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Leeds Catholic Post History

Newspaper for the Diocese of Leeds

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Apr 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 1

Apr 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

CATHOLIC POST THE NEWSPAPER FOR THE DIOCESE OF LEEDS APRIL 2011 www.dioceseofleeds.org.uk www.catholicpost.org.uk Whats inside CASTLEFORD’,S CANON JOINS THE CHAPTER Tales from Peru Page 20 Sylvia comes home Page 5 Easter joy and Wedding Bells Page 4 Building a future for schools Page 2 I t all began more than a hundred and thirty years ago when the Canons of the Cathedral Chapter met for the first time following the creation of the Leeds diocese in 1878. The present Chapter did so again on Wednesday 23rd March and on this occasion their meeting was a special one as they welcomed the newest addition to their ranks, Canon Sean Durcan, the parish priest of St Joseph’,s, Castleford. Irish-born and a product of the seminary at All Hallows in Dublin, the Canon came to the diocese following his ordination in 1966. He has been parish priest in Castleford since 1996 and prior to this he was parish priest at St Clare’,s, Bradford and at St Augustine’,s in Leeds. Until he stepped down last year he was the Chair of Governors at St Wilfrid’,s High School in Featherstone and during his years in office it became one of the most successful Catholic secondary schools in the country. Canon Durcan was formally installed as a member of the Chapter during a Mass at the Cathedral concelebrated by Bishop Roche and the other Canons. In part a solemn occasion, it was also a joyful one as the honour bestowed on Canon Durcan recognises a devoted pastor regarded with affection and respect not only in Castleford but across the diocese.

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Page 2

Apr 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 2 Leeds Catholic Post Some people will remember the “,Suez Crisis”, of 1956. There was that chilling time when the Army numbers of reservists being called up was read out over the radio. It ended, as we know, with we and the French alone, but not as in 1939. We began to withdraw from such adventures, and settled into a cold-war peace. You could join the Army &, see the world, as long as that wasn’,t the Shankill Road. Then, 25 years later, came the Falklands war. It was hard to accept those casualty figures and sunken battleships, especially when the Pope was here, but at least we thought we were repelling tyrannical invaders. Then Kuwait and the first Iraq war: another invasion by a tyrant, ending in a “,turkey shoot”, on the road to Basra. Then the second…, and then Afghnistan: attacking what might happen, choosing unacceptable regimes and forcibly changing them: now Libya, but not Zimbabwe: is oil your ticket to be invaded? Someone predicted a long time ago that we may avoid a nuclear holocaust but would have wars over things like oil- energy wars- who is to obtain it, control it, use it. “,War should belong to the tragic past, to history: it should find no place on humanity`s agenda for the future”, Pope- soon to be Blessed- John Paul II told us here in 1982. This is a good time to reflect on his words, and ask him to help us to pray always for peace in a world which still does not seem to see war as the very last resort. The Post Says Building a future for our schools O nce upon a time there was a publication called the Catholic Building Review. It appeared annually and as the name implies it provided a nationwide survey of all the new churches and schools completed each year. Through its pages it is possible to trace the history of such developments, diocese by diocese, for nearly three decades from the early fifties onwards. A simple comparison indicates the course of events. In 1953 the Northern Edition of the review ran to exactly 200 pages, by 1965 it was over 560 and then in 1981 the total had fallen back to a mere 128 pages. Looking back we can see that from the late 1950s until the mid seventies, in this diocese and elsewhere, we were building at a rate –, new churches and especially new schools. It was a time when many parishes got their long-awaited new primary school and nearly every deanery got a modern purpose-built secondary school, often for the first time. This building boom seems a long time ago now and the excitement of those days a distant memory. But in fact there’,s a mini-boom going on at the moment with several schools in the diocese undergoing major building works to make them, as they say, ‘,fit for purpose’,. In the Bradford area a government scheme known as the Primary Capital Programme has resulted in nearly £,5 million being spent on upgrading the accommodation at three schools: St Clare’,s at Fagley, St Francis, Eccleshill, and St Winefride’,s, Wibsey. The extensions and internal remodelling at St Francis’, school were completed in March and the other projects are underway at the moment and due to be completed by the autumn of 2011. Almost £,1 million is being spent in Bingley to enlarge St Joseph’,s Primary School, work began in February and will be completed in October this year. At Yeadon a completely new school is being built under PCP at a cost of £,3.6 million to replace Ss Peter and Paul’,s Primary School. Work on the site began in March and the new building will be ready by Christmas. In the secondary sector St Bede’,s Grammar School and St Joseph’,s College have shared almost £,8 million in capital investment recently. St Bede’,s has a new specialist teaching and administration block, completed in September 2010, while ‘,SJC’, has been provided with a new dining area and classroom block. Over in Leeds meanwhile there are two developments taking place as part of the Building Schools for the Future programme which between them will cost in the region of £,25 million. At Mount St Mary’,s High School work has begun on a new sports hall and the redevelopment of the main buildings, some of which date back to the middle of the nineteenth century. A few miles away at Corpus Christi Catholic College another sports hall will be built alongside new teaching and administrative spaces, while the existing 1960s buildings will be remodelled internally. Both these BSF projects are due for completion in the spring of 2012. While it’,s unlikely that we’,ll see this type of work taking place on the same scale in the near future these current projects will help to create the kind of facilities needed to deliver an up to date curriculum across every key stage. It’,s true of course that it’,s the human capital which makes our schools what they are, but at the same time it’,s welcome news that staff and pupils in diocesan schools are able to work in modern environments thanks to the significant capital investment witnessed over the past few years. Statement on Catholic Education and Academies in the Diocese of Leeds W e are considering the government’,s policy of encouraging schools to become academies and are reflecting on the opportunities and challenges it presents for Catholic education in our Diocese. Firstly, it is important to ensure that any change will maintain and further strengthen the mission of the Church through its schools. “,This educational mission entails the ongoing development of the entire potential of every person. It seeks to promote the well-being and freedom of every person, which shape the daily life of a Catholic school as a community in which faith is expressed and shared through every aspect of its activity", (Statement from the Catholic Bishops’, Conference of England and Wales, May 2000). The ways in which schools in the Diocese of Leeds support the mission of the Church is explained in more detail in the document ‘,Schools of Discipleship’,. In a time of great change, it is important to balance where the expected benefits of new educational models may be a positive change against the long established rights of voluntary aided status that has served our schools well. We are most grateful to the head teachers who responded to the initial discussions on academies. The Office for Education and Schools will continue to consider the options and how they can enable Catholic schools in the Diocese to develop their mission and to prepare to manage any future changes taking into account the differing needs of schools and the parish communities that they serve. A working party of head teachers from both the primary and secondary schools is being established to support this work, there will be further consultation with governing bodies and head teachers across the Diocese during the coming term. The views expressed will be carefully considered by the Bishop and Trustee of the Diocese as they seek to discern the opportunities for change and development in our Diocesan schools. We are aware of the desire of some schools to move as quickly as possible to academy status. We know that your concern for the common good will help you to see that it will not be appropriate for a school to move forward individually in isolation from its local community of Catholic schools, whether these are considering changing status or not. Schools should use this time to reflect on their mission and develop still further strong local partnerships and to ensure that governors are fully aware of the implications of any possible change. School Community Toast the Future O n Wednesday, 30th March the staff, pupils, governors and parish priest of Ss Peter &, Paul Catholic Primary School, Yeadon came together to begin the final part of their journey towards a new school. Mr Tom Robertshaw, headteacher said a few words about the schools future and said that today would begin the fruition of a year’,s planning. Canon Martin Forde offered some prayers and a blessing for the success of the project and then the two youngest and the two oldest pupils of the school donned their hard hats and high visibility jackets and spades in hand cut the first piece of turf from the ground where the new building would be built. Following the short ceremony members of the school community toasted the continuing success of the project.

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Page 3

Apr 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Leeds Catholic Post Page 3 Induction and Planning for the Future M gr Andrew Summersgill was inducted as Parish Priest of St Stephen’,s Skipton on Shrove Tuesday by the local Dean, Fr Malachy Larkin. He was welcomed by the Florence Begley and Peter Vetch chairs of the Pastoral Councils of St Stephens and St Margaret Clitherows in Threshfield and by Canon Adrian Botwright the Rector of Holy Trinity Parish Church in Skipton. Bishop Arthur appointed Mgr Summersgill to Stephen’,s following nine years as Secretary to the Bishops’, Conference and last year heading the team from England and Scotland that organised Pope Benedict’,s historic State Visit. After the Mass nearly two hundred parishioners, priests of the deanery and guests gathered in the Easter Room in St Monica’,s Convent for a celebration which included –, of course - pancakes. Among the guests were members of Mgr Summersgill’,s family as well as Robin Smith and Terry Forbes, Trustees of the Diocese. Terry Forbes has been chairing a working group of parishioners and professional advisers looking at the future of the former convent and land behind St Stephen’,s. During the first weekend of Lent outline proposals were made available to parishioners to comment on before the Convent was open to the public to express their views. Mgr Summersgill told the Catholic Post that “,the public consultation was visited by around 115 people, mainly neighbours from the houses in the vicinity of the Church. The written comments and e-mails are now being studied and we will be getting a report shortly. The majority seem to be favourable to the proposals create accommodation for the elderly, with the Church at its heart, and to renovate the old Presbytery and former school building as the residence of the priest and a parish centre.”, He commented that “,The Catholics of Skipton are very fortunate that such an impressive site for the Church was donated almost one hundred and seventy years ago by the Tempest family. All through that time it has met our needs for a place of worship and for education, we are now looking forward to continuing our mission in a different way in the twenty-first century.”, Fr Malachy Larkin instructs Mgr Andrew Summersgill on his duties as Parish priest during a Mass of Induction on Shrove Tuesday at St Stephen’,s, Skipton. News from St Gregory’,s Parish Fran Hughes writes: F or as many years as I have attended St Gregory’,s Church, Leeds, I can remember the annual call for sponsorship for Larry Jordan on his charity walk to York. Remarkably, it was only this week that I found out the real significance behind the annual Easter Monday ‘,pilgrimage’,. Larry was part of the congregation of the former St Margaret Clitherow chapel of ease of our parish, and when the 400th Anniversary of the Martyrdom of St. Margaret Clitherow was celebrated in 1986, he decided to mark the occasion, along with many others, by making his own pilgrimage. As I understand it, many of the ‘,pilgrims’, went by coach but Larry decided to walk the route from Swarcliffe in Leeds to St. Margaret’,s house in York. I may not have all the details correct, but I had a very uplifting conversation with Larry’,s son, Brendan, after mass on Sunday and he is very keen for this year’,s 25th Anniversary of the walk to be marked in a special way. The walk has traditionally raised money for charity and has during recent years collected sponsorship money in aid of St. Gemma’,s Hospice. Brendan said “,the walk has evolved to become an annual event for a large group of people from any denomination and none. I always felt that those of our friends that don’,t have faith and have always joined us on our pilgrimage see and learn by our example the strength of our Christian faith.”, CATHOLIC CARE (Diocese of Leeds) - REDISCOVERING OUR ROOTS I n 2013 Catholic Care will be celebrating 150 years of caring work in the Diocese of Leeds. In 1863 the first home for homeless girls was opened in the Mount St. Mary’,s area of Leeds by the Sisters Oblates of Mary Immaculate. This was followed in 1880 by the opening of the St. Vincent’,s Home for Boys in Claypit Lane, Leeds. Since those early days the Diocese has tried to take care of the poor and the needy and this work is continued today by Catholic Care. To prepare for the Celebration in 2013, we are planning to produce and Anniversary Brochure tracing the work of the Agency since 1863. We are appealing for photographs which you or members of your family may have which depict the work of caring services in the Diocese since that time. If you have photographs of orphanages, care homes or of other areas of caring work related to Catholic Care, please do contact us. We would like to borrow them so they can be considered for inclusion in the Anniversary Brochure. All photographs, etc. will be kept safely and returned to their owner. If you can help in any way, please contact Catholic Care on 0113 –, 3885400. DEMENTIA - A GROWING CHALLENGE A lmost weekly in the Media we read of the growing challenge which Society and families are facing in relation to Dementia. The Department of Health tells us (July 2009) that the numbers of people with Dementia in England and Wales will grow substantially in the next 15 years. Clearly, the need for Carers will also grow very significantly. Catholic Care would like to invite you to a short meeting to learn from your experiences about what needs to be done in order to care for people with Dementia in the future and to learn of the needs of Carers. An informal meeting will be held on Thursday, 5th May 2011 at 2.30 p.m. at Hinsley Hall. You would be most welcome. The purpose of the meeting will be to chart and discuss what you feel needs to be done to ensure care for those with Dementia. If you wish to attend or require further information, please telephone Catholic Care on 0113 –, 3885400. ST. MALACHY CATHOLIC PRIMARY SCHOOL FURNESS PLACE, ILLINGWORTH, HALIFAX, HX2 8JY Telephone 01422 244628 Headteacher Mrs. C. Russell Email: head@st-malachys.calderdale.sch.uk Website: www.stmalachys.org.uk SECONDMENT Required for September, 2011 Acting Deputy Headteacher for 1 year GROUP 2 ISR: 5-9 depending on experience Number of children on roll 152 plus 30 in nursery Required for September 2011, a suitably experienced teacher to be an acting deputy headteacher for 1 year. The successful candidate will: , Be a practising Catholic , Be an excellent classroom practitioner , Have good ideas for making learning fun , Have leadership/ management experience , Be a strong team player with good interpersonal and communication skills , Be looking for an opportunity to demonstrate and improve their leadership skills Visits to the school are warmly welcomed. Application packs available from the school website or on request by email or post. Closing date Friday, 6th May 2011

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Apr 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 4 Leeds Catholic Post A lthough not a ‘,Whitsun Wedding’, William and Catherine’,s long awaited Easter wedding is close enough to be reminiscent of Larkin’,s poem of the same name, written in 1964 when getting married was still popular and not infected by big fat budget- busting wedding fantasies. Most young people still dream of lifelong, loving marriage but recent social change suggests a new wariness of entering something so daunting that no longer seems to ‘,work’,. While good marriage is undeniably a good for all, for the woman and man at the heart of the marriage, and for any children they have, it is also a blessing for the whole of society. It is the basic common good. That is, marriage is good when people properly understand and are able to live the real beauty and truth of the married state. How do we teach this in a world where so many marriages do not last? Given that Catholics experience divorce and domestic abuse at the same rates as the rest of the population we need to address this as a matter of urgency. Rabbi Dr Jonathan Romain of Maidenhead Synagogue made the news recently by saying that marriage preparation should be compulsory ‘,As a congregational rabbi, I insist that couples who request a wedding come to marriage preparation sessions about relationships and expectations’,. His twenty questions to the couple have, he says, reduced the divorce rate among those who take his pre wedding test. Catholic teaching consistently requires that a couple be well prepared. Pope John Paul II said that marriage preparation must be: Serious in purpose, Adequate in length, Excellent in content and Obligatory by nature. Why? Because the truth is that there is more to marriage than the couple and there is more to marriage preparation than a few sessions, however well done, in the run up to the wedding day. “,Willed by God in the very act of creation, marriage and the family are interiorly ordained to fulfillment in Christ, and have need of His graces”, (Familiaris Consortio) The church sees preparation for marriage as lifelong and occurring in broad phases: remote, our earliest home life and family experiences of love, proximate, in the more formal catechesis on relationships and sacrament taking place during adolescence and immediate, with a couple when they announce their engagement. Marriage preparation courses provided for engaged couples is a good start. Such a course may alert them to potentially significant differences in values, attitudes and behaviour that they need to be aware of (conflict is not a problem in marriage but the avoidance of conflict can be). However, without the best early catechesis at home and at church and at school, on marriage as vocation and sacrament, those courses are of limited value. Also couples are inadequately supported after the wedding day and throughout the lifelong joys and challenges at different stages of the family life cycle. So, how can we, at home, in the parish, at school to help our young people to know themselves, to know God and to know how to give and receive love? Do they know that what is required in marriage is the very same first two commandments identified by Jesus as summing up the whole of the law: Love God and love your neighbour as yourself? I would suggest that valuing and celebrating marriage as a true vocation and, indeed, the natural call of most (but not all) people in all that we say and do would be a good start. This would create the climate of respect for the beauty and dignity of a man and a woman together for life within which marriage would be both better understood by those entering it and appreciated and supported by the whole community before and after the wedding day. Recognising that family cycles echo church cycles and sacraments and teaching people how to recognise the differently sacramental aspect of everyday where ‘,God himself is present in human fatherhood and motherhood’, (Pope John Paul II) is an important part of this. On a more practical level, relationship preparation is something that all young people should be offered before they enter into a relationship, as part of their broader education in lifelong commitment or vocation. Examples of such commitment already within the church include ordained, religious and married life (which, properly understood, is an ordained and religious life). Once in a loving relationship a couple could then, as part of the normal ministry of parishes, be offered a more focussed preparation, the point of which would be to give them time and space to consider whether they do want to get engaged to be married. Then when they get the wedding day wobbles they will be better able to discern whether it is a genuine alert to truth or a normal wobble in light of the seriousness of the undertaking. After the wedding marriage enrichment and parenting support in the parish can give the couple the best possible community support without which the ‘,remote’, marriage preparation of the next generation in the home cannot be done well. Any point of contact with a family is a good one because all evangelisation is done in relationship. As Fr Raniero Cantalamessa, preacher to the papal household, said on his visit to our diocese ‘,you cannot catechise those you do not love’,. For many families the most important point of contact, the one most pregnant with possibility, is that first meeting with the priest when they seek a Catholic Wedding. This is when the relationship with the parish can really begin or enter a new phase. Yes, William and Kate took their time to get to know one another. William’,s remote and proximate family history and experience seems to have helped prepare him to understand the seriousness of the commitment and the importance of love. One without the other is simply not enough to sustain a marriage especially in these days of longer life, freedom of choice, increased social division and the all pervading illusions of happiness and self satisfaction that advertising tries to sell us. So, I rejoice at William and Kate’,s act of faith, hope and love. As the bells peal on their wedding day I wish every blessing for themselves and for all who dream of the joyful intimacy that only a love that persists through the darkness into the light beyond can reveal to us. This is what we celebrate every Easter - Happy Easter! Train to be a Marriage Preparation Presenter: 1. Contact your parish priest 2. Training dates 2011: 7th, 14th, 21st 28th November (evenings) 3. Contact Breda at flm@flm.org.uk for an application form Family Life Ministry resources www.flm.org.uk Engaged Encounter www.wwme.org.uk Home is a Holy Place Resource for schools and parishes www.homeisaholuplace.org.uk Catholic Marriage Care www.marriagecare.org.uk Catholics Experiencing Domestic Abuse Resources (CEDAR) at www.cedar.uk.net Easter Joy and Wedding Bells! By Breda Theakston FLM Coordinator Gap Year Opportunity for UK students in South India T here is an opportunity for students from the UK, aged 18 + to do voluntary work at the school. Two students can be accommodated for around 3 to 4 months, from September each year and two also from January. One student has already been approved for this coming September. There is accommodation in the school, which is basic but adequate and accommodation, food and laundry are provided free of charge. The students have to fund their own air travel but will be met and escorted from and to Chennai airport which has flights from London and Manchester. The school educates profoundly deaf children, mostly from around the ages of 4 to 16 and the visiting students assist the teachers, mainly in the younger classes. The children are from very poor backgrounds but are cheerful and friendly and are eager to learn and play both in and out of school hours. There are 32 staff plus some teaching aides and student teachers, plus around 30 domestic staff and they are friendly and helpful. There are also opportunities to help our student nurses with English conversation and to help organise feedback to the UK sponsors of the children in the school for the deaf. The visiting students need to be mature and reasonably outgoing and able to get along with each other and with the teachers. They also need to cope with a fairly long spell away from home, in a different culture and eating different food. This is not an organised GAP or VSO programme but we believe the arrangements are safe. Many of our Trustees and supporters have visited the projects and are available for background discussions in advance. Over the years, Sylvia has welcomed a large number of gap year students and they have found the experience both enjoyable and inspiring whilst several have become lifetime supporters. For more information please contact Tony Allinson on 0113 2675735 ‘,FAMILIARIS CONSORTIO’, ‘,The Christian family in the modern world’, Quote of the month “,God is love and in Himself He lives a mystery of personal loving communion. Creating the human race in His own image and continually keeping it in being, God inscribed in the humanity of man and woman the vocation, and thus the capacity and responsibility, of love and communion. Love is therefore the fundamental and innate vocation of every human being.”,(FC 11) Reflection: Familiaris Consortio is a call to action that locates the family at the very centre of church mission. Written by Pope John Paul II it warns that ",the family is the object of numerous forces that seek to destroy it or in some way to deform it",, it is also a positive declaration of faith in humanity and in marriage and family as a place of renewal and healing for a wounded humanity. Given that the Pope called it a summa of the Church`s teaching on the family, and its sense of an urgent call to action, a celebration of its publication is 30 years ago is long overdue. Familiaris Consortio remains a key source of teaching on family life for all families and all who work with families. The declaration at FC 11 (above) is, in summary, the basis for all vocations and all ministries. If love is our vocation, teach us how to love is the call of family people everywhere as family is the place where we first encounter love and in doing so encounter God. The Pontifical Council for the Family went further in 2003 saying: ‘,As the smallest Christian community, the ",domestic church", is the living cell of the whole Church, offering a vision for Evangelization and spiritual growth within the Church. We call on all responsible for pastoral planning to make the family their priority, to shape the pastoral vision and plan of each diocese and parish around the family. The family emerges, not merely as a passive subject of Evangelization and care, but as an active subject, indeed an agent, in the mission of Christ in his Church’, Without the vision of John Paul II expressed so courageously and imaginatively in Familiaris Consortio this truth, of the importance of family to mission as well as mission to family, might not have been heard. All pastoral activity affects families and families need pastoral recognition and affirmation to help them to realize their significance role in the church’,s mission. We do this by equipping families to ",become what you are!", (FC 17) communities of life and love or, as Pope Benedict XVI put it, ",Family: live and transmit the faith!",. More on family life and resources can be found at www.flm.org.uk LEEDS CATHEDRAL CHURCH OF ST ANNE Great George Street Leeds LS2 8BE FOR African &, Caribbean Mass Date: Sunday 8th May 2011 Time: 1:00pm DIVINE MERCY SUNDAY 1st May 2011 The feast of the Divine Mercy will be celebrated in Our Lady and St. Robert’,s Church. Robert Street, North Yorkshire, Harrogate. HG1 1HP Leeds People For Life YORK SUNDAY MAY 8TH 11 100 CROSSES FOR LIFE WALK Assembles at west front precinct of York Minster 1.15 for 1.30, Total distance approx 2 mls. Coach from Leeds Further details Pat. 0113 2582745. Mob 07747698553 Email patriciamarysammon@btinternet.com CATHOLIC CHARISMATIC RENEWAL DIOCESE OF LEEDS, A series of Life In The Spirit Seminars led by the Leeds Diocesan Service Team will take place at St. Aelred`s Church, Woodlands Drive, Harrogate HG27BE. Fridays May 6th, 13th, 20, 27th and June 3rd, 10th, 17th. 7pm to 9pm Speakers Mgr. Donal Lucey, Fr. John Marsh, Fr. Francis Smith and Fr. John Wilson Further information ring Dolores Omand 01423870789 or visit our web site www.ccrleeds.org.uk

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Apr 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Leeds Catholic Post Page 5 The hymn book supplements are getting ready to roll off the presses: Parish Mass Books will be ready in June! The hour of the new Mass translation is coming! Just in case I’,m confusing you, that hour is actually the First Sunday in Advent, when the shiny new altar missals will seriously creak open for the first time. Before that, we will all be kitted up with interim bits and bobs, so we can get some practice in. We will see the end of those funny sung Mass parts- remember the Peru- vian, the oddly named Israeli or that cute versified “,Salazar”, -the one with the upside-down exclamation marks? Good music, though, will survive- Marty Haugen, for example, already has his lovely Mass of Creation done in a revised form. So things may not be what they seem. People fear some sort of sea- change, but in fact we are looking only at word-change: last time, the whole structure of Mass changed: and this time you will have to work quite hard to spot so much difference in the “,Instruction”, on the missal- the “,how to celebrate Mass”, guide- which was published as long ago, now, as 2005. Last time round, it was different, though: in the 60’,s and 70’,s there was really a sea change: Sacrosanctum Concilium, the Constitution on the Sacred Liturgy, had been published as one of the principal documents of the Second Vatican Council. In “,Lumen Gentium”, the Pope and Bishops of this Council had talked of the “,holy priesthood of the baptised”,, and in “,Sacrosanctum Concilium”, the participation of this priesthood in every Mass: “,Pastors of souls must therefore realize that, when the liturgy is celebrated, something more is required than the mere observation of the laws governing valid and licit celebration, it is their duty also to ensure that the faithful take part fully aware of what they are doing, actively engaged in the rite, and enriched by its effects.”, So much for people quietly saying a rosary whilst the priest gets on with the rites behind the altar rails. It had gone for ever. Or…, “,Such participation by the Christian people as ‘,a chosen race, a royal priesthood, a holy nation, a redeemed people’, is their right and duty by reason of their baptism. In the restoration and promotion of the sacred liturgy, this full and active participation by all the people is the aim to be considered before all else.”, That’,s pretty clear. And then of course, that wonderful section, which I can never resist…, ‘,The rites should be distinguished by a noble simplicity, they should be short, clear, and unencumbered by useless repetitions, they should be within the people`s powers of comprehension, and normally should not require much explanation.’, It’,s worth reading these words- and the others in these “,constitutions”, again: these are the words through which the Spirit guides today’,s church, and we should not pass them by or imagine that they are past: they are now. Benchmark Sidelines On Saturday 19th March, around fifty singers and musicians took part in an afternoon entitled ",Washing the Feet of the World",, exploring the music and spirituality of the Iona Community with Philip Jakob, Master of Music in Hallam Diocese. We began with tea, coffee, biscuits- and registration in the welcoming venue of the Catholic Chaplaincy at Leeds University. The participants were mainly Catholic, but also included Baptists, Methodists, and Anglicans. We then adjourned to the (somewhat chilly!!) chapel for the main part of the event. There, mainly through the medium of song, Philip outlined the basic tenets of the Iona Community, a dispersed Christian ecumenical community working for peace and social justice, rebuilding of community and the renewal of worship. We began with a couple of short songs –, `We will take what you offer` and `Always in your presence`. I was impressed that the group was learning and singing in three parts in such a short time! Phillip had grouped a number of songs by theme:–, Bereavement, Justice &, Peace, Welcome &, Hospitality, Ecumenism, Interfaith, War &, Peace and Environment We sang one or two from most categories –, one of the most moving was one we merely read: `Cradling Song` was for still-born babies. Two others which particularly struck me were `If the War goes on` –, always topical –, and an Interfaith song –, `encourage us to look and care, for gifts you`ve given which others share, our fellow trav`lers led by light`. A list of the songs is available on the WYPM network website (see below). After a brief break, Philip took us on a lightening preview of his `New Wine` Mass, which hopefully will be available as a setting of the `new translation`, before we finished with more Iona music, ending on the up-beat `Shout for Joy`. Overall, I felt it was an enjoyable and inspiring afternoon and I am pleased that the feedback from participants was very encouraging. In the spirit of openness and transparency (valuable commodities in any organisation) feedback comments and analysis is also available on our website, for the next few weeks. We hope that further meetings like this can be arranged, and will be announced here. Tim Devereux Useful links…,. Tim Devereux tim.devereux@ssg.org.uk West Yorkshire Pastoral Music Network: http://www.westyorkshirechurchmusic.org.uk/ Society of St Gregory- http://www.ssg.org.uk/ National Network of Pastoral Musicians- http://nnpm.org/ Iona Community &, Wildgoose Publications- http://www.iona.org.uk Philip Jakob’,s Compositions- http://www.hallam-diocese.com/music-of- philip-jakob.html Musical Notes by Tim Devereux Sylvia comes home A former Leeds nurse who sold all her worldly goods to help look after the poor, sick and disabled in Southern India has made her annual trip home to Leeds. In 1982, Sylvia Wright left her home, parish and friends in Adel as well as her nursing career in Leeds to devote her life to those less fortunate than herself. 29 years later at the age of 73, she runs a 220-bed hospital in the poor Indian state of Tamil Nadu and cares for patients suffering with conditions ranging from TB and diabetes to HIV/AIDS. 80,000 outpatients are treated each year. Other projects include two day centres for 80 severely disabled children, a residential school for 210 profoundly deaf children and a recently opened Nursing College to train 80 student nurses to the high standards she learned at Leeds General Infirmary. Sylvia was awarded the OBE in 2008. During her visit, Sylvia visited local Catholic Schools, community groups and churches to thank them for their loyal support over the years. Sylvia said to them all: “,Without you I can do nothing.”, St Gemma’,s Hospice was also included in her busy schedule and Sylvia paid her first visit to the Leeds Hindu Temple whose members have also begun helping her in her work. Sylvia also hosted a successful Coffee Morning at Sandmoor Golf Club in Alwoodley where she spoke to over 150 supporters about her continuing work among the poor. Among the guests were Mr Aiden Duffy (Headteacher) and pupils Joey Starr and Keevy Penman from Holy Name Catholic Primary School in Cookridge. St Paul’,s Catholic Primary School in Alwoodley was represented by Mrs Maria Cabry (Headteacher) and Mrs Julie McGurk (Teaching Assistant) with pupils Ciara Stevens, Joseph Hemsworth and Matthew Gribbon. Our photo shows Ciara Stevens, presenting a bouquet of flowers to Sylvia on behalf of all the many schools that support Sylvia. Musical entertainment was provided by the Leeds University String Quartet and the tombola and home produce stalls helped to raise £,1,600 for Sylvia’,s work. Sylvia was also persuaded to test her skills on the Sandmoor putting green. Financial support for Sylvia’,s projects is co-ordinated by the The Sylvia Wright Trust, a registered charity, which sends £,200,000 each year to help fund her humanitarian projects. 97 pence in every £,1 raised goes directly to support this work. 200 out of the 210 profoundly deaf children in Rangammal Boarding School are now sponsored by UK supporters. It costs £,30 per month to clothe, feed, educate and accommodate a child in the school. Sponsors give what they can afford. Anybody interested in sponsoring one of the remaining 10 children are invited to contact Angela Clark on: 0113 2677660 or via email at sponsors@sylviawright.org Diocese of Leeds St Joseph’,s Catholic Primary School Station Road, Tadcaster, LS24 9JG 01937 832344 e-mail: admin@st-josephs-tadcaster.n-yorks.sch.uk 0.8 Class Teacher Foundation and Key Stage 1 Fixed Term Contract 1 Year. We are seeking to appoint an enthusiastic, innovative and dedicated teacher to join our supportive team. We are looking for a teacher who has high expectations of learning and behaviour and who can inspire and motivate children. We can offer a happy school with well motivated children and supportive parents. Visits to the school are welcome by appointment. Further details and an application form are available from the school office. Closing date: Tuesday 10 th May. Short listing: Week commencing 9.5.2011 Interviews: Week commencing 16.5.2011 The Governors are committed to safeguarding all pupils and an enhanced CRB check will be essential for this post.

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Page 6

Apr 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 6 Leeds Catholic Post What do deacons do? At worst, be like liturgical “,plantpots”,. At best, be active servants of the Word, the Altar and Charity- in the widest sense, those who need the help of the church. We have heard a lot recently about the deacon as servant of the needy- but what about the rest, too? I read a blog recently which reflected on this- at varied ways in which a deacon can be servant of the Word. One of the most difficult things we have to do today is to try to judge our needs for Priests and Deacons. How will populations move? Will the church grow in a certain area, through births or inward immigration- or even large numbers of conversions? Are there areas which we want to focus on to grow the church- overspills, new towns and so on: an area which we have not really tackled well in the past. Many of the new “,estate”, churches opened in the 50‘,s have since closed sometimes because people never “,owned”, them like the churches of their parents. Are we into that rather worn phrase- mission or maintenance? Maintenance is a simpler option: we have a more captive audience, homing on to an established building: we go through Lent, Easter, the annual round of First Communions and then Confirmations: then the Dead List and Holy Souls, Christmas and there we go again. The discouragement can come when the numbers each year are a few less than the one before, and the cycle is actually a gentle downward spiral. Christ did not want us to be only that, valuable though the work is. The Great Commission is still there, to go and make disciples of all. It has not been withdrawn. Caretaking and evangelizing, cultivating growth- both inwardly and outwardly: both are necessary for a Church to be fully alive in Christ. In a very few dioceses in the USA, there are more deacons than priests, and in others the gap is closing. So do we introduce a ",quota", for diaconal vocations? Should the Church ",take a break", from such vocations? Deacons cannot celebrate Mass, but that is not the first requirement of Evangelisation. First, people must be introduced to the Word by Ministers of the Word- and they can be Deacons. Deacons do not need expensive buildings for this work, nor salaries for their upkeep. The harvest is huge, and in comparison the labourers are small. Not only that, but they are called to be the “,catechizers and animators of the charisms of the lay faithful”,. Are all the faithful catechized? Are all the faithful animated? Are they in turn fulfilling their vocations? Those who serve as deacons can help all to grow in such a ministry. Vocations are needed for every kind of ministry, priests, deacons, religious and lay ministers and all, through the Holy Spirit, build up the body of Christ, and answer the Great Commission. Deacons, as Ministers of the Word- the Gospel- are called especially to carry out and animate this work: it is an opportunity that we should not overlook. `Woe betide me`, said St Paul, `if I do not preach the gospel`. Something for Deacons to think about. Deacons Diary In this chapter our Bishops offer guidance on the subject of interreligious prayer. “,At Assisi…,it was seen that it is impossible to have peace without prayer, the prayer of all, each one in his/her own identity and in search of the truth. Every prayer is under the influence of the Spirit. (Pope John Paul 1986) If you wish to understand those of other religions, watch them as they pray. (Paraphrased words of Archbishop Rowan Williams) When people of different religions meet, they often wish to pray together. As friendship grows between members of different religions, at weddings, funerals and other times of celebration or great sorrow we may find ourselves invited or inviting others to occasions when we naturally pray. Can we pray together? In October Pope Benedict is to repeat the invitation to the leaders of all religions first issued by Pope John Paul 11 several times during his pontificate, to come to Assisi to pray for peace. Pope John Paul taught that “,every authentic prayer is called forth by the Holy Spirit, who is mysteriously present in the heart of every person.”, It follows that non-Christian religions are related to us in the Church through the Spirit of God in the one movement of prayer. When the Church joins with others in prayer it is carrying out its mission to be the ‘,sacrament’, of uniting all people to God. Now because prayer is an expression of faith and we do not share one faith, we cannot exactly pray together. Then what happened at Assisi? The Bishops use Assisi as a model and example of how we can pray with those of other religions. There each leader said a prayer in turn whilst the others respectfully and prayerfully gave silent encouragement in quiet solidarity with them. Hence the phrase used to best describe this: “,WE COME TOGETHER TO PRAY, WE DO NOT PRAY TOGETHER.”, Or as the Bishops have it: “,We don’,t come to pray together –, we come together to pray.”, In this way prayer stays within the different context it occupies in each different religion –, it is not wrenched out of that context into some amalgamated prayer shared by all. No –, each prayer retains its integrity within its context of belief. Members of different religions can listen in silence and respect the different prayers said –, all this in a shared spirit of solidarity in prayer. No prayer is voiced in common. No one feels that they are compromising their beliefs –, on the contrary they feel they are exactly expressing their belief that prayer is of overwhelming importance to all those who believe in God or are searching for peace beyond themselves in prayer. If you want to experience what interreligious prayer looks and feels like –, there is an example nearer to home than Assisi –, come to the Khidmat Centre in Bradford on the 11th day of each month at 7 pm and you will find a group of people from different religions who “,come together to pray, they do not pray together”,. These prayers for peace have been held on the 11th of every month since September 2002 –, the first anniversary of the New York disaster of 9/11. Be prepared for a good curry and to meet friends of different religions! For Christians prayer is essentially Trinitarian –, it is the inner life of the Church, the active indwelling of the Spirit of God, ever uniting Christians since the day of Pentecost to our risen Lord Jesus Christ. Prayer is the action of the Holy Spirit within us enabling us to respond to God’,s loving dialogue with us. In both public liturgy and in private prayer we proclaim and make real our identity as the ‘,Body of Christ’,. In multi-religious prayer, believers from different religions use their own prayers in the presence of those of other religions. It must be well planned with care and thought. To invite or accept an invitation to another’,s place of worship is an act of hospitality. It is one of the royal roads to understand and respect another’,s religion and can be a profound experience. Pope Benedict visited the Blue Mosque in Istanbul in 2006 and spent time there in silent prayer. It was a “,source of healing and blessing for Catholic-Muslim relations”,. (Para 145) Catholics can accept invitations to prayers by friends of other religions. We show respect and can, whilst we observe their prayer, pray in our hearts, thus witnessing to the universal presence and action of the Holy Spirit. So good relations are fostered and the Church is fulfilling her mission to be the sacrament of unity between all people and God. It is best to prepare such visits in good time and learn about how we should dress and behave appropriately so that the visit is marked by our “,respectful presence”,. Likewise we should make sure any guests we invite to our prayer are well informed, welcomed, guided and are clear about the nature and form of our prayer and what we expect of them. Prayer is part of the “,interfaith walks for friendship”, held in Leeds, Bradford and Keighley locally. An interfaith pilgrimage took place for the first time last year to the shrine of Our Lady of Jesmond in Newcastle upon Tyne. It attracted Christian women of different denominations, including Catholics and Muslim women –, the second of these will take place on May 7th this year. World conflicts or natural disasters draw people of faith together to pray. These events bear powerful witness to the oneness of our human family and the love we can share in the face of suffering and evil. We can turn to God together in prayer. The Bishops conclude their reflection with the overriding thought that all these occasions should be marked by the respect shown to those who participate and to their religious traditions. They must not be occasions to indulge curiosity or express rivalry. Our participation does not mean we agree with all that is said. Respect can be shown to individuals whatever they believe –, it does not mean we adopt a relativist or syncretistic approach. People and beliefs are respected. “,The symbol of the ‘,gathering’,united in common humanity and common concern, is surely the most powerful gesture of all.”, (Para 152). Catholics should therefore have no hesitation in attending and promoting interreligious prayer as part of their calling to be missionaries of the Church. A DATE FOR YOUR DIARY: “,THE CALL TO DIALOGUE”,. An opportunity to explore this Bishops’, statement on interreligious dialogue on Saturday June 25th 2011 at Wheeler Hall, from 9.30 to 1.30 pm ending with lunch. Bishop Arthur Roche will welcome speakers: Archbishop Kevin McDonald (Chair of the Bishops’, Committee for Other Religions), Bishop Tony Robinson (Anglican Bishop of Pontefract), Fakhara Rehman (Community Faiths Coordinator Kirklees Faiths Forum) There is no charge but since we need to know numbers please contact David Jackson for the booking form and all details: Tel 01274 or email: dandt55@btinternet.com See the advert in this and next month’,s Catholic Post. The same is true for any information about the work of interreligious relations in the Diocese or for any further details to do with the above article on Interreligious Prayer. FEASTS AND FESTIVALS April 19 –, 26: Passover/Pesach. Jewish. Commemorates the Exodus from slavery in Egypt. The festival begins with the telling of the story at the Seder meal in family homes. Unleavened bread is eaten (Matzah) throughout the festival. Homes are Spring- cleaned. The first and the last two days (April 19,20, 25,26) are full festival days. April 21 –, 2 May: Ridvan. Baha’,i. The most important festival. In these 12 days Baha’,u’,ullah declared himself as the Promised One prophesied by the Bab. The first, ninth and twelfth days are celebrated as holy and significant. During this time Baha’,is elect their local, national and international governing bodies. May 2: Yom Ha-Shoah. Holocaust Day. Jewish. A day of rememberance for the victims of the Nazi Holocaust. Memorial candles are lit and services held. May 17: Vesakha Puja/ Wesak/Buddha Day. Buddhist. Theravadins celebrate the birth, enlightenment under the Bodhi tree in Bodhgaya in north India and final passing away of Gautama Buddha. Mahayanists have separate days for each of these and on Bodhi day celebrate the enlightenment only. Houses are decorated with lanterns and garlands and temples ringed with oil lamps. People send ‘,Wesak’, cards. Lay people gather at monasteries for this the biggest of the Buddhist festivals. The Vatican Council for Interreligious Dialogue usually sends a greeting –, see www.vatican.va and copy to Buddhist friends. Spacious holiday apartment by the sea (Weston-super-Mare) Close to local shops, churches, golf course and parks. Sleeps 1-6. All faiths welcome. Come and ee the new pier! Bookings start mid march 2011 Tel 01934 631339 MEETING GOD IN FRIEND AND STRANGER Summary Part 5 –, Chapter 4: Prayer And Worship (Paras 134 - 152) ",Interreligious Prayer members with the art work used at the gatherings in Bradford on the 11th of each month.",

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Apr 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Leeds Catholic Post Page 7 Young Frenchman joins vocations team A 22-year-old French student is to help foster vocations in the diocese during a two-and-a-half month placement at Hinley Hall which has just begun. Jean Riegel (pictured) is currently completing a Masters in Communication and Business Management at Leeds Trinity University College (where he worships) in association with the Institute of Public Relations and Communications in Angers in Anjou, north western France. He previously completed a law degree at the Catholic Institute of Higher Education at La Roche. Jean, whose family lives in Bourges in France, is especially interested in exploring methods of fostering good internal communications in organisations. Vocations visits to south of diocese The ongoing mission of preaching about vocations led to visits by Fr Grogan to the Parishes of Sacred Heart and St William in Uppermill, the Immaculate Heart of Mary in Huddersfield and Mary Mother of Unfailing Help in Leeds in recent weeks. He is pictured with Fr John Aveyard outside English Martyrs’, Church, Huddersfield. Visits to primary and secondary schools Fifteen primary schools have so far signed up for visits by Fr Grogan and others to explore the idea of Christian vocation during the summer term. This new initiative is aimed at helping 11-year-old pupils to think through what they might want to do in the future. Studies show that many men and women who ultimately opt for, for example, the priesthood or the religious life, are first drawn to these states of life at about this age. Other speakers will include Sister Maria Graca Almeida and Sister Natalia Gomes of the Comboni Missionary Sisters, other female religious and representatives of the diocesan Family Life Ministry, including Mrs Rose McCarthy (pictured) depending on availability. During the same period Fr Grogan and the Comboni Missionary Sisters will be giving extended assemblies to 15- year-olds in diocesan high schools. The picture shows RE teacher and liturgy coordinator Mrs Dervla Farrell and some of the Year 10 students at Corpus Christi Catholic High School, Leeds following a recent Mass in the school on the theme of “,Christian Vocation.”, Discernment group visits Myddelton Calvary Members of the monthly discernment group for men who wish to explore the possibility of priesthood are to say the Stations of the Cross at the Calvary at Myddelton Grange, Ilkley on the evening of Friday 15th April. Afterwards those taking part will go for a short walk before sharing a meal together. The next meeting of the group will be on Friday 20th May at the Chaplaincy at Leeds Trinity University College, beginning at 7pm. Anybody who is interested in joining the group is invited to contact Fr Grogan: dolvocs@aol.com . Conquering ourselves to serve others T he importance of self-discipline, especially in prayer, was emphasised by Bishop David Konstant in a recent talk to members of the discernment group. It is “,essential for growth and essential for anyone who believes that he or she is called to the service of others,”, he said. The Emeritus Bishop of Leeds recalled his own time at seminary. “,There were 20 students in my year, roughly half of us more or less straight from school, and the other half demobbed from the armed forces,”, he said. “,We came from as wide a variety of backgrounds as you could imagine. The older ones who had lived under authority had little difficulty in living the disciplined life of the seminary. The younger ones among us chafed at the restrictions. It took some time for us to learn that external discipline makes possible internal or self- discipline. There is a phrase from Thomas à, Kempis’,s The Imitation of Christ that is appropriate: “,victor sui et domnus mundi”, - “,the one who conquers himself has mastery of the world”,. Bishop Konstant was reflecting on Pope Benedict’,s recent visit to Britain and on the “,Letter to Seminarians”, which he published shortly afterwards. “,He seemed completely at home, ready to listen, to speak, to show affection, to chide, to correct, to demand—,like a father with his children,”, he said, speaking of the Pope’,s encounter with young people outside Westminster Cathedral. “,The experience each of us has of family life will differ and will not necessarily always be a good one, but we all recognise and cherish genuine family love when we experience it.”, In a fascinating and wide-ranging talk, the complete version of which is available on the diocesan vocations website, Bishop Konstant noted that the priest is first of all a “,man of God”, who helps people to understand that “,God is real.”, He said that he was grateful for the opportunity to meet the young men in the group because the occasion reminded him “,that the Church of today is very much alive and active and full of faith.”, Young people speak of their Christian vocation Jade Broadley, 19, (pictured) is one of the young people from the diocese who have kindly agreed to speak after Mass in one of the parishes on Vocations Sunday (17th May). She will describe her own sense of vocation and explain why she feels that the priesthood and the religious life are important. The nationwide initiative, called Vocations Voices, is being coordinated by the National Office for Vocation in London. Jade, a parishioner in the Parish of Blessed John Henry Newman in north Leeds and a former student at Notre Dame Sixth Form College in the city, went on a training day in Liverpool earlier this month to prepare for Vocations Sunday. She is currently on a gap year after which she will study Theology at Manchester University. She is participating in a course called “,n:fuse”, through which she is doing voluntary work for the diocesan youth service, in particular, she helps with the monthly event “,Revelation.”, In May she will be going on a trip to Corrymeela reconciliation centre in Northern Ireland after which she will be heading off with the diocesan group to the World Youth Day in Madrid. Confirmation candidates discuss holiness and tennis Young people in the Parish of Christ the King, Leeds met with vocations director Fr Paul Grogan and their parish priest Fr Paul Redmond recently to reflect on God’,s call to each of them as they prepare to receive the Sacrament of Confirmation. This was the first contribution that the vocations service has made to a confirmation preparation programme. After Fr Redmond reminded the candidates of the significance of each of the ceremonies in the Easter Triduum, he led them in a period of silent meditation. Then Fr Grogan described how the Holy Spirit, whom they would soon receive, would help them to grow in holiness. He cited as models for young Catholics two young Italians who have recently been beatified: the mountain climber, political activist and assiduous visitor of the poor, Pier Giorgio Frassati and the tennis-loving Chiara Luce Badano. Confirmation group leaders may book a visit by Fr Grogan through contacting the Vocations Office: celia.blackden@dioceseofleeds.org.uk . New group for young men Young men aged 13 to 17 and above are being invited to join a new group especially for them: it is called the Quo Vadis Group for High School Boys. It is aimed at Catholic boys who have been confirmed and who wish to have fun together, explore their faith and begin to discern their Christian vocation. Events will include days out, talks, sport, prayer and meals. The group’,s first outing will be on Saturday 16th July: a trip to Osmotherley in the North York Moors. It will include a six-mile walk, picnic lunch, a rosary procession to the shrine of Our Lady of Mount Grace, Vigil Mass, tea and cakes and a fish and chip supper on the way home. The Quo Vadis Group will succeed the Youth Discernment Group which has met for the last six years. During that period eight of its members have begun at seminary or are currently seriously considering doing so and other members have begun work or gone to university. “,Quo Vadis”, meaning “,Where are you going?”, are the words which, according to a tradition, St Peter, who was fleeing from Rome, used upon seeing Christ, going in the opposite direction. Jesus is said to have replied: “,I am going to Rome to be crucified again.”, St Peter promptly gained new courage and resumed his ministry in the city, resulting in his own crucifixion a little later. The patrons of the new group are Blessed Ralph Grimston and Blessed Peter Snow, two Yorkshiremen, respectively a layman and a priest, who gave their lives for Christ and his Church in the sixteenth century and whose relics are in the altar in Leeds Cathedral. The choice of these two great local saints is intended to demonstrate the possibilities for service that young men have in today’,s Church either as laymen or as priests. A Facebook page has been set up for the group and leaflets about its activities will be sent out to schools and parishes in the next few months. A new volunteer helper has kindly agreed to assist with the group’,s activities. Mr John Wood (pictured), who is a member of the Parish of SS John Fisher and St Thomas More in Burley in Wharfedale and an active member of the Catenian Association, recently retired from his work as a careers advisor in the school and further education sectors. He is very active in a charity which he helped to found which helps the people of Mali in Africa. He is also a keen walker. Parents who thinks their sons might enjoy being members of the group are invited to register their interest by contacting the Vocations Office: celia.blackden@leedstrinity.ac.uk

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Page 8

Apr 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 8 Leeds Catholic Post Take your message about global poverty to the heart of government. Make a date for tea with your MP! When: Thursday 9 June 2011 11am-4pm Where: Central Hall, Westminster, London SW1H 9NH There`s nothing like a chat over tea to help people understand one another. But on 9 June, tea time is about more than just a cosy chat. It`s about making MPs understand how important it is to you that poor communities can receive healthcare and education and break free from poverty forever. Let your MP know that effective aid, promised by the UK government, is vital now. But aid alone isn`t enough. They can ensure that more money gets to the poorest communities by: , stopping companies tax dodging , getting companies to open up their books on payments they make to developing countries , supporting innovative ways of funding development like a tax on financial transactions (The ‘,Robin Hood’, Tax –, see full explanation below). If you think you would be able to join fellow CAFOD campaigners in London on 9th June, please contact Joanne or Margaret 0113 275 9302, leeds@cafod.org.uk The Robin Hood Tax would turn a crisis for the banks into an opportunity for the world. Join the campaign for a new global tax that will create huge change for the world’,s poor. Just a tiny tax on bankers will raise billions to tackle poverty and climate change. We are only asking for 0.05 percent traded by banks –, 50p for every £,1,000. And yet this could raise around $400 billion per year to help fight poverty and help developing countries combat climate change. Tea time for change: A Westminster lobby for international development A mparo, who features in this year’,s Lenten Give it up! campaign. He witnessed how she and other people like her are rebuilding their lives with the help of our partners and projects. The photo shows the Bishop and CAFOD’,s Director Chris Bain with Amparo and her work colleagues. Bishop Drainey writes, “,I met Amparo and her companions in the place where they work. Given her story and theirs, you might think that they would feel so bitter and victimised. However, they were attempting to make a life for themselves and their families. They were trying to live with some dignity and freedom, and the wonderful thing is that with a bit of help from us via CAFOD, they were achieving it. But the fact of the matter is that it is YOU who have made the difference. Amparo and her friends and many others we met know it is you who have helped them and they were continually asking us to let you know how good it is to have brothers and sisters who think of them in their need. I come back from Colombia very much inspired by the people we met. Despite what is lacking in their lives, they are extremely grateful for what they have and they are especially aware of being part of the family of the Church, knowing that they have brothers and sisters in England and Wales who pray for them and support them. We too have brothers and sisters in Colombia who support us in prayer and in whose lives we are playing a vital part. Knowing things like this is one of the reasons why for me Lent is a joyful season. I hope it is for you also.’, The CAFOD Leeds Team would like to thank our parishes and schools for all your wonderful Lenten efforts to support our work. We are well aware of the number of parishes and school who have prayed with us using the ‘,Walk with Us’, Stations of the Cross,the fundraising events that have been organised, for example hunger lunches, CAFOD markets, sponsored fasts as well as all who have taken to heart the Give it Up’, campaign all through Lent. It is YOUR commitment and generosity that makes the work of transforming lives possible! Thank you for making a difference this Lent Refugee Crisis continues as people flee from Ivory Coast W ith intense fighting continuing in Cote d’,Ivoire (Ivory Coast), at least 100,000 refugees have poured into neighbouring Liberia. Thousands more are crossing every week - and food and water supplies are running dangerously low. Our staff are on the ground, responding to this humanitarian crisis. Here’,s how one person is coping - Patrice`s story Patrice Doho had known for weeks that the fighting was drawing near his village in Cote d’,Ivoire. But when he heard heavy gunfire on 24 February, he and his family didn’,t even have time to pack their bags. “,The children couldn’,t understand what was happening,”, says Patrice. “,They were in floods of tears. We didn’,t have time to collect our possessions, we just fled.”, Since last year’,s disputed election, there have been increasingly violent clashes across the West African state, with hundreds of thousands of people forced to leave their homes. The fighting is intense, and there have been reports of massacres by both sides. Patrice and his family decided to head for neighbouring Liberia. “,It took us two days to walk to the border,", he says. ",Then we spent all the money we had on crossing the river.”, Welcomed as brothers and sisters It wasn’,t the first time Patrice had made this journey. He had been forced to flee from Cote d’,Ivoire’,s civil war in 2002. Back then he was offered shelter in the small Liberian village of Glarlay. Now he has returned with his extended family. “,When we arrived in Glarlay, I asked the village chief for help,”, says Patrice. “,We are from the same tribe. They welcomed us as brothers and sisters.”, The population of the Liberian village of Glarlay has doubled in the last few weeks [photo Antonio Cabral / CAFOD] Despite the kindness of their hosts, life is not easy for Patrice’,s family. The population of Glarlay has more than doubled since the refugee crisis began. This is already one of the poorest parts of the world, and the new arrivals are placing an enormous strain on the village’,s meagre resources. Patrice is one of 24 refugees crammed into one small house. There is a serious shortage of basic supplies, and food-stocks are running dangerously low. “,We need mattresses to sleep on,”, says Patrice. “,And I need tools so I can work. There is little hope of us going home any time soon.”, ",Children will start dying", ",The food is running out and there is no clean water,", said CAFOD`s Joseph Mansaray after visiting Glarlay. ",We are facing a humanitarian crisis where children will start dying.", Joseph is one of our staff on the ground in Liberia, working with local partner organisations to provide emergency food aid, sleeping mats, blankets and cooking utensils. We are also supplying seeds to help families to grow more food over the coming months, as well as constructing latrines and launching projects that will help to protect refugee children. “,It’,s inspiring to see the compassion that Liberian communities are showing towards their neighbours,”, says CAFOD’,s Antonio Cabral. “,But when the rainy season starts, it will be far harder to get aid to remote villages like Glarlay. That’,s why we need to act now.”, CAFOD’,s Partners are already working hard Caritas Gbarnga in Liberia, as well as the Centre for Justice and Peace Studies (CJPS) and Don Bosco Homes (DBH) are longstanding and trusted CAFOD partners. On the Liberian border with Cô,te d`Ivoire, we have participated in a seven person assessment mission in conjunction with these three local partner organisations. We have approved a grant of £,100,000 (USD 162,000) in funding to our local Caritas partner in Gbarnga for emergency seed distribution, provision of essential items such as mattresses, blankets and cooking utensils, and for building latrines for refugees. We have also provided £,52,000 for projects to protect refugee children, projects to help people trace their families, and peace building initiatives. As Cote d`Ivoire descends into civil war, thousands of Ivorians are fleeing the violence in the commercial capital Abidjan. [ photo REUTERS/Luc Gnago courtesy of alertnet.org] CAFOD’,s Antonio Cabral said: “,This situation is at breaking point. The reports we are getting from the ground of increased fighting and thousands of terrified families fleeing to Liberia must be sufficient spur to the international community to act. “,A peaceful solution must be brokered, the UN peacekeeping mission must look at more effective ways to protect the civilian populations and international donors must address the growing humanitarian crisis inside Cô,te d’,Ivoire and over the border in Liberia, where more than 100,000 refugees have amassed. “,The eyes of the world are on Libya and the Arab uprisings, but there is a civil war going on in West Africa. The people of Cô,te d’,Ivoire and Liberia need help now, they cannot wait for the political and news agenda to catch up.”, For further information and how to donate to CAFOD’,s work in the Ivory Coast, visit www.cafod.org.uk or contact the Leeds office leeds@cafod.org.uk Creator God, Because of your abundant love you chose to bring light and order into the formless void, to create a world of unsurpassed beauty and you saw that it was good. We ask that you continue to recreate the world with that same attentive love, to bring light into today’,s ever increasing chaos and darkness where we have failed to be stewards and carers of your creation. Replenish our hearts so that we too can renew the face of the earth. Amen Kieran O`Brien/CAFOD An Easter Prayer Recreate the world

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Apr 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Leeds Catholic Post Page 9 By Jo Dommett and Maggie Atkinson “,From the moment the massed choir of all the feeder primaries of St. John Fishers primary school bounced into the opening number, ‘,Hosanna,’, I tingled all over. The students threw themselves heart and soul into belting out the words and performing every action in impressive unison. The confidence of all the soloists –, Judas, Jesus and Pilate –, from such young students (Jesus was only a Year 5!) was testament both to the huge amount of talent inherent in the primary schools of Harrogate and hard work of Community Arts Director Darren Roberts. In between the music, the story was told by an assortment of readers from the various primary schools. Again, the clarity of diction was excellent. Perhaps the most moving moment was Jesus’, journey to Calvary as he zig zagged through the choir, now playing the hostile crowd. There were tears in the eyes of many audience members as he was pushed and shoved to the ground. As the students sang their final number –, Roll Back the Stone- the mood in St. Robert’,s church was joyful. Then it was time for St. John Fisher High School students to take over. There were some moving solos from the Sixth Form Choir, accompanied by elegant interpretative dance from the talented Year 10 dance group. The Year 9 drama students who performed the crucifixion scene carried off this dramatic climax with the suitable gravitas and solemnity. When the St. John Fisher school choir and band moved into ‘,Roquiem’, itself they proved to be in their usual excellent form, with the musicians well balanced to the sound of the vast school choir, performing in Latin with subtitles in English on the video screens. A mention must go to the hard work of those involved in the camera work and editing which allowed the audience to follow every word in English and see every face –, no matter where they were sitting. As the performance reached its finale the roof of St. Robert’,s must nearly have come off as the primary schools joined in for ‘,In Paradisim,’, and the combined voices of all the schools filled the church. The entire event was a very moving experience for all those present and was a wonderful advert for our present young people, and for the promise the future holds. Roll Back the Stone Class 3 at St Francis Catholic Primary School Morley have been busy preparing for Easter in a special way. They are performing ‘,Resurrection Rock’, for the school and parents. This performance tells the story from Palm Sunday through to the resurrection of Jesus on Easter Sunday. The children’,s class teacher, Miss Grayston said ‘,It is a great way to teach the children the Bible stories of Holy week and lets them really get involved.’, Bible Rock Leeds Middlesbrough Hallam When Yorkshire Priests retire or fall sick they receive support from THE YORKSHIRE BRETHREN FUND Under the patronage of Blessed Nicholas Postgate (founded in 1660) A NYONE CAN HELP THEM BY BECOMING A BENEFACTOR Each Benefactor will have five Masses offered during life or after Death as requested, and share in over 400 monthly Masses offered by Priest Members. Apply to your Parish Priest or The Secretary: Fr Timothy Wiley, St Mary’,s Presbytery, Cross Bank Road, Batley, WF17 8PQ Contribute £,30.00 Registered Charity Number 511025

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Apr 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 10 Leeds Catholic Post O n Tuesday, 22nd March, St Walburga’,s Catholic Primary School, Shipley, were delighted to welcome Bishop Arthur to their school. A welcoming party of Fr Barr (Parish Priest), Mr Moor (Chair of Governors) , Mrs Connor (Headteacher) and the six members of the RE Council greeted Bishop Arthur outside and led him to the Prayer Garden where he blessed prayer books for distribution to each child. These had been organised by school to mark the occasion of the visit and prior to their production, the RE Council organised a competition to find a design for the cover and a special school prayer. Following the blessing, Bishop Arthur toured the school, spending about ten minutes in each class talking to the children and then praying with them. In each class the Bishop presented the prayer books and a special prayer card for Collective Worship Areas from the Papal visit in September. This was the first visit by a Bishop to the school in its 34 years at this site and was indeed a memorable experience. Bishop Visits Shipley Schools Bishop marks his visit with a Prayer Book

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Apr 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Leeds Catholic Post Page 11 Welcome to Alexandra Court! We are a small private family orientated residential home for the elderly, where standards of care and cleanliness are our priority. Together with my three children, a dedicated and conscientious manager and our wonderful team of staff members, some of which have been with us since we opened in 1992, we have ensured Alexandra Court continues to exceed expectations. We have home cooked meals and desserts, tailored care plans to meet each resident’,s individual needs and activities galore including entertainers, fitness instructors, beauty and cinema afternoons and two little dogs visit regularly who bring a lot of happiness to our residents. Most rooms are en-suite complete with television and telephone points, nurse call systems and they are decorated regularly to ensure the Alexandra Court stays fresh, clean and always smells nice! In order to experience life at Alexandra Court please feel free to contact my daughter Marilouise, to arrange a viewing or alternatively have a look at our website for more information. We look forward to welcoming you soon. 333 Spen Lane, Leeds LS16 5BB Tel: 0113 274 3661 Email: court_alexandra@yahoo.co.uk www.alexandracourtcarehome.co.uk Family orientated residential home for the elderly S t Anthony’,s Catholic Primary School ,Shipley were delighted to welcome Bishop Arthur to their school on Tuesday 22 March 2011.The sun shone brightly as he arrived and he enjoyed the elevated position of the school and the wonderful views of Bailden and Ilkley. He was presented with a rose tree named Blessings by two year 6 pupils and it was hoped that when it blossomed it would remind the bishop of the school. The school celebrates 40 years of Catholic Education this year. The bishop enjoyed an art exhibition, toured all the classes in the school and prayed with all the children. He was amazed by the quality of the art work especially the Stations of the Cross. Each class presented the Bishop with a card and a prayer. The Bishop left a gift for each class too, a prayer card from the Papal visit. It was a special day and one that the school will remember for a long time. Bishop’,s Visit is a Blessing!

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Apr 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

FROM JUST £,299 R.G.R. MEMORIALS COLOUR CATALOGUE QUALITY MEMORIALS AT AFFORDABLE PRICES IN GRANITE, MARBLE &, STONE ALL PRICES INCLUDE DELIVERY &, FIXING Ogee top memorial 2’,6”, high Fully polished Black Granite, Delivered and Fixed for £,399 inc VAT FREE Tel: 0113 282 3888 43 High Ridge Park, Rothwell, Leeds LS26 0NL ‘,What A Wonderful Morning! T hursday March 31st , Bishop Arthur visited St. Anthony’,s Catholic Primary, Clayton and what a wonderful morning it was. He was welcomed by children from reception and year 6 who gave him a card with signatures from all our children and then he was guided around the school. His first port of call was morning nursery where he engaged in free flow. He went outside to the fantastic play area and sat and talked with children in our pavilion. Moving on to Reception class the children presented Bishop Arthur with letters, all secured in a special gift box made by the children, including some fantastic pictures of him in his big hat. In year 1 and 2 Bishop Arthur asked the children all about their work and their favourite subjects at school. Year 2 were finding out about Antarctica and when asked “,can you remember which special visitor came to our country for a great assembly? (The Pope)”, answered “,was it penguins?”, Bishop Arthur was greeted in year 3 and 4 with more gifts, including hope flowers and a book of poetry, written by the children. In year 5 the class presented a spiritual bouquet and explained why they had chosen these particular flowers. Bishop Arthur remarked “,You have got me just right.”, Moving onto year 6, our top class sat engrossed as they heard about the pope’,s mission for every one of us, and then presented a box of hopes, prayers and poems they had prepared. In each class Bishop Arthur presented the children with a wonderful gift of a prayer card of The Holy Family, signed by The Pope and prayed with the children. The morning culminated in a whole school assembly where the children sang hymns prepared by Mr. C. McElroy, and read bidding prayers. They finished with a wonderful whole school rendition of ‘,There is someone’, led with signing from staff. This was a truly marvellous event in the life of our school and one I am sure the children and staff will remember for a very long time. Page 12 Leeds Catholic Post Thinking about Life Choices? Sr Frances will help you choose what`s right for you! Visit: www.sistersofnazareth.com Email: vocinfo@sistersofnazareth.com Mobile: + 44 (0) 77 859 759 61

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Apr 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

NEWS FROM LEEDS TRINITY UNIVERSITY COLLEGE Leeds Catholic Post Page 13 Repeat success for Leeds Trinity at Yorkshire Internship Awards L eeds Trinity University College has repeated its success of 2010 with a double award-winner at the Yorkshire Internship Awards 2011. The Careers Service at Leeds Trinity boasted two out of the four shortlisted candidates for the West Yorkshire Internship of the Year award at Thursday’,s award ceremony. Alex Beavis and The Knowledge Partnership won the award on the night, as well as scooping the ultimate accolade of Yorkshire Internship of the Year. Alex now works as a Graduate Market Research Analyst with The Knowledge Partnership following a 12 week internship at the company organised by Leeds Trinity Careers Service. Alex said, “,Post internship, I am now certain that I wish to develop and pursue a career in marketing, an ambition that my new employer has willingly supported. My internship was an invaluable kick-start to begin my career.”, Also nominated for the West Yorkshire category was Leeds Trinity intern Joanna Midgley, who graduated from Leeds Trinity in 2010 with a BA in Business and Management. Joanna’,s internship with Leeds based Dudley Child Executive Recruitment led to a permanent position as the company’,s office manager with HR responsibilities. Joanna said, “,I first worked for Dudley Child on a six week work placement during my degree, which was a great introduction to the recruitment business. The nomination for the internship award recognises the excellent work that Dudley Child does in helping graduates onto the career ladder.”, Managing Director Jordan Dudley (pictured with Joanna) said, “,We have taken on a number of Leeds Trinity students and are impressed with their skills and personal qualities. Jo is a great example –, we couldn’,t do without her!”, The Yorkshire Internship of the Year Awards 2011 celebrate the work of graduates who have gained valuable workplace experience through an innovative partnership between Graduates Yorkshire and careers services at the region’,s higher education institutions. The scheme is funded by the Higher Education Funding Council for England. Events at Leeds Trinity University College Please visit our website at www.leedstrinity.ac.uk for more details and a full events listing. Health and Happiness: What matters? Who cares? 18 May 7.00 to 9.00pm Debate with expert panel, and information about Health, Wellbeing and Sports courses and activities at Leeds Trinity. Catholic Partnership Day for schools 20 May 9.30am to 3.30pm The theme for this year is Music and Liturgy with CJM Music (www.cjmmusic.com). For more information and to book call the Education Partnership Office on 0113 2837100 ext 379. Course fee £,50.00 per school (including lunch and refreshments). Atkinson Grimshaw Day Conference 21 May 9.00am to 4.00pm Speakers including artists, museum curators, academics and poets will discuss Grimshaw`s work, life, and relevant themes. Cost £,35, including entry to private evening viewing of Atkinson Grimshaw exhibition at Harrogate`s Mercer Art Gallery, on Friday 20 May. Email Joy Hamblin on j.hamblin@leedstrinity.ac.uk A fter 31 years teaching PE, Anne Wolliter has made a winning start to her retirement with a special award from Leeds Trinity University College in recognition of her achievements in Catholic education. Anne retired from Cardinal Heenan Catholic High School in December, and visited Leeds Trinity this month to receive her award from Professor Freda Bridge, Leeds Trinity’,s Principal and Chief Executive. As a Catholic foundation, the university college gives the Leeds Trinity Award for Outstanding Contribution to Catholic Education to retiring teachers with a longstanding connection with the institution. The award recognises teachers who have trained at Leeds Trinity, gained substantial experience in Catholic schools, made a strong contribution to the Catholic school community, and been involved in training Leeds Trinity’,s student teachers. Liz Cox, Head Teacher at Cardinal Heenan, said, “,Anne has been instrumental in establishing this school’,s reputation for high achievement in girls’, sport, and we are grateful for her energy, enthusiasm and commitment.”, “,She has also used her extensive experience to become coordinator of the school’,s training programme for newly qualified teachers and student teachers.”, “,Anne’,s outstanding leadership of the pilgrimage to Lourdes has been a huge commitment of her free time that has given so much to the spiritual life of this community. She has given of her time very generously and has been a dedicated servant of Catholic education throughout her career. We owe her a great deal and wish her a long and happy retirement.”, Anne is not retiring fully from the service of Catholic education –, she has been appointed a Foundation Governor by the Diocese of Leeds. PE teacher retires at the top of her game with Leeds Trinity award Female professors to the fore at Leeds Trinity University College L eeds Trinity University College has bucked the national trend with the appointment of four new female professors as it recognises the achievements of academic staff. This means that four out of the five professors on the teaching staff at Leeds Trinity are women, which contrasts sharply with the national picture. Times Higher Education reported in January that 19.1% of professors nationally are female compared with 44% of all academic staff.* This year eight academic staff at Leeds Trinity achieved the rank of professor or reader, senior academic titles conferred on those who fulfil criteria such as a national or international reputation for original research, a portfolio of publications, and communication of knowledge through teaching and course development. Humanities are well represented by the new professors and readers, reflecting the findings of the latest Research Assessment Exercise (2008) which found between 50% and 70% of the department’,s research to be internationally recognised or internationally excellent. Professor Maureen Meikle, Head of Humanities and Professor of Early Modern History, said, “,For four out of the five professors to be women is a major achievement. The appointment of seven professors and readers in the Humanities department acknowledges the level of scholarship in our department and the international reputation of our researchers.”, With scholarly work subject to peer review by expert colleagues around the world, the conferment of the titles is acknowledgement of achievements by the wider academic community as well as by Leeds Trinity itself. Pictured left to right are: Paul Hardwick, Professor of English, Karen Sayer, Professor of Social and Cultural History, Rosemary Mitchell, Reader in Victorian Studies, Di Drummond, Reader in Modern History, Principal and Chief Executive Professor Freda Bridge, Maureen Meikle, Professor of Early Modern History, Hannah Hunt, Reader in Eastern Christianity, Kirsteen Kim, Professor of Theology and World Christianity, Judy Donnelly, Professor of Nutrition Education *Data from Higher Education Statistics Agency December 2009

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Apr 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 14 Leeds Catholic Post ‘,The YES’, O n 23rd March the LDYS monthly youth event looked a little bit different. Young people from all corners of the Diocese of Leeds gathered at the Cathedral Hall for ‘,The YES’,. During the evening, a variety of people gave testimony to ways which they have said ‘,yes’, in their faith journeys. The theme of the evening anticipated the celebration of the Annunciation a couple of days later, so we looked at Mary and her amazing ‘,yes’, to God. The usual team were joined by an ecumenical team called “,New Generation”, who focus on evangelisation within schools. They shared their top tips on how to say ‘,yes’, to the message of the Gospel in our daily lives, and practical ways on how this could be done with our peers in school and college. They shared some amazing stories about how prayer and evangelisation had changed the lives of young people, including one story about a 15 year old girl who prayed for the person who was bullying her. The twist at the end of this story was that the bully actually ended up becoming an active Christian! The evening also included a time of praise and worship, and opportunity to make Rosaries and the evening concluded with Night Prayer of the Church. Rosaries, made by young people of the Diocese of Leeds will be available to buy at the Diocesan Corpus Christi Procession on Sunday 19th June 2011. The next Revelation will take place in Cathedral Hall on Wednesday 18th May 2011, 7 –, 9pm. Leeds Diocesan Youth Service ‘,All who are thirsty, come!’, (Rev 22:17) TESTIMONY TIME Name : Lauren Jackson Age : 22 Where are you from? Leeds Tell us a little bit about yourself and your faith journey…, I am currently a 2nd year student at Leeds Trinity University studying Theology. I enjoy playing music and doing lots of singing. I guess my Faith journey started seriously when I went to World Youth Day in Cologne in 2005, it was a great chance to meet lots of new people and discover that there are loads of young Catholics in the world! From then I have just tried to learn more about my faith, going to different events and prayer times and just experiencing more and more of what God has in store for me. In 2008-2009 I was part of the Animate community in Liverpool and whilst there I was able to deepen my prayer life, spending more time each day in silence, placing myself and my day in the Lord’,s hands, and it’,s been really amazing to see much he has done for me ☺, . Who is your favourite Biblical character? Peter, because although he kept getting it wrong he was the one who recognised Jesus as the Messiah and who God chose to be the rock of His Church. He is a great reminder that we don’,t need to be perfect and get everything right for God to have great things he wants each of us to do. When is the time that you have felt closest to God? I feel closest to God when I am on my own, often in front of the Blessed Sacrament where I am able to just be myself and open up to God knowing he is listening. If you could send a text to God, what would it say? Hi God! How are things up in heaven? U keeping those saints in line? Thanks for being awesome and wonderful, looking forward to spending eternity with you! ☺, x Who has been influential in your faith? Lots of people! Priests, Religious, Friends, Family, everyone who I have seen something special in ☺, What’,s your favourite Biblical quotation? “,For I know the plans I have for you,”, declares the LORD, “,plans to prosper you and not to harm you, plans to give you hope and a future. Then you will call on me and come and pray to me, and I will listen to you. Jeremiah 29:11-12. How do you keep your faith alive in everyday life? Try to attend at least one weekday Mass and go to a holy hour each week. Everyday I spend just a few moments in prayer before getting up and before going to bed, asking God for his help and strength and thanking him for his faithful love. Finish this sentence, “,In heaven I bet there’,ll be…,”, …, lots of lovely people to share everlasting chocolate with and a massive castle with all things Disney! For more information about how to register for Leeds Diocesan Youth Service events, check out: www.leedsyouth.org.uk, contact Anna at the Youth Office: 0113 261 8058 / abcleedsdiocese@hotmail.com or join the “,Leeds Diocesan Youth Service”, Facebook group. Friday 15th April “,Handmaids”, Evening of prayer for young women aged 18 –, 30ish 7 –, 9pm St. Joseph’,s Convent, Hunslet Sunday 17th April Palm Sunday Retreat For pilgrims on the WYD Pilgrimage Myddelton Grange, Ilkley Tuesday 3rd May Northern Diocesan Youth Officers Meeting 10.30am Hinsley Hall Thursday 12th May Youth Ministry Coordinators Meeting 10.30 –, 3.30 Hinsley Hall Wednesday 18th May REVELATION 7 –, 9pm Cathedral Hall, Leeds Thursday 19th May Youth Ministry Holy Hour Praying for young people in the Diocese of Leeds 2.30 –, 3.30pm Hinsley Hall Chapel Thursday 26th May Ecumenical Youth Worker Breakfast 9.15 –, 10.30am TBC Leeds Diocesan Youth Service Calendar

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Apr 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Leeds Catholic Post Page 15 Classified Advertising LEEDS CATHOLIC MARRIAGE CARE Marriage isn’,t always easy —, Counselling can help For an appointment in confidence, with an understanding and experienced listener, please telephone: LEEDS 0113 261 8045 HUDDERSFIELD 01484 422523 A Relationship Counselling Service W. Lever Ltd BRADFORD 01274 547137 524 THORNTON ROAD, BRADFORD BD8 9NB FOR OVER 75 YEARS PROVIDING A COMPLETE PERSONAL &, CARING 24 HOUR FUNERAL SERVICE CHAPEL OF REST H UGHES F UNERAL S ERVICES (Catholic Funeral Directors) 180 YORK ROAD, LEEDS LS9 9NT. Tel 2480953/63 152 GREEN LANE, CROSSGATES. Tel 2326900 3 HOLLIN PARK PARADE, OAKWOOD ROUNDABOUT Tel 2499338 Web: wwww.hughesfuneralservices.co.uk Email: info@hughesfuneralservices.co.uk Family owned and managed. Fully Qualified in all aspects. 24 Hour Service Guaranteed Fixed Price Funeral Plans etc. “,At a time of bereavement we carry out our duties with dignity and respect”, In times of bereavement please contact: B. J. MELIA &, SONS (B. J. Melia Dip F.D.) F UNERAL D IRECTORS AND M ONUMENTAL M ASONS Private Chapel of Rest 64 GIBBET STREET, HALIFAX Telephone: 01422 354453 PRE-PAID FUNERAL SERVICE AVAILABLE DETAILS ON REQUEST Jennings Funeral Services (Catholic Funeral Directors) 13 Racca Green, Knottingley WF11 8AT Telephone: 01977 677715 •, Highest standards of care •, Family owned and managed •, Pre payment plans •, 24 hour service •, Personal attention of Barry and Elizabeth Jennings A Personal and Dignified Family Business that Cares S J F S t John Fisher Catholic High School is the first school in Harrogate to be awarded an ICE (Investing in Community Engagement) quality mark. Bestowed by the Special Schools and Academies Trust (SSAT), this prestigious award recognises the school’,s achievements in improving outcomes for all. The SSAT assessor stated that “,St John Fisher has a clear vision for community engagement that clearly strives to create the best environment for all its’, students.’, The school met the criteria for the award with clear demonstrations of effective leadership and management with clear aims and purposes for the school’,s community role. By enhancing the learning and achievement for all stakeholders through a range of quality partnerships, it was also proven that St John Fisher is responsive to the needs of the local area as a centre of learning and provides a clear vision for its future impact in the community. ICE Award coordinator and Head of Year 7, Debbie Chattaway explained, “,We have worked hard to build local, regional and international partnerships that broaden educational opportunities for our students, and that enable the wider community to benefit from our facilities and specialities. Our partnerships are many and diverse. Just a few examples are our Fisher Arts outreach programme, which offers adult learning courses in subjects ranging from languages to performance arts, our connection with the Diocese of Leeds and the Leeds Trinity College, for which we provide teacher training placements, and the strong links we have with local and international schools, local businesses, for example, Betty’,s and local government organisations.”, Paul Jackson, Head Teacher, commented, “,The ICE mark is awarded to schools that demonstrate long term commitment and high standards in community engagement. Christian values are at the heart of our school and it is important for us to build solid, reciprocal relationships within our communities. Debbie has worked hard on behalf of the school to achieve this status, and I am delighted that her efforts and those of the school and our partners in the community have been rewarded with this national recognition. It’,s a great accolade of which we are all very proud.”, St John Fisher awarded prestigious ICE Quality Mark Debbie Chattaway, Head of Year 7 and ICE Award Coordinator, with Mr Paul Jack- son, Head Teacher, holding the ICE Award certificate. O n Monday, 21 March, Sir Trevor Brooking, Director of Development at the F.A. officially opened the new state of the art floodlit Artificial Turf Pitch at St. Mary’,s School in Menston. Many high profile ex-St. Mary’,s students from the world of music and sport attended the event. Sir Trevor was full of praise for St. Mary’,s and the new facility, “,St. Mary’,s is an outstanding Sports College where excellence and inclusion in sport go hand in hand with excellent academic results and high achievement in music and the arts. Sport has the potential to add so much to a person’,s all-round education. The new pitch at St. Mary’,s is tremendous and David Geldart and his team deserve great credit for their determination and perseverance for making it a reality. The school has excellent links with the community and with its partner football clubs who will benefit enormously from the facility. It is a great honour for me to formally open this excellent facility.”, The new Artificial Turf Pitch forms part of a £,750,000 investment in sport at the school which will also see all remaining grass pitches drained to a high standard. The new facilities are a fantastic boost for St. Mary’,s and the wider sporting community, particularly the school’,s partner clubs of Guiseley Juniors FC, Menston Juniors FC and Burley Trojans FC. The project was part funded with the help of a £,325,000 grant from the Football Foundation. Funded by the Premier League, the FA and the Government via Sport England, the Football Foundation is the nation’,s largest sports charity. Launched in July 2000, the Foundation celebrated its tenth anniversary last year and has so far supported around 8,000 community sports projects worth £,945m. The fruition of the project is a dream come true for Assistant Headteacher David Geldart who has campaigned for such a facility at St. Mary’,s for over ten years. “,I am delighted with the new facilities, they are everything that we ever hoped for and they are no less than the school and the wider community deserve”,. Following a reception and speeches in the school’,s Main Hall, invited guests went onto the pitch which was blessed by Father O’,Connor and then formally opened by Sir Trevor Brooking. ‘,State of the Art’, Sports Facility opened by Sir Trevor Brooking

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Apr 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Children, staff, parents and governors all turned out to officially open their new school kitchen garden dedicated to the memory of Mr George Clinton a parishioner and school governor. On a lovely sunny morning the St Joseph’,s Castleford school community gathered for an orchestral string concert with pupils from Year 3 to Year 6 performing. Guests continued to arrive through the morning including former pupils who now attend St Wilfrid’,s the feeder high school. The high school is a flagship school for the Food for Life Partnership and encourages schools to grow food to support their school kitchens. Through the Open Futures programme children and staff of St Joseph’,s have been working with Paul Kettell from the Royal Horticultural Society who teaches them in effective school kitchen gardening. Mrs Sarah Delany, ‘,Grow It’, co-ordinator for the school said: ‘,This is a fantastic opportunity for children and staff to really understand the growing process and to nurture the crops in a very structured and enjoyable way. Children can see where there food is coming from, it is also a wonderful opportunity for learning beyond the classroom. Children love the potting shed ad getting their hands dirty!’, The official opening followed a year’,s planning, designing and building of the garden. A special guest was invited to open the garden. Mrs Lily Clinton cut the ribbon and unveiled plaque in memory of her husband George. The school council had decided to name the garden following a generous donation to the school following George’,s funeral. The money was used to support the garden as George had been a very practical man and helped the school and parish over many years. Up until been taken ill George had attended the school’,s senior citizen’,s luncheon club and seen the children regularly. After a short prayer service Lily thanked the school for their support and said she was very moved by such a wonderful occasion which she shared with her daughter Maureen and her granddaughter Cassandra. She was presented with a voucher from the children, which entitled her to come and pick vegetables from the school garden whenever she pleased. Kieron Flood, Head teacher, commented: ‘,It is a delight to be part of such a caring community where everyone’,s efforts are recognised. George and Lily have been a big part of the community and it’,s important we recognise this whenever we can. We look forward to the garden blossoming as we nurture it through the seasons just as we see the children blossom through the nurture of its community.’, Page 16 Leeds Catholic Post Emotional Affirmation The top Spanish Flamenco dancer was recently asked “,what’,s the biggest threat to flamenco folk dance in your country? and she replied “,I worry about what childhood has become Consumerism, the internet, video consoles and all that leave children with little time to cultivate their emotions. All that is a long term threat, because it is where art comes from”,. She has been a traditional Flamenco dancer since she was four practicing one of the oldest dance forms in the world and she stressed that dance is not just about numbers and counting but about expressing ones emotion and experiencing “,a huge emotional charge”,, “,Flamenco”, she says “,is born out of emotion and the technique comes afterwards”,. It strikes me that this comment is in stark contrast to the insistence on absolute rationality that seems to dominate our society, in its culture and consciousness. In the western world philosophy has turned us to worship at the shrine of reason and “,logic”, whether we are dealing with the economy or ordinary relationships and though this may seem an abstract matter it does have profound human implications. How regularly are those with dementia or severe learning disabilities ignored or talked about in the third person while they are present because we judge them to be “,out of it”, and therefore effectively ignorable? As our society ages and more and more older people suffer from dementia and diseases such as Alzheimers more and more become excluded and written off , actually present but treated as absent simply because they fail to join in a conversation or are unable to use words to communicate. How often, whether it is in company, a shop or even at the doctors, the person known to suffer memory loss is spoken about rather than with. We tend to act as if they aren’,t there .And as Stephen Post put it in his work “,The Moral Challenge of Alzheimer’,s Disease “,Once, less than seven decades ago, the step between psychological and physical elimination proved notoriously short. As part of the Nazi extermination programme, known as T-4, persons with dementia selected for hypothermia experiments were taken out of German mental asylums and left to freeze in the cold night air”,. Professor Post points out that we should not pick out the one property of rationality as the basis for moral consideration. Human beings are comprised of so much more. Too often rationally is defined procedurally, as an ability to do certain things, such as act consistently, based on clear thinking, arrive at decisions by deliberation, and envision a future for oneself. In fact points out Post “,rather few of us go through life with consistent rationality,. We act on emotion, intuition, impulse and the like. We go through periods of considerable irrationality due to our variations in moods.”, Indeed babies and young children have limited undeveloped reasoning capacities but we don’,t value them less but we do take account of their emotional expressions of affection, upset, appreciation and love . In “,Dementia Reconsidered : The Person Comes First”, the late director of the Dementia Institute at the University of Bradford Tom Kitwood writing for carers of those with dementia stressed that love was really about comforting ,tenderness and closeness, and the calming of anxiety, building up deep bonds of friendship and trust rather than rationality or intelligent conversation. Persons with dementia want love, “,a generous, forgiving, and unconditional acceptance, a whole hearted emotional giving, without expectation of direct reward”,. In other words, emotional affirmation is much more important than rational communication. There are over 100 L”,Arche communities worldwide including in Britain set up under the inspiration of Jean Vanier and centred in the village of Trosly-Breuil in northern France where people with and without intellectual disabilities live and work together in small basic Christian communities. The L’,Arche Charter reads “,Our mission is to create homes where faithful relationships based on forgiveness and celebration are nurtured. We want to reveal the unique value and vocation of each person and to live relationships in community as a sign of hope and love”,. L’,Arche communities are characterised not only by working together but by celebrations that “,bring people together in food, wine, song, dance, laughter, dress and decoration ...all that is beautiful”,. This mission ought not to be confined to L”,Arche but should be for all our homes not least in a society in which the high incidence of broken parental relationships leaves so many children growing up without a stable supportive home. Jean Vanier who visited Yorkshire recently, draws our attention to Pope John Paul’,s contribution in 2004 to a symposium on the “,Dignity and Rights of Disabled People”, in which he stated that “, disabled people are humanity’,s privileged witnesses. They can teach us about a love that saves us, they can become heralds of a new world, no longer dominated by force, violence and aggression but by love, solidarity and acceptance a new world transfigured by the light of Christ ,the Son of God who became incarnate who was crucified and rose for us”,. Jean Vanier adds “,Since people with learning disabilities are limited in their capacity to rationalize and forms ideas, and their verbal language is limited, they tend to communicate more through their bodily gestures and simple words of love or of anger. Through them I have discovered the importance of work and interesting activities for their personal development but their desire to celebrate life and have fun are even more important because they are a sign of mutual belonging”,. But he does not leave it there. His emphasis on the need to respect the whole person and include their primary emotional needs and responses as deeply human is a real challenge in a society to ready to write off the inarticulate. Jean Vanier concludes “, I have come to the realization that peace cannot come to our societies and our world unless those who are rich and powerful accept loss and a certain helplessness in order to enter into authentic relationships with those who are weak, vulnerable, and powerless and unless the latter rise up from their depression, aggression and anger and find trust in themselves and others. This can only come about if we rediscover new ways for the weak, and the strong, the rich and the poor to meet each other and discover their common humanity”, John Battle KSG Blessing of a Very Special Garden O smondthorpe Resource Centre welcomed Bishop Arthur Roche to officially open their new sensory garden, on Friday March 25th, in bright sunshine. The Bishop was welcomed by Julie Hewson chairperson of United Voices and her colleagues John Perman and Steven Greenall. The Bishop formerly opened the garden and dedicated it to Denise Lindo and Beverley Hanlon who previously used the centre. Mrs Lindo and family were in attendance. The nationally recognised centre has been offering services to disabled people from all over Leeds for over 21 years and has been a support for carers and other partner organisations. The Bishop made particular reference to the wonderful work that the centre provides and acknowledged the real value of mutual support and coming together. Julie Hewson thanked the Bishop for undertaking the official opening and invited the Bishop to return again when the garden is in full bloom in the summer. Osmondthorpes Resource forms part of Leeds City Councils services in Adult Social Care and has seen over 400 people pass through its doors and back into the community over the years. St Joseph’,s School Garden blossoms in Memory of a Parishioner, Governor and Friend

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Page 17

Apr 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Leeds Catholic Post Page 17 ‘,Therefore let us keep the Feast, not with old leaven, neither with the leaven of malice and wickedness, but with the unleavened bread of sincerity and truth.’, That verse from Paul’,s first letter to the Corinthians inspired the title of a book, recently published in paperback by Riverhead Penguin, about one family’,s battle with depression. More than just a survival manual, ‘,Keeping the Feast’, is a celebration of life and love, a journey from the depths of despair to hope and healing, sustained by food, friendships and faith. Journalist and author Paula Butturini came to Rome’,s ‘,Caravita’, Church just before Easter to share her story... When Paula Butturini and John Tagliabue first met in Rome in the 1980’,s, it seemed like the perfect love story. Two Italy-Americans finding romance in the land of their forefathers, two foreign correspondents sharing a passion for reporting, for asking questions, for uncovering the truth and helping to shape history for future generations. Paula worked for the former United Press International, while John had made his name with the New York Times and the two of them were transferred to Warsaw at the end of the decade to witness the dying gasps of the Communist regimes across the Eastern bloc. On November 17th 1989, Paula was badly beaten by police in Prague at the start of the so-called Velvet Revolution. Shocked but undeterred, the two of them returned to Rome to get married, but just three weeks later, as John was reporting on the uprising in Romania, he was shot in the back by a sniper’,s bullet. For several days he was kept, without antibiotics or anything but the most basic medical supplies in a Romanian hospital until the Red Cross was able to fly him to Germany, where doctors later told the couple that he was lucky to be alive. The healing process was slow, complicated by numerous operations and a serious infection, but as his physical wounds began to heal, John began to suffer from symptoms of depression –, a disease that had already reared its ugly head in both of their families in earlier decades. Paula’,s mother had been treated for serious post-natal depression on four occasions, though she didn’,t tell her daughter until she was almost 30 years old. John carried on working and was sent to cover the breakup of Yugoslavia, where he again saw snipers shooting, an experience which triggered severe post-traumatic stress disorder. Paula was horrified as John told her he could not carry on, unable to work, incapable of even getting up in the morning. Her story of survival will resonate with all those who’,ve had to deal with depression in the family, a daily battle against the demons that caused her husband to panic when the phone rang, to spend days in a dark room or beat his head against the wall and cry. ‘,Anyone who has depression I see as a hero,’, she says, ‘,just for surviving, one day or one week at a time, because what they have is such a serious illness’, Her coping mechanisms included a daily, early morning walk to the market, where she would carefully select fresh vegetables and cook up three nourishing meals a day. As she fights back her tears and masters new and delicious recipes, she thinks back to the happy times she spent with her family around the dinner table of her childhood. She also finds solace each day, on her way back from the market, by dropping in at the nearby chapel of the Brigitine sisters, where she can put down her heavy bags and let the tears flow. Just at that lowest point however, two old friends come back into her life –, a Jesuit priest and a Sister of Mercy, who help her express the anger that’,s been building inside her, anger at her husband but also an unspeakable anger with God. ‘,I felt like Job and I was so angry with everyone, but I didn’,t realise it, because I was still trying to be patient’, she recalls. Gradually she learns to channel that anger, to demand from John his active participation in the healing process and his presence at table with her at meal times. ‘,Sharing food remains one of the most fundamental and primordial rituals of the human community,’, she says as she recounts a second bout of depression that John suffered more recently, after the birth of their daughter. With the support of friends, family and her doctors, Paula finds the right words to explain to a six year old that ‘,Daddy has a sickness which makes him feel very sad and he’,ll take a long time to get better. It’,s not anybody’,s fault, but what we have to do is to remind him that life can be fun and to encourage him to have fun with us again.’, Paula is currently starting work on another book about helping children deal with depression. She began her first book to set down the facts of their family history and help their own children cope with these traumatic experiences, to provide them with that ‘,sincerity and truth’, of which St Paul speaks. In the process –, as she discovers almost every time she speaks about her story in public –, she has helped many other people to break the silence that still surrounds this disease and to begin their own journeys of healing and hope. Philippa M Hitchen Our Rome Correspondent National Football Success S t John’,s School for the Deaf in Boston Spa is toasting national success this month after taking part in a schools football tournament. The school sent three five a side teams to Derby for the National Deaf School Football Championships where they were up against some of the best teams in the country. The U-16s boys team won all their mini league matches, scoring plenty of goals on their way to the semi final. They won this match 2-0 to earn a place in the final where the score remained nil-nil at full time. Extra time followed and St John’,s scored the only goal to become national winners for the first time in the school’,s history. The boys U-14s also reached their final but lost 1-0 to finish silver medal winners. PE Teacher Anne Chambers said “, I am very proud of all the players but especially the under 16 boys team for becoming national winners”, Second season of organ concerts! T he Summer of 2011 sees the second season of organ concerts on two of the most stunning organs in West Yorkshire. This series brings together some of the country’,s most celebrated organists to delight and entertain audiences. Adding a European dimension, international prize-winner Adriano Falcioni of Perugia Cathedral makes a welcome first appearance - not to be missed! The organ at St Patrick’,s Huddersfield was built in 2009 by Š,krabl of Slovenia and combines the technical brilliance of a modern Classical organ with the warm tones of Central Europe. Leeds Cathedral’,s new organ is a full bodied Romantic instrument, built on the Edwardian gravitas of the original 1904 instrument with a touch of magic provided in the reconstruction of 2010 by Klais of Bonn. , Leeds Cathedral: Mondays at 1.15pm Free admission , St Patrick’,s Huddersfield: Thursdays at 7.30pm £,5, £,3 concessions Monday 9th May –, Benjamin Saunders Thursday 12th May –, Thomas Leech with Huddersfield Girls’, Choir Monday 16th May –, Peter King Thursday 19th May –, Graham Barber Monday 23rd May –, Thomas Leech Thursday 26th May –, Gordon Stewart Monday 6th June –, Ian Tracey Thursday 9th June - Adriano Falcioni Monday 13th June –, Adriano Falcioni Monday 20th June –, Christopher McElroy Thursday 23rd June –, Thomas Leech with Huddersfield Boys’, Choir Monday 27th June –, Benjamin Saunders Thursday 30th June –, Simon Lindley Busy Month for Diocesan Choirs! M arch has been a busy month for diocesan choirs in Huddersfield, Bradford and Leeds, with competition successes, special liturgies, new choirs being founded and broadcasts on BBC radio! The Mrs Sunderland Competition in Huddersfield saw both the Huddersfield Boys’, and Girls’, choirs take part. Directed by Keith Roberts (Choral Director, Diocese of Leeds) the choirs are in residence at St Patricks Church in Huddersfield, where they regularly carry out liturgical singing duties. The boys’, choir took first prize in the Year 8 and Under Novice class, with the girls being awarded a commended for their performance in the Under 19 competition. In addition to the competition performances, the choirs sang together at Our Lady of Lourdes Church in Huddersfield for a special Mass to dedicate the Altar led by Bishop Roche on the feast of the Annunciation, and the boys travelled to Liverpool to sing Vespers in the Metropolitan Cathedral. The Bradford Boys’, Choir (choir in residence at St Joseph’,s Church, Bradford) took part in the Harrogate Festival, singing works by Vaughan Williams and Elgar to a packed audience. The Bradford Girls’, Choir took first prize at the Skipton Festival (13 and under choir class) in addition to receiving outstanding feedback from the judges at the National Festival of Music for Youth event in Huddersfield. St Patricks day saw Leeds Cathedral Girls’, Choir travel to Manchester to broadcast the Daily Service live on BBC R4 LW. The choir sang words from St Patricks breastplate: ‘,Christ be beside me,’, alongside the motet ‘,Gaudent in Caelis’, (The saints in heaven rejoice) by 17th Century composer Richard Dering. The end of March saw the first performance of the Dioceses two newest choirs: Leeds Cathedral Junior boys and girls choirs. Directed by Lucy Haigh (Choral Director, Diocese of Leeds) these choirs take children from aged seven upwards from Catholic schools in Leeds. After extensive auditions, the choirs began rehearsals in January of this year, leading to their first appearances in the Cathedral singing at Mass. The junior choirs will contribute regularly to the liturgical singing at the Cathedral in the future alongside the Cathedral senior choirs and the Choir of Holy Rosary St Anne primary school. www.dioceseofleedsmusic.org.uk

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Page 18

Apr 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 18 Leeds Catholic Post First Friday of the Month SINGLE CATHOLICS meet at 8.00pm for mass at our Lady of Lourdes, Leeds. We also a have a program of 4-8 events during the month, walks, meals, cinema and theatre trips, etc. Phone David Easterbrook Chairman LDSC on 0113 2289468 evenings between 6 and 7.30pm only. Membership is open to all single Catholics who are free to marry within the church. Leeds Cathedral 20-35 Group Young people (20-35 years old) who attend St. Anne`s Cathedral in Leeds meet regularly every Thursday for spiritual, social and charitable activities. For further details search Facebook for “,Leeds Cathedral 20-35 Group”,, phone 07816 891872 or 07759 591233 or email leedscathedral20-35@hotmail.co.uk Crusade Mass The crusade Mass and Rosary of Mary Immaculate is held at St Patrick`s Church, Bradford, on the first Saturday of the Month after 12.15pm Mass , Second Sunday of Month 2pm Meeting of Bradford Fraternity of the Secular Franciscan Order at St. Anthony`s Convent, Clayton, Bradford.` `Third Sunday of Month 2.30pm Meeting of Leeds Fraternity of the Secular Franciscan Order at the Cathedral. Ampleforth Renewal Community Ampleforth Abbey, meet 1st Sunday each month, at Ampleforth. 11 .30am Praise, Speaker, Sharing Groups, Reconciliation, Exposition, Finishing with Mass and Healing at 4.00pm. All enquiries: Seamus McEneaney 01429 426181 Monthly Vocations Mass Mount St Joseph’,s Chapel 11am First Wednesday of Month. Calix: An organisation for those recovering from addiction and working the 12 Step Programme of AA so that they can develop and deepen their relationship with Jesus as their Higher Power. Meets on the First Sunday of every month at Corpus Christi Church, Neville Rd. Osmondthorpe. Leeds. Mass at 4.30pm followed by meeting. Contact: Fr. Michael on 01977 510266 Helpers of Gods precious infants, prayer vigils, regular weekly prayer vigils at Marie Stopes Abortuary, 7 Barrack Road.LS7 4AB, next to Jaguar car showrooms. Fridays 12-30 to 1-30, and Saturdays 9am-l1am. Monthly all night vigil of reparation in St Marys Horsforth 12th of every month, 9-30pm to 6am . Other times variable. Further details Pat 0113 2582745 Rosary rally Sat Oct 9th 2010 12- 30pm Leeds cenotaph, outside art gallery, Headrow. Contact 07747698553/ or 0113 2582745 Diary “,This is no time to be ashamed of the Gospel. It is the time to preach it from the rooftops. Do not be afraid to break out of comfortable and routine modes of living in order to take up the challenge of making Christ known in the modern metropolis. “, Pope John Paul II “,On this first visit of a Pope to Canterbury, I come to you in love... the love of Peter …,. I come to you also in the love of Gregory, who sent Saint Augustine to this place to give the Lord’,s flock a shepherd’,s care. Just as every minister of the Gospel must do, so today I echo the words of the Master: “,I am among you as one who serves”,. With me I bring to you, beloved brothers and sisters of the Anglican Communion, the hopes and the desires, the prayers and good will of all who are united with the Church of Rome, which from earliest times was said to “,preside in love”,. Pope John Paul II Canterbury 1982 Blessed John Paul- pray for us Be Still Deadline: For receipt of material for next edition: April 8th 2011 Parishes receive their copies: April 24th 2011 Send articles, reports &, pictures: Mr John Grady, Hinsley Hall, 62 Headingley Lane, Leeds LS6 2BX. Send text as word doc, pictures as jpeg, e-mail to: john.grady@dioceseofleeds.org.uk Tel: 0113 261 8022. Advertising Deadline Please note All paid-for advertising is dealt with by: CathCom, L4 Blois Meadow Business Centre, Steeple Bumpstead, Haverhill, Suffolk, CB9 7BN. To advertise call 020 7112 6710 or email: ads@cathcom.org Your Cath Post Thursday 21 April 7pm Mass of the Lord’,s Supper, Leeds Cathedral Friday 22 April 3pm Celebration of the Lord’,s Passion, Leeds Cathedral Saturday 23 April 8pm Easter Vigil, Leeds Cathedral Sunday 24 April 11am Solemn Easter Mass, Leeds Cathedral Monday 9-12 May CBCEW, Spring Meeting, Hinsley Hall Thursday 12-14 May Visitation, Beda College, Rome Sunday 15-17 May Visitation, English College, Rome Wednesday 18-23 May Visitation, English College, Valladolid Wednesday 25 May 11am VGs’, Meeting, Bishop’,s House, 7pm Confirmation, Leeds South Deanery Thursday 26 May 11am Presbyteral Council, Hinsley Hall, 7pm Confirmation, Leeds North Deanery Friday 27 May 10.30am Meeting with Diocesan Finance Board &, Trustee Directors, Hinsley Hall, 7pm Confirmation, St Mary’,s, Selby Bishops Engagements –, April/May +REGULAR EXTRAORDINARY RITE MASSES+ Sacred Triduum. EASTER 2011 Holy Thursday, April 21st. Notre Dame Chapel, St. Mark`s Avenue, Leeds. 7.30p.m. Good Friday, April 22nd. Notre Dame Chapel, St. Mark`s Avenue, Leeds. 3.00p.m. Holy Saturday, April 23rd. Notre Dame Chapel, St. Mark`s Avenue, Leeds. 7.30p.m. Every Sunday 3.00p.m. St. Joseph`s, Pontefract Road, Castleford. Every Saturday (Vigil Mass) 6.00p.m. St. Marie`s, Gibbet Street, Halifax. Every first Sunday of the Month. 11.30 a.m. Sacred Heart, Broughton Hall, Skipton, Missa Cantata. Every Monday 6.45a.m. St. Mary of the Angels, Cross Bank Rd. Batley (term time) Low Mass. 9.30 a.m. Sacred Heart, Broughton Hall, Skipton, Low Mass. Every Tuesday (term time). 6.45a.m. St. Mary of the Angels, Cross Bank Rd. Batley. Low Mass. Every Wednesday. 6.45a.m. St. Mary of the Angels, Cross Bank Rd. Batley (term time) Low Mass. 9.30 a.m. Sacred Heart, Broughton Hall, Skipton, Low Mass. Every Thursday (term time). 6.45a.m. St. Mary of the Angels, Cross Bank Rd. Batley (term time) Every Friday (inc. first Fridays). 9.30 a.m. Sacred Heart, Broughton Hall, Skipton, Low Mass 7.30p.m. Holy Spirit, Bath Road, Heckmondwike, except last Fridays of the month. Every second Sunday of the month. 3.00p.m. St. Peter`s, Leeds Road, Laisterdyke, Bradford. Missa cantata. Every third Sunday of the month. 5.00p.m. St. Augustine`s, Harehills Rd. Harehills, Leeds. Every fourth Saturday. (Vigil Mass) 3.00p.m. St. Mary of the Angels, Crossbank Road, Batley. Every fifth Saturday. (Vigil Mass) 4.00p.m. Notre Dame chapel, Leeds University chaplaincy, St. Mark`s Avenue, Leeds. Every Saturday. 9.30a.m. Sacred Heart, Broughton Hall, Skipton. Please check the blog lmsleeds.blogspot.com for frequent postings giving details of other Masses outside of the regular schedule. Penalties For Cash C hildren from St Joseph’,s Catholic Primary School in Tadcaster took part in a Penalty Shoot Out in association with York City in the Community. Each pupil took 5 penalties against a coach from the project. A prize giving assembly was held on Wednesday 30th March, where prizes included signed footballs and match tickets. An amazing £,383.00 was raised by Jazmine Goldsmith who received a York City Shirt. The school raised a total of £,694.50 which was split equally between St Joseph’,s and York City in the Community. Pupils from left to right: Back Row: Max Haigh, Jasper Franklin, Jazmine Goldsmith, Nathan Chatakondu. Front Row: Callum Haigh, Abigail Taylor, Andrew Benjamin, Eleanor Colquhoun T he sixteenth York Catholic History day will take place on 4th June at the Bar Convent. As usual, the talks will cover several aspects of Catholic life in the region and will appeal to a wide audience. Martin Craven, local historian and author who spoke at the 2009 History Day, returns to speak on The Rise and Fall of the East Riding Gentry in the Struggle for Church Independence. In response to several requests over the years for a talk about local architect Joseph Hansom, Penelope Harris will speak about The Yorkshire Works of Joseph Hansom, Catholic Architect, born Micklegate (York) 1803. She has already published work on Hansom and is researching another book. The third speaker, Fr. Nicholas Hird, who spoke at the History Day two years ago, will share further results of his research into the Leeds clergy in a talk entitled Typhus 1847 –, a Clerical Response. Coffee will be served from 10 a.m. and the first talk will be at 10.30. The Day will end with Mass in the Convent chapel. The cost will be £,14.50 (students £,7.00) which includes refreshments but not lunch. Meals and snacks are available at the Bar Convent Café,. Further information can be obtained from Judith Smeaton judith.smeaton@btinternet.com 01904 704525 York Catholic History Day

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Page 19

Apr 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Leeds Catholic Post Page 19 Church Pews Uncomfortable? Why not try top quality upholstered foam pew cushions? Safefoam, Green Lane, Riley Green, Hoghton, Preston PR5 0SN www.safefoam.co.uk Freephone 0800 015 44 33 Free Sample Pack of foam &, fabrics sent by first clss mail When phoning please quote UP101 FAREWELL TO PIONEERING MAN OF PROPERTY I t was the last day of the month and also the final pay day for David Damant, the Diocesan Property Administrator for the past twenty-three years. To mark his retirement on March 31st David hosted a farewell lunch at the Curial Offices attended by his colleagues, past and present. He joined the diocese back in January 1988 and at that time the diocese had no property department, it was David’,s task to establish a new office with responsibility for the diocese’,s extensive property portfolio. After being presented with retirement gifts from his colleagues David noted how his new role did not get off to an altogether auspicious start as his first building inspection resulted in a recommendation that it should be demolished. As he said, things got better and he thanked his close colleagues in particular for helping to put the department on a firm footing. During his time with the diocese David’,s expertise was greatly valued by the Diocesan Trustees as well as the members of diocesan committees such as Art, Architecture and Heritage, and Historic Churches. Over the years this was to the great advantage of parishes and schools throughout the diocese. His knowledge and experience in such matters was also acknowledged nationally and he was asked to contribute to various committees and working parties of the Bishops’, Conference. In between engagements, Bishop Roche stopped by and paid a warm tribute to David’,s achievements, notably in setting up the Property Department, and expressed his gratitude for the expert professional advice provided to both Bishop Konstant and himself. ‘,His has been a job well done’,, said the Bishop, who went on to wish David and his wife, Margaret, a long, healthy and happy retirement. Cardinal Heenan Pupils in Town Hall Concert C horisters from Cardinal Heenan Catholic High School, Leeds, were invited to join a glittering cast of international soloists for a performance of Bach’,s St Matthew Passion in Leeds Town Hall on Saturday 9 April. Conductor Simon Wright led the Northern Sinfonia, Leeds Festival Chorus, Choristers of Cardinal Heenan Catholic High School and Leeds Parish Church in the three hour long performance. The concert was part of the Leeds International Concert Season. Performances of the St Matthew Passion, Bach’,s most extended work, have long been a traditional a part of the classical music calendar at Easter. Bach’,s music drama is an innovative and beautiful depiction of the Easter story. Sally Barnes, Head of Music at Cardinal Heenan, said “,Our singers were delighted to be involved. They enjoyed the opportunity to work some of the country’,s leading musicians.”, The soloists for the Leeds performance were James Gilchrist, (tenor), Paul Whelan (bass), Sophie Bevan (soprano), Robin Blaze (counter-tenor), Andrew Staples (tenor) and Mark Stone (bass). Our pictures shows Cardinal Heenan pupils who joined international soloists, the Northern Sinfonia and Leeds Festival Chorus in a a performance of Bach’,s St Matthew Passion in Leeds Town Hall.

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Page 20

Apr 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 20 Leeds Catholic Post Designed and produced by CathCom, L4 Blois Meadow Business Centre, Steeple Bumpstead, Haverhill, Suffolk, CB9 7BN. To advertise call 020 7112 6710 or email: ads@cathcom.org Tales From Peru P upils from St Matthew’,s Catholic Primary School in Allerton, Bradford shared their knowledge of South America with Bishop Arthur when he visited the school on Thursday 24th March. Bishop Arthur looked at colourful displays and children’,s work on different countries and shared with the staff and children his own experiences, particularly those gained in Peru. The children are learning about South America as part of a Lenten focus and have been involved in a range of activities including art work and South American dancing, as well as fundraising activities for CAFOD. Bishop Arthur reflected on Pope Benedict’,s visit to the UK last September and presented the children with a prayer card from the Pope. Myles, a Year 5 pupil who had sung in the Choir at Cofton Park in September said, ‘,It was really special that the Bishop came to see our school. It felt like no-one else had the prayer card, just us. It’,s precious’,. These sentiments were mirrored by Mrs Katy Cox, Headteacher of St Matthew’,s: ‘,Bishop Arthur’,s visit was very special. The children were in awe of him and will remember the day for years to come.’, The Bishop was presented with a framed triptych photograph of the school’,s motto, ‘,Come follow me’, made in mosaics, which dominates the school’,s entrance. To advertise in the next issue call the Advertising Team on 0870 228 4266 Shaking the foundations - PREPARING THE WAY OF THE LORD There will be an audio visual presentation with a powerful team of speakers including major African Church leader Dr. William Kumuyi, Maranatha’,s co-founder Dennis Wrigley, Father Bill Keogh and others. There will be prayer, praise, sharing and healing. SATURDAY 7 TH MAY 2011 10.30am –, 1pm St. Benedict’,s Parish Centre Aberford Road Garforth, Leeds LS25 1PX Anglicans, Catholics, Methodists, Baptists, Pentecostalists, will be joining together with members of the New Churches, United Reformed Church, Salvationists and other Christians. At this time of economic and social crisis a tide of prayer is rising across our land. There is a hunger for the truth of the Gospel. Our nation is in desperate need with fear of unemployment, of broken families, widespread violence and addiction to drink, drugs and pornography. We have created a culture of death and debt. We are a nation in need. We will gather as ONE family. We will worship as ONE people. We believe God wants His Church to speak with ONE voice. YOU can make a difference in the life of this nation. DO COME TO THIS IMPORTANT MEETING Arranged by Maranatha The Maranatha Community UK Office, 102 Irlam Road, Flixton, Manchester M41 6JT Tel: 0161 748 4858 Email: info@maranathacommunity.org.uk www.maranathacommunity.org.uk A nationwide movement of Christians active in all the churches who are coming together to proclaim the Gospel with ONE voice.

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