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Leeds Catholic Post History

Newspaper for the Diocese of Leeds

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Nov 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 1

Nov 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

CATHOLIC POST THE NEWSPAPER FOR THE DIOCESE OF LEEDS NOVEMBER 2010 www.dioceseofleeds.org.uk www.catholicpost.org.uk Children make a joyful noise for All Saints at Leeds Trinity L eeds Trinity University College rang to the sound of children’,s voices on Monday as young people from across the Leeds diocese celebrated All Saints Day at the Horsforth campus. The university college marks the Feast of All Saints every year, in commemoration of its original foundation as Trinity and All Saints College, a Catholic teacher training institution. Rt Rev Arthur Roche, Bishop of Leeds, celebrated a special Mass in the Chapel, before blessing the new buildings that transformed the campus for the new academic year. Children bearing colourful school banners processed into the chapel with the Bishop for Mass. Music during the service was provided by the choir of Holy Rosary and St Anne’,s Primary School, Chapeltown, and the Music Group of St Mary’,s Catholic High School in Menston. Carrying a banner for Leeds Trinity were theology students Jemma Smith and Debbie-Rose McNeill. Debbie- Rose said, “,All Saints remains part of the identity and history of Leeds Trinity so it’,s important to celebrate the feast day. This is a wonderful day uniting the university college and schools.”, Head Girl of St Mary’,s Menston, Paige Retalic, carrying a banner with Head Boy Khen Cruzat, said, “,We last visited the campus in the thick of the building works. It looks amazing and we are honoured to be here.”, Bishop Roche visited the new student residence, All Saints Court, to deliver a blessing and pray for those who live there, before proceeding to the refurbished main reception which is now accessed through a new airy glass atrium. The Bishop said, “,I pray that all who enter may heed the voice of Christ, who gave himself to us as the true door to eternal life. We ask your blessing upon this place and all who enter here.”, Whats inside How fortunate you are Pages 10 Bishop visits St Patrick’,s School Page 20 2005-55 Audi A3 Sport TDi 5 Door 44088 Miles £,8950 2008-08 Renault Clio Extreme 5 Door 15707 Miles £,4750 2002-52 Renault Clio Expression 3 Door 45019 Miles £,2450 2000-W Nissan Micra Profile 3 Door 53480 Miles £,1695 2005-05 Daihatsu Charade 1 owner 5 Door 23483 Miles £,2650 2000-W Ford Ka 1 owner 54235 Miles £,1595 2000-Y Vauxhall Astra Auto 5 Door 75893 Miles £,1975 2002-02 Vauxhall Corsa SXi 5 Door 35534 Miles £,2850

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Page 2

Nov 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 2 SCHOOLS NEWS In a recent article, the Archbishop of Westminster writes about a conference he attended on “,Values and Trust in the City: beyond Law and Regulation”, He said “, as a society we are somewhat adrift when it comes to being clear about the moral basis for our lives. Points were made about the long, slow withdrawal from a consensus around Christian principles, values and behaviour. Equal concern was expressed in the lack of any alternative, any shared basis for behaviour that can be taught and authentically shared. This was surely the point being made by Pope Benedict in his remarkable speech in Westminster Hall on 17 September when he said that “,the world of reason and the world of faith –, the world of secular reality and the world of religious belief –, need one another and should not be afraid to enter into a profound and ongoing dialogue, for the good of our civilisation”,. In other words, business and banking, without the guidance of an ethical code, becomes an anything goes, a short-termism reduced to the relativism of just saying what suits me, now. At a simple level, we all know how annoying it is to deal with salespeople and others who seem to be prepared to tell you anything to secure a deal and will just as easily deny they said it: or will add some extras on to a contract without saying anything to you: and then may well be supported by a company who will deny or ignore your allegations or complaints- at best fobbing you off with a few platitudes. We then cease to trust people and so are all diminished: we very much need principles of honesty and trust that no pages of government regulation can replace. On the consumer’,s own side, honesty can be replaced by greed in insurance claims or purchase exchanges, and again trust declines. Secular and religious need to meet and embrace and dialogue, as the Pope suggests: or we will become that entirely secular reality and realise too late that something vital is missing. The Post Says …, “, Hope for the Flowers”, by Trina Paulus was the inspiration for the Year 7 Welcome Mass at Mount St Mary’,s Catholic High School. The theme developed was the emergence from the cocoon (the primary school) to the wider world of the butterfly (the secondary school). The Pastoral Day to prepare for this comprised of a carousel of activities in which the pupils made prayer beads and butterflies. They were engaged with a dance “,Into the Light”, which was lead by the “,More Than Dance”, trio and also the singing group. The hall was alive and beautiful with the energy of Year 7 and the colourful butterflies which were everywhere. Father Eamon celebrated the Mass with a full congregation of parents and representatives from the 32 primary schools, whose pupils form our new Year 7. The Percussion8 group gave a rousing introduction to the service, and participation was the order of the evening with pupils from Year 7 reading, singing, presenting prayers and setting the alter for this sacred meal. Mass concluded with the signed movement “,Into the Light”, performed by 45 pupils which incorporated all the ideas they had worked with –, “,We can choose to stay safely in a cocoon or emerge into the light as a butterfly. This is what God calls us to be.”, Proud parents, guardians and carers were left with this thought: “,It takes lots of butterflies to make flowers and it takes lots of people to create a truly loving community.”, Year 7 Pastoral Day &, Welcome Mass Happy 40th Birthday Faith &, Light Faith and Light celebrates its 40th birthday next year. We began with what Jean Vanier intended to be a one off Pilgrimage to Lourdes for people with learning difficulties, their family and friends at Easter 1970. We are now world-wide. We have celebrated each 10 year anniversary with an International Pilgrimage to Lourdes at Easter. It is both a blessing and cause for sadness that we are now too bi and too wide spread for this to be viable so internationally we are having a year of celebrations starting February 2nd 2011. Here in the United Kingdom we decided we wanted to return to where it all began and a Lourdes Pilgrimage has been arranged for 8-15th July 2011. At least 3 communities from the Leeds Diocese will be represented on the Pilgrimage. As with all travel the cost is high, approximately £,650 so watch out for our fund raising events!! The Leeds Diocese were present on the first pilgrimage, led by the wonderful Winnie Briggs (RIP) and have been well represented on all subsequent celebrations. We would love anyone with past links to Faith and Light or anyone who feels this would be an appropriate Pilgrimage for them to join us. If you are interested please contact –, Marjorie Parker either by phone 01132405068 or e- mail marjorie_parker@hotmail.co.uk or Fr Lucey at St Robert’,s Presbytery Harrogate. Please keep us all in your prayers. Watch this space for news of other events especially those nearer home. UK North Province Lourdes Pilgrimage 8 -15 July 2011 The Pastoral Commission for People with Disabilities This Commission seeks to promote and support the inclusion, in the life and mission of the Church, of people who may be excluded, by means of physical, sensory or learning disability and disability resulting from mental ill health. Fancy Coming to Madrid to See Pope Benedict XVI? Leeds Diocesan Youth Service have a limited number of places available on the World Youth Day pilgrimage to Madrid in August 2011. The pilgrimage is open to young adults aged 16 –, 30. For more information or a registration pack please email –, wydleeds@live.co.uk. www.catholic-care.org.uk Since 1863 we have been meeting the needs of the most vulnerable children, adults and families in the Diocese of Leeds, by offering professional care, respect and individual support. Our services include: , Children’,s Residential Services , Services for Adults with Learning Disabilities , Supported Housing for Adults with Mental Health Issues , Schools Social Work and Family Services , Support Services for Older People How you can help? , Remember us in your will. Your legacy can bring new life to someone who needs our help. , Make a donation. , Become a volunteer. We have a variety of opportunities for those wishing to help. For more details about our work and how you can help please contact: Catholic Care 11 North Grange Road, Headingley, Leeds, LS6 2BR tel: 0113 388 5400 fax: 0113 388 5401 email: info@catholic-care.org.uk www.catholic-care.org.uk Taking the Caring Church into the Community Registered Charity: 513063

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Page 3

Nov 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

YOUTH Page 3 Leeds Diocesan Youth Service ‘,All who are thirsty, come!’, (Rev 22:17) For more information about how to register for Leeds Diocesan Youth Service events, check out: www.leedsyouth.org.uk, contact Anna at the Youth Office: 0113 261 8058 / abcleedsdiocese@hotmail.com or join the “,Leeds Diocesan Youth Service”, Facebook group. Friday 12th November Worship Central UK Tour 7.30pm Abundant Life, Bradford Saturday 13th November St. Pio Day 1-6pm St. Pio Friary, Bradford Friday 19th November “,Handmaids”, Evening of prayer for young women aged 18-30ish 7-9pm St. Joseph’,s Convent, Hunslet Sunday 21st November Leap of Faith National Youth Sunday Event 3-7.30pm Immaculate Heartl, Leeds Saturday 4th December Leeds Oasis Prayer Group 1-6pm Leeds University Chaplaincy Wed 8th December REVELATION For young people in Yrs 9-13 7-9pm Cathedral Hall, Leeds Friday 17th December “,Handmaids”, Evening of prayer for young women aged 18-30ish 7-9pm St. Joseph’,s Convent, Hunslet Leeds Diocesan Youth Service Calendar Papal Visit Reunion A lthough the Papal Visit has been and gone, the memories and impact of it are still resonating with many of the young people who travelled with us. To capture what the visit of the Holy Father meant to them many of the pilgrims gathered on the morning of 23rd October at Immaculate Heart Parish to spend some time reflecting on their experiences, catching up with new friends they have made and to find out about other events happening throughout the Diocese of Leeds for young people. Remembering The Pope’,s Words We watched the footage of the Pope speaking to the young people at Westminster and spent some time reflecting on his words to us. “,This is the message I want to share with you today. I ask you to look into your hearts each day to find the source of all true love. Jesus is always there, quietly waiting for us to be still with him and to hear his voice. Deep within your heart, he is calling you to spend time with him in prayer. But this kind of prayer, real prayer, requires discipline, it requires making time for moments of silence every day. Often it means waiting for the Lord to speak. Even amid the “,busy-ness”, and the stress of our daily lives, we need to make space for silence, because it is in silence that we find God, and in silence that we discover our true self. And in discovering our true self, we discover the particular vocation which God has given us for the building up of his Church and the redemption of our world.”,- some of Pope Benedict’,s words to young people in the Westminster Piazza. Keeping Our Faith Alive We looked at practical ways in which we can keep our faith alive at home, giving some time each day to pray, staying in contact with those people we met on the pilgrimage and others with whom we can share and grow in our Catholic faith, going to Mass and Confession on a regular basis and being open and honest about our experiences of the Papal Visit and our faith by telling friends and family about it. Putting It Into Practice One of the highlights for many of us during the pilgrimage was the time of silent Adoration of the Blessed Sacrament with Pope Benedict in Hyde Park. So, to conclude our reunion, the morning ended with a beautiful time of Adoration of the Blessed Sacrament. It was a great start to putting our experiences and our future in the hands of the Lord. Many of us took this opportunity to celebrate the Sacrament of Reconciliation. Here’,s what the young people of the Diocese of Leeds thought about their experiences of the Papal Visit…,. “,When the pope was coming and we could see it on the screen and I was just so excited”, “,When hearing the speakers at Hyde Park they were so inspirational and I’,m a Christian but not a Catholic and they showed me the true reason why people are Catholics and have made me consider converting”, “,It’,s made it stronger because I know that it will help me through hard times and there is always an answer to every problem if I just trust it”, “,Being before the Blessed Sacrament in Hyde Park with Pope Benedict, all the Bishops and 80,000 other Catholics praying together. Also receiving Holy Communion outside Westminster Cathedral was very special for me”, “,It has definitely strengthen my faith and made me want to share my faith with everyone I meet”, “,For me the thing that stood out from the words spoken by Pope Benedict was: Do Not Be Afraid Of Your Faith.”, “,The Pilgrimage for me has reinforced in me exactly what Faith Is Really About. It is about standing up and being counted.”, “,My highlight was when in Hyde Park all the youth started singing Shine Jesus Shine at the tops of their voices and at that moment I felt like I was part of something really special”, “,Well before I went I was having some problems with my faith and belief but seeing the sheer amount of people at Hyde Park just reaffirmed my faith which is something I thought the visit could never do”, “,I have a new found belief in God and pure excitement for Madrid!!!”, “,The atmosphere when the Pope arrived was amazing and when we were all praying together in silence during the vigil it was so beautiful”, “,The words that stood out to me most from what Pope Benedict said are that: that love is very important, we were made to love and receive love and that love makes us who we are and brings happiness to peoples lives. That we shouldn`t be ashamed of our religion and that we should be who we want to be. That silence allow us to be with God and listen to God and allows us to be who we are with God”, “,I feel that my faith has been strengthened because of this pilgrimage and that I have a better understanding of what and why I believe, particularly about the Blessed Sacrament and how important that is.”, “,I will take away everything that I have written above but also new friends and a new enthusiasm for my religion”, FROM JUST £,299 R.G.R. MEMORIALS COLOUR CATALOGUE QUALITY MEMORIALS AT AFFORDABLE PRICES IN GRANITE, MARBLE &, STONE ALL PRICES INCLUDE DELIVERY &, FIXING Ogee top memorial 2’,6”, high Fully polished Black Granite, Delivered and Fixed for £,399 inc VAT FREE Tel: 0113 282 3888 43 High Ridge Park, Rothwell, Leeds LS26 0NL

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Nov 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

I t is almost Advent. Advent, when we wait and prepare and wait to celebrate the birth of Jesus as an historic event and as Emmanuel who comes again and again and is always waiting at the locked, or overgrown, door of our hearts to be let in again, and again, and again. It seems to me that Advent is a particularly family friendly Church season, when our inner Advent is actualised in all the family preparations we make to celebrate Christmas at home. My parents were very serious about making a good Catholic home for us, but religious practice was largely seen as what happened at church. The best family people could hope for then, it seemed, was to live from one week to the next without doing, or failing to do, anything too serious to face in confession. If we were patient and kind and helpful that was a bonus (but there was nowhere to tell that). Advent was a real time of trial as my parents struggled to find ways to make our limited budget stretch to provide the minimum essentials for a modest Christmas feast. When I became a parent the trials did not cease but for some reason I consciously tried to connect our home rituals to the universal church traditions. Nowadays schools and parishes help families prepare. For instance some send out a Travelling Crib, to visit each home on its journey back to church on Christmas Day. I learnt the hard way. Some of my own attempts ‘,to connect’, I would prefer to forget (don’,t ask about the large twig I once painted white to use as an Advent Jesse Tree) Eventually I discovered that an Advent wreath, once you find a way to safely secure the candles, is both attractive and effective. At its simplest, it is there as a visual reminder for the whole of Advent. Its very presence in the home is witness. As a ‘,look, see, hear, feel’, activity, making an Advent Wreath or decorating a bought one or using a ready made one, can engage people of different ages at different levels. The three purple candles (representing the repentance we were called to by John the Baptist) and one pink candle (for week three when we are relieved of the pain of repentance to enjoy hope filled anticipation of the impending birth) are usually arranged in a circular green wreath. It can be used silently, or not: The mystery of the colours, the candles the greenery, the light, are entrancing in themselves and are likely to prompt questions and offer opportunities for reflection, or for shared prayer, stories, song. Advent Candles and complete Advent wreaths can be found, or ordered from St Paul’,s bookshops (Cookridge Street or at Hinsley Hall). Most of the pieces to go in a Travelling Crib can also be found there. If you think an Advent wreath might be a stretch too far in your home, be reassured. Although I still make one, I know now that my parents’, sacrifices of time and hard work and money to make what they could of very meagre resources were an authentic Advent witness. My fallen Jesse tree and lovely Advent wreaths are visible reminders of our belonging to the universal church, but it is in the peculiarly human preparations of spending carefully, planning and cooking that our inner preparations are grounded and expressed. The fact that I did not see the holiness in my mother’,s efforts does not mean that it was not there. Family preparations for Christmas Day even resemble parish preparations for celebrating Christmas Mass. The resemblance helps remind us that our celebration of Mass originated in a meal which Jesus transformed forever by his words, his life, his death and his resurrection. Lighting Advent candles and sharing stories about our preparations might bring some surprises. It may make us laugh at our mishaps (or cry at our brokenness). It may even enable us to see each other, our own lives, and the events we are about to celebrate at Christmas, in a fresh light. In the ‘,light of the world’, that reveals the holiness in the newborn in Bethlehem and reveals how we share that holiness: at Mass, at the Christmas feast, at home and whenever, and wherever, we love one another as He loved us. However ‘,poor’, our love might seem to us we take heart knowing that Jesus waits for us too, to return, again, and again and again (and again!). Page 4 FAMILY LIFE / SIDELINES / MUSIC There are two events I need to mention, one in the future, one in the past. Let`s have the future first, an exciting West Yorkshire Network of Pastoral Musicians event happens in early 2011. Called “,Washing the feet of the world”, and lead by Philip Jakob, it will take place at Leeds University Catholic Chaplaincy on Sunday 19th March. Church musicians and singers can look forward to an afternoon centred around the work and music of the Iona community. And now for the past: what is it that one is always told when trying to write something factual? What, when, where, why? Let`s deal with the first three for now: the last West Yorkshire Church Music Network meeting was on 17th October in the hall at Assumption of Our Lady Catholic Church, Spen Lane, Leeds. Ten of us, from five parishes, took part in the afternoon. The format was a departure from previous occasions, as in addition to the repertoire sharing, Joe Burns gave a presentation on “,The Internet as a resource for Church Musicians”, (A version of this is available on the website –, follow the link from our home page, http://www.westyorkshirechurchmusic.org.uk ) We sang and played a number of pieces, mostly with the connection to Advent, and members reported back from a couple of summer church music events. (List available on the website). Two of us were still fizzing with enthusiasm about the National Network of Pastoral Musicians conference in Chester in July. This influenced the music we played –, three of the pieces were from `A Bernadette Farrell Songbook` published this year by Decani Music, and Bernadette had been one of the inspiring speakers. One of us (OK, I`ll stop being so coy: me) had enjoyed the Society of St Gregory Summer School (Whitby in August) but was concerned that the new translation of the liturgy was perhaps being used by some in the Church as a means of curtailing and controlling the music and instruments used in worship. An anguished blogger in the USA puts it like this:“,An imperial Roman church is trying with all its might and power to roll back the clock on Vatican II. The imposition of the New Missal from on high is but the latest attempt to impose uniformity where Vatican II sought unity.”, http://paxchristisouth.org/2010/09/28/up-to-rome/ As I go to press, the whizzes, flashes and bangs of Bonfire night burst uninvited into my consciousness. I remember my ambivalence about the occasion as a child: on the plus side, fireworks, the bonfire and baked potatoes (no parkin –, I suffered a deprived, southern childhood), on the minus side, `gunpowder, treason and plot` –, a decidedly Catholic plot –, which made me feel decidedly like an outsider –, `my side` were the baddies! The WYCMN event encouraged me to explore parts of the internet I`d not previously visited. And my outsider feeling is back, but this time, some of `my side` see me as one of the baddies!! How about this from last month? “,Sacred music cannot be limited to Gregorian chant, but it is chant that contains the key to renew liturgical song, according to a consultor for the Office of Liturgical Celebrations of the Supreme Pontiff. Father Uwe Michael Lang, also an official of the Congregation for Divine Worship and the Sacraments”, (www.zenit.org/rssenglish-30573) Fr Lang seems to be building on what Pope Benedict wrote in 2007, in his post-synodal apostolic exhortation Sacramentum Caritatis: “,Finally, while respecting various styles and different and highly praiseworthy traditions, I desire, in accordance with the request advanced by the Synod Fathers, that Gregorian chant be suitably esteemed and employed ... as the chant proper to the Roman liturgy.”, I quite like hearing Gregorian chant, but I find it hard to make the leap of imagination necessary to see it as the everyday music of the liturgy in my parish church. Well, by this time next year, when the new translations are introduced, we will have had some catechesis which will doubtless enhance our understanding. Earlier in this piece, I mentioned a what, a when and a where. So how about the why? Why church music? One last quote from Pope Benedict gives us the answer: “,Saint Augustine rightly says in a famous sermon that ... `Singing is an expression of joy and, if we consider the matter, an expression of love` ... The People of God assembled for the liturgy sings the praises of God”, Tim Devereux tim.devereux@ssg.org.uk Musical Notes by Jane Shields Families Prepare! By Breda Theakston Friends recently returned from the Netherlands with a grim tale from a diocese over there: it was feared, they said, that the diocese may shrink to just one parish: it was desperately short of priests- a lot of work in the parish they visited was done by both the deacon and his wife- but there were no diocesan facilities to train priests. Daily Mass is, locally, a rarity. This may be an overly gloomy picture: we here have no facilities to train priests in the diocese, but can at least send them elsewhere. We shouldn’,t be too smug, though, as we have also halved- at least- the number of churches or parishes in a number of our deaneries, with more to come. Liverpool, that centre of ex-pat Catholicism reports a similar expected reduction in priests as ours. It is the end of the holiday season, and talking to people who have strayed to other rural parts of Europe reveals a tale of those straggling mega-parishes made up of many churches, some only celebrating Mass three or four times a year. An elderly priest rushes round on Sundays from church to church without time to speak to his many flocks. In others, services do take place, but these may be remote-controlled with a parish priest sending to his local laity an entire script for the Sunday liturgy, including a homily. Without leadership, these communities will wither on the vine: without Eucharist they will starve. We can be smug because we are so tightly packed into our diocese that we can close churches and people will still only be as far from church as from supermarket: but we need leadership- priests and deacons and trained catechists- and regular Eucharist. Most of all, this tells us, we need more priests and the closure of Ushaw College is telling us that a long era has ended. What does the Holy Spirit have to say about the future? And are we listening? **** After that, we need some signs of hope: we could start with the Entente Porte-Avions with France: at least we can then gang up on any weird and Foxy US government (maybe better called a tea-party) in 2012 (if you can’,t understand any of that, do try to keep up). Then, more seriously…, “,Lutherans and Catholics have decided to celebrate the five hundredth anniversary of the Reformation together on 31 October 2017”, and back in the Netherlands, 80,000 young Europeans are expected to converge on Rotterdam, despite the winter, at the end of December to join the Taize Community at its annual European meeting, staying in homes, eating and meeting simply and joining in Bible study, reflection, prayer and silence. Should we be listening to them? Sidelines Diocesan Silver Medal for retiring organist R etiring organist Elizabeth Edwards got the surprise of her life when she completed 30 years of playing the organ at sung Mass on Sunday morning, August 15th. “,After we got back from communion, Brenda Boyle, the choir leader, said Fr. Chris wanted us all downstairs again,”, said Elizabeth. “,I thought, why bother with me because it’,s my last Sunday Mass. We were ushered into the front pew and it was then I began to wonder what was going on.”, The secret was revealed when Fr. Chris, having said there was nothing much in the weekly bulletin to expand upon, announced that Elizabeth, 86, was being awarded the Diocesan Silver Medal and certificate. Just two days later Elizabeth was on the move, leaving Harrogate for Sudbury in Suffolk where she has set up a new home next door to her elder daughter, Thea. Elizabeth explained how, by chance, she took on the job of playing the organ with the traditional choir at St Robert’,s. “,I learned the organ as a child. My grandmother played at Ickleton in Essex and she said as soon as my legs were long enough I had to learn the organ. “,I went to New Hall near Chelmsford, a Catholic girls boarding school, but continued to play at home as long as I was there, just simple things like Mass settings on a small organ and as I learned I became quite confident. “, I became an Army wife (her late husband Arthur was a Major in the Cheshire Regiment and in later years based at the Army Apprentices College in Pennypot Lane, Harrogate). “, As an Army wife we travelled round and if we ended up in a station where there was a Catholic church with a small organ I would often volunteer to play the hymns. “,At Pennypot there was a Catholic chapel. The organist broke her arm and as I was already involved with the church I said I would play the hymns for the following Sunday. “,Time marched on and my elder daughter Thea got engaged . Although we were in Bilton parish we often used to go to St. Robert’,s because the music was just so wonderful. “,In 1980 Canon Moverley was the parish priest. We asked if my daughter could be married there and he agreed. He said that unfortunately there was no organist because they had had a Frenchman called Hugo on exchange but he had gone back to France. “,A little bird had told the Canon that I sometimes played the organ at Pennypot but I said not to a high standard. In the August I played at Mass one Sunday morning and my daughter, who was in the congregation complimented me on my playing but said it was impossible to sing to! “,When I played a couple of weeks later I found a man standing behind me as I played and he turned out to be the choir director, Phil Rogers. “,He told me choir practice was at 8.15p.m. on a Thursday and asked me to come along and give it a go.”, And that is how Elizabeth embarked on a 30-year playing career at St. Robert’,s. “,I learned on the hoof. I had never done any choir work or sung in choir. I felt confident to play the hymns so this was the beginning of a long, happy and at times frenzied relationship. It was all a closed book to me. I realised there was a lot to learn and I attended a course run by the Anglican School of Music, joined the local organists’, society, went on courses and to recitals. “,Organist is a difficult role to fill because for 11 months of the year you have choir practice on a Thursday evening followed by the performance on Sunday. I used to go in on Wednesday afternoon to practice for the Thursday practice and on Saturday afternoon to run through it again. “,It’,s given me so much in the way of friendship and an interest in music,”, she concluded.

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Page 5

Nov 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

COME AND SEE Page 5 COME AND SEE What next? By Mrs Josephine Stow A s Advent approaches, we look forward to a new Liturgical year with all its possibilities. As with all beginnings, there is a closing of the old and a launching out into the new. This Advent marks the official conclusion of our diocesan process for renewal, Come &, See. It leaves a legacy of lasting fruit to be celebrated and built upon. In the past five years there have been a variety of events, resources and training taken up by groups and individuals within the diocese. Parishioners and teachers, together with clergy and religious gathered with the Bishop each year, to hear inspiring speakers, to meet and to talk with people from across our diocese. In our parishes prayer groups, study groups and evangelisation groups have been established. The children in our primary and secondary schools have participated in liturgies on the theme of each year and been encouraged in their faith. So what follows Come &, See? Although the formal five year process has concluded, evangelisation is still a top priority. On the feast of Ss Peter and Paul this year, Pope Benedict announced the creation of a new Pontifical Council for the New Evangelisation. During his homily delivered in the Basilica of St. Paul Outside the Walls in Rome he said that the new Council has `..the specific task of promoting a renewed evangelisation in countries where the first proclamation of the faith already resounded, and where Churches are present of ancient foundation, but which are going through a progressive secularisation of society and a sort of ",eclipse of the sense of God,", which constitutes a challenge to find the appropriate means to propose again the perennial truth of the Gospel of Christ.` In our diocese, we aim to keep evangelisation in the forefront of our thoughts by continuing our annual gatherings with opportunity to hear from inspiring speakers and share our experience with one another. The various Come &, See groups in parishes will be a key vehicle in building on the valuable work they have been doing in their localities. Centrally, Fr John Wilson, Mrs Josephine Stow and Mrs Linda Pennington, who make up the Office for Evangelisation and Catechesis, hope to work with people in their local area (deanery) to promote, encourage and plan for continued growth in faith into the future. All the resources produced for Come &, See continue to be available on the website www.comeandsee.org.uk If you are unable to access the internet for resources contact Mrs Josephine Stow at Hinsley Hall on 0113 2618057. All future events, news and information about the work of evangelisation can be found at www.dioceseofleeds.org.uk/evangelisati on Catechesis and Evangelisation Events Calendar For further details visit www.dioceseofleeds.org.uk/evangelisation or telephone Mrs Janine Garnett 0113 2618040 Saturday 4th December Advent Day of Recollection The Briery Retreat Centre, Ilkley Friday 4th February More Ways to Pray (for school staff) Leeds Trinity University College, Horsforth Saturday 5th February More Ways to Pray (for parishioners) Leeds Trinity University College, Horsforth C atholic Women’,s League National Conference and Annual General Meeting took place this year in Southport nearly 600 members and guests were in attendance, from all the regions of the country. Our retiring National President opened the weekend, with an insight into the work undertaken by Feet First Worldwide, an organization founded by an Orthopedic Surgeon, who gives his time, and expertise (with others)) to treat physical disabilities and to teach orthopedic procedures to indigenous medics in disadvantaged countries. One of the doctors involved in this scheme gave a power point presentation, after a collection on Saturday morning he was presented with a cheque for £,2,000. The Social Awareness Team, gave updated reports on work by members on Health issues, Parliamentary affairs, Relief and Refugee, Our Lady’,s Catechists and Services Committee. A presentation on the Centenary celebrations for World Union of Catholic Women’, Organisations, was given by Barbara Stitt of Harrogate, who had travelled to Jerusalem with the eleven strong delegation from CWL,UCM and National Board members of England and Wales The proceedings on Saturday, opened with a Civic welcome by the Mayor of Sefton. After Lunch, a cheque for £,81, 219.73p was presented to David Gammell, from Help for Heroes. This had been our National Charity for the year, this money had been raised, by our members, the length and breath of the country, Leeds Diocesan Branch raised £,803.00. The speaker in the afternoon was Oona Stannard, Chief Executive and Director of Catholic Education Services for England and Wales. With a short break, after the business of the afternoon, Mass was concelebrated by Bishop Peter Doyle of Northampton, CWL Bishop Liaison with the Bishop’,s Conference, Mgr. Michael McQuinn Leeds V.G. Fr, Stephen O.S.B Chaplain to Clifton Branch CWL, with Fr. Brian Nicholson Chaplain to Middleborough Branch CWL acting as M.C. At the end of Mass Mrs. Margaret Richards from Cheltenham, was installed as the new National President, by Bishop Peter. After dinner, it was time for entertainment and dancing. Sunday started with Mass for the 30th Sunday in Ordinary time, prepared by the Host Branch, Shrewsbury, this was followed by reports from the Promotions Team, including the Editor of CWL News and The Web Manager. The Conference concluded with Prayers and the singing of ‘,I The Lord of Sea and Sky’, The collection taken before Mass on Sunday was for Shrewsbury Diocese Catholic Children’,s Society, this raised £,1400.00 All too soon, it was time to give our farewells, to travel home, to be ready for the next set of tasks that await us. Please God we shall meet again next October in Worthing. GENEROUS HELP FOR HEROES by Joan D. Cheetham Hon. Secretary Leeds Branch CWL The Missionaries of Silence Aims, objects, commitment is to live by prayer and silence in the Secular World Prayers, Meditation, Contemplation are the Missionaries tools of co-operation: , For the conversion of us all to love God , For bringing souls to our blessed Lord , Calling the presence of the Lord within us always , Through saying our prayers or mantras in silence each morning and evening It is also a way of living at peace with oneself, ones neighbour, the world and with God WHY NOT SHARE WITH US OUR COMMON BOND 13 Fairfax Crescent BD4 8BP Telephone: 07976 634574

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Nov 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

D iocesan Deacons recently met to touch base with their new Diocesan Director and look at ongoing formation with the Episcopal Vicar for Clergy. It must be remembered that the Diaconate is- by church standards- new in this diocese: the first Deacons were ordained in 1971- remarkably early- but an formation ongoing programme did not commence until the early 1990’,s. This is long ago indeed from an Irish viewpoint, where the new Deacon formation programmes are only just getting under way. “,Why?”, you ask does a land replete with priests (or so we still think) need deacons- and whoops! - you have fallen into the trap and assumed that Deacons are a sort of special constabulary of wannabee priests. The Diaconate is a separate order of clergy with its own charisms and contribution to make to the church- here and in Ireland. One paper recently published in connection with the new Irish diaconate forms an interesting summary and acts as a refresher for everyone. “,Doing the Diaconate Right”,- five key points: 1) Select only those applicants who have the gifts and abilities to be servant-leaders across the whole range of diaconal ministry. 2) Approach the diaconate with the same energy and commitment given to the presbyterate. 3) Recognition by all that the deacon is not a part-time minister. 4) Deacons must be correctly perceived as being ordained for service to the entire diocese, not simply to a parish. 5) There needs to be a solid framework of human, spiritual, intellectual and pastoral dimensions from the moment an applicant enters formation throughout his active ministerial career. These are good points: the first is suggesting that deacons should not be selected because they have specific gifts or carry out some particular function, if they do not have the gifts to lead across the whole spectrum of Altar, Word and Charity. The second suggests that- for example- ongoing formation for deacons should always be available, or facilities for a retreat. It also touches on such things as Vocations appeals or appointment and appraisal. The third is interesting- a deacon is a deacon every hour of every day: retirement may ease his obligations, but the deacon remains an ordained minister: whilst the fourth confirms that a deacon is not just a version of the Anglican “,Locally Ordained Minister”, but historically and scripturally, a Bishop’,s assistant. What does (5) mean? It brings us back to the recent meeting: no man (or deacon) is an Island and we have to ensure that essential structures are in place for a growing diaconate. Page 6 DEACONS NEWS Deacons Diary Prayer workshops with Year 7 at Holy Family A lison Wray of CLIKS was invited by the lay-chaplain at Holy Family School, Keighley, Hazel Hornsby, to lead Year 7 in prayer workshops. This followed on from the work Alison has previously carried out with the same students when at primary schools in Keighley. The Learning Resources Centre was used and a number of Prayer Stations were created to provide stimulus and to promote thought and reflection. Following a short film and some guided work, students were left to compose their own prayers, which they recorded on doves, pebbles and post-it notes. Hazel Hornsby explained that the prayers will be placed in the Chapel to create a ‘,Year 7 Prayer Space’,. In addition each Year 7 form will also continue to write prayers in their Religious Education lessons and these prayers will form the basis for a school prayer book. “,We have been delighted with the support from Christian Links in Keighley Schools”,, she added, there is a thriving network of schools workers locally that can offer a lot of spiritual sustenance to the care and development of young people.”, UCM Rosary Rally held in Cathedral By A Middleton F or the last five years Aileen Queenan of St Malachy’,s Foundation Halifax has organised an annual Rosary Rally in the Leeds Diocese, always using a different church within the Diocese as the venue. The Rally has proved to be very popular and always been well attended. However this year, encouraged by members and friends alike, Aileen sought and was granted permission to stage the Rally in St Ann’,s Cathedral, Leeds, what an event it turned out to be. The Cathedral was filled with members and others who came to celebrate the Rosary in the wonderful setting of the Cathedral, some UCM members having travelled by coach from as far away as Liverpool, Warrington, Middlesborough and Hallam Dioceses. Father Michael McLaughlin gave the Welcome Address and expressed his particular delight at seeing such a large congregation during a busy Saturday afternoon. Aileen’,s Welcome Reflection was most movingly given reflecting on the Spirit of God within us, ‘,God is love, he who would live in love lives in God and God lives in him’,. She asked us all to think about that and what it means. It is actually quite ‘,mind blowing’, to think that God lives in each and every one of us. The Holy Father, Pope Benedict XVI, calls us all to holiness: to be holy and to witness to our faith. She asked us not be afraid to bear witness to God in ourselves. She observed that the Chilean miners trapped in that deep mine had not been afraid to give witness to their faith and, incidentally, the Holy Father had not only offered up his prayers for the miners but had send rosary beads to be sent down to them. Aileen said we should help each other in our needs and weaknesses, completing her reflections by quoting Cardinal Newman on radiating Christ, “,Dear Christ, shine through me and be so in me that every soul I come into contact with may feel thy presence in my soul. Let them look up and see no longer me, but only Jesus. Stay with me and then I shall begin to shine and be a beacon to others. The light of Jesus will be all from thee. None of it will be mine. It will be thou shining on others through me”,. Written petitions were collected and placed on the altar followed by the recitation of the Rosary whilst the congregation walked in procession around the Cathedral following the new Leeds Diocesan UCM banner. Mrs Maureen Thompson sang ‘,Panis Angelicus’, accompanied by the Cathedral organist. Father McLaughlin very kindly gave a Benediction to complete the service. He wished us all a safe journey home and expressed the hope that next year’,s Rosary Rally would again be held at the Cathedral which drew a resounding round of applause. Tea and cakes were served in the Wheeler Hall.

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Nov 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

INTERFAITH Page 7 Classified Advertising “,Meeting God in Friend and Stranger”, –, Summary Part 1 WHAT IS DIALOGUE? “,In Britain today we are engaged in a process of learning how to construct and live in a society made up of people of many different faiths. This is a process from which no-one is excused.”, (Archbishop Vincent Nichols in the Foreword to the document). Strong words indeed. He goes on to say that this insistence arises from two related convictions: 1) That belief in God is a force for good in our society today. We know that many say religion is divisive or irrational. Christians believe that the quest for God is rooted in the human spirit and that, despite our failings, this human quest brings us to holiness, goodness, compassion, forgiveness and truth. The truth is we find our true humanity in the quest for God. 2) That our faith guides us to Christ as the unique pathway to God and that our faith guides us as to how we are to learn about and cooperate with people of other religions. It is this guidance for Catholics which the document sets out –, it may also provide insight for all those of other faiths and of none about the task of dialogue which we all face. The Bishops then point out that attachment to religious identity is the deepest attachment people have. Anything that helps us understand different beliefs must contribute to peace in times when peace and justice are so threatened. In our small world beliefs count for peace or for conflict –, dialogue aids peace. The Bishops encourage us to regard “,dialogue as an essential part of our witness today”,. They understand that as a Church we may be preoccupied with inward-looking problems (no doubt we have them!) but nonetheless we are called to face outwards in dialogue taking Christ as our model. This is the task of the Church –, to be a sign or sacrament of the reconciliation with God which we witness to and which is for all humanity. The Bishops urge us to work with our fellow Christians ecumenically in dialogue. They say: “,We have much to learn from them”,. This is a fact borne out by Catholics who have become involved in interfaith dialogue. Often Christians of other denominations are to the forefront of the local “,dialogue of action”, –, standing alongside those of other religions and working for the common good in practical ways. We Catholics, with notable and laudable exceptions, have not been yet able to leave our own “,comfort zones”, confidently. We should take courage that now we have the Bishops behind all our efforts to do so and that we will be welcomed by other Christians who do value the Catholic gifts we bring. Moreover dialogue is a joyful thing to do –, lives are transformed by the meetings of those who seek God. Our Bishops then say that dialogue is a powerful rebuttal to all those who say that in our so- called secular society, religion is dead. Interreligious dialogue is making a vital contribution to our society –, it offers hope and vitality to a society seeking harmony and meaning. With these words of introduction the Bishops then in Chapter 1 turn to a preliminary definition of interreligious dialogue. First they set the big picture: “,The whole history of our salvation is one long, varied dialogue which begins with God and which He prolongs with us in so many different ways.”, This is a magnificent backdrop to our human task of dialogue. Can we imagine that God has been speaking to us in an eternal dialogue of love since the first instant of creation? Then that God has been in dialogue with humanity through the whole history of our salvation –, culminating in the Word which is Christ? Then that, most intimately, God is in dialogue with each one of us –, (as Muslims say: “,God is closer to us than our jugular vein) reconciling us to Himself.”, If we can wake up in some small way to all these marvels –, then we can begin to realise that the call to dialogue goes to the roots of our identity as Christians. Then the Bishops come to the details of practical dialogue. It is not only discussion, they say, but all positive and constructive dialogue with individuals and communities of other faiths directed at mutual understanding and enrichment. It is as Pope John Paul II said: “,Not so much an idea to be studied as a way of living in positive relationship with others.”, Various reports into the state of our northern cities spoke of an atmosphere of fear and of people living “,parallel lives”,. This is the opposite of dialogue as defined by the late Pope. We are called to live in positive relationship with others. Dialogue includes living as good neighbours. Often Catholics may think dialogue is for the experts in religion. No –, it’,s too important to be left to them! It is often nothing more than being neighbourly. It can go on from that to be working with those of other religions in matters of common concern or to theological exchange. But most of all dialogue is a frame of mind, an attitude –, of willingness to get to know our neighbour’,s religious life and culture. The Bishops talk of the ‘,Challenge of Difference’,. Dialogue does mean trying to cross the ‘,gulf of difference’, to be open to the goodness and truth we might find there, but also the real differences as well as what we share in common. In our discovery of differences, the Bishops say, God can lead us into further truth about himself. The Bishops touch on a very important aspect of our faith. God’,s mystery can never be fully within our grasp. Our journey as learners is endless. We are pilgrims towards a greater fullness of truth. That said, we do journey in the light of God’,s revelation inChrist, and so we can confess that we may find something false in what others believe, something which is not a glimpse of God’,s truth or holiness. It is an essential part of dialogue that, in courtesy, we say so.”, Those we dialogue with vary in their attitudes. Some are hostile, some welcoming. Some, because of past experiences of relations with Christians, view talk of dialogue with fear and suspicion. The idea of dialogue, where both sides listen in order to understand and appreciate the other, rather than bargaining, arguing or seeking to prove superiority or to convert or persuade may be utterly alien to them. Some Catholics, and some who belong to other religions, regard dialogue as a betrayal of the faith they proclaim. Such criticisms, the Bishops say often issue from a misunderstanding of the nature of dialogue. Dialogue does mean being aware of our own prejudices and being able to ‘,empty ourselves’, so that we can truly meet the reality of others’, beliefs. Dialogue means being prepared to be surprised and to change our minds. If we view our neighbour as being made in God’,s image and as being involved in the same dialogue we ourselves take part in with God –, then we may learn the true nature of another’,s beliefs. Be sure that others have preconceptions about us! We must listen to them and try and correct them patiently. The Bishops conclude this first part of the document by admitting that the challenge of dialogue demands genuine love and respect, openness to truth and goodness. It requires a firm grasp of our own faith and a willingness to be led by its light. We shall see in subsequent parts of this summary that our Church “,recognises the presence of what is true and holy in other religions as being ‘,rays of the Truth’, and ‘,seeds of the Word’,. The call to dialogue should certainly be marked with caution but the need for this should not undermine it but ensure we engage in it with integrity. Next month: Dialogue and the changing face of Britain. A REMINDER: National Interfaith Week –, takes place from November 21st to 27th. In parish, school or as individuals do not forget our offer, as the Diocesan Interreligious Relations Commission, to support any activities you may like to promote. Contact us via: www.dioceseofleeds.org.uk/interfaith or (for David Jackson) Tel 01274 581094 or email : dandt55@btinternet.com Feasts and Festivals of Other Religions 21 November: Sikhism –, Birthday of Guru Nanak –, the first Sikh Guru. A great occasion for rejoicing for the Sikh communities in our area. Wish your Sikh neighbours and friends every blessing. 24 November: Sikhism –, Martyrdom of Guru Tegh Bahadur in 1675. Under orders from the Moghul Emperor, the ninth Guru was executed in public near the Red Fort in Delhi for upholding the individual’,s right to worship in the manner of his/her choice. He defended Hindus in this instance. A Sikh Saint and martyr –, a powerful image for all involved in interfaith relations. 2 to 9 December: Judaism –, Hanukah. Celebrates the re-dedication of the Temple in Jerusalem after it was captured by the Maccabee brothers from the Syrian Greeks. Candles are lit for each of the 8 days of the festival. The candles are lit from right to left on a Hanukkiah –, a nine-branched menorah. The ninth candle from which all the others are lit is called the “,Servant”, (shamash) candle. The miracle of the replenished oil is remembered by cooking foods with oil –, latkes (potato cakes) and doughnuts. Children may play the game of dreidel to commemorate the great miracle. Wish your Jewish neighbours –, “,Happy Hanukah”,. 7 December: Islam - Al-Hijra (New Year’,s Day) The Muslim calendar dates from the time when Muhammad and his followers fled persecution in Makkah to establish themselves in Medina to the north in Saudi Arabia. Wish your Muslim neighbours and friends “,A Happy and Peaceful New Year”,. 8 December: Buddhism –, Bodhi Day. Some Buddhists celebrate Gautama Buddha’,s attainment of enlightenment on this day in December under the Bodhi tree in Bodhgaya, north India. Wish any Buddhists you may know a good feast day. 16 December: Islam (Shi’,a Muslims) –, Ashura (The Day of Mourning) the holy day observed on the 10th of the Islamic month of Muharram. For Shi’,a Muslims it as a major festival and day of mourning marking the martyrdom of the Prophet`s grandson, Hussein. Contact Caroline on 01223 968 649 for information LEEDS CATHOLIC MARRIAGE CARE Marriage isn’,t always easy —, Counselling can help For an appointment in confidence, with an understanding and experienced listener, please telephone: LEEDS 0113 261 8045 HUDDERSFIELD 01484 422523 A Relationship Counselling Service Wanted for the Missions Large Statues (Even damaged ones), old vestments, pictures, church fittings, rosaries, prayer books, etc. Please ring Mr. B. Ferris KSC, 102 Moor St, Earlsdon, Coventry CV5 6EY Tel: 02476 676986

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Nov 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

PAGE 8 An Event to Remember! O n Friday 22nd October Mount St Mary’,s Catholic High School enjoyed their annual ‘,Sponsored Events’, afternoon. Students from Years 7, 8 and 9 chose their events from a fun-filled list including a disco social in the hall, 5 a-side-football, hill running, a cooking session, basketball and surfing the net. Between them, our students have pledged an impressive £,5000, money that will help a number of charitable causes. A special well done to Charley-Travis Brennan from 8KiH who managed to complete a remarkable 32 laps around the hill running circuit! Former Prime Minister of Haiti Visits Leeds School Former Prime Minister of Haiti, Michè,le Duvivier Pierre-Louis, visited a Leeds school on Thursday 14 October. The former leader spoak to pupils at Cardinal Heenan Catholic High School about development issues and the re-building of Haiti following the devastating earthquake last January. Madam Pierre-Louis was Prime Minister of Haiti from September 2008 to November 2009. The former premier is visiting the UK as part of her work for ‘,Progressio’,, a charity that helps people in developing countries to overcome poverty and take power over their own lives. Since leaving office, Mme Pierre-Louis has worked on the world stage to advocate a just rebuilding of Haiti. She is now executive director of the Knowledge and Freedom Foundation (FOKAL), an educational organisation. She holds a visiting Professorship at Harvard University. Liz Cox, Headteacher at Cardinal Heenan, said: ‘,This is a wonderful opportunity for our pupils to learn about development issues and to meet a world leader. Our distinguished visitor will be in the UK for two days and we are the only school that she will be visiting during her busy schedule. ’, The former Prime Minister took on a central role in rebuilding Haiti after the Duvalier dictatorship. She has become a world advocate for the just rebuilding of Haiti, following the earthquake last January. Madam Pierre-Louis has worked extensively on literacy programmes and has taken a lead on agrarian reform.

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101 days of Prayer for Peace in Sudan Leeds diocese was privileged to welcome Bishop Rudolph Deng, Diocese of Wau, Sudan for a week-end visit 16th -18th October. Bishop Rudolph is in the UK to seek support for a free, fair and peaceful referendum on the status of South Sudan. The referendum will take place on January 9th 2011 and CAFOD’,s partners (Sudan Catholic Church and the Sudan Ecumenical Forum) have sent us an appeal for prayer. The Background. As part of the 2005 Comprehensive Peace Agreement (CPA), which brought to an end more than 20 years of civil war in Sudan, the UK government promised to support a fair, free and transparent referendum on independence for Southern Sudan. This referendum will take place on 9 January 2011, and at least 60 per cent of registered voters must turn out for it to be valid. The future of the country is in the balance. In response the Sudan Catholic Bishops’, Conference, together with Ecumenical partners, initiated 101 days of prayer for peace. The prayer started in Sudan on September 21st, the International Day of Peace and is continuing until January 1st, World Day of Peace –, 101 days. The Church in Sudan feels these 101 days are an important time to teach people how to be peace-builders and prepare for the referendum by being advocates for peace and asking their communities to pray for peace. They are now asking us to pray in solidarity with them. Prayer of Solidarity Bishop Rudolph was invited to concelebrate the 11.00 mass at St. Anne’,s Cathedral with Bishop David Konstant. He encouraged all of us to join with his people in this movement of prayer. After mass he met with members of the Sudanese community in our diocese over a shared lunch. He was able to bring them ‘,news from home’, as well as listening to their concerns. This is a crucial time for the people of Sudan and Bishop Rudolph again appealed to the people of Leeds to offer their support. The political temperature in Sudan is rising. If the way in which people register and cast their votes is not clearly fair and transparent, the current fragile peace could be at risk and violence could be reignited. The UK government has promised to support the peace process. We can hold them to that promise and urge them to support the outcome of a free and fair referendum. Whatever the result, Sudan will need support to build peace for the long-term. If you would like to urge the UK government to stand in solidarity with the people of Sudan go to http://www.cafod.org.uk/take- action/sudan-peace It is a moment of great hope –, but also a moment of real fear that violence could break out again. Please join the people of Sudan and pray every day that the forthcoming referendum will be free, fair and peaceful. Why not ask your parish to include prayer for Sudan in the intercessions on Sundays this Advent? CAFOD PAGE 9 A Church Arm in Arm with the Poor B ishop Arthur was the keynote speaker on October 9th at the CAFOD /Justice and Peace Conference. ‘,A Suffering Church`, the title of the Bishop’,s presentation, was the fruit of his visit earlier this year to Guatemala and El Salvador. Bishop Arthur was in El Salvador in March for the celebrations marking the 30th anniversary of the martyrdom of Archbishop Romero. He also used the opportunity to visit his friend the apostolic delegate to Guatemala, both occasions affording him a unique insight into the life of the Church in those countries. Guatemala Bishop Arthur shared the deeply moving story of Bishop Juan Gerardi, Bishop of Guatemala City. Bishop Gerardi undertook to chronicle the violence, killings and disappearances of so many people at the hands of the national army during the civil war. He saw the purpose of making public his report as a powerful tool in speaking truth and bringing the perpetrators of the violence to account. Two days after his ‘,Recovery of Historical Memory`, report was published, Bishop Gerardi was bludgeoned to death in the garage of his home on 26th April 1998. His assailants used a concrete slab, disfiguring him to the extent that his face was unrecognisable and identification of the corpse was made only by means of his episcopal ring. A later UN Truth Commission confirmed as accurate much of what Bishop Gerardi had detailed in the report. Solidarity today Archbishop Romero was shot whilst celebrating mass on 24th March 1980 as a consequence of his commitment to be a ‘,voice for the voiceless’,. Whilst in El Salvador Bishop Arthur visited places associated with the Archbishop as well as meeting with the director of the legal centre in San Salvador that Archbishop Romero set up to support poor people seeking justice in a regime where human rights were constantly being violated. It is still active today supporting people in a variety of ways. He also visited CAFOD’,s programmes supporting children who are at risk because of violence. He learned about the work being done to prevent young people being drawn into gangs. School for many young children is the only place they can feel safe. The bishop was grateful that there are still people of great courage, compassion and vision today, people like the CAFOD partners he met, who are working alongside those who are poor and oppressed. The Church in our diocese A notable feature of the day was the participation of students from Holy Family High School, Carlton as well as the contribution of students from St. Mary`s Menston who facilitated a workshop. They explained how students from the school, in conjunction with the Myddelton Grange team and Leeds Justice and Peace Commission, are constructing a ‘,Climate Justice Walk’, using CAFOD resources. They want not only to raise awareness but also to promote local action for climate justice. Other workshops explored the work of Church Action on Poverty, the West Yorkshire Ecumenical Chaplaincy and Connect2 –,making local/global connections. ADVENT PRAYER God of light, shine forth, show us how to bring hope to others. God of mercy, help us to comfort your people and share in their joy. God of hope, make us an Advent people, preparing the way for life in all its fullness. Amen. Catherine Gorman/CAFOD Bishop Deng, from Wau, Sudan visited Leeds Diocese to ask for support at this critical moment in Sudan’,s history

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Nov 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 10 S unday October 31st was the date chosen by the Parish of St Patrick, Elland, to celebrate its Golden Jubilee and to remember the Golden Jubilee of its present Parish Priest Fr Sean Leonard. A gem of a sixties Church, as it is, sitting in rather Northern surroundings, it was pleasantly full for the 10am Parish Mass that the Bishop had come to celebrate. It shone like a new pin and was resplendent in its floral arrangements for the day. In his opening words the Bishop said how happy he was to be there and how it was this Church that made it possible for them all to gather in that place. As the Mass got under way the very young children left the main assembly to take part in their own liturgy –, but leaving enough behind to form part of a really good choir of Adults and children that not only performed well but also sang appropriate music to complement the Mass, leaving a feeling that this was a gathering that was use to this kind of celebration. The Bishop in his homily pointed out that though everyone knew the beatitudes, which was the Gospel reading they had listen to he wondered if they realised that the translation should be How fortunate are they who…,…,. They were fortunate he said who were poor…, who mourn.. who were meek because they were like Jesus and they will receive a gift …, sharing the life of Jesus. He went on to point out that Fr Sean was celebrating 50 years a priest and that Coronation Street was celebrating 50 years as well –, here was the Priest the Church and the people all celebrating 50 years of example –, they were he said that example by their lives they brought the Church into the world. At the end of the Mass the Bishop thanked everyone who had taken part and congratulated them on all they were doing. He said he had just visited their school and was most impressed by what he had seen. However Fr Sean stepped forward to claim the last word as a Parish Priest should he said and thanked all especially the Bishop for all they had done –, with which the congregation agreed in long applause. How Fortunate You Are

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Nov 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 12 LEEDS TRINITY UNIVERSITY COLLEGE I nternational students can follow a new pathway to undergraduate study at Leeds Trinity University College, thanks to a new partnership with the Twin Group. Established since 1993 as a provider of English language summer schools and work experience for international students, Twin is now working with UK educational institutions to offer a new route to degree courses via its international foundation programme. Twin representative Maciej Kiszka, a TESOL* specialist, is setting up the new programme at Leeds Trinity, which will be the first Twin collaboration with a Leeds higher education institution. The international foundation programme at Leeds Trinity will focus on English language and study skills, supplemented by preliminary studies of two additional subjects, including the student’,s likely degree subject. Maciej said, “,International students may find the UCAS system daunting and this offers an alternative route to a UK degree, with a place on a degree course guaranteed to those who pass the foundation programme. “,I think the project has a great future in a vibrant city like Leeds and Leeds Trinity is the ideal venue, with its welcoming campus offering lots of facilities and events for students.”, Leeds Trinity currently has around 200 international students, recruited and supported by International Development Manager Min Li and her team. Min said, “,We pride ourselves on providing a friendly and supportive environment in which international students can flourish. “,The association with Twin will facilitate the admissions process so that we can welcome even more to benefit from our great learning environment and contribute to making Leeds Trinity an even better international community.”, For more information contact Maciej on 0113 283 7100 ext 490, or email M.Kiszka@leedstrinity.ac.uk *Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages Leeds Trinity twinned with new international partner Retirement surprise for an outstanding teacher A fter 34 years teaching at St John Fisher Catholic High School, Harrogate, Mary Rogerson felt confident that not much took place in school without her knowledge. However on her retirement this summer, she had an unexpected visit from the Principal of Leeds Trinity, Professor Freda Bridge, to present her with a special award for her outstanding contribution to Catholic education. Each year Leeds Trinity University College recognises teachers who have trained at Leeds Trinity, gained substantial experience in Catholic schools, made a strong contribution to the Catholic school community, and been involved in training Leeds Trinity’,s student teachers. Visiting Leeds Trinity for the All Saints Day celebrations, Mary said, “,Winning this award was a great honour and a complete surprise –, that’,s when I realised that I didn’,t know everything that was going on in school!”, “,Although I was ready to pass on the baton to the new young generation, life seems quiet without the buzz and hurly burly of school life. I hope to use my experience to make a contribution to education once I have recharged my batteries.”, Mary was nominated for the award by St John Fisher’,s head teacher, Paul Jackson, for her commitment to the life of the school and long service, which saw her advance from newly qualified teacher to Deputy Head, including one term as acting head teacher. Paul said, “,Mary was a very special teacher, who cared passionately about people and always made time to listen to a child or a colleague. We have missed her this term, and really appreciate how she worked tirelessly and often behind the scenes to make sure things ran smoothly.”, Mary studied for the BEd at Leeds Trinity, starting in 1970, and went onto do a BPhil at York, before starting her teaching career at St John Fisher. Her contact with Leeds Trinity continued through the provision of school based training for trainee teachers. Events at Leeds Trinity University College Postgraduate Open Evening Wednesday 24 November 5.30 to 7.30pm Find out about the postgraduate courses on offer at Leeds Trinity, meet tutors, students, finance and admissions staff and get answers to all your questions about postgraduate study at Leeds Trinity. Our range of postgraduate degrees, diplomas and certificates include journalism, secondary teacher training, education, business studies and Victorian studies. To book visit www.leedstrinity.ac.uk, call 0113 283 7150 or email enquiries@leedstrinity.ac.uk Carol Service Thursday 2 December at 7.30pm All welcome. Music will be provided by the Leeds Trinity choir, the Music Group of St Mary’,s Church, and other guest musicians. Lecture presented by Joyce Simpson Wednesday 8 December at 12.30pm John Keble and the Christian year: Plainchant or ‘,Pintpot of simple measures’, Eastern Christian Seminar Thursday 9 December at 7.15pm Byzantine Heresies and the Papacy as revealed through the frescoes in S Maria Antiqua in the Roman Forum Lecture presented by Eileen Rubery, Girton College, Cambridge. For more information please call 0113 283 7126 or email s.simpson@leedstrinity.ac.uk

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Page 13

Nov 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

13 Funeral Services W. Lever Ltd BRADFORD 01274 547137 524 THORNTON ROAD, BRADFORD BD8 9NB FOR OVER 75 YEARS PROVIDING A COMPLETE PERSONAL &, CARING 24 HOUR FUNERAL SERVICE CHAPEL OF REST H UGHES F UNERAL S ERVICES (Catholic Funeral Directors) 180 YORK ROAD, LEEDS LS9 9NT. Tel 2480953/63 152 GREEN LANE, CROSSGATES. Tel 2326900 3 HOLLIN PARK PARADE, OAKWOOD ROUNDABOUT Tel 2499338 Web: wwww.hughesfuneralservices.co.uk Email: info@hughesfuneralservices.co.uk Family owned and managed. Fully Qualified in all aspects. 24 Hour Service Guaranteed Fixed Price Funeral Plans etc. “,At a time of bereavement we carry out our duties with dignity and respect”, In times of bereavement please contact: B. J. MELIA &, SONS (B. J. Melia Dip F.D.) F UNERAL D IRECTORS AND M ONUMENTAL M ASONS Private Chapel of Rest 64 GIBBET STREET, HALIFAX Telephone: 01422 354453 PRE-PAID FUNERAL SERVICE AVAILABLE DETAILS ON REQUEST FORTHCOMING EVENTS at The Briery Retreat Centre 38 Victoria Avenue, Ilkley LS29 9BW Tel, 01943 607287 Email: srscs@aol.com Website:http://www.briery.org.uk 25th November Pre-Advent Quiet Day The Briery Team 10am-3pm 10th –, 12th December Now fully booked Advent Preached Retreat “,Christmas is for Adults Too!”, Fr. Daniel O’,Leary Weekend A time to reflect on the astonishing and life-changing meaning of the Incarnation –, and maybe for the first time. There are beautiful secrets they never told us about. 15th December Carol Service The Briery Team An evening of carols with mulled wine and mince pies. 7.30 pm Year of Catholic Education 2010-2011 T he annual CESEW Parliamentary Reception took place on 19th October 2010 at the House of Commons, hosted by Jim Dobbin MP. The event, attended by over 100 headteachers, governors, diocesan education officers, MPs, Peers and other friends of Catholic education, celebrated the legacy of the Papal Visit by Pope Benedict XVI and marked the beginning of the Year of Catholic Education 2010-2011 Jim Dobbin MP, who hosted the reception for a second consecutive year, welcomed everyone on behalf of his parliamentary colleagues and invited the guests to celebrate the success of the Catholic Education Service. ‘,The Catholic Education Service is integral to the education service right across the country and makes a marvellous contribution to society’,. He also emphasised his pride of the Catholic schools in his constituency in Greater Manchester, saying that ‘,the job they do there is absolutely fantastic’,. In his address to the guests, Chairman of the Catholic Education Service, Bishop Malcolm McMahon spoke about the legacy of the Papal Visit. The Pope ‘,reminded us that in Catholic education, the true purpose of education is that we should all become saints’, and ‘,strive for perfection’,. The Pope gave us, Bishop Malcolm continued, ‘,an agenda of work we really must get on with’,. One aspect of that, he explained, is ‘,the sense of awe and wonder which we try to inculcate in our students and children, which is something we hope and know will lead them to knowing God’,. Chief Executive and Director of CESEW, Oona Stannard, told the guests of the sixth CESEW Parliamentary Reception held in the Palace of Westminster, that the Papal Visit has had a profound effect on all of us and has reminded us that faith does belong in the public space. The visit of the Holy Father, she said, ‘,leaves us invigorated, refreshed and committed to our mission in Catholic education’,. She encouraged the guests to celebrate the Year of Catholic Education in their schools, institutions and dioceses so that people continue to see the legacy of the Papal Visit and see us living out the theme for the year: ‘,I have come so that they may have life and have it to the full’, The Diocese was represented at the Reception by Joanna Jackson, Lay Chaplain at St Joseph’,s College, Bradford and co-ordinator of school chaplains in the diocese, Tony Britten, a Foundation Governor at Notre Dame Sixth Form College and Mount St Mary’,s High School in Leeds and the diocesan representative on the City Council’,s Scrutiny Board for Children’,s Services, and Robert Finnigan who works in the Office for Education and Schools at Hinsley Hall. During the course of the event they were able to meet colleagues from other dioceses and discuss issues that are affecting Catholic schools and colleges in general at the present time. Following on from the Papal Visit and the Parliamentary Reception, over the coming months the Catholic Post will be featuring a series of articles about the Year of Catholic Education and this will also form the theme of the Bishop’,s annual education conference to be held next summer. Jennings Funeral Services (Catholic Funeral Directors) 13 Racca Green, Knottingley WF11 8AT Telephone: 01977 677715 •, Highest standards of care •, Family owned and managed •, Pre payment plans •, 24 hour service •, Personal attention of Barry and Elizabeth Jennings A Personal and Dignified Family Business that Cares S J F Assumption Church Cafod Group Lobby Local MP on Climate Change M embers of the CAFOD group at the Church of the Assumption of our Lady (Part of the new parish of Our Lady of Kirkstall) in Leeds recently lobbied their local MP (Greg Mulholland) about Climate Change. They joined with others in the constituency to press for Government action both locally and internationally. Joe Burns, 55, from Ireland Wood commented : “,we are very concerned about the impact of climate change on the world’,s poorest communities. The current Coalition Government has stressed ‘,fairness’, in this difficult economic period. This must apply internationally as well as nationally and locally so that the millions of people around the world who already live in dire poverty are not further damaged and disadvantaged by the impacts of climate change.”, Further rounds of international talks about Climate Change are due to take place in December and CAFOD is concerned that everything possible is done to ensure that our own government supports a fair deal for the world’,s poorest nations.

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Page 14

Nov 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 14 BREAD FOR BISHOP ARTHUR IN HALIFAX T he children and staff of St Mary’,s school, which was originally founded in 1846, enjoyed a special afternoon with Bishop Arthur as part of his current round of school and parish visits in and around Halifax. Bishop Arthur spent a great deal of time talking to the children and finding out about the school. He was also asked some searching questions by the children, including “,How old are you?”, and “,Do you have any time off?”, The Bishop gave every class a signed Prayer Card from Pope Benedict and asked the children to prayer for His Holiness as he undertakes his very difficult role. As the afternoon came to an end the school gathered in the Main Hall to receive a blessing and to give Bishop Arthur some small gifts –, Among these was a handmade green and white ribbon badge which the children have been selling in aid of the Pakistan Floods Appeal and a loaf of warm bread made by the First Communion Class. As he left, the Bishop asked the school community to undertake a small mission to fit a special stained glass window in the Main Hall in celebration of the Papal visit to England. Mr Mark Brennan (Headteacher) accepted the mission on behalf of the school community and thanked Bishop Arthur for blessing the school with his presence.

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Page 15

Nov 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 15 The Idea of a University T rinity University College, Leeds, yet again laid on a fitting celebration for its feast day on Monday November1st. This year the congregation was joined by two school choirs and children from a number of other schools from across the Diocese as well as the Deputy Lord Mayor and his Consort. Joining them were a number of former heads of the College along with students and friends. The Bishop welcomed them all in his opening remarks and said how good it was to see so many young people there and he thanked them for bringing their school banners with them which they had just brought up in procession. Bishop Arthur in his Homily pointed out how Cardinal John Henry Newman set out ‘,The Idea of a University’, in a series of lectures: ‘,In writing his lectures’,, the Bishop said ‘,Newman was consciously opposing two currents of thought which were emerging in his own time and which have gained strength since. The Utilitarians were arguing that the sole purpose of education is the imparting of skills which will be useful in the workplace, secularists were arguing that there is no such thing as religious truth and that the inclusion of theology in a university curriculum is therefore nonsensical.’, The Bishop went on to outline just what Trinity does do, and how well: ‘,The point I am endeavouring to make’,, He said ‘,is that every subject in the curriculum finds its fullest meaning within the context of the Christian vision of what it is to be a human person. I am not of course suggesting that the religious dimension should be always to the fore. The Second Vatican Council highlighted the need for the Church to respect the secular sphere and academic freedom must be observed. This inner logic, however, points to a deeper truth than is graspable from within the confines of the discipline alone. And academic freedom is exercised most properly through openness to this deeper truth. In the Christian tradition this Truth is the person of Jesus Christ who, as the same Council reminded us, ‘,reveals man unto himself’,. It is, surely, the reason why the chapel stands at the very mouth of this institution –, it is not by coincidence but by design, underscoring a deeper design which suffuses all that is offered through the entire enterprises of this place of learning.’, Full text of the Bishop’,s Homily The beatification of Cardinal John Henry Newman by our Holy Father last month was a highly significant moment for all who are concerned with higher education. Blessed John Henry, who died in 1892 at the age of 91, was a strikingly original theologian, a celebrated educational theorist and practitioner and a tireless and warm-hearted pastor. His writings can help us to understand what we are about in this Catholic University College of Leeds Trinity. As many of you will know, he delivered a series of influential lectures which were gathered together in a book entitled “,The Idea of a University.”, Two of the points which he made in this book are of particular relevance to us now. Firstly, he argued that reality is a single undivided whole and that the different disciplines in a university need to be coordinated to reflect that fact. Secondly, theology needs to be taught in the university because religious truth “,bears upon”, all truth. In writing his lectures, Newman was consciously opposing two currents of thought which were emerging in his own time and which have gained strength since. The Utilitarians were arguing that the sole purpose of education is the imparting of skills which will be useful in the workplace, secularists were arguing that there is no such thing as religious truth and that the inclusion of theology in a university curriculum is therefore nonsensical. Here, in Leeds Trinity, we live in the tension created by these diverging understandings of the purpose of learning. It is not always a comfortable position to occupy. However, the situation here is also replete with possibility. One of the startling things about the recent Papal Visit was that people with no connection to the Catholic Church demonstrated that they wished to learn more about our vision of human reality. The gracious manner in which so many politicians and opinion-formers listened to Pope Benedict’,s speech at Westminster Hall exemplified that. This is, I sense, a providential moment when we can articulate once again the particular dynamic, the specific physiognomy, if you like, of Catholic higher education in the knowledge that we will be listened to, and that others wish to learn about our perspective. There is no need to be defensive. We simply need to be generous. The diverse subject areas which are taught here have been developed in the way they have precisely because they correspond to the Catholic vision of education which Blessed John Henry Newman articulated so beautifully. Time does not allow me to treat of each one, but I hope if I mention a few of them I will convey the point I wish to make. A good number of students study forensic psychology. This, as you know, investigates how we can become locked into negative patterns of behaviour and how, with help, we can be released from such negativity. It points to something beyond what it, by itself, can cover, namely what does it mean to be truly free, what does it mean to be truly healed? This of course lies at the heart of the Gospel –, I came that you may have life and have it to the full. Then there is history. In their first week, first- year students of this subject visit Kirkstall Abbey and the Armley Mill Museum. To understand the first building one needs to consider the great flowering of Christian spirituality in this area during the course of the Middle Ages when there were more monasteries per square mile in Yorkshire than any other part of Christendom, while, during the tour of the second landmark, it is natural for them to ask themselves how the workplace may be humanised - a question to which Catholic social teaching makes a thorough and cogent response. And what about journalism? Can the media be redeemed?! Journalism is based upon the idea that it is possible to tell a story successfully, to convey the reality of the situation which it describes. The discipline, of course, naturally points to questions outside its competence. For example, is there such a thing as objective truth of which journalistic accuracy is an expression? Again, is there a mega-story about humanity which provides a framework for understanding the tragedies and the moments of elation which journalists are charged with narrating for us? The last example I will take is sport, which is a component in several of the degree courses which are offer here. Pope John Paul II developed a theology of sport. He said that the joy that we experience on the field or on the court is an anticipation of heaven. It helps us to understand that we were created for innocent enjoyment and for cooperating with one another. The point I am endeavouring to make is that every subject in the curriculum finds its fullest meaning within the context of the Christian vision of what it is to be a human person. I am not of course suggesting that the religious dimension should be always to the fore. The Second Vatican Council highlighted the need for the Church to respect the secular sphere and academic freedom must be observed. This inner logic, however, points to a deeper truth than is graspable from within the confines of the discipline alone. And academic freedom is exercised most properly through openness to this deeper truth. In the Christian tradition this Truth is the person of Jesus Christ who, as the same Council reminded us, ‘,reveals man unto himself’,. It is, surely, the reason why the chapel stands at the very mouth of this institution –, it is not by coincidence but by design, underscoring a deeper design which suffuses all that is offered through the entire enterprises of this place of learning. When a proper understanding of the relationship between this university college and the Christian faith is understood, those who work and study here are freed to contribute as they judge best. One of the lecturers here, recently remarked, that Leeds Trinity is a place where it is all right to be publicly Christian. Clearly that is how it should be. In this environment gospel-inspired initiatives emerge very naturally. I am thinking, for example, of the MA in Literature and Spirituality. Another illustration is the recent inaugural lecture which Andy Lloyd, the Head of the Centre for Children Young People and Families, delivered here. I gather that he very effectively debunked the idea that children who commit very serious crimes can be categorised as “,evil”, and hence dehumanised. He spoke from his wide experience as a social worker, and now as an academic, he also spoke as a Christian and as an elder in a local Baptist church. At Leeds Trinity, Christians, please God, will continue to express their faith in such creative ways, sometimes implicitly and sometimes more explicitly. In this place people, staff and students, should not only have the freedom to do this but also the confidence because, as Chrstians, we are skilled in humanity. Indeed, Pope Paul VI tellingly said that we are, in fact, “,experts in humanity.”, We have a clear vision of what human flourishing consists of. Just as the person of Christ brings unity to Leeds Trinity at the institutional level, so at the personal level, he should be the one to bring unity and community to the lives of those of you who live and work here –, but it does require, of course, an openness to him. This interior unity, this state of personal integration, is what we call “,holiness”, and which we celebrate as we recall the college’,s feast day. The different qualities which Christ points to in the Beatitudes, taken together, describe the fully integrated person. The passage is a self-portrait by Christ, but there is no selfishness in Christ, there is no crisis of identity with him, and he invites us, too, to grow in our humanity, fully shaped, fully enlivened by him. This pursuit belongs to every age and every circumstance. Blessed Pier Giorgio Frassati, the mountain-climber, political activist and indefatigable helper of the poor, who died aged 24, was famously described by Pope John Paul II as being a “,man of the beatitudes.”, And it is astonishing to see how quickly grace worked in those young people whose banners are on display in the new atrium: Blessed Chiara Badano, a member of the Focolare Movement who died in 1990 and who was beatified only one month ago, St Thé,rè,se of Lisieux, the Carmelite sister whose relics came to Leeds Cathedral last year, and St Gabriel Possenti, who was a member of the Passionist family, to which the Sisters of the Cross and Passion, co- founders of this institution, belong. God is calling the young people in this university college (and indeed all of us) to follow the example of these ordinary people who discovered the extraordinary and become saints. It is for this reason that we have come to Mass today. Like the martyrs in the vision granted to St John in our first reading, we have gathered round the Lamb to worship him. In giving his life for us Jesus showed us something of the greatness of what it is to be truly human. Blessed John Henry Cardinal Newman delighted in the Mass. He knew and spoke of how he was being transformed through encountering Christ at this Altar. On his death in 1890, the Leeds Mercury printed this: ‘,Few cultivated Englishmen will hear without emotion the news of Cardinal Newman’,s death. In the fashion of his death, indeed, there is nothing to regret, he had outlived the storms of controversy, the clouds of misunderstanding, and he is called away in the peacefulness of an honoured old age. His countrymen will mourn for him with no bitterness, but in such wise as is fitting when the venerated figure of a man of conspicuous genius and goodness passes from the scene.’, How truly marvellous it would be if the same could also be said of us not only for what we pursued in this place but for allowing it to shape us. But let us never forget, Newman’,s greatness came from Christ his Lord and his Teacher.

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Page 16

Nov 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 16 BATTLE John Battle KCSG At the Votive Mass of All Saints on the occasion of the Leeds Trinity`s Patraal Feast Day held at Trinity and All Saints University College on 1st November in his brilliant thought provoking sermon on Blessed John Henry Newman`s `Idea of a University` Bishop Arthur Roche dropped in an aside to the physiognomy of a place of learning. Physiognomy is a rarely used word now, and it means the art of judging character and disposition from the features of the face. In the nineteenth century it implied foretelling a person`s destiny from the features and hues of their face. The great Yorkshire writer, Charlotte Bronte commented in one of her novels Jane Eyre “,We know of your skill in physiognomy –, read that countenance”,. The face has commonly been taken as an index to the mind and character. Notably in chapel in Trinity and All Saints is a remarkably striking sculptured crucifix with a large steel figure whose muscles are stretched to full extension. Yet it is the head and face of Christ that is the most transfixing. Christ`s head is turned upwards and the eyes and mouth are in a gesture of desperate appeal to God the Father in Heaven. The physiognomy spells out those last words of Christ on the cross recorded in St John`s Gospel “,My God my God why have you forsaken me”, - Christ`s agonistic cry to his Father humanly stretched to the utmost limit. The face on the Trinity Crucifix draws the deep sympathetic response - “,For God`s sake get this man down”,. It is unbearable to gaze on that suffering face without experiencing both the need and the sense of helplessness to do something. The suffering Christ is crying out not only to his Father but to us all who cast a glance at his face, to intervene and to act. The Salvadoran Jesuit priest, Fr Ellacuria martyred for campaigning for justice for the poor challenged us to set our eyes and hearts on people suffering from poverty,hunger, oppression and repression. He said “,I only want two things, I want you to set your eyes and your hearts on those people who are suffering so much some from poverty and hunger, others from oppression and repression. Then standing before these people thus crucified, ask yourselves what have I done to crucify them? What must I do for these people to rise again?”, Fr Ellacuria invites us to seek out the crucified people, get to know who they are, ensure that they are not invisible and then to embrace them in love –, set our hearts on them. We have, therefore, to identify the suffering, the poor and oppressed in our world, wherever they are and take their part. Then `standing before them` we are asked to examine our relationship to them publicly. Asking `what have I done to crucify them` means examining and confessing how I am part of the problem, nailing the suffering poor up on the cross, using the hammer or passing over the nails, holding the wood steady, and further back providing the tree for the wood. Fr Ellacuria goes further, stressing that recognising the existence of the suffering poor, taking their part, at home and abroad, even confessing our role `in their crucifixion` is not enough `standing before` the crucified people we are publicly asked what am I doing to crucify them? What am I doing to get them down from the cross? Rather than contributing to nailing more people up, what practical actions are we taking to get people down and to ensure no more are nailed up. In his reflective book “,O God show me Your Face”, the French Dominican Fr Pierre Hugo OP spells out how we usually envisage a distorted face of God. We superimpose our own images in the absence of a clear portrait of the Father. He warns us that we can recreate the face of God in our own distorted image as if in a poor mirror. He reminds us of the ministry of the Dominican priest Fr Bartolome de las Casas who sailed out with the Spanish Conquistadores to `discover` the West Indies. Witnessing the invasions of the Spanish sailors following Christopher Columbus he reacted against the murder and enslavement of the native Indians, insisting that they “,had souls”, and should be respected as fellow human beings. He petitioned the King of Spain to stop the violence as counter productive to the missionary task of converting them to the Gospel, He pointed out that “,the face of Christ has been altered in the eyes of the Indians”,. They saw a violent aggressive face advancing on them and threatening them with death. Little wonder they feared the Christians and when offered the choice of heaven and hell they opted to prefer to go to hell because at least the Christians would not be there. The physiognomy of Christ presented to them had been distorted into a deadly threat. Bartolome de las Casas reminded the missionaries and conquistadors that they were responsible for presenting the Indians with the face of Christ. In the main entrance foyer at Trinity and All Saints was a photographic exhibition put up by CAFOD comprising a series of portraits of the beautiful faces of the women of the women from the Democratic Republic of the Congo who had been raped in the terrible violence still blighting that country. They were the faces of women who had suffered –, violently pinned to a cross. Their physiognomy revealed something of their suffering –, their beauty demanded a compassion “,why”, and the need to campaign to support them and prevent repeats. I think it was St Gregory of Nissa who quietly prayed “,For 30 years I searched for you to discover you were searching for me”,, but the face of God that is revealed is nothing less than a personal call to intervene to go from the alter and the sacrifice of the Mass and take the crucified people down from the Cross. What I must do for these people to rise again is to act. The Face of God Singing for the Pope in Birmingham T housands of worshippers cheered and waved flags as the Pope celebrated Mass in Birmingham`s Cofton Park on the fourth and final day of his state visit to the UK. A massed choir of 2000 included some 500 members from the Diocese of Leeds Schools Singing Programme, all dressed in their papal yellow hoodies! Eleven Coaches left Yorkshire, literally at the crack of dawn, to transport children in time for the extensive security checks on site at 4am. The rehearsal began two hours later, but the rain, cold and lack of sleep did little to dampen the excitement of the young singers. The children, who all attend Catholic schools, are drawn from Bradford, Keighley, Huddersfield, Harrogate and Leeds. These include all the members of the Cathedral boys` and girls` choirs, the Bradford boys ‘,and girls` choirs, Huddersfield boys` and girls` choirs and Harrogate boys` choir. The pope`s arrival by helicopter was could be seen on the large television screens at the venue, and once the Popemobile came into view, the singing began with the hymn ‘,Praise to the holiest in the height`. The mass was broadcast live around the world on most news channels and afterwards the Pope could be seen speaking to some of the organisers. These included the choir`s conductor, Fr Peter Jones from Birmingham Diocese, and the Master of Ceremonies, Mgr Philip Moger, Dean of Leeds Cathedral. After the service the eleven coaches made their way quietly back to Yorkshire and the singers caught up on a nights missed sleep. Preparations for all the children taking part had been taking place over the last 6 months, in schools. The music for the Beatification of John Henry Newman included many of the hymns he had written over his life. Also featured was a new mass by James MacMillan for choir, organ and brass. Musical Events in the Diocese: Advent/Christmas 2010 ST CECELIA’,S DAY LUNCHTIME CAROL CONCERT Monday 22nd November, 1pm at Leeds Town Hall. A lunchtime carol concert sung by the combined Cathedral Choirs and the choir of Leeds Parish Church ADVENT CAROL SERVICE Sunday 28th November, 4pm at Leeds Cathedral The annual Advent Carol Service sung by the combined Cathedral Choirs. Early seating for the congregation is advisable. BRADFORD CAROL SERVICE Sunday 12th November, 4pm at St Joseph’,s Church, Bradford. A traditional carol service sung by the Bradford Boys` and Girls` Choirs. CATHOLIC CARE CAROL CONCERT Sunday 12th November, 4pm at Leeds Cathedral Carols and readings for all to sing. Music led by school choirs from the Diocese of Leeds Schools Singing Programme. LEEDS BUSINESS COMMUNITY CAROL SERVICE Monday 13th November, 1.15pm at Leeds Cathedral The carol service for the Leeds Business Community, organised by the West Yorkshire Society of Chartered Accountants. The music is sung by the Cathedral Boys` Choir. BRADFORD CAROL CONCERT Saturday 18th December, 3pm at St Georges Hall, Bradford The Bradford Boys` and Girls` Choir join the Bradford Festival Choral Society and Rothwell Temperance Band for the annual carol concert in St Georges Hall. CHRISTMAS CAROL SERVICE Sunday 19th December, 4pm at Leeds Cathedral The main Cathedral Christmas Carol Service sung by the combined Cathedral Choirs and Holy Rosary School Choir. Early arrival advisable for seating. New CD of Cathedral Organ An exciting recording is now available of the new Klais organ at Leeds Cathedral, played by Benjamin Saunders. The disc features music for all tastes including original compositions by Vierne, Guilmant, Part, Howells and Kushnariov alongside transcriptions of music by Glass, Dvorak and Britten. The CD booklet contains full details and pictures of the organ. To get your copy, please send a cheque for £,11.99 made payable to ",Leeds Cathedral", along with your name and address to Leeds Cathedral, Great George Street, Leeds, LS2 8BE

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Page 17

Nov 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

ROME Page 17 November is a month of plenary meetings here in the Vatican, just as it is for many of the different bishops conferences in countries around the world: before the great liturgical seasons of Advent and Christmas begin, they offer an opportunity to look back at events of the past year, take stock and set out a vision for the coming months…,. That’,s exactly what the Pontifical Justice and Peace Council has been doing under the leadership of its new president, Cardinal Peter Turkson from Ghana who took over his new job in January this year. For two days at the beginning of November, members from around the world came for a brainstorming behind closed doors, sharing their expertise and experience of peace and human rights promotion in places as diverse as Russia, the Philippines, Cuba, Argentina and the Democratic Republic of Congo. The Cardinal himself brings a wide experience of justice and peace work across the region of West Africa, notably in support of communities opposing exploitation of natural resources by governments and multinational companies. He also has significant skills in ecumenical and interfaith relations, growing up with a Methodist mother and Catholic father in a country boasting an impressive array of Christian, Muslim and traditional religions. When he took over his new post, he joked with journalists that continuity would be the hallmark of his leadership: ",If Africans would excuse my expression, I do not wish to become like an African head of state!", he said. ",When a new government comes in, it sweeps away all that has been going on before, accusing it of corruption. Instead I want to maintain a sense of continuity, to find out what has been going on, how far it`s got.", Over recent months he’,s been doing just that, using the Pope’,s encyclical Caritas in Veritate as a starting point for discussions in different countries about political, economic and environmental justice in an increasingly globalised and inter- dependent world. The following week the Pontifical Council for Culture held its four day plenary assembly, in very different style with a broad spectrum of invited guests speaking about the need to find new languages with which to communicate the timeless Gospel values to today’,s culture. Under the guidance of Italian cardinal-elect Gianfranco Ravasi, a prolific author and popular TV commentator, participants set out to discuss the Church’,s use of modern communications media, “,in particular cinema, music, figurative and plastic arts, the internet and multimedia platforms, in order to discover the words, colours, sounds and images capable of presenting Christian life as a valid experience for everyone today”,. Departing from the rather dry and predictable presentations that usually characterise such events, the plenary was structured around discussions with experts in these different fields, from veteran Italian composer Ennio Morricone to the managing director of Microsoft Italia. Also under the spotlight was Ravasi’,s ambitious ‘,Courtyard of the Gentiles’, project which draws on his own vast network of contacts with artists, writers and other men and women of cultural or intellectual renown but with little or no faith. Beginning in Paris next spring, the council will be organising a series of debates and dialogue with ‘,those who are far from God’,, just as the temple in Jesus’, time had a space which welcomed those who wished to learn more about the God being worshipped within its sanctuary. Last but certainly not least is the plenary of the Council for Christian Unity which takes place from November 15th to 19th with the theme ‘,Towards a New Phase of Ecumenical Dialogue’,. Significantly, the Council is currently celebrating the 50th anniversary of its founding under Pope John XXIII, an event which will be officially commemorated by leaders of the different dialogues today, notably the Anglican Archbishop of Canterbury Dr Rowan Williams and the Orthodox Metropolitan of Pergamon John Zizioulas. Under the leadership of another new president for that council, Swiss theologian and archbishop Kurt Koch, members will be examining ecumenical relations on the different continents, as well as looking ahead to some new areas of theological debate and practical cooperation. Philippa M Hitchen Our Rome Correspondent TAKING STOCK Silence, Candles and Poppies –, In Remembrance R emembrance Sunday 2010 dawned bright and sunny as the people of St Joseph’,s, Castleford gathered to celebrate Mass and to remember and honour the war dead of the parish. Father Durcan began Mass by welcoming everyone to the celebration and inviting the congregation to observe a two- minute silence, to offer prayers for all those who have given their lives in war and for those they leave behind to mourn them. Following the Offertory Procession the names of each of the fifty-one men from the parish who had given their lives during the world wars and two from the war in Afghanistan were read out as an individual candle was lit in his memory. The poignant words of Lawrence Benyon who died in 1943 reverberated around the church …,.. ‘,When you go home tell them of us and say, for your tomorrow we gave our today’,. Father Durcan then invited Mrs Kath Betteridge to carry the Poppy wreath to the altar. Mrs Betteridge’,s brother Able Seaman Thomas Raftery had been killed in action on May21st 1941 at the age of 20 when his ship the HMS Juno was attacked –, his name is inscribed along with his comrades on the Royal Naval Memorial, at Chatham in Kent and reads…,. ‘,In honour of the Navy and to the abiding memory of these ranks and ratings of this port, who laid down their lives in the defence of the Empire and have no other grave than the sea’,. At this point in the celebrations Father Durcan said that it gave him pleasure to invite Mrs Greta Sharkey and her granddaughters Sarah and Emma to present a book which they had researched and written containing a biography of each of the thirteen men who died during WWII. He blessed the book and said that it would be placed on the War Memorial at the rear of the Church for all to read. He concluded by saying that he hoped the book, along with the biography written about the thirty-eight men who died in WWI which had been written a few years earlier by Mrs Bellwood, would be an inspiration for generations of parishioners to come to remember these men with pride and honour. Many of the parishioners were visibly moved as to bring proceedings to a fitting end one of the altar boys, Evan Lynch, played the ‘,Last Post’,.

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Page 18

Nov 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 18 BE STILL/DIARY/ENGAGEMENTS First Friday of the Month SINGLE CATHOLICS meet at 8.00pm for mass at our Lady of Lourdes, Leeds. We also a have a program of 4-8 events during the month, walks, meals, cinema and theatre trips, etc. Phone David Easterbrook Chairman LDSC on 0113 2289468 evenings between 6 and 7.30pm only. Membership is open to all single Catholics who are free to marry within the church. Leeds Cathedral 20-35 Group Young people (20-35 years old) who attend St. Anne`s Cathedral in Leeds meet regularly every Thursday for spiritual, social and charitable activities. For further details search Facebook for “,Leeds Cathedral 20-35 Group”,, phone 07816 891872 or 07759 591233 or email leedscathedral20-35@hotmail.co.uk Crusade Mass The crusade Mass and Rosary of Mary Immaculate is held at St Patrick`s Church, Bradford, on the first Saturday of the Month after 12.15pm Mass Second Sunday of Month 2pm Meeting of Bradford Fraternity of the Secular Franciscan Order at St. Anthony`s Convent, Clayton, Bradford.` `Third Sunday of Month 2.30pm Meeting of Leeds Fraternity of the Secular Franciscan Order at the Cathedral. Ampleforth Renewal Community Ampleforth Abbey, meet 1st Sunday each month, at Ampleforth. 11 .30am Praise, Speaker, Sharing Groups, Reconciliation, Exposition, Finishing with Mass and Healing at 4.00pm. All enquiries: Seamus McEneaney 01429 426181 Monthly Vocations Mass Mount St Joseph’,s Chapel 11am First Wednesday of Month. Calix: An organisation for those recovering from addiction and working the 12 Step Programme of AA so that they can develop and deepen their relationship with Jesus as their Higher Power. Meets on the First Sunday of every month at Corpus Christi Church, Neville Rd. Osmondthorpe. Leeds. Mass at 4.30pm followed by meeting. Contact: Fr. Michael on 01977 510266 Helpers of Gods precious infants, prayer vigils, regular weekly prayer vigils at Marie Stopes Abortuary, 7 Barrack Road.LS7 4AB, next to Jaguar car showrooms. Fridays 12-30 to 1-30, and Saturdays 9am-l1am. Monthly all night vigil of reparation in St Marys Horsforth 12th of every month, 9-30pm to 6am . Other times variable. Further details Pat 0113 2582745 Rosary rally Sat Oct 9th 2010 12-30pm Leeds cenotaph, outside art gallery, Headrow. Contact 07747698553/ or 0113 2582745 Diary Be Still A few moments for thought and prayer “,The spirit of God is hovering over my chaos and it is important that I allow it to do so, so that the Spirit may produce life and order out of my chaos …,”, A thought from Fr Gerard Hughes as part of “,Growing into Silence”, , the Jesuit website related to BBC2’,s “,The Big Silence”,. Deadline For receipt of material for next edition: December 3rd 2010 Parishes receive their copies: December 19th 2010 Send articles, reports &, pictures: Mr John Grady, Hinsley Hall, 62 Headingley Lane, Leeds LS6 2BX. Send text as word doc, pictures as jpeg, e-mail to: john.grady@dioceseofleeds.org.uk Tel: 0113 261 8022. Advertising Deadline Please note All paid-for advertising is dealt with by: CathCom, L4 Blois Meadow Business Centre, Steeple Bumpstead, Haverhill, Suffolk, CB9 7BN. To advertise call 020 7112 6710 or email: ads@cathcom.org Your Catholic Post B orn in St Mary’,s parish, Bradford on 15th February 1931, Fr Tony Wilkinson was educated in the city at St Bede’,s Grammar School before studying for the priesthood at St Cuthbert’,s College, Ushaw. He was ordained by Bishop Heenan at St Mary’,s, East Parade on 15th July 1956 –, one of nine priests ordained for the diocese in the space of just nine days that summer. His first appointment was to the Holy Rosary parish in Leeds where he served under Canon Patrick O’,Meara. In 1961 he was one of the first priests to volunteer to join the new diocesan mission in the Peruvian capital, Lima. By 1964 four Leeds priests were working in Lima and they were visited in July of that year by Bishop Dwyer who reported that it was ‘,heart-warming to see the great work they are doing in the vast population of the San Martin district with its unpaved streets, half-built or simply bamboo mat houses, its poverty and yet all its unbounded high spirits and lively sense of hope. To restore to all the people a deep understanding and full practice of the Faith is an immense task’, said the Bishop, ‘,but the roots of the Faith are there and our priests are kindling more flames of it every day’,. Long after he left Peru, Fr Wilkinson was still fondly remembered by the people in Lima and his success there probably owed much to his innate determination. After five years working on the Peru Mission Fr Wilkinson returned to the diocese in August 1966 and Bishop Wheeler appointed him as assistant priest at St Brigid’,s, Huddersfield. The following year he moved to the parish of the Sacred Heart in Bingley and then in 1970 he retuned to Leeds and the Holy Rosary. In September 1971 came his first appointment as Parish Priest when he assumed responsibility for what was then the parish of St Thomas of Canterbury at Hebden Bridge, in the Calder Valley. A very different landscape awaited him six years later when he became the Parish Priest of Our Lady’,s at Acomb, on the outskirts of York. In December 1981 this parish, (along with English Martyrs, York), was ceded to the Diocese of Middlesbrough. Fr Wilkinson continued in post, while remaining a Leeds priest and in 1984 he returned to the diocese and to Huddersfield, as Parish Priest of Our Lady of Lourdes at Sheepridge. It was while he was in Huddersfield that he was seriously injured in a car crash and in some ways he lived in the shadow of this accident for the rest of his life. In 1992 Bishop Konstant asked Fr Wilkinson to become the Parish Priest of St Mary and St Michael at Settle in North Yorkshire and he remained here until his retirement in 2006. There as elsewhere he will be remembered as a gregarious and kindly individual, a gifted musician and with many of the traits of a ‘,typical’, Yorkshire man. Physically, he was never the same after his car accident but his heart remained always in his priestly ministry. Following his retirement from Settle he was cared for by the Little Sisters of the Poor in Leeds and after a short illness he died in the city’,s St James’,s Hospital on 26th October 2010. On Thursday 4th November his body was taken to Settle for Mass in his former parish church and the following day Bishop Roche celebrated his Funeral Mass at Mount St Joseph’,s, with the homily preached by Mgr Michael McQuinn VG. From there Fr Wilkinson’,s remains were taken for burial at Killingbeck Cemetery. Obituaries F r Gerard Harney was born on 29th May 1942 in County Mayo, Ireland. He began his studies for the priesthood at Mungret College, Limerick and completed his training at St Kieran’,s College, Kilkenny. He was ordained in Kilkenny Cathedral on 6th June 1965. The following month he was appointed to St Peter’,s, Doncaster where he served until 1969 when Bishop Wheeler appointed him to St Mary’,s, Bradford. Two years later he moved to St Joseph’,s in Brighouse and then in 1975 he returned to South Yorkshire and St Bede’,s parish in Rotherham. He became a Parish Priest for the first time in 1978 when he was appointed to St Joseph and English Martyrs, Kendray and he was here in 1980 when fifty parishes in South Yorkshire were transferred from the Leeds diocese to form the greater part of the new Diocese of Hallam. In 1985 he renewed his acquaintance with Doncaster when Bishop Moverley appointed him as parish priest of St Peter-in-Chains. In the years which followed he became a leading figure in the town, much concerned with alleviating the social and economic effects of the decline of the coal industry and especially after the miners’, strike of the mid- 1980s. Fr Harney’,s contributions to the community Doncaster were recognised in 2000 when he was made a Freeman of the Borough. Two years later he became parish priest of St Anne’,s, at Deepcar in Sheffield. Fr Harney had been ill for some time before his death in Ireland on 18th October 2010. His funeral Mass was held at St Patrick’,s church in Louisburgh, County Mayo, and was led by Bishop John Rawsthorne of Hallam. This was followed by interment in Kilgeever Cemetery. Across South Yorkshire Fr Harney was well-known as a result of directing the annual Hallam Diocesan Pilgrimage to Lourdes for twenty-five years from its inception in 1980 until 2005. He was also firm in his commitment to Catholic education and to ecumenism in the Hallam diocese. In his leisure time he had a great love of sport, especially golf and football. He was a gentle man who will be remembered affectionately by his many former parishioners in both the Leeds and Hallam dioceses. Rev Gerard Harney Fr John Horan was a priest of the Leeds diocese for nearly forty years, from 1943 until he joined the Diocese of Hallam on its formation in 1980. He served his new diocese for a further twelve years until his retirement to Ireland in 1992. Fr Horan was born County Kerry, Ireland on 29th August 1917 and studied for the priesthood at Mount Melleray in Ireland and St Joseph’,s College, at Upholland, near Wigan in Lancashire. He was ordained for the Diocese of Leeds in the chapel at Upholland on 19th June 1943. Fr Horan’,s first appointment as curate was to the Holy Rosary parish in Leeds and then in June 1944 he moved to St Patrick’,s, Huddersfield, as assistant to Canon James Grogan. In these early days in Leeds Fr Horan became known amongst the clergy as ‘,the Bishop’,s vet’,. He and Bishop Poskitt were both from farming stock, the Bishop was well-known for keeping livestock at Bishop’,s House and many a time he would call upon Fr Horan for his advice on animal husbandry. His interest in animals was life- long and in later years Fr Horan was renowned for his prize- winning thoroughbred show dogs. In 1952 Bishop Heenan appointed him to St Mary’,s, Halifax and in 1955 he moved him to Bradford and the parish of Our Lady and First Martyrs. Three years later he went to St Joseph’,s, Batley Carr but was to stay for only twelve months, as Bishop Dwyer appointed him to be Parish Priest of St Anne’,s, Thornhill in June 1959. In 1963 Fr Horan moved from there to the Sacred Heart at Hemsworth, where he was Parish Priest during a period of rapid growth resulting from an influx of Scottish mining families into the area. During his time there he worked with the diocese and the Wakefield education authority to secure the necessary expansion of the parish primary school. In 1966 Fr Horan began his association with South Yorkshire when he became the Parish Priest of St Oswald’,s, in Sheffield. In October 1980 the new Bishop of Hallam, Bishop Moverley, transferred Fr Horan to the parish of Our Lady of Sorrows at Bamford in Derbyshire and he remained there happily amidst the rural setting of the Peak District until his retirement in July 1992, shortly before his 75th birthday. He is remembered in Bamford with great respect and affection. For those in the Leeds diocese who still remember Fr Horan, they will recall a quiet man with a solid, down to earth approach to life in general and to his ministry, someone who had a good ‘,business brain’, and was an able and dedicated parish priest. Fr Horan retired to County Kerry in 1992 where he died at the age of ninety-three on 22nd October 2010. His funeral, attended by the Bishop of Hallam, took place at Our Lady of Lourdes Church in Scartaglen, Co. Kerry on Sunday 24th October and was followed by burial in the church grounds. Rev John Horan Rev Anthony Wilkinson

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Page 19

Nov 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 19 Bishops Engagements - November/December Sunday 21 November 10am Visitation, St Theresa’,s, Queensbury Tuesday 23 November 11am VGs’, Meeting, Bishop’,s House Wednesday 24 November 11am Presbyteral Council Meeting, Hinsley Hall Thursday 25 November 10am Visitation, Sacred Heart Primary School, Sowerby Bridge Saturday 27 November 6pm Mass for all Nascent Human Life, Leeds Cathedral Sunday 28 November 11am Visitation, Sacred Heart &, St Patrick, Sowerby Bridge Monday 29 November 10am Leeds Trinity University College Governors’, Meeting, Horsforth, Leeds Tuesday 30 November 10.30am Catholic Care Trustees’, Meeting, Hinsley Hall Thursday 2 December 10.30am Meeting with Diocesan Finance Board &, Trustee Directors, Hinsley Hall Friday 3 December 11am VGs’, Meeting, Bishop’,s House Saturday 4 December 11am SVP Open Day, Leeds Sunday 12 December 11am Visitation, St Columba’,s, Halifax 4pm Catholic Care Carol Service, Leeds Cathedral Monday 13 December 10.30am Northern Bishops’, Meeting, Bishop’,s House Tuesday 14 December 11am Visitation of Apostleship of the Sea, Immingham Docks Thursday 16 December 11am VGs’, Meeting, Bishop’,s House Harvest Festival at St Anthony’,s S t Anthony’,s school hall was packed with parents, grandparents and friends to see our children celebrate harvest. The school hall rang out with song and prayer as children told the story of creation and of how we should look after our world. Afterwards all of the generous donations of tinned and fresh produce, which parents had sent into school, were made into over 60 food parcels. Members of the school council were able to deliver these parcels to three local residential homes. The residents in the homes were delighted to receive a visit form our children as well as the food parcels they left behind. The living legacy of St. Thé,rè,se’,s relics visit A year after the visit of the relics of St. Thé,rè,se of Lisieux to England and Wales in the autumn of 2009, Carmelites in Yorkshire have reflected back on the experience with those involved in the planning. On Sunday 24th October Leeds Carmelite Spirituality Group, meeting at St. Theresa’,s Church in Cross Gates, heard a presentation on the legacy of the relics visit by the organiser of the event at St. Anne’,s Cathedral, Fr. John Wilson, Episcopal Vicar for Evangelisation in Leeds Diocese. Fr. John recalled the sense of expectancy before the visit, which was widely reported in the media, both religious and secular. He spoke of Thé,rè,se as proof that people are drawn to holiness, and described her as someone who helps people searching for holiness to approach God with confidence, not only Roman Catholics but also other Christians, people of other faiths, and even non-believers. Fr. John recalled the large numbers of people who queued to get into the Cathedral, who were willing to be counted as Christian. He observed that, with hindsight, the visit of St. Thé,rè,se’,s relics was good preparation, spiritually and logistically, for the visit of Pope Benedict to Britain a year later. Carmelites reflecting with Fr. John also spoke of how the relics visit gave an insight into the reality of the Church, at Leeds the bishop, clergy, religious, laity, young, old, male and female all gathered together as members of the body of Christ. Pilgrims were reminded that they are part of a universal Church, experiencing the relics visit as it has been experienced in other parts of the globe. The visit of Thé,rè,se’,s relics also reminded the Church of its duty to welcome all people and to turn no one away who is seeking God. Fr. John spoke about how the relics visit had been an opportunity to proclaim the Gospel, and to listen afresh to the Word of God as the Scriptures were proclaimed at various liturgies. He described how the relics visit had also been an affirmation of the Resurrection, Christians believe in the communion of saints, the resurrection of the body, and life everlasting, all of which was recalled by the presence of the relics. Several Carmelites reflected on how St. Thé,rè,se had pointed people to Christ in the sacraments of Eucharist and Reconciliation. They also noted how the relics had reminded us of the sacramentality of the Christian faith, that is, how outward gestures and objects express some inward truth, people wanted to touch the reliquary, to kiss it, present gifts to Thé,rè,se, and thus show through their actions the deepest longings of their hearts. The Carmelites in Leeds agreed with Fr. John that the visit of the relics had also been a formative experience for the many children and young people who came to the cathedral, this once-in-a-lifetime occasion will have made a deep impression on them, and allowed for unique encounters to take place between pilgrims. The Carmelites - like Christians across the country - agreed that the legacy of the relics visit will be a blessing that we experience for a long time to come. For more information about Leeds Carmelite Spirituality Group, visit www.carmelite.org/leeds or contact the convenor, Mr. Johan Bergströ,m-Allen, by calling 01904 411521 or e-mailing leeds@laycarmel.org

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Page 20

Nov 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Designed and produced by CathCom, L4 Blois Meadow Business Centre, Steeple Bumpstead, Haverhill, Suffolk, CB9 7BN. To advertise call 020 7112 6710 or email: ads@cathcom.org Bishop Visits St Patrick’,s School T he pupils and staff at St Patrick’,s, Elland, were delighted to receive a visit from Bishop Roche, yesterday (13th October). He visited each class and spoke with the children about The Pope’,s visit. He presented each class with a signed photograph of The Pope and led the pupils in a prayer. During his visit, the Bishop took the time to speak to the Parish Priest, Father Leonard. He also spoke to Acting Chair of Governors, Mr Mike Bowden and to each member of staff. £,32

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