speaking on a phrase written by Pope Benedict in his Letter to proclaim the Year for Priests, summing up the thought of St John Mary Vianney, namely “,The fervour of a priest’,s life depends entirely upon the Mass.”, The group is open to any man over 17 who wishes to explore the possibility of the priesthood. It meets at 7pm for a Holy Hour, during which there is the possibility of sacramental confession and which finishes with Evening Prayer. After the talk there is a meal and lifts home are provided. 7. Vocations Preaching Mission 22nd/23rd May: St Patrick’,s, Elland 5th/6th June: St Columba’,s, Halifax 12th/13th June: St Augustine’,s, Leeds NATURAL FAMILY PLANNING SERVICE (YORKSHIRE) For free, confidential tuition in the symptothermal method of natural family planning telephone: Leeds (0113) 260 0844 The N.F.P. Service is sponsored by the Diocese of Leeds LEEDS CATHOLIC MARRIAGE CARE Marriage isn’,t always easy —, Counselling can help For an appointment in confidence, with an understanding and experienced listener, please telephone: LEEDS 0113 261 8045 HUDDERSFIELD 01484 422523 A Relationship Counselling Service Wanted for the Missions Large Statues (Even damaged ones), old vestments, pictures, church fittings, rosaries, prayer books, etc. Please ring Mr. B. Ferris KSC, 102 Moor St, Earlsdon, Coventry CV5 6EY Tel: 02476 676986

Read in full

Page 8

May 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

PAGE 8 INTERFAITH “,Meeting God in Friend and Stranger”, Fostering Respect and mutual Understanding between the Religions This “,Teaching Document of the Catholic Bishops of England and Wales on Dialogue with People of other Religions”, launched by Archbishop Kevin Nichols on April 23rd. was launched in our own diocese on April 28th 2010 by Bishop Arthur Roche. It is available as a CTS publication and from the contact below (£,5.95). The Diocesan Interreligious Relations Commission is offering an “,Open Evening”, to explore the teaching contained in the document on Tuesday May 18th at Hinsley Hall (7 for 7.30 until 9 pm) ALL WELCOME. Any parish, school or Catholic organisation wishing to explore the document in whatever detail they wish –, please contact David Jackson 01274 581094 or email: dandt55@btinternet.com SHARING TREASURES Each April, on the great limestone buttresses which climb to the top ridge of Pen-y-ghent –, the beautiful purple saxifrage (saxifrage oppositifolia), one of the first mountain plants to appear, flowers in lovely trailing sheets. It grows in crevices, on scree and small ledges and in cracks –, to be treasured all the more because of its inaccessibility and apparently hostile environment. To make not too fanciful a comparison –, the treasures of interreligious dialogue are often only revealed to those willing to make the effort to enter what might appear to be inhospitable, difficult ground. But the rewards are great. Ten years in the making, the Bishops of England and Wales significant teaching document on inter- religious dialogue appeared in April. Our own diocese will now play its part in helping to make its teachings known and acted on. We are well placed to do so, since we live and work alongside so many who follow the major world religions in this area of Yorkshire. The basic theme which runs through the whole of the document is that God’,s love is universal and therefore soaks through our common humanity, like a broad river which we can use to navigate into our human but God- given diversity. God calls us to this dialogue of love which began with creation, was focused through the covenant of the Old Testament and which culminated in the Word of dialogue incarnate, Jesus Christ. So we are enriched by finding rays of that one Truth –, the love of God at work in all humanity. Hence, as the document teaches, inter-religious dialogue is no longer to be regarded as an “,optional extra”, but is to be part of our shared responsibility as baptised evangelists. What do we mean by being enriched by what is good and true in other religions? Those who were able to attend Bradford Cathedral one evening in late April listened as two women talked of their deepest and most treasured beliefs. A Christian spoke of what Jesus meant to her, a Muslim spoke of what Muhammad meant to her. It was very moving to listen as these two friends spoke in trust of what they each held most dear. It was like eavesdropping on two women opening their jewellery boxes and with great reverence and care describing how that necklace and this brooch was dear to them and what memories and feelings were attached to each piece. Too often we may allow our total dedication to the beauty and truth we find in Christ, instead of opening us up to revere and appreciate the treasuries of others, where they find the love of God, to close us off from that exploration. It need not. Our love of Christ ought to open us up to the spiritual treasuries of others. It is the experience of Christians who enter into dialogue with those of other faiths that they find there ‘,a ray of the one Truth’, and ‘,seeds of the Word’, and are thereby enriched. (Para 62) Members of the diocesan Interreligious Relations Commission offer an introduction to the contents of the Bishops’, document on 18 May from 7 to 9 pm at Hinsley Hall –, all are welcome. We offer then to come and explore the document with any parish, school or organisation in any manner most useful –, an hour, an evening, a day or any arrangement in between. We can discuss the arrangement which would suit you best beforehand. We guarantee it will require much less effort than climbing up Pen-y-ghent and the rewards will be different but as enriching as discovering the purple saxifrage! Feasts and Festivals 19 May: Shavout (Jewish): The start of the two day festival marking the time when the harvest was taken to the Temple. Also known as the feast of Weeks. 23 May Declaration of the Bab (Baha’,i): The Bab (“,Gate”,) forerunner of Baha’,u’,llah, the founder of the Baha’,i faith. His mission was to prepare the world for the coming of Baha’,u’,llah –, he announced this on May 22nd 1844. 23 May: Birthday of Guru Amar Das (1479 –, 1574 (Sikh): The Third Sikh Guru. 27 May: Wesak or Buddha day –, the most important of Buddhist festivals, it celebrates Buddha’,s birth and for some Buddhists his enlightenment and death. 29 May: Ascension of Baha’,u’,llah (Baha’,i): The anniversary of his death in 1892 near Akka in Israel. 16 June: Martyrdom of Guru Arjan Dev the fifth Sikh Guru and first martyr. He compiled the Sikh sacred book the Guru Granth Sahib. C ardinal Cormac Murphy-O’,Connor was the main celebrant at a Mass which took place in St Austin’,s Church, Wakefield on Friday 18 March 2010. Bishop David Konstant joined the Cardinal and special guests at the Mass included the Dean of Wakefield Cathedral, the Very Revd Jonathan Greener, members of the Cathedral Chapter and the Bishop of Pontefract, the Rt Revd Tony Robinson. The previous evening the Cardinal had been the guest of the Bishop of Wakefield, the Rt Revd Stephen Platten. They had taken part in an extremely well attended public debate on “,Authority and the Church”, in Wakefield Cathedral. At the Mass, celebrated on St Joseph’,s Day, the Cardinal had specially asked for Eucharistic Prayer 1. He recalled the circumstances of a bishop, held a prisoner for many years in Communist Eastern Europe, who prayed constantly to St Joseph and whose intercession had helped him survive these terrible times. He took the opportunity when later meeting Pope Paul V1 to ask for St Joseph’,s name to be included specifically in the Mass and the Pope granted this very special request. After the Mass the Cardinal met members of the congregation where his warmth and friendliness became very apparent. Fr T Swinglehurst said, “,The Cardinal’,s visit was a great encouragement to us all and it was a delight to welcome him to Wakefield.”, The Cardinal visits Wakefield L ike many of the Catholic Schools across the diocese, Holy Family High School, Keighley responded with great compassion and generosity when the earthquake struck Haiti. The students raised £,2,500 for the CAFOD Haiti appeal. Each year, students in year 13 organise a concert for CAFOD and they were very disappointed this year, when it had to be cancelled because of the snow. However, they were able to rearrange it for the Friday before half term and the event was enjoyed by the whole school. The whole school contributed to the appeal in one way or another. For example some children from year 7 helped to pack bags at the local Sainsbury supermarket. In my role as School Volunteer with CAFOD it was a privilege to visit school to receive the donation and also to share with the students the ways in which their fundraising has helped the people of Haiti. Pam Lloyd, CAFOD School Volunteer Holy Family’,s Concert for Haiti

Read in full

Page 9

May 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

O nce again the CAFOD Leeds team wants to thank parishes and schools in our diocese for journeying with us during Lent through prayer, fasting and almsgiving. Many people were faithful to the ‘,give it up’, challenge throughout Lent, turning wine into water or biscuits into bicycles with their donations. David Kanyamanza, a health worker from Kigali, Rwanda describes the difference your support makes. “,If you love, then you will be loved in return.”, David, Rwanda David Kanyamanza is a trusted friend to orphaned children all over Kigali, the capital of Rwanda. As a community volunteer, David regularly visits the homes of children who have been left to fend for themselves after losing their parents to HIV or genocide. He is very popular with the children, not just because he helps with practical things like food, medical care and clothing, but also because David brings a little happiness into their otherwise difficult lives. The children get to choose which community volunteer they would like to visit them, so David’,s popularity is proof that he is doing a great job. However, his special role in the lives of so many children is only possible because of the bicycle he received from CAFOD. Without his trusty wheels, David simply wouldn’,t be able to make so many visits, especially as he is now 74. As he says: “,This bicycle is essential in helping me reach out to orphans in Kigali.”, The gift of a bicycle to volunteers like David can help them play a vital role in the lives of many orphaned children. CAFOD PAGE 9 CAFOD’,S Lenten Journey Risen Christ, when darkness overwhelms us may your dawn beckon. When fear paralyses us may your touch release us. When grief torments us may your peace enfold us. When memories haunt us may your presence heal us. When justice fails us may your anger ignite us. When apathy stagnates us may your challenge renew us. When courage leaves us may your spirit inspire us. When despair grips us may your hope restore us. And when death threatens us may your resurrection light lead us. Amen. Annabel Shilson-Thomas/CAFOD To download more prayers or worship materials or to sign up to weekly email reflections, visit cafod.org.uk/worship This photo was taken in the UK by a primary school child taking part in the ‘,Picture my World’, project. Credit: Doll2 Resurrection Light J oin Team CAFOD in the 2010 Great North Run on September 19 and make a difference to people living in some of the world’,s poorest communities. Last year more than 30 people from Leeds Diocese ran for CAFOD, including Paula Jones and Jane Clegg from St. Joseph’,s Castleford, both of whom received wonderful support from the parish Why don’,t you take on the world’,s famous and most popular half marathon route in Newcastle? It always delivers on being a fantastic day with an atmosphere second to none. We’,re asking people to commit to raising £,275 minimum in sponsorship that will go towards supporting our work with some of the world’,s poorest communities. Given the massive impact of the financial crisis hitting the world’,s poor hardest, we really do need to ensure that together we raise the most we can. Apply today and whether you have gained a place in the ballot or through CAFOD directly, we will provide: ·, •, A CAFOD running vest •, Training schedules and top tips •, A fundraising pack, sponsorship forms and your own fundraising web page •, Team CAFOD e-newsletters •, Lots of support and hospitality on the day! Running and fundraising for CAFOD really provides much inspiration, and it is incredible what many of you achieve having taken that first step and signed up to the race Visit cafod.org.uk/gnr or contact Helen Hinde at hhinde@cafod.org.uk or on 020 77337900 Great North Run 2010 H ave you ever wanted to find out more about CAFOD’,s work on the ground and how it impacts on the lives of people in the communities where your generous donations are used? If the answer is yes, then from now, you and your parish will be able to do so. CAFOD is offering the opportunity for your parish community or group to enter into a relationship with one of our overseas partners to learn more about the impact your generosity is making in the lives of people in specific communities in El Salvador, Cambodia, Rwanda, Brazil, Ethiopia and Bangladesh. We asked a number of our key partners in these countries if they would be willing to enter into a more in depth relationship with parishes around England and Wales. Their response was one of great enthusiasm. Our Cambodia partner is Salvation Centre working with the Samrong Mean Chey community a very poor displaced community living in temporary shelter near the capital of the Cambodia capital, the work is around promoting the need for permanent homes and providing counselling on HIV &, AIDS. In El Salvador our partner is the Jesuit Development Service working together with a rural community Puentecitos (Little Bridges) providing training in farming and growing nutritious crops to support them making a living on the outskirts of San Salvador. Our Brazilian partner is APOIO working in Sao Paolo with families and young people, contributing to reducing violence, promoting respect for human rights and working to secure safe housing. The Adigrat Diocese Catholic Services in Ethiopia is our partner working with the Bera community in North East Tigray with a very poor community living in a drought affected area, developing local agriculture and managing crops and developing new ways to make a living. Our Partner Caritas Bangladesh works with a community helping them to adapt ways of making a living in areas prone to flooding by seas and rivers. In Rwanda or partner Avega is trying to help the community in Kigali East, a community of widows to deal with the aftermath of conflict and genocide. They all want you to know more about them but they also want to hear about you and life in your community. So it’,s a real opportunity to go on a journey together. When you get involved in Connect2: you will learn more about the lives, hopes and struggles of particular people in a community you choose and how their lives change over the next few years. And through photographs of special events, cards and stories you can share something of your own parish and community life. If your parish or group would like to explore the idea of Connecting2: one of CAFOD’,s partners and the communities they work with, please contact Margaret or Joanne in the Leeds office 0113 2759302 email leeds@cafod.org.uk and we will be in touch. We look forward to hearing from you. Introducing Connect2: getting closer to CAFOD’,s work

Read in full

Page 10

May 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 10 GOOD SHEPHERD Good Shepherd Keighley schools drum in Rainbow Nation L eeds Cathedral vibrated to the sounds and songs of a Rainbow Nation as hundreds of pupils from all over the diocese colourfully marked the Good Shepherd celebration with Bishop Arthur. The catholic primary schools from Keighley - St. Josephs, Our Lady of Victories and St. Anne’,s –, combined in a fine example of partnership and unity to lead the rainbow nation celebration that featured a samba band as well as young people involved in the impressive Diocese of Leeds schools singing programme. The theme was developed by prayers and poems that reflected the rich diversity of our communities and our differences that make us special and unique. Mark Wiggin, Chief Executive of Catholic Care told the pupil representatives present that 99 years ago a small group of mums had sat down with their Bishop to talk about how they could raise money to help the poor children of Leeds Diocese. The answer they came up with was called the Good Shepherd Fund. Today, the money raised goes to support some of the neediest and vulnerable children in our community who still need our help and our prayers. Mark Wiggin added, “,A Good Shepherd is someone who will help you when you get lost, someone who cares for you, someone who loves you…, Your teachers are GOOD SHEPHERDS Your parents are GOOD SHEPHERDS Your Bishop Arthur is a GOOD SHEPHERD Each one of you is a GOOD SHEPHERD And above all Jesus is the GOOD SHEPHERD …,because he loves each one of us.”, Bishop Arthur congratulated personally each school representative, thanking them for raising over £,36,000 on the day which will over the next few weeks rise to an impressive £,50,000 plus. Before ending the service with a blessing he thanked mark Wiggin for his work with Catholic care and wished him well as he will shortly take up a new post with the neighbouring Diocese of Salford.

Read in full

Page 11

May 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

GOOD SHEPHERD Page 11 GUARANTEED WEEKLY PRIZES , 1st Prize £,2,000 , 2nd Prize £,200 , 3rd Prize £,50 , Plus 150 prizes of £,5 each WEEKLY PRIZES Entry only £,1 per week - Drawn every Friday INTERESTED? Please return the coupon below to: The Lottery Office, Wheatfields Hospice, Grove Road, Leeds, LS6 2AE. For more information telephone 0113 278 1500 NOW St Gemma’,s and Wheatfields Lottery If you want to help JOIN NOW Please make cheques payable to: ST GEMMA’,S &, WHEATFIELD LOTTERY Mr/Mrs/Miss/Ms/Other Name .................................................................... Address ...................................................................................................... .................................................................................................................... .................................................................................................................... Postcode:................................... Tel: ......................................................... PLEASE TICK PREFERRED PAYMENT METHOD AND RETURN TO THE LOTTERY OFFICE  CHEQUE –, Minimum £,10 (to be sent now)  STANDING ORDER  CASH COLLECTION Visa/Switch Telephone 0113 278 1500 CALL NOW! We can all be winners £,1 gives you the chance to win £,2,000 GIFT VOUCHERS NOW ON SALE Winners are automatically paid by post each week. All profits shared equally between St Gemma’,s &, Wheatfields Hospices. Registered with the Gambling Commission for Great Britain LOTTERY NEW MEMBERS’, FORM

Read in full

Page 12

May 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 12 GATHERING TO REMEMBER A Gathering to Remember , From page one O n the evening of Wednesday 5th May students from schools across the Wakefield Metropolitan District congregated at St Wilfrid’,s Catholic High School to enjoy an evening designed to celebrate sporting achievement. From its humble beginnings in 1978 this has become a major event in the local sporting calendar and at this, the 32nd, Presentation Evening of the WMD Schools’, Sports Federation St Wilfrid’,s played host to over 20 schools. Following an opening welcome from Mrs Viv Buckley, Chairperson of WMDSSF, every child who has represented Wakefield for the first time was presented with a badge by Mrs Elaine McHale, Corporate Director Family Services and President of the WMDSSF. Actor Chris Walker was the guest speaker and school teams and individuals who have gained national honour received a Special Award from him. This was indeed a wonderful celebration of local youngsters achievements. Wakefield District Schools Celebrate

Read in full

Page 13

May 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

POLISH NEWS 13 Commemorative Plaque in Leeds O n February the 22nd 2009, the senior members of the Polish Scouting Movement –, ZHP pgK (outside Poland) took a pilgrimage to Czę,stochowa in Poland. A plaque in thanksgiving for 100 years Polish scouting was deposited during this pilgrimage in the sanctuary of Our Lady of Czę,stochowa. This ceremony started the preparation of our organization for the 100th Anniversary of Polish Scouting in 2010. A copy of this plaque is now touring the whole of England and during the month of April, the plaque has been in Yorkshire. The plaque arrived in Leeds during a religious conference on the 7th of April. The brownies, cubs, brownies and scouts in Leeds met during Holy Mass on the 11th to pray not only for those in the air crash which killed the polish president Lech Kaczynski and our former president in Exile, and scout leader Ryszard Kaczorowski but also to thank Our Lady of Czestochowa for her protection over our association. The plaque was taken to the Cathedral on the 22nd of April during Mass celebrated by Bishop Arthur Roche, in memory of those in the Smolensk disaster. Bishop Arthur Roche received the commemorate badge celebrating 100 years of Polish Scouting from one of our chief scout leaders, druh Waclaw Mankowski from Huddersfield. This badge is currently been worn on the uniforms of all the polish girl guides and scouts throughout the World. T he Polish Scouting Association was started in 1910 by Andrzej Malkowski and his wife Olga Drohanowska who recognized the power of the ideas of Lord Baden Powell. It is an educational and cultural organization for young people working through the ideals embodied in scouting. Polish Scouting fosters a spirit of heritage while developing boys and girls into productive members of society. It maintains the historical philosophy of Scouting as a movement that holds a belief in God and free from organized political affiliations. The goals of ZHP are to preserve its national heritage and to develop self sufficient individuals. Currently, Polish Scouts are established where ever there are Polish é,migré, communities in the USA, Canada, Great Britain, France, Belgium, Denmark, Sweden, Germany, Norway, South Africa, Hong Kong, Australia and Argentina. In the Polish Scouting Movement, 4-7 year olds are called skrzaty which are the equivalent to “,Rainbows”, and “,Beavers”, in the English Scouting Movement. The word SKRZATY is an old Polish word for good elves, who according to ancient beliefs, lived in houses, under mushrooms and in the roots of trees. They helped people with their daily chores and looked after children and animals. Cubs and brownies are called zuchy. The word ZUCH means a brave, courageous brave. It implies physical and moral bravery with a touch of daring, sprightliness and helpfulness. The Badge of the girl Zuchy is a gold sun against a blue background. The sun and its rays represent the happiness and joy which radiates from every Zuch (Brownie). The badge of the boy Zuchy is a wolf cub. It represents the qualities of keenness, bravery and watchfulness with every Zuch (Cub) tries to develop ZWIAZEK HARCERSTWA POLSKIEGO - POLISH SCOUTING ASSOCIATION ‘,Living Theology’, 2010 Residential Summer School of Christian Faith is now open for booking! T he 2010 Living Theology Residential Summer School will take place at the new venue of Mount St. Mary’,s College, Spinkhill, Sheffield, S21 3YL from Monday, 26 July to Saturday, 31 July. The week is also open to non-residential day participants, which will appeal to those living locally and people wishing to make their own accommodation arrangements. Full details including lecture titles, names of lecturers, cost, and a downloadable booking form, timetable and poster can be found on their website http://www.livingtheology.org.uk From the 16 courses on offer, participants can select a total of 4 courses which they follow for the week. Each course consists of 4 lectures. Lecturers have been chosen for their particular expertise and experience. The topics are very varied, and include: scripture, ethics, liturgy, Jewish and Islamic perspectives, interfaith relations, Canon Law, ecology and environmental issues, and contemporary theology. Funeral Services W. Lever Ltd BRADFORD 01274 547137 524 THORNTON ROAD, BRADFORD BD8 9NB FOR OVER 75 YEARS PROVIDING A COMPLETE PERSONAL &, CARING 24 HOUR FUNERAL SERVICE CHAPEL OF REST H UGHES F UNERAL S ERVICES (Catholic Funeral Directors) 180 YORK ROAD, LEEDS LS9 9NT. Tel 2480953/63 152 GREEN LANE, CROSSGATES. Tel 2326900 3 HOLLIN PARK PARADE, OAKWOOD ROUNDABOUT Tel 2499338 Web: wwww.hughesfuneralservices.co.uk Email: info@hughesfuneralservices.co.uk Family owned and managed. Fully Qualified in all aspects. 24 Hour Service Guaranteed Fixed Price Funeral Plans etc. “,At a time of bereavement we carry out our duties with dignity and respect”, In times of bereavement please contact: B. J. MELIA &, SONS (B. J. Melia Dip F.D.) F UNERAL D IRECTORS AND M ONUMENTAL M ASONS Private Chapel of Rest 64 GIBBET STREET, HALIFAX Telephone: 01422 354453 PRE-PAID FUNERAL SERVICE AVAILABLE DETAILS ON REQUEST

Read in full

Page 14

May 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 14 LEEDS TRINITY UNIVERSITY COLLEGE Exam candidates tackle the big questions at Leeds Trinity S ixth formers from around the region are approaching their exams with renewed confidence after attending an ethics revision day at Leeds Trinity University College. 150 year 12 and 13 pupils from eight schools refreshed their subject knowledge and picked up top exam tips before sitting AS and A level examinations in Religious Studies. Assistant Principal Dr Stephen Bulman welcomed the students and their teachers to the campus. He placed the subject of ethics in context saying, “,The absence of ethical behaviour exhibited by the bankers shows that ethics is central to our thinking and needs for the future. I am glad the subject is taken seriously in schools.”, Theology lecturer Dr Ann Marie Mealey led revision sessions on ethics topics, and Wesley Davies, Head of Humanities at Dixon City Academy, spoke on exam techniques. “,Break out”, sessions during lunch gave the visitors a chance to chat to current students and get the inside story on Theology and Religious Studies at Leeds Trinity. The day was organised by Dr Ann Marie Mealey in conjunction with Leeds Trinity’,s Schools and Colleges Liaison team. Ann Marie said, “,The day was a great opportunity for the students in our partnership schools to experience university life and to probe pressing ethical questions. Their interest shows that they are already trying to understand how we should live as members of a complex and morally challenging society.”, Mr Child, Religious Studies teacher at Abbey Grange, said, “,It is great to see Leeds Trinity working closely with schools in this way, and giving students a taste of what higher education might be like. The students all enjoyed the day, and found Ann Marie a very engaging lecturer.”, Ali O’,Connor, Year 12 at St Mary’,s Menston, said, “,It was good to be able to concentrate away from the distractions of school, the sessions were easy to listen to and Students help break down barriers to higher education I joined the Schools and Colleges Liaison team at Leeds Trinity in June 2009, a role which has a special focus on widening participation activity at the university college. The purpose of widening participation work is to make sure that every young person knows that higher education (HE) could be for them, regardless of their social background, their faith, age, gender or any disability. An individual’,s perceived social status is one of the main barriers to HE. We work closely with Aimhigher West Yorkshire, to ensure young people from groups under represented in HE can join in activities run by the Schools and Colleges Liaison team at Leeds Trinity. We aim to give young people a taste of what HE could be like, through events run on our campus, and give them advice and support through the application process by running sessions in their schools. I coordinate a new mentoring initiative from Aimhigher at Leeds Trinity. The Student Associate Scheme allows our own students to work as ambassadors for HE, by working directly with young people in schools and colleges in West Yorkshire. The students act as mentors for the pupils, drawing on their own experiences to work through the pupil’,s own aspirations and concerns, opening them up to the options available after school and ultimately helping them to make key decisions about the future for themselves. Having come from widening participation backgrounds themselves, the students are role models to the pupils with whom they work, demonstrating that HE is a real option. The students meanwhile gain valuable experience that will stand them in good stead for their future careers especially if they choose to work with children and young people. Read about Stewart’,s experience as a Student Associate on this page. The student associates scheme runs for two years until July 2011. For more information or to find out how your school can get involved, please contact me on li.wright@leedstrinity.ac.uk or call 0113 283 7227. Lucy Wright Schools and Colleges Liaison Officer Leeds Trinity University College Friday 28 May 9.30am to 4.00pm Catholic Partnership Day “,Praying with young people”, with keynote speaker Rev Fr John Wilson. Open to teachers from primary and secondary schools in the Catholic sector. For more information contact Anne Trotter on 0113 283 7177 or email a.trotter@leedstrinity.ac.uk Wednesday 30 June 10.00am to 3.00pm Open Day for prospective students Find out more about studying for a foundation, undergraduate or postgraduate degree at Leeds Trinity University College. To book visit www.leedstrinity.ac.uk, call 0113 283 7150 or email opendays@leedstrinity.ac.uk Monday 7 June 10.00am to 3.00pm Cooking Communities Final Conference To celebrate the achievements of the three year Cooking Communities programme and update delegates on school food and cooking programmes, regional and national. For more information contact Julie Wadsworth on 0113 283 7100 ext 348, or email j.wadsworth@leedstrinity.ac.uk Events at Leeds Trinity University College Students aim higher with mentor Stewart S tewart Malley is a recent recruit to the Aimhigher Student Associate scheme, having been mentoring four students at Allerton High School since February. Now in the second year of a BA in Sports Development and PE at Leeds Trinity, Stewart, from Longridge, Lancashire, meets the Year 11 and 12 students weekly for one to one sessions. He advises them on their coursework and exam revision techniques, and draws on his own experience to talk over their career options, including the possibility of further or higher education. He said, “,I have been there and know what it’,s like for these students. They are selected for the scheme because they are on the borderline for achieving the grades they need for university.”, “,I did better than predicted in my GCSEs and went on to complete a BTEC at Preston College. At that time I wouldn’,t have had the confidence to go straight to university –, I worked and went travelling for a few years including a period coaching football in the USA. After that experience I’,m now getting so much more out of my university education.”, “,I enjoy the mentoring. As I’,m not a teacher the relationship with the students is more relaxed –, I’,m there to offer friendly advice, I tell them how it is, and in the end they have to make their own decisions.”, relevant to the syllabus.”, Ann Marie is pictured with Rob Rattray, Schools and Colleges Liaison Manager. Enjoyable Chant Day at St Austin’,s Wakefield U nder the leadership of Philip Duffy over 35 people form all over Yorkshire and beyond enjoyed a day’,s instruction in Gregorian Chant. Philip Duffy, one of the leading teachers of plainchant in the UK, taught participants the music for the Mass of the fourth Sunday of Easter as well as giving an entertaining and informative talk on the history of Gregorian and other chant. Everyone on the course enjoyed the facilities at St Austin’,s including the use of the cloister garden where many enjoyed lunch in the warm spring sunshine. The music studied was the Missa Lux et Origo Mass along with the proper for the day. St Austin’,s Choir, augmented by some of the visitors, gave joyful and sensitive renditions of ‘,Regina Caeli’, by Aichinger and Tallis’, ‘,Bone Pastor’,. Mass was celebrated at the end of the day by Father Matthew Habron whose singing enhanced that of the participants. The lovely service was enjoyed by a good number of St Austin’,s parishioners as well. Patrick Ganley, Director of Music with St Austin’,s Choir said: “,I t was hugely enjoyable day. Philip Duffy was an excellent teacher who managed to get us all to sing chant as it should be sung. His humour and patience ensured that all the participants gained a great deal from the day as well as the opportunity to meet others interested in the chant. The day was brought to a fitting end with a lovely mass sung in the traditional way”,.

Read in full

Page 15

May 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 15 May your work excite your heart Kindle in your mind a creativity To journey beyond the old limits Of all that has become wearisome In the late 1980s, the then Secretary of State for Education, Kenneth Baker, introduced the National Curriculum and in-service training days for teachers. These professional development days have often been criticized but staff at Mount St Mary`s Catholic High School in Leeds spent a purposeful and enriching Holy Thursday considering their role as servants and teachers in a Catholic school. A whole-school audit had identified the needs of staff and a committee drew up a programme in response to these and in line with the school’,s development plan. Peter Siney, School Chaplain at Ellesmere Port Catholic High School facilitated the day and established a relaxed and supportive atmosphere with an opening, interactive session on the qualities of a servant followed by a prayerful reflection on the German priest Sieger Koder’,s painting of The Washing of Peter’,s Feet. The day then progressed with the choice of a carousel of activities: Creative Prayer, led by Peter, was both relaxing and inspirational with just the right amount of workshop- style activities designed for participation and inspiration. One of the staff said: “,I found it very imaginative and encouraging and I came away with fresh ideas on how to engage my form in prayer”,. Frequently Asked Questions on the topic of Catholicism provided an opportunity for lively discussion in an environment where staff felt comfortable sharing their thoughts on the Catholic ethos of the school. Wonderful World celebrated the beauty of each culture around the world through music and quotations from different sacred texts. It gave staff a greater insight into the different cultures many of the school’,s pupils come from. Celebrating an Encounter was a meditative reflection on Rembrandt’,s painting of the Prodigal Son which was both an art critique and a spiritual analogy and by drawing parallels between the two evoked more in-depth feeling. Each person was then invited to encounter God in quiet prayer and in sharing of God’,s word to them. The group experience was profoundly moving as each participant shared their ‘,word’,. Everyone gathered in the tranquility of the library for a time of meditation and reflection before the day concluded with the celebration of the Eucharist. Unleavened bread was baked on the premises and the setting of the altar table represented the Last Supper. The ritual washing of hands was a moving and poignant end to a rewarding and insightful day. Called from worship into service Forth in God’,s name we go To the child, the youth and each other Love in living deeds to show. Called to Serve M ount St Mary`s Catholic High School in Leeds is the latest recipient of a Metro SAFEMark award for promoting good behaviour on its school buses. SAFEMark is given to those schools which make a commitment to improve safety and the behaviour of pupils on school and regular bus services. Metro`s SAFEMark team runs the scheme in partnership with local bus operating companies and West Yorkshire Police. ",I`m delighted that Mount St Mary`s has gained this award,", said Giles Nightingale, Metro`s Assistant Director, Corporate Services. ",Metro`s SAFEMark scheme rewards secondary schools for taking public transport seriously by making a commitment to improve safety and the behaviour of pupils on school and regular bus services. This award demonstrates Mount St Mary`s dedication to forging links with the local community and also serves as a good example of what can be achieved through a partnership approach.", Receiving the award for Mount St Mary`s, school SAFEmark co-ordinator, Seamus Daly said: ",We are delighted to receive this award from Metro. The drive to reach the Award standard has come from the pupils themselves. Since signing up to the scheme, pupils have improved on their already good behaviour, and the Award is a just recognition of that. The service is very much appreciated by our pupils and their families and we are very proud to receive this Award and look forward to continuing our work with Metro in promoting the SAFEMark scheme.", Mount St Mary`s School reached the required standard for the award by: - actively promoting SAFEMark through parents` evenings and the school`s web site, - producing a handbook to make sure all school staff know who to contact and what to do, - regularly liaising with service operator, First, on any incidents. SAFEMark is one element of Metro`s drive to improve public transport and cut road congestion across West Yorkshire. The school run is currently responsible for 1 in 5 cars on the road at peak times and Metro is reducing that figure through schemes such as SAFEMark and My bus yellow buses, which encourage pupils and parents to choose public transport for the home-to-school journey. Travel Award for Mount St Mary`s pupils COME AND JOIN US The Church of the Immaculate Conception Idle Bradford is cele- brating its 50th anniversary on 1st July 2010 with a Concelebrated Mass at 7.00pm followed by a buffet in the grounds.Anyone wishing to attend is welcome but owing to number restrictions we ask those coming to contact me for a ticket (free)", Real Choice www.realchoiceuk.net Sister Roseanne Reddy of the Cardinal Winning Pro-life Initiative will be speaking at Immaculate Heart Parish Hall Harrogate Road, Leeds Tuesday June 15th 7.45pm All welcome The Cardinal Winning Pro-life Initiative On 9 March 1997, the late Cardinal Thomas Winning launched a major practical initiative to help women facing a crisis pregnancy. You can find out more about the ongoing work of this Glasgow- based project at www.cardinalwinningprolifeinitiative.wordpress.com The speaker Ever since its formation, Sister Roseanne Reddy has been the driving force behind the initiative. She is a highly entertaining speaker and her optimistic story of how she and her group help pregnant women is heart-warming and inspirational. Directions Immaculate Heart of Mary church is situated on Harrogate Road in north Leeds about halfway between the Majestic wine ware- house in Chapel Allerton and the Yorkshire Bank at the junction with Street Lane (Moortown Corner). More detailed directions are available at www.immaculateheart.org.uk or phone Niall Cox on (0113) 2663676. Real Choice is the Immaculate Heart Pro-life Group.

Read in full

Page 16

May 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 16 BATTLE John Battle KCSG Inevitably –, printing deadlines –, means that I’,m writing this in April, but on my last day as a Member of Parliament –, and the first time I’,ve not taken part as a candidate in local or national elections since 1980. It’,s been a great privilege and a hectic roller coaster of a ride being an elected public representative, hard work dealing with and trying to help thousands of constituents with their everyday problems but an amazing opportunity to meet people in every imaginable situation at home, at school, at work or in the community. No other area of work surely gives such privileged access into the lives of a great diversity of people. This time I’,ve rather enjoyed going round to ask people to vote for other people, including the young woman chosen to be my successor, rather than asking for votes for myself hopefully passing on the torch but politics can’,t just be about asking people to support particular candidates in elections, perhaps we should have tried harder to make the period of a General Election campaign a time of reflection and renewal –, personal and political renewal in our communities. This time there has been some focus on the party leader, the TV debates and the voting system. For all the talk about the new social media twittering and blogging the campaign has been dominated by the national news media –, based on its convenient fiction “,the Westminster village”,. Historically in our parliamentary democracy much weight has been attached to electing a local representative –, a “,constituency MP”, and in recent years political parties have been under pressure to put forward candidates rooted in the neighbourhood that elects them. It is this direct local link that has characterised our election system significantly supported by Labour and Liberal Democrats to propose changing to a proportional system in future. What the direct link constituency election means is that candidates are usually under pressure to listen to the voices of their area, preferably to live there and be part of the community. They will usually be representatives of national parties –, with a national organisation and a nationally agreed common programme –, a manifesto –, but individual candidates are expected to root themselves and their promises in the needs of the local electorate. In other words, the general election is in fact a series of ‘,local elections’, in which local candidates ought to be taken much more seriously not least by the national media. The problem of the fiction of the Westminster Village –, a media construction symbolised by the interviewing tents put up on College Green outside the House of Commons –, is that it assumes a centralised one party –, one person presidential approach when the action is actually much more local and closer to home. How often is a “,buzz in the Westminster Village”, announced on TV when all MPs are not actually in Parliament but at home in their constituencies? Who is setting the political agenda as media commentators’, front the Parliament back drop is increasingly a significant question in our democracy? To seize back the agenda will mean rebuilding politics from “,the bottom upwards”,. Rather than just focussing on proportional systems that will inevitably move our representatives further away from local people should start by renewing faith in local politics. This year –, at the same time as the General Election there were local council elections which hardly merited a mention. No local council candidates were given medial coverage –, the daily issues of governing our cities, neighbourhoods and communities were totally ignored. I’,d start renewing politics now by strengthening local government by increasing the number of local councillors by properly supporting and remunerate them to be full time active community representatives in touch with the people regularly at street level “,go local”, must include developing and strengthening local representation as the basic building blocks of change, democracy and accountability. Councillors should now start to be recognised as important as MPs in our communities as formal community and political leaders opening up participatory politics from within our neighbourhoods. That’,s the future route to deep political renewal –, re-routing politics where we actually live. Politics has not ended with this General Election - it’,s hardly started. Into Local Politics Generous Giving Local representatives of CAFOD, Joan Smith and Margaret Garbutt, visited St Paul’,s Catholic Primary School in Leeds to present a certificate and thank pupils, parents and staff for their generous donation of £,1250.00. The Ladies delivered a special assembly to inform the children of how their money has helped the people of Haiti to recover from the earthquake and how CAFOD is continuing to support. St Paul’,s have also donated £,600 to Sylvia Wright’,s School for the deaf in India and £,1000 to the Bishop of Leeds Good Shepherd Collection this year. T he fifteenth York Catholic History Day will be held at the Bar Convent on Saturday 5th June. Last year the programme included topics both local and international. The day began with a talk by Sr. Patricia Harriss CJ on Mary Ward through her writings. It was most appropriate that the History Day included this talk in the year when the Bar Convent Community and the rest of the Congregation of Jesus were celebrating the life and achievements of their founder. Fr. Nicholas Hird, who has compiled a biographical dictionary of the Leeds clergy, then spoke about Fathers of Faith: insights into the founding clergy of the diocese of Leeds. Dr. Simon Ditchfield of the University of York gave the final lecture, entitled A Catholic Reformation for the twenty first century: the making of Roman Catholicism as a world religion 1500 to 1700. This year Alexander Lock, a PhD student at Leeds University, who is researching the Gasgoigne family, of Lotherton Hall, near Leeds, and other places, will speak on `The qualifications as adorn a gentleman and a Christian`: the education and upbringing of Sir Thomas Gasgoigne of Parlington Hall. Peter Hills is researching the Widdrington family and will speak on The Widdringtons: a Northumbrian recusant family and the `Fifteen Jacobite Rising. Lord William Widdrington (1678 to 1743) and his brothers Charles and Peregrine, who took up arms in the Jacobite cause in 1715, were connected to other recusant families in the North, including Yorkshire. Their mother was a Fairfax and William was born at Gilling Castle. He was buried at Nunnington in the family vault of his second wife, Catherine Graham. The third speaker, Dr. John T.Smith of Hull University, will speak on The priest and the teacher in the Victorian Era. His book, `A Victorian class conflict? Schoolteaching and the parson, priest and minister, 1837 –, 1902` was published in 2009 The History Days are sponsored by the Postgate Society, the Catholic Record Society and the English Catholic History Association and attract an audience whose interests include Catholic, local, national and family history. The programme on the 5th June begins at 10.30 am, with coffee from 10 am, and closes with the vigil Mass in the Bar Convent chapel at 5 pm. The cost is £,13.50, students £,6, including tea and coffee in the morning and afternoon. Further information is available from Judith Smeaton 01904 704525, judith.smeaton@btinternet.com York Catholic History Day FORTHCOMING EVENTS at The Briery Retreat Centre 38 Victoria Avenue, Ilkley LS29 9BW Tel, 01943 607287 Email: srscs@aol.com Website:http://www.briery.org.uk 2-9th June 2-9th July 6 Day Individual Guided Retreats The Briery Team 7th –, 14th July Preached Retreat Fr. John Fuellenbach, SVD “,The God image of Jesus and our call to follow him today”,. Jesus was sent to reveal to us who God really is and who He wants to be for us. He summarized his message in two words or phrases. The first one contains his God experience expressed in the word Abba (his human expression of his innermost experience of God). The second one is the phrase Kingdom of God, God’,s dream for the whole of creation. He called disciples whom he sent out to carry out his own mission. 20th –, 24th September Mon - Friday Retreat for Priests Fr. Tom Lane, C.M. “, I will show you the way to Heaven”, The Curé, de’, Ars, John Mary Vianney, is the patron of all priests in pastoral ministry. When he asked a young boy the way to Ars, the boy obliged. To express his gratitude the Curé, spoke the lovely words that are the theme of the retreat. October 29th –, 31st Sacred Circle Dance weekend Sylvia Williment 10th –, 12th December Advent Preached Retreat “,Christmas is for Adults Too!”, Fr. Daniel O’,Leary Weekend A time to reflect on the astonishing and life-changing meaning of the Incarnation –, and maybe for the first time. There are beautiful secrets they never told us about. RETREAT AT L’,ARCHE There will be a retreat in English at La Ferme near Paris where l’,Arche (founded by Jean Vanier) began. Entitled “,The spirit of l’,Arche and my daily Life’, it will be given by Fr David Wilson, a priest of the Westminster Diocese who has lived in l’,Arche in France for over 20 years. It begins on the 28 June and ends on the 3 July. Those interested may contact for further details: La Ferme de Trosly Service Accueil BP 21 23 rue d’,Orleans 60350 Trosly-Breuil France Accueil@lafermedetrosly. corn www.lafermedetrosly.com

Read in full

Page 17

May 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

ROME Page 17 At a recent meeting in Malaga organised by the Council of European Bishops’, Conferences (CCEE), bishops, religious men and women, Caritas representatives and other experts took an in-depth look at three areas where the Catholic Church focuses its advocacy and pastoral work to promote the dignity and rights of migrants –, the family, the parish and the public arena. I took part in the five day encounter which concluded on May 1st with Mass in Malaga Cathedral…, Cash Point Parents: that’,s how children of migrant families sometimes describe their mothers or fathers, whose faces and voices they no longer recall –, the only certainty that remains is that they’,ll be sending money home each month. The lasting effects of such enforced separation on the so-called ‘,orphans of migration’, was just one of the problems discussed by participants from across East and Western Europe, many of whom work full time with refugees, economic migrants and other people on the move in countries of origin, transit and destination. The meeting began with the premise that multi-cultural, pluralistic societies are an inescapable and necessary feature of Europe today, thus the role of the Churches (experts from the Conference of European Churches representing over 160 Protestant and Orthodox organisations were also on hand) must be focused on overcoming fears and finding ways of building a shared future on the continent. The southern Spanish city of Malaga is itself a significant location along the migration route between Africa and Europe and the diocese supports an impressive variety of programmes for families, parishes and other Catholic organisations providing spiritual, pastoral and practical care for immigrants. In his recent encyclical Caritas in Veritate, Pope Benedict describes migration as a phenomenon of vast, global proportions, requiring “,bold, forward looking policies of international cooperation”, if it is to be handled efficiently. While governments tend to see it simply in terms of national security or economic resources, the Church must provide a prophetic and holistic vision, stressing the rich contribution migrants can bring to host countries, as well as their rights and dignity that must be respected. With those rights, of course, go responsibilities of immigrants to respect the people, the laws and the customs of their host nations: Bishop Patrick Lynch of Southwark, who heads the English and Welsh bishops’, office for migration and refugee policy, spoke forcefully about the Church’,s ability to provide a safe and welcoming space for that process of integration to begin. Many participants at the Malaga meeting stressed the need for trained pastors and skilled lay experts who can deal effectively and sensitively with the complex challenges facing migrant families. For the ‘,orphans’, left behind when fathers –, or increasingly mothers –, leave to seek work abroad, these include psychological and practical problems experienced before and during the parents’, absence, as well as after their return. Besides the experience of abandonment and loss of authority figures, older children may be expected to assume responsibility for the house and other siblings, leaving them unable to accept the parents when –, and if –, they return. In some countries, children are left with extended family members where they are expected to work as servants for cousins, aunts or uncles. In other places, they are left with friends or in institutions causing lasting emotional trauma that reduces their own ability to form stable, trusting relationships. On the other hand, fathers and mothers who move away to work suddenly lose their sense of responsibility for those children and often look for casual relationships to fill the emotional void created. At the Malaga meeting, I heard many inspired suggestions about how churches are trying to cooperate more closely and provide internet contacts or ‘,summer camps’, where kids can go and spend time with parents working abroad. For children who are taken abroad with their parents, life can be equally as challenging, as they may feel deep resentment at being uprooted, yet are unable to express the anger and frustration, so often behave badly, perform poorly at school, or reject the authority of family members at home. The impact of encountering such a different culture from their own, often dominated by advertising and a ‘,must have’, mentality, can cause deep confusion and a desperate desire to fit in at all costs. On the other hand, children learn new languages more quickly than parents and grandparents, so often become mediators between their families and the local culture, again reversing the parent-child roles. Finally there is the small but very vulnerable category of unaccompanied minors who set off on perilous journeys in search of work to support families back home. They are often able to integrate fast into a new culture and language, but without any authority figures, they lose all sense of traditional values in favour of local street culture, often making them easy prey for sophisticated criminal gangs. Fathers of families too may feel a strong sense of frustration if they are unable to attain their goals of a better life abroad, leading into a downward spiral of depression, criminal activity, jail and even suicide. A concluding statement from the Malaga meeting urged governments to focus on reducing the causes of poverty and conflict that generate forced migration. It also called on societies to take a historical perspective and highlight the positive aspects of human mobility. And it insisted on the need for developing a fair, legal framework that respects the rights of migrants and their families. The message of this meeting to Christians was equally as clear: if we are to provide a credible witness to our Gospel values, we must speak out against racism or xenophobic policies (bishops in several European countries have been very active in protesting appalling conditions in holding centres for asylum seekers). Many countries have signed up to international legislation on migration but governments often try to water down their commitments in national legislation. Churches in the UK and elsewhere are playing a key role in mobilising public opinion to makes sure migration is seen in terms of individuals and families like our own, not just as numbers and statistics to be manipulated by the press or politicians. Finally Church communities must themselves be more open to welcoming the ‘,strangers in their midst’, –, migrants often have much to offer from their own rich experiences of faith life and, if given the chance, are keen to contribute to the development of their host countries and religious communities. Philippa M Hitchen Our Rome Correspondent ‘,Strangers In Their Midst’, When should we sing? I n the Mass before the second Vatican council (now known as the Extraordinary form) there existed a distinction between ‘,High’, Mass (where everything was sung) and ‘,Low’, Mass (where everything was spoken.) The liturgical books treated the ‘,Low’, Mass as the norm –, indeed the Mass was only valid if the priest spoke the text himself, regardless of whether the choir or congregation sang. In our current rite, the division between ‘,High’, and ‘,Low’, Mass has been replaced by the notion of progressive solemnity. Recalling the notion that singing invests the rites with a greater solemnity, then it could be said that that the more we sing the more ‘,solemn’, is our liturgy. In practical terms then, what does this mean? Lets us look at the liturgical year –, just like a terrain of mountains there exists peaks of varying sizes. In liturgical terms, these would be Christmas, Easter and the Patronal Feast of a church/ school. Celebrations related to these occasions then would want to be celebrated with greater solemnity, than for example, a weekday during ordinary time. An important principal is that each community accepts singing as normative. Children especially thrive on ritual –, singing at each and every communal gathering (assembly, liturgy etc) reinforces the notion that singing is an important function of that gathered body. Whilst it is not necessary to sing everything that might be sung the normative status of singing in the liturgy cannot be over stressed. How many of us have attended a birthday party where instead of singing ‘,happy birthday’, together, we instead spoke it in a monotone? Almost everyone at a birthday party will join in with singing happy birthday, even if the resulting sound is a more of a joyful cacophony that a melodious song! The same expectation of communal song is also vital in church and school. This is the second article following on from why we should sing. Future articles will look at who should sing, and exactly what they should sing. BYC girls in Provence T he Bradford Girls’, Choir (a choir of the Diocese of Leeds) have just returned from the South of France, having performed, by invitation, in the 9è,mes Rencontres Internationales deChoeurs d`Enfants. The 40 strong choir, which rehearses twice weekly at St Josephs Catholic College, Bradford, performed to audiences in towns and cities in the Provence region of France. A variety of repertoire was performed including a Missa Brevis by the French composer Leo Delibes, movements from Benjamin Britten’,s ‘,Ceremony of Carols’, and music from Africa, Hungary and Ireland. The performances were very well received by the audiences and local choirs with standing ovations at many of the performances, in addition to several encore requests! The trip wasn’,t all hard work however! The girls visited Marseille, did some shopping and spent the day in Euro Disney in Paris on their return to England. The trip has capped off an outstanding year for the choir which has seen them take the National Festival of Music for Youth Senior choirs award in Birmingham, be ranked the top UK choir at the Llangollen International Eisteddfod in the senior children’,s choir class, and perform live on BBC Radio 4. African &, Caribbean Chaplaincy Leeds and Bradford Communities Annual National Caribbean &, African Pilgrimage to Walsingham Sunday 27 June 2010 6:15am Coach depart from Alhambra Theatre Bd7 1AJ Bradford 7.00am Coach depart from St Anne’,s Cathedral Leeds 12 noon Coach Arrival &, Lunch Break at the Shrine 1 :00pm Coach take everyone down to the village 1 :45pm Assemble for Procession, Friday Market in the village 2:00pm Procession along the Holy Mile from the Village to the Shrine of Our Lady of Walsingham (pilgrims unable to walk the mile may be dropped off at the Church) 3:15pm Sung Mass: 5:00pm Coach depart Walsingham to return Please bring a Packed Lunch. All are welcome including children &, families Coach Price of £,12 per person should be paid in advance Please Contact Immediately Rev Michael on 0113 2959718 or mob. 07884197261 First Come First Served. Available seats and time limited!!! Booking Form I /We wish to go on a pilgrimage to Walsingham on Sunday 27 June 2010 Name (s) ...................................................................................................................... ........................................... Address &, phone number ........................................................................................................ ............................... ................................................................................................................................................................................. ................................................................................................................................................................................. I enclose the sum £,12 per person. (Please make Cheques payable to LEEDS DIOCESE and send them together with the completed form to the chaplain: Rev Michael Mkpadi No. 1 Deanswood Gardens Leeds LS17 5JF )

Read in full

Page 18

May 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 18 BE STILL/DIARY/ENGAGEMENTS First Friday of the Month SINGLE CATHOLICS meet at 8.00pm for mass at our Lady of Lourdes, Leeds. We also a have a program of 4-8 events during the month, walks, meals, cinema and theatre trips, etc. Phone David Easterbrook Chairman LDSC on 0113 2289468 evenings between 6 and 7.30pm only. Membership is open to all single Catholics who are free to marry within the church. Crusade Mass: The crusade Mass and Rosary of Mary Immaculate is held at St Patrick`s Church, Bradford, on the first Saturday of the Month after 12.15pm Mass Second Sunday of Month 2pm Meeting of Bradford Fraternity of the Secular Franciscan Order at St. Anthony`s Convent, Clayton, Bradford.` `Third Sunday of Month 2.30pm Meeting of Leeds Fraternity of the Secular Franciscan Order at the Cathedral. Ampleforth Renewal Community: Ampleforth Abbey, meet 1st Sunday each month, at Ampleforth. 11.30am Praise, Speaker, Sharing Groups, Reconciliation, Exposition, Finishing with Mass and Healing at 4.00pm. All enquiries: Seamus McEneaney 01429 426181 Monthly Vocations Mass : Mount St Joseph’,s Chapel 11am First Wednesday of the Month. Calix: An organisation for those recovering from addiction and working the 12 Step Programme of AA so that they can develop and deepen their relationship with Jesus as their Higher Power. Meets on the First Sunday of every month at Corpus Christi Church, Neville Rd. Osmondthorpe. Leeds. Mass at 4.30pm followed by meeting. Contact: Fr. Michael on 01977 510266 Helpers of Gods precious infants, prayer vigils, regular weekly prayer vigils at Marie Stopes Abortuary, 7 Barrack Road.LS7 4AB, next to Nissan car showrooms. Fridays 12-30 to 1-30, and Saturdays 9am-l1am. Other times variable. Further details Pat 0113 2582745 Diary Be Still a few moments for thought and prayer Lord, we are so sorry for what some of us did to your children: treated them so cruelly, especially in their hour of need. We have left them with a lifelong suffering. This was not your plan for them or us. Please help us to help them. Guide us, Lord, Amen. A prayer sent to the Archbishop of Dublin by an abused person. Bishops Engagements - May/June Deadline For receipt of material for next edition: June 4th 2010 Parishes receive their copies: June 20th 2010 Send letters, articles, reports &, pictures: Mr John Grady, Leeds Diocesan Curia, Hinsley Hall, 62 Headingley Lane, Leeds LS6 2BX. Send text as word doc, pictures as jpeg, e-mail to: john.grady@dioceseofleeds.org.uk Tel: 0113 261 8022. Advertising Deadline Please note All paid-for advertising is dealt with by: CathCom, L4 Blois Meadow Business Centre, Steeple Bumpstead, Haverhill, Suffolk, CB9 7BN. To advertise call 020 7112 6710 or email: ads@cathcom.org Your Catholic Post Sunday 16 May 3pm Blessing of the Organ, Leeds Cathedral Tuesday 18 May 11am VGs’, Meeting, Bishop’,s House. Wednesday 19 May 11am Presbyteral Council Meeting, Hinsley Hall Thursday 20 May 10.30am Meeting with Diocesan Finance Board &, Trustee Directors, Hinsley Hall, 6pm Confirmation, St John’,s, Normanton, 7.30pm Confirmation, SS Peter &, Paul, Sandal Friday 21 May 11am Chapter Meeting, Leeds Cathedral Saturday 22 May 6pm Mass for those received into the Catholic Church at Easter, Leeds Cathedral Wednesday 2 June 11am St Bede’,s Trustees’, Meeting, Bishop’,s House Saturday 5 June 11am Catholic Women’,s League Centenary Mass, Leeds Cathedral Sunday 6 June 6pm Mass, Leeds University Chaplaincy Tuesday 8 June 6pm Confirmation, St Patrick’,s, Huddersfield, 7.30pm Confirmation, English Martyrs’,, Huddersfield Wednesday 9 June 6.30pm Confirmation, St Anne’,s, Keighley Thursday 10 June 1pm VGs’, Meeting, Bishop’,s House, 6.30pm Confirmation, St Anthony’,s, Beeston Friday 11 June 11am Celebration of Priesthood Mass, Leeds Cathedral Saturday 12 June 12 noon Annual Mass for Altar Servers, Leeds Cathedral Sunday 13 June 11.30 am 700th Anniversary Mass, Markenfield Hall Monday 14 June 10.30am Northern Bishops’, Meeting, Bishop’,s House Tuesday 15 June Confirmation, Our Lady &, All Saints’,, Otley &, St Mary’,s, Horsforth Wednesday 16 June 6.30pm Confirmation, St Paulinus, Dewsbury Thursday 17 June 11am VGs’, Meeting, Bishop’,s House, 6pm Confirmation, St Joseph’,s, Bradford, 7.30pm Confirmation, St Joseph’,s, Bradford Sunday 20 June 2pm Corpus Christi Procession, Little Sisters of the Poor, Leeds. Tuesday 22 June 6pm Confirmation, St Robert’,s, Harrogate, 7.30pm Confirmation, St Joseph’,s, Wetherby Wednesday 23 June 6.30pm Confirmation, St Malachy’,s, Halifax Thursday 24 June 10am Diocesan Education Conference, Wheeler Hall A fter eight and a half years as Manager of the ST PAULS bookshops in Leeds, Tom Kala has retired. Tom has been associated with the Society of St Paul, who run the bookshops, on and off throughout his life, initially in his native Kerala, then coming to London at the time ST PAULS opened their first shop, in Westminster, seventeen years ago. After a brief return to India he was back in the UK in 2001 to help establish the bookshop in Hinsley Hall, later taking on the additional responsibility as Manager of their shop on Cookridge Street, Leeds. Tom`s association with the Society, together with his knowledge and experience of the Catholic Church, made him the ideal person to manage the ST PAULS media centres, and his ability to relate to people of all backgrounds ensured he gained the love and respect of many people in Leeds and throughout the diocese. As an author, he wrote Meditations on the Icons, as well as several books of a secular nature, which demonstrate the wide field of general knowledge and interests he enjoys. Tom retired in March and has returned to his family in Kerala. Stephen Moseling, Operations Co-ordinator for ST PAULS, said, ",Tom`s contribution to the work of ST PAULS in Leeds has been invaluable, it was an immense privilege and pleasure to work with him. All at ST PAULS wish him a long and happy retirement.", ST PAULS is now looking for a suitable replacement to manage their shops in Leeds and anyone interested in the position should send a CV and covering letter to Stephen Moseling at ST PAULS by Westminster Cathedral, Morpeth Terrace, London SW1P 1EP or email stephen@stpauls.org.uk Work Well Done It is with great pleasure that the governing body of St Wilfrid’,s Catholic High School and Sixth Form College, Featherstone, announce that Mr Michael Pyle has been appointed as headteacher of the school. Mr Pyle is currently the headteacher of St Mary’,s Catholic School in Menston where he has led the school for thirteen years and enabled it to become not only an outstanding school in academic achievement but also as a school that Inspectors have recognised as living the ideal in relationship to its Mission Statement. We look forward to Mr Pyle bringing his own ideas to our already thriving school community and to his leadership ensuring that we too are viewed to be outstanding and living the ideal. New Head at St Wilfrid’,s

Read in full

Page 19

May 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

APOLOGY Page 19 A rchbishop Vincent Nichols Chairman of the Conference of Bishops for England and Wales today, April 22nd issued a statement on behalf of the Bishops Conference with regard to child abuse in the Church. This statement is to be made available in every church in the country as from this weekend. The statement admits to failings in the past and promises that the Church will work to continue the good work now being done: ‘, we recognise the failings of some bishops and religious leaders in handling these matters. These, too, are aspects of this tragedy which we deeply regret and for which we apologise. The procedures now in place in our countries highlight what should have been done straightaway in the past. Full co- operation with statutory bodies is essential. Now, we believe, is a time for deep prayer of reparation and atonement.’, ‘,We commit ourselves afresh to the service of children, young people and the vulnerable in our communities. We have faith and hope in the future. The Catholic Church abounds in people, both laity, religious and clergy, of great dedication, energy and generosity who serve in parishes, schools, youth ventures and the care of elderly people. We also thank them. The Holy Spirit guides us to sorrow and repentance, to a firm determination to better ways, and to a renewal of love and generosity towards all in need.’, A Heartfelt Apology Summer Music 2010 Wednesdays at 7.30pm 16th June Dr CHRISTOPHER JOHNS organ, LEEDS CATHEDRAL 23rd June PHILIP C TORDOFF organ , HALIFAX MINSTER 30th June IAN SHAW organ, ST JOHN GREENHILL HARROW 7th July DAVID H BARKER organ ST PAUL KING CROSS HALIFAX with FRANK BRANCH bass-baritone Admission free –, retiring collection stwilfridleeds.org.uk The church is on Whincover Drive, just off the Ring Road at Lower Wortley, a little west of Ringways, and is served by bus routes 5 and 42. Further details at www.stwilfridleeds.org.uk or contact Wilf O’,Neill: 0845 456 0992, recitals@stwilfridleeds.org.uk

Read in full

Page 20

May 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 20 CELEBRATION FOR THE POPE Designed and produced by CathCom, L4 Blois Meadow Business Centre, Steeple Bumpstead, Haverhill, Suffolk, CB9 7BN. To advertise call 020 7112 6710 or email: ads@cathcom.org Celebration For The Pope T he Cathedral Church of St Anne’,s, Leeds, was full on Monday evening April19th, to celebrate with the Apostolic Nuncio the fifth Anniversary of the Election Of His Holiness Pope Benedict XVI. The Nuncio was the Main Concelebrant at a special Mass that was attended by all the Bishops of England and Wales along with a number of priests from the Diocese of Leeds. The Bishops were staying at Hinsley Hall for the meeting of the Bishops Conference which goes on until Thursday Lunch time, so they were on hand to celebrate the occasion along with the religious, Papal Knights, laity and the Lord Mayor of the City this special day. The Homily was given by The Right Reverend Peter Doyle Bishop of Northampton who started his address by recalling how he was himself in Rome on that very day five years ago when white smoke was seen coming from the Vatican. Along with many others he rushed along to St Peter’,s Square and was there to see the Pope come out on to the balcony. He then went on to speak about the Bishops meeting with the Pope last year and how they were all welcomed by him. He spoke of the difficult task facing the Pope and asked that all should keep him in prayer and he praised the courage the Pope was showing as he guided the Church at such a difficult time.

Read in full

Find your local Catholic Historical Church newspaper. Scroll to find yours.
Contact Us
Current Catholic Papers
Church Advertising
www.CatholicDirectory.org
© CathCom 1997 - 2021