Church Papers Archive
Feb 2013 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Feb 2013 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Jan 2013 U edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Jan 2013 U edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Dec 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Dec 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Nov 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Nov 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Oct 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Oct 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Sept 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Sept 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Jul/Aug 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Jul/Aug 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Jun 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Jun 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
May 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
May 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Apr 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Apr 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Mar 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Mar 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Feb 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Feb 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Jan 2012 U edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Jan 2012 U edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Dec 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Dec 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Nov 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Nov 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Oct 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Oct 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Sept 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Sept 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Jul/Aug 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Jul/Aug 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Jun 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Jun 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
May 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
May 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Apr 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Apr 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Mar 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Mar 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Feb 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Feb 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Dec 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Dec 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Nov 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Nov 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Oct 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Oct 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Jun 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Jun 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
May 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
May 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Apr 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Apr 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Mar 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Mar 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Feb 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Feb 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Dec 2009 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Dec 2009 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Nov 2009 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Nov 2009 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Oct 2009 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Oct 2009 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Sep 2009 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Sep 2009 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Leeds Catholic Post History

Newspaper for the Diocese of Leeds

.

Feb 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 1

Feb 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Whats inside Journey back to the 80s Page 10 Wiz, Bang for Corpus Page 11 CATHOLIC POST THE NEWSPAPER FOR THE DIOCESE OF LEEDS FEBRUARY 2010 www.dioceseofleeds.org.uk www.catholicpost.org.uk A successful visit to Rome C atholic bishops from across England and Wales spent ten days in the Vatican at the end of January, discussing the challenges they face in their individual dioceses and looking ahead to Pope Benedict’,s visit to Britain in September. The bishops’, visits (known in Latin as Ad Limina Apostolorum since their primary purpose is to make a pilgrimage ‘,to the threshold of the Apostles’, tombs’,) culminated on February 2nd with a papal audience in which Benedict XVI encouraged them to proclaim “,the full saving message of Christ”, in our increasingly secular age and to “,continue to insist upon the right to participate in national debate through respectful dialogue with other elements of society”,. The Pope also held up Cardinal Newman, whose beatification he is expected to preside over in the autumn, as a model of “,faithfulness to revealed truth”,, praising his dedication to prayer, his passion for preaching and his “,pastoral sensitivity towards the needs of his flock”,. While headlines in the secular media said Pope Benedict “,attacked the government”, over its proposed equality legislation, such reports largely failed to note that he praised Britain’,s “,firm commitment to equality of opportunity for all members of society”,. But he went on to point out that the effect of some equality legislation has been “,to impose unjust limitations on the freedom of religious communities to act in accordance with their beliefs”,. His words were taken as a reference both to the Sexual Orientation Regulations, approved by Parliament three years ago, which obliged Catholic adoption agencies to consider same-sex couples as potential adopters and to the current Equality Bill, which aims to tighten up existing anti- discrimination legislation. The Pope’,s insistence on the need for the Church’,s moral teaching to be given a voice in the public square is likely to feature high on the agenda during his visit to England and Scotland later this year. His words may also be echoed in the bishops’, guidelines for Catholics which they are expected to publish ahead of the general election in May this year. Another important aspect of the Pope’,s message to Catholics in Britain this autumn is expected to be a focus on dialogue and cooperation –, both with other Christians and people of the other major faith communities. Almost all the bishops I spoke with during their visits to the Vatican told me they hoped he would promote unity - within the Catholic community and amongst those who share a similar vision on issues of religious freedom, family values and the protection of the most vulnerable members of society. A document from the bishops’, conference on inter-religious dialogue has been in the works for some time and is also awaiting publication in the next couple of months. While the meeting with the Pope marked the culmination of the Ad Limina visits, the bishops had a busy schedule during their stay in Rome, visiting a total of 24 Vatican councils and congregations dealing with everything from religious life, liturgy, evangelisation and education to justice and peace, healthcare, communications and interfaith dialogue. For some of them, like auxiliary John Arnold from Westminster, it was a first time experience –, and a very positive one: in particular, he told me the bishops were delighted to be told that “,our conference is the best in the world for the way in which we respond and organise ourselves in terms of public healthcare”,. Others, like Archbishop Patrick Kelly from Liverpool, are old hands having made up to half a dozen such visits, but they too spoke of a very positive and encouraging experience, with ample opportunity to share details of Continued on page 2 CATHOLIC CARE (Diocese of Leeds) - Taking the Caring Church into the community

Read in full

Page 2

Feb 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 2 SCHOOLS NEWS A successful visit to Rome pastoral challenges in the different dioceses across the United Kingdom. Archbishop Peter Smith of Cardiff revealed he’,d found a good sense of humour amongst Vatican officials and a genuine desire to dialogue over even the most difficult issues. On the subject of Anglican-Catholic relations, the bishops I talked to said they had had little or no interest in their dioceses from Anglicans regarding the new Apostolic Constitution for groups seeking to come into communion with Rome. In his address to the Pope, Archbishop Vincent Nichols of Westminster, president of the Bishops’, Conference, noted that “,years of close cooperation and deepening friendship and communion with our brothers and sisters in the Church of England have helped us to ensure that the various interpretations of and reactions to ‘,Anglicanorum Coetibus’, have not seriously disrupted the relationships between our Ecclesial Communions”,. Questioned by journalists about the shortage of priests and declining vocations, Archbishop Nichols talked about “,a mixed picture”, with some areas, notably the larger cities, reporting an increase in numbers entering the seminaries, but severe difficulties in many rural areas of the country. Bishops from the northern dioceses also told me about their difficult decisions to close parishes due to a declining Catholic population. Bishop Arthur Roche, on his third Ad Limina visit (his first was as general secretary of the conference with Cardinal Hume in 1997) told me he discussed with Pope Benedict the situation in Leeds regarding the amalgamation of parishes and the closure of churches. “,I talked to him about the great courage of people, as well as the pain experienced and he was very encouraging, saying it’,s a necessary work to strengthen the base of the Church for the future”,. Bishop Roche said he was very struck by the “,warmth, encouragement and serenity of the Holy Father”, adding that “,he was very affirming of our ministry and aware of the challenges and opportunities we face in our different dioceses”,. Continued from Front Page Every school should have one T uesday January 26th saw a small gathering of people in St Paul’,s book shop at Hinsley Hall –, they were there for a book launch. In fact it was a four pack book launch. Patricia Ainge after years of work was able to present her worship books for children in School. There are two books to each pack and are beautifully set out following the church’,s liturgy of the day. They are a resource that any teacher would be glad to have. Pat said that she had decided to base it on the liturgy of the day because that demonstrated to the children just how universal the church is and introduced them to the kind of readings they would experience in church. The work itself had come out of her practical experience of ‘,doing’, liturgy in school with children. She had used it so she knew it worked. Thomas, the manager of the Book shop introduced Patricia and said how pleased St Paul’,s was to support authors in this important work and how pleased they were to have everyone there especially Bishop David and Stephen Moseling their operations manager from Westminster. Thomas also pointed out that this really was a unique publication in that it came in two versions –, one Catholic and one Anglican both faithful to their own liturgical calendar. Bishop David said he was pleased to be there and said what a great work it was and how it would be useful not only to teachers but also to priests. –, He also thought it was a neat trick to produce it in two versions! Deirdre Rowe, Principal Officer for Education, in the Diocese said: ‘,It is a great resource, much needed by the schools’, The Book Critic for the |Catholic Post said : ‘,There is no doubt that this is a first class piece of work. It is well laid out, it is easy to use, it is fresh and brings the liturgy to life. Every school should have at least one copy!’, Copies can be obtained from St Paul’,s book shops price £,59.99. O fsted inspectors visited the school during late November 2009. Their report is a great testament to the hard work and dedication of all pupils, staff, parents and governors at St. Joseph’,s Catholic Primary School, Harrogate. What Ofsted had to say about the school. Ofsted believed that the overall effectiveness of the school is outstanding and its capacity for sustained improvement is outstanding. To quote directly from the report. •, ‘,The school makes learning exciting. Pupils hunger to learn and want to achieve as well as they can.’, •, ‘,Pupils’, spiritual, moral, social and cultural development is a hallmark of the school.’, •, ‘,The school has made outstanding progress since the last inspection in all aspects of its work.’, •, ‘,Pupils behave extremely well. The quality of learning is exceptional.’, •, ‘,Those who have special educational needs and/or disabilities or who are new learners of English as an additional language receive specific support which is extremely well tailored to their needs.’, •, ‘,Pupils care for each other. They are good listeners and are patient and supportive to those who have problems. They see themselves as, ‘,one big friendship group’,. •, ‘,Pupils’, actions exemplify the school’,s mission statement: ’,Loving, caring, kind and sharing.’, •, It is a measure of the school’,s highly successful outcomes that year 6 pupils see themselves as, “,ambassadors for the school”, and say, “,It gets better and better as you get older.”, •, ‘,The curriculum is highly creative and inspires pupils’, writing skills and those who have special gifts and talents.’, Headteacher, Mrs Muddiman said “,Ofsted have recognised that St. Joseph’,s is a school for the 21st century, looking to improve all the time.”, Our end of term activities will be very special this year as we celebrate our ‘,Outstanding Success’, and look forward to a well earned rest. St. Joseph’,s Catholic Primary School, Harrogate gets a Good Report N otre Dame College celebrated its Patronal feast of the Immaculate Conception with a week of visiting speakers. Not only were the students fortunate to hear from a Notre Dame Sister, but also from Fr. Stephen Webb the diocesan youth chaplain, the Franciscan Sisters of the Renewal and Mr Colin Parry whose son Tim had been murdered by the IRA in the Warrington bombing of 1993 Sister Maureen from Sisters of Notre Dame spoke eloquently about paralysis in the face of adversity. She quoted St. Julie the founder of the order that established the college who remarked that it was far better to act than be paralysed by indecision and uncertainty. St. Julie who had been unable to use her legs still worked for the good of others. Colin Parry echoed this message in a series of talks he gave to all the RE classes that took place on the 7th December as well as a large assembly of students. Colin’,s message was unequivocal the loss of his son could have meant paralysis in anger and grief but instead it spurred his wife and himself to set up a foundation for peace in the name of their son and of the other child who was killed that day –, Johnathan Ball. Some of the students had experienced the work of the Peace Foundation in their previous school in Leeds where conflict had been skilfully turned into reconciliation. Instead of the paralysis of inaction and despair he was impelled to meet evil with good works, to tell a simple message: Violence breeds innocent victims and does not provide the answers to any problem. His message had a major impact on those who heard him. Celebrating a Feast Day

Read in full

Page 3

Feb 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

YOUTH Page 3 Leeds Diocesan Youth Service ‘,All who are thirsty, come!’, (Rev 22:17) For more information about how to register for Leeds Diocesan Youth Service events, check out: www.leedsyouth.org.uk, contact Anna at the Youth Office: 0113 261 8058 / abcleedsdiocese@hotmail.com or join the “,Leeds Diocesan Youth Service”, Facebook group. 19th-21st February Youth 2000 Regional Retreat www.youth2000.org St. John Fisher, Harrogate Saturday 27th February National Youth Ministry Congress, London Sunday 28th February RSVP Small Group Leader Training, TBC Hinsley Hall, Leeds Wednesdays 3rd, 10th, 17th, 24th March RSVP For young people in Yrs 9-13 7-9pm, Cathedral Hall, Leeds Thursdays 4th, 11th March Lectio Divina with Bishop Arthur Roche For young adults 17-30ish 7.30-9pm, St. Anne’,s Cathedral, Leeds Friday 5th March “,Handmaids”, Evening of prayer for young women aged 18-30ish 7-9pm, St. Joseph’,s Convent, Hunslet Saturday 13th March St. Pio Day, 1-6pm St. Pio Friary, Bradford Sunday 28th March World Youth Day, Pilgrims’, Retreat, TBC Leeds Diocesan Youth Service Calendar Revelation: Our Lady Star of the New Evangelisation R evelation is the monthly youth event for young people throughout the diocese. For the past few months we have been focusing on the theological virtues of Faith, Hope and Love. Over the course of 2010 will be looking at mission and evangelisation, what is it and what part do the young people have to play? The 20th January was spent looking at the story of Our Lady of Guadalupe and the theme “,New Evangelisation”,. To kick start the evening Lauren Jackson, led some games with a slightly Mexican feel. Amongst them were a Mexican wave, church building and rose throwing! Our Lady of Guadalupe and Juan Diego We then had the opportunity to hear from Sister Mary Pieta CFR about Our Lady of Guadalupe and Juan Diego and why she is the patroness of the Franciscan order. She explained how Our Lady had appeared to Juan Diego an Aztec convert, and asked him to go speak to the Bishop and a church be built there. Juan Diego did as she asked but the Bishop wanted a sign so Our Lady told Juan to visit her again the next day, but he was not able to return. His uncle had become ill and Juan stayed with him. After two days, with his uncle near death, Juan left his side to find a priest. Juan had to pass Tepayac Hill, where Our Lady had appeared to him to get to the priest. As he was passing, he found Mary waiting for him. She told him not to worry about his uncle for he will be well but to go and pick the flowers growing on top of the hill and bring them to her. She said to him that this will be the sign the Bishop had requested and to show him the flowers he had collected in his cloak. So Juan did as she asked but when he opened his cloak the flowers fell out and there on the cloak was an image of Our Lady just had Juan had described. Within six years of this apparition, six million Aztecs had converted to Catholicism, around the same time the many Europeans were leaving the church during the reformation. Sister Mary also explained parts of the image of Our Lady of Guadalupe and how the local people were able to identify her straight away as the Virgin Mother. We then had an opportunity to discuss what we had heard in small groups, whilst keeping the Mexican feel of the evening eating nachos! Adoration After a short break we then ended our time together in prayer. We were each given a star with the words “,We have come to worship him”, and invited to think about how we give ourselves to God how do we surrender to his call. We then had the wonderful opportunity to spend some time in adoration in the Cathedral, thinking and praying about all we had heard and to spend time with Our Lord. To end our time of prayer together we sung the Hail Mary inviting Our Mother to intercede for us in the coming week. WYD: The Journey Begins O n Sunday 31st January, a group of excited young adults gathered at Hinsley Hall to begin their 18 month preparation programme leading up to the World Youth Day pilgrimage in Madrid in August 2011. The afternoon was an opportunity for young people to meet some of their fellow pilgrims, complete the registration process, learn a bit of Spanish (including a song!) and place the entire pilgrimage experience into the hands of Our Lady in prayer. Do you fancy coming to see the Pope with us in Spain next year? The official deadline for registration for the pilgrimage was Sunday 31st January 2010, however, there are still some places left and will be given out on a first come, first served basis. The pilgrimage is open to young adults aged between 16 –, 30. If you’,re interested, get in touch with Anna Cowell at the Youth Office for more information about the pilgrimage and how to register –, abcleedsdiocese@hotmail.com / 0113 2618058.

Read in full

Page 4

Feb 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

A lively shared lunch was enjoyed by parents and grandparents to celebrate their recent completion of parenting programmes at Holy Rosary Church and St Anne’,s Catholic Primary School, Chapeltown, Leeds. The celebration was a crowded, joyful occasion where everyone, including Mgr Peter Rosser, Episcopal Vicar for Christian Life, felt welcome. Delicious home made food was provided by these already busy mums and grandparents, a sign of how much they valued the parenting programmes and the friendships they formed there. Also present were the Deputy Head of St Anne’,s and an Education Leeds official, who just happened to be visiting the school that day and who was particularly impressed by the parents’, enthusiasm for the programmes as well as the evidence of the school’,s practical and positive support for the families of its pupils. We heard what they had liked best about the parenting courses and about how they practiced their new skills, about the changes they had already made in their own lives and homes and about their plans for what they want to do next. These included attending adult literacy classes at school, running one of these parenting programmes themselves and getting children to tidy bedrooms! Everyone seemed transformed and enthused by a new sense of their own special value as individuals and as parents and grandparents: ‘,I have learned so much!’,, ‘,I appreciate my children more’, and ‘,I feel better about myself’, were the most frequent comments. Grandparents said that they wished that they had had this opportunity much earlier in their lives. Prayers said, the adults busied themselves with food, and enjoying their precious time together, while the children slept, played, ate, and ran around happily (my phone was commandeered by one determined young lady intrigued by the pictures I had taken and enthusiastic to see what else it could do). Finally, the parents and grandparents presented surprise gifts to Sam, expecting her first child*, and flowers to Marjorie and Lyndsey#, the programme leaders. Plans are already afoot for a new course and one for fathers. This was a happy, holy occasion and a rich witness to the many benefits for individuals, home, school and parish, of the Parent Support Project. •, * Rueben James, 7 1/2lbs, was born safely to Sam on 10th January, welcome and congratulations! •, # Lyndsey’,s work in family support was recognised and celebrated in December with an award presented to her at a big event in Leeds Civic Hall, Congratulations Lyndsey! To find out more about how you can be involved in the Parent Support Project call Anne Ruane 0113 261 8050 or 07868535245 or go to www.flm.org.uk Page 4 FAMILY LIFE / SIDELINES / MUSIC Sidelines I ’,m glad that discussion on the new translation of the Mass has revealed that I am not alone in thinking that some of these “,new”, words we can now sample on the American Bishops’, website are not new at all. “,Consubstantial”, “,with thy spirit”, “,under my roof”, and others - “,God of hosts”, “,grevous fault”, (always pronounced grevious- which is it?) appeared either in the earliest translations into English, or even in those vaguely illicit English translations I seem to remember used in schools before the windows of the Vatican were flung open by Blessed John XXIII. I like “,and with your Spirit”, - the Latin, et cum spiritu tuo being, as every schoolboy knew, the Holy Ghost’,s telephone number. Finance and debt is going to be an issue this year, both here in the church and in the wider world. How do we reduce debt, maintain our structures, increase our net income: good company stuff: next thing we know, we shall all retire to prepare a business plan. Sometimes I think that we must be careful not to revisit Brideshead, and seek the old certainties which have already gone. Closing churches and combining parishes avoids the crunch which other churches have faced: a shrinking population with incomes reducing as its age profile increases striving to keep a building going. Sooner or later, the building becomes the overriding reason for this particular group to continue, and so we turn our churches into heritage attractions, urged on by government funded schemes: only if I was a conspiracy theorist would I relate this to the way all the former churches in the equality-bound USSR were (but no longer) called “,museums”,. That is a worldbound view of our future- a heritage organization: it may be the ways that humans think, but these ways are not God’,s, as the Holy Spirit will no doubt tell us- if we ask. On a more worldly retrospective, I have been thinking back to the days when your GP practice looked after you 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. You knew the doctor who called. It needed a pretty strong vocation, but nowadays it seems that priests are the only ones who still live over the shop, on call- although this shop may not these days be your local branch. We did regard such things as a vocation to help your fellows: there is no other reason for sleeping with one ear tuned to the phone. It is now alarming to hear the horror stories circulating about some out of hours medical cover services. The answers we are given are circuitous, but the solution is more simple: you can farm out the work, but surely not the responsibility, and any GP directly or indirectly hiring in what proves to be inexperienced or inadequate assistance could be deemed negligent. The duty may be absolute but that’,s how it works- or should. Quote of the month “,I did try to act as honestly as possible but where I failed, I am sorry.", Barbara Follett MP on her “,winning”, £,42,000 expenses claim. So honesty has become relative: you are no longer honest or dishonest, but “,as honest as possible”, These “,possibilities”, are endless. Benchmark Parishes in Bradford, Huddersfield and Wakefield have been re- organised, and here in Leeds, it will be our turn imminently. Maybe we`ll be sharing priests with somewhere else or maybe my parish will have an influx of parishioners from closed down churches, (vice versa is unthinkable!). Perhaps we`ll have fewer Sunday Masses here at St Joseph`s, Pudsey- that set me thinking about the differences in the musical styles within the three Sunday Masses. There is a Saturday Vigil Mass, a Mass at 9.30 with a Children`s Liturgy, and an 11.15 Mass. I quickly realised that at the moment, we are very fortunate –, each Mass has at least its own organist, and on the first and third Sundays of the month, the 9.30 also has a Folk group (or a Music group –, look, don`t ask me to pick one name, I have to sing and play with these people!) I cannot comment with any knowledge about the Vigil Mass, but the 11.15 seems quieter, more reflective, less rumbustious than the 9.30. There are many more children at the earlier Mass. I wonder how we will all get on if we do have to reduce the number of Masses? When one person is responsible for the music, clearly, they choose what to play. But for the Folk group, life is a little more complicated –, you see, there is no Musical Director, Choir Master/Mistress, Leader, Maestro, or Boss. There are fifteen of us, so we just take it in turns. As I describe this apparently straightforward system, I cannot quite reconcile it with the e-maelstrom which frequently precedes Friday practice, and sometimes rages on through Saturday. I suspect that the larger the number of (copied-to-all) emails that have flitted to and fro, the smaller the amount of information that has been absorbed –, a familiar situation to anyone whose work entails reading/writing/ignoring emails. Nevertheless, by Sunday, at 9.25, we are there at the back of church, with our updated and revised list of music, and our hymn books, (relatively) ready to start. Email in the service of music can thus be tiresome and tedious, but not always, this week, something nice happened. On Sunday 31 January, the West Yorkshire Church Music Network had an afternoon sharing music for Lent and Easter, hosted by St Austin’,s, Wakefield, and nine of us, from five parishes, played and sang a dozen or so pieces. One was a lovely setting of Psalm 21, `My God, my God, why have you forsaken me`, from a book now, alas, long out-of-print. After WYCMN events, a list of the music is circulated to all the members, and in the accompanying notes, I wrote “,An effective setting of this powerful psalm - if you can find it anywhere! Info much appreciated!”, And two days later, the composer, John Ainslie, emailed, having been contacted by a member of the network, attaching a copy of the music. I was really pleased –, not only do we now have the psalm setting, but it is incontrovertible proof that one member, at least, reads the notes! It is available, along with other gems, at www.westyorkshirechurchmusic.org.uk Looking ahead to the summer, this year, the Society of St Gregory (the national society for liturgy and music in the Roman Catholic Church in the British Isles) is holding its annual Summer School at Sneaton Castle, Whitby, from 2nd to 6th August. “,As publication of the new English translation of the Missale Romanum is imminent, there will be some exploration of the issues it raises. The week includes a full programme of talks, workshops, seminars and liturgical celebrations as well as opportunities for rest, recollection and socialising.”, (www.ssg.org.uk) The event will be most rewarding, if previous summer schools are any guide. tim.devereux@ssg.org Musical Notes by Tim Devereux Parents and Grandparents Celebrate Family! By Breda Theakston FLM Coordinator Parents and grandparents celebrate in Chapeltown at the end of the first two parenting courses run there under the Celebrating Family ‘,Parent Support Project’, H aving celebrated St Valentine’,s Day, which closed National Marriage Week last week, let’,s reflect on some of our church’,s understanding of why the, apparently very ‘,human’,, vocation of marriage matters. Marriage is a foundational or primary sacrament. It is, after all, the very first ‘,commandment’, in the Bible: ‘,It is not good for man to be alone’, followed by ‘,Go forth and multiply’,. So in part, our church celebrates marriage because in and through their free, faithful and committed love a man and a woman may also cooperate with God’,s great act of love and creation. Then, faithful and committed love between parents is necessary because, once born, humans remain dependent for longer than any other creature. The human baby is born in a particularly ‘,immature’, state and its survival, and physical and emotional needs, are absolutely dependent on the love and care of able, responsible and committed adults. We now know for instance, thanks to recent advances in neuroscience, that the frontal cortex of the human brain, the area of responsibility, consequences and self control, is not finally and fully formed until our early to mid twenties! (our responsibilities to our young adults are as important as our care of infants even if very different!) So, one way to see it is that marriage matters because the ingredients of free, faithful and fruitful love it requires are necessary for the survival of the species. However, we are more than our biologies. Marriage is also fruitful in other ways. Through their free, faithful and committed union a man and a woman can share in the joy of discovering each other’,s depths and differences and discover God, the source of all life and love. In short, marriage is a physical and a spiritual ‘,yes’, to love, to life, to each other and to God. This is a witness to God in the world. This is also why marriage matters. Not only is it our most basic and our most sublime way of being human, in no other human relationship do we expect (and sometimes find) the complete, mutual, giving of self in a love which does reflect (however imperfectly) God’,s complete and unending love for us. The bible gives us many accounts of God’,s love for humanity. We have it revealed to us most wonderfully, painfully and dramatically in the incarnation. Thanks to Mary’,s free, faithful and committed ‘,yes’, to God, to mystery and to new life, we have Jesus, who, in his turn, gave a free, faithful and committed (but not altogether fearless if we remember the agony in the garden) ‘,yes’, to God’,s will even unto death ‘,a death he freely Marriage matters because it too involves sacrifice. In some Eastern churches the bride and groom wear ‘,martyrs crowns’, at their wedding to symbolise the willing surrender of self. Marriage is the biggest leap in faith, hope and love that an individual and a couple can make. No one can know what ‘,for better and for worse’, will mean for them, yet we still say ‘,yes’,. Whether we get sick or win the lottery, whether children are born to us, or not, whether our marriage survives until death, or not, our ‘,yes’, in marriage is always an echo of Mary’,s ‘,yes’,. In recognition of the importance, seriousness and wonderful magnanimity of the commitment people make to each other in their wedding vows it is right and proper to celebrate and support marriage whenever we can, National Marriage Week is just one opportunity to do that. Let me know how you celebrate marriage in your home, parish, school or group. Encourage married couples in your community to meet together over coffee and cake, a pint or a meal, or go bowling once a month. Invite unmarried and engaged couples along. Try the ‘,Couple Alive’, enrichment programme. Consider supporting parishioners to become Marriage Preparation Presenters (training in our Diocesan Marriage Preparation Programme begins November 8th see www.flm.org.uk , call 0113 261 8050 or email flm@flm.org.uk for details). Married couples need all the love, support and prayers that their families and church community can give them. In return they can be witnesses to faithful and generous love and bring new life, in many forms, into the world and the church. Whether you are a married couple enjoying good times, enduring difficult times, in loss, or in brokenness, a young person dreaming of your future - will it contain marriage and family or is God calling you to a different vocation of love? Whether you are a couple wondering if marriage is right for you, an engaged couple preparing for marriage, a bereaved spouse, a parent raising your young without the loving support of a husband or wife, a separated or divorced person, a rejoicing or a grieving person, God is with you, always, in all situations. Sometimes the best way to discover this is through other people, friends, family. ‘,Teams’, forms local fellowship groups of married couples of all ages who share a monthly meal in an enjoyable and supportive context (Yorkshire contact Christine and Tom Ward www.teamsofourlady.org.uk.) Catholic Marriage Care offers confidential relationship counselling to individuals and couples Call 0113 261 8045 or 0113 270 3940 Retrouvaille offers a weekend away for couples at breakdown point www.retrouvaille.com www.flm.org.uk for lots of links to sites on marriage and family life Marriage Matters

Read in full

Page 5

Feb 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

COME AND SEE Page 5 COME AND SEE Christ as Evangeliser, bringing about transformation O ur theme for this fifth year of Come &, See, is Mission and Evangelisation. Each month a quotation from a key document on Mission and Evangelisation will be included on this page, with a little information about the document it is taken from. Ten years after the closing of the second Vatican Council, and one year after the Third General Assembly of the Synod of Bishops, which was devoted to evangelisation, Pope Paul VI wrote Evangelii Nuntiandi. This is still a key document today, it built on Vatican II and set the scene for Pope John Paul II’,s New Evangelisation for the new millennium. “,As an evangeliser, Christ first of all proclaims a kingdom, the kingdom of God, and this is so important that, by comparison, everything else becomes ",the rest,", which is ",given in addition.", Only the kingdom therefore is absolute and it makes everything else relative. The Lord will delight in describing in many ways the happiness of belonging to this kingdom (a paradoxical happiness which is made up of things that the world rejects), the demands of the kingdom and its Magna Charta, the heralds of the kingdom, its mysteries, its children, the vigilance and fidelity demanded of whoever awaits its definitive coming. “,As the kernel and centre of His Good News, Christ proclaims salvation, this great gift of God which is liberation from everything that oppresses man but which is above all liberation from sin and the Evil One, in the joy of knowing God and being known by Him, of seeing Him, and of being given over to Him. All of this is begun during the life of Christ and definitively accomplished by His death and resurrection. But it must be patiently carried on during the course of history, in order to be realized fully on the day of the final coming of Christ, whose date is known to no one except the Father. “,This kingdom and this salvation, which are the key words of Jesus Christ`s evangelisation, are available to every human being as grace and mercy, and yet at the same time each individual must gain them by force - they belong to the violent, says the Lord, through toil and suffering, through a life lived according to the Gospel, through abnegation and the cross, through the spirit of the beatitudes. But above all each individual gains them through a total interior renewal which the Gospel calls metanoia, it is a radical conversion, a profound change of mind and heart. Taken from Evangelii Nuntiandi, paragraphs 8-10 www.vatican.va School of Prayer An opportunity to participate in a day to reflect on the meaning of prayer, to experience different ways of praying and to explore methods of leading others in prayer. The day will include reflection, input and a variety of workshops. The focus of the day will be for catechists, liturgists and anyone involved in parish ministries. 20th March 2010 9.30 am -3.30 pm Leeds Trinity University College Chaplaincy, Brownberrie Lane, Horsforth, Leeds, LS18 5HD, £,20 For more information or to book a place contact Mrs Janine Garnett on 0113 261 8040 or janine.garnett@dioceseofleeds.org.uk

Read in full

Page 6

Feb 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

A n article on the national Deacons’, website (diaconate.org.uk) about Deacon Bill Ditewig’,s book “,The Deacon at Mass”, is a reminder to bring out or buy this useful book- for all who are involved in our liturgy. Not only does it clearly define the role of the deacon in liturgy, but it does so the context of the new GIRM- the latest Instruction on the liturgy of the Roman Missal, yet to be fully adopted when the new translations finally come “,on line”,. This will be a good time to ensure that the role of the deacon is carried out fully and properly. The author reminds readers that the deacon is not merely a liturgical functionary, but someone exercising an important ministry- (“,not a liturgical flowerpot”,!) It is a useful book for deacons, their parish priests and MC’,s and liturgists. Some are not aware that Deacons should, for example, announce the Intercessions at Mass and may share with the Priest the Introduction to the Mass and the Penitential Rite. The Deacon is especially minister of the chalice, and at large celebrations this should not be overlooked. Some of these functions need to be introduced with tact and pastoral care, but that does not mean not introduced at all. It is important, the US Bishops tell us, that a Deacon does exercise his ministry wherever possible - “,because of its centrality in the life of the believing community, the ministry of the deacon in the threefold diakonia of the world, the liturgy and of charity is uniquely concentrated and integrated”,. In other words wherever possible, a deacon- properly vested in dalmatic- is a vital part of every Mass, demonstrating the diakonia- servanthood- of both deacons and the church. Having a deacon exercising ministry in the Mass is not just an option if one is present, nor is it an option for the deacon, either! This is reinforced by that well loved paragraph 40 from the official Directory for the Diaconate which is quoted in the book: “,They should not be relegated to marginal duties, be made merely to act as substitutes, nor discharge duties normally entrusted to non-ordained members of the faithful. Only in this way will the true identity of permanent deacons as ministers of Christ become apparent and the impression avoided that deacons are simply lay people particularly involved in the life of the Church.”, The Deacon at Mass: A Theological &, Pastoral Guide- Deacon William T Ditewig Paulist Press New York: £,10.99 Those who are happy- or deskbound- to say their office online may know that Universalis.com appears to have substantially finished its work of putting the Daily Office online. For a one-off charge, they say, Grail Psalms are also available in this paid-for version- it’,s all explained on the Homepage. It is hoped that a further Deacons’, meeting/social will be arranged after Easter: Deacons should watch their Inboxes! Page 6 DEACONS NEWS Deacons Diary F or some months now the Finance sub- committee of the Diocese has been exploring ways in which the Diocese could balance its books and avoid the Year End deficits. At the Presbyteral Council meeting in June (2008) Diocesan Finances and particularly the annual deficit was on the agenda. A series of regional Deanery meetings were set up for the priests to address issues that had been raised. There were meetings with the staff at the Curia offices and it was announced that 20% had to be cut from the ‘,non parish’, expenditure- and new targets were set. During the course of these meetings it became evident to the committee and the trustees of the Diocese that there would have to be an appeal to the Parishes of the Diocese to encourage everyone to give more at the offertory and to gift aid this money. On Wednesday night January 27th the Diocese, in the first of two meetings, invited lay people to listen to the presentations of the facts and figures. About 50 people attended at SS Peter and Paul, Wakefield. Mgr Heskin started the evening with a prayer and welcome to be followed by Peter Lomas one of the Directors of the Diocese. Peter explained the facts and the history of the finances of the Diocese, over the last ten years, giving an outline of the measures already taken. Terry Forbes, also a director of the Diocese reported back on comments from the earlier priests meetings. David Damant, Property Administrator, gave an outline of the situation with schools and how much they were costing the Diocese as well as explaining the cost involved in just maintaining the Parish plant. David Herd, Director of Finance, spoke about the money needed to run the different departments and the Parishes. Mgr Heskin then went on to voice the fact that no matter what was done there was a needed to generate more money coming into the Parishes –, but he put this in terms of what people should be giving: - in Biblical times it was believed that a tenth of what people made should be given, but he was not suggesting that but the suggestion was that if everyone, who could, gave £,2.50 of every £,100 of net income. He also outlined the plan of action in that there will be a Pastoral letter on the Sunday before Lent followed over two subsequent weekends with literature and explanations asking people to think of what they are giving and asking them to increase it. Plea for Realistic Giving Slavonic Organ for Huddersfield A short series of free organ recitals has been arranged, at Saint Patrick’,s Roman Catholic Church, New North Road, Huddersfield, to mark the installation and dedication of a new pipe organ in the church. This new pipe organ, regarded as one of the finest classical instruments in Britain, was built in the workshops of Anton Š,krabl in Rogaš,ka Slatina, Slovenia. The stop and key action is entirely mechanical, the case of oak, and keys and inlay of bone and ebony. Anton Š,krabl started his organ building career in the famous organ building workshop of Hubert Sandtner in Bavaria, before he studied organ building skills in Ludwigsburg and Munich. Having finished his education and training, he worked at the organ building workshop in Hoce near Maribor. Then in 1990, he set up his own organ building workshop Rogaš,ka Slatina. St. Patrick’,s Church is one of three churches which comprise the Parish of the Holy Redeemer. The Parish Priest, Father Ian Smith said ‘,St. Patrick’,s is one of Š,krabl’,s first major works in the UK. They have now completed their work here, and it has been wonderful to work with them. The parishioners have been delighted with the results, and now Š,krabl are currently installing a new organ in Lyme Regis.’, A large part of the money that paid for the organ came from a building fund initially raised to build a new church on the site of the former St. Brigid’,s Church. Father Smith paid tribute to all those who gave so generously to that fund and chose to leave their money in the fund for the benefit of the new parish of the Holy Redeemer, after the reorganisation of the parishes in Huddersfield. In addition a very generous bequest was received from the estate of a former St. Brigid’,s parishioner, the late Mrs. Marie Barraclough, However, Father Smith also congratulated the current parishioners who so generously responded to the Organ Appeal Fund which raised the remaining balance of £,50,000 in just four months. Father Smith said ‘,This is a truly astonishing achievement, especially in these uncertain economic times. I was delighted that not only were there some very generous donations, there were also some wonderful fundraising social events, which brought the parish together’,. The concert series began after the blessing of the organ by Rt. Rev. Arthur Roche, Bishop of Leeds, in December. Further concerts will be held in Saint Patrick’,s Church, New North Road at 7.30pm on: Friday 26 February, 7.30pm (Thomas Leech), Mothering Sunday, 14 March, 3.30pm (Joseph Cullen) and Friday 26 March, 1pm (Graham Cummings).

Read in full

Page 7

Feb 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

VOCATIONS Page 7 Classified Advertising NATURAL FAMILY PLANNING SERVICE (YORKSHIRE) For free, confidential tuition in the symptothermal method of natural family planning telephone: Leeds (0113) 260 0844 The N.F.P. Service is sponsored by the Diocese of Leeds LEEDS CATHOLIC MARRIAGE CARE Marriage isn’,t always easy —, Counselling can help For an appointment in confidence, with an understanding and experienced listener, please telephone: LEEDS 0113 261 8045 HUDDERSFIELD 01484 422523 A Relationship Counselling Service All Night Vigil of Reparation Walk For Life April 25th Meet outside York Minster For more information call Pat: 07747 698553 National vocations festival launched A national vocations festival was announced this month –, and Leeds Diocese is going to be involved. Invocation will take place between Friday 2nd and Sunday 4th July in the grounds of Oscott College in Birmingham. It is aimed at young men and women aged 16-35 who are looking to deepen their relationship with Christ, discover God’,s call for their lives and perhaps be open to the possibility of a vocation to the priesthood or the religious life. The weekend costs £,50 but free places are available for those who would find paying difficult. Vocations directors from around the country met at Oscott earlier this month to discuss the details of the event, which unfortunately clashes with the opening days of our own diocesan pilgrimage to Lourdes. There are going to be a series of talks and discussion groups as well different forms of worship, such as all-night Adoration, Midnight Rosary, Sung Vespers and a Reconciliation Service. Speakers will include Abbot Christopher Jamison, Dr Andrew O’,Connell and Sr Gabriel Davison. The concluding Mass on Sunday evening will be celebrated by Rt Rev Vincent Nichols, Archbishop of Westminster. Speaking after the planning meeting, Leeds Diocesan Vocations Director Fr Paul Grogan said, “,Not all young people who want to discern whether the Lord is calling them to the priesthood or the religious life can afford to go on pilgrimage to Lourdes. This festival would be a great second-best opportunity for them to take a next step in faith. The diocesan vocations service will be arranging transport from the diocese to help them. The programme has been well thought-out. We hope that Invocation will become an annual event. “,However, there is no substitute for gathering together as members of the diocesan family with our bishop to worship at the place where Our Lady appeared to St Bernadette. The graces received through going on pilgrimage to Lourdes have given many young people the courage to make a radical commitment to Christ as priests or religious. That’,s why we’,ll be having events such as our now traditional Vocations Walk up the Pic de Jer during the pilgrimage once again this year. We’,ll also be having a special evening for men who want to find out more about the priesthood during the course of the week.”, For further information about the diocesan pilgrimage to Lourdes, please go to www.tangney-tours.com. For further information about Invocation, which is being organised by the Diocese of Birmingham in association with the other dioceses in England and Wales, the National Office of Vocation and Compass, the discernment programme for those considering religious life, please go to www.invocation.org.uk . The picture shows Fr Grogan talking to Fr Mark Floody, Vocations Director in Nottingham Diocese, during the planning meeting at Oscott College. Laser quest plus prayers Trips to Laser Quest in Castleford, the Sealife Centre in Scarborough and to the shrine of Our Lady of Osmotherley in the beautiful North York Moors are among the attractions in the new youth discernment programme. Parish priests and schools received brochures detailing the various activities earlier this month with a request that they hand them on to young men whom they think may be interested. The group is aimed at boys aged between 14 and 18 who want to find out more about the priesthood. It is run by the vocations director in association with other priests in the diocese, such as Fr Matthew Habron and Fr Christopher Angel. It is hoped that some lay people will also assist with some of the events. The aim of the meetings, which are held every couple of months, is to balance spiritual formation with enjoyment. Bishop Roche set the group up six years ago in response to requests from teenagers. It provides an ideal opportunity for young men who have just been confirmed to explore a little more where the Holy Spirit is leading them. The next event –, labelled “,a fun half-day”, - will take place on Saturday 6th March and will comprise coffee and cakes at Cathedral House, followed by ten-pin bowling, Mass in the cathedral and a burger lunch. For further information, please go to the youth group web page in the vocations section of the diocesan website. Catenians show their commitment to the priesthood The Catenians, well known for their work in promoting vocations, are now providing help in a new way. One of their members sat on the panel of the latest diocesan selection advisory conference which interviews prospective seminarians and sends a report to Bishop Roche to help him in his decision-making. Mr Mike Carroll, a retired oral surgeon and parishioner of Holy Name Church, Leeds, joined diocesan trustee Ms Ann O’,Brien and Mrs Moira Flynn, a parishioner at St Benedict’,s, Garforth, for the conference, which took place earlier this month at Leeds Trinity University College and was chaired by the Episcopal Vicar for Clergy, Fr David Smith. Three candidates took part in the day and during the course of two half-hour interviews they explained why they felt that God was calling them to the priesthood as well as providing some details about their family backgrounds, their friendships, their experience of work and study and their prayer lives. A second conference will be held next month which at least three other candidates are expected to attend. Nuncio’,s right-hand man speaks about the priesthood Mgr Peter Grant, who recently retired from parish life, will be speaking next month to members of the discernment group on the theme of “,The priesthood is the love of the heart of Jesus.”, The title is drawn from the “,Letter”, which Pope Benedict issued last June to inaugurate the Year for Priests. Mgr Grant, who was until last year Parish Priest of St Paul’,s, Alwoodley, before that appointment acted as Private Secretary to the Apostolic Nuncio, the Papal ambassador, in London. The evening, which has been switched to this date from the advertised date of 26th February, will begin at 7pm with a holy hour, during which there will be the opportunity for confession. Mgr Grant will give his talk at 8pm after which those present will go for a light supper. The meetings are open to all men who wish to explore the possibility of the priesthood. Enquirers head north for a weekend retreat A good number of enquirers from the Diocese of Leeds attended a discernment retreat at St Cuthbert’,s College, Ushaw last weekend –, bookings were still being made as the paper went to press. During the retreat, which was given by Fr Grogan, participants, who were drawn from several dioceses in the north of England, were invited to reflect on the life and ministry of the Curé, of Ars and to ask themselves how as priests they hoped to contribute to the Church’,s mission of evangelisation in our time, as St John Mary Vianney had in his. Seminarians told to show themselves off Seventeen seminarians and prospective seminarians were told to wave and identify themselves at the end of a weekday Mass at the Cathedral during the Christmas period. Fr Boniface Akpoigbe, msp, as Assistant at the Cathedral, told the delighted congregation that it was encouraging for lay people to see how many young men were discerning their vocations. Earlier the group had coffee in Cathedral House, hosted by the other Assistant Priest, Fr Michael McLaughlin with kind permission from Cathedral Dean Mgr Philip Moger, before playing ten-pin bowls nearby. The men finished off their time together with lunch. Vocations Preaching Mission in March 6/7 March: St Cuthbert’,s and First Martyrs’,, Bradford 20/21: St William’,s, Bradford Arranged for Leeds Catholic Post Buy now to start March, April, May, June or July and mention this advert and get a £,20 discount off any annual policy

Read in full

Page 8

Feb 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

PAGE 8 INTERFAITH VERY DEAR TO GOD GREGORIAN CHANT DAY SATURDAY 24th APRIL 2010 ST AUSTIN’,S CHURCH, WAKEFIELD WF1 3QN Gregorian Chant is the most ancient form of liturgical music in the western church and conveys the listener back to the early days of Christianity. It is currently enjoying a revival of interest. In recognition of that interest a ‘,chant day’, with tuition and practice will be held in the beautiful Georgian church of St Austin’,s. The day will conclude with a Gregorian chant Mass in the church. The day course is open to all people regardless of denomination, though some musical experience would be useful as you would be expected to join in the singing! The course will begin at 10.00a.m. and finish at the end of Mass at about 5.15p.m. The cost of the course will be £,10.00 per person and this will include professional tuition, refreshments and a buffet lunch. There will be parking available and Wakefield is easily accessed by the motorway network. The church is only ten minutes walk from Wakefield Westgate railway station and five minutes from the bus station. For an application form and more details please contact Patrick Ganley. the director of music for St Austin’,s Choir Contact details: Telephone: 01924 364135 9home) 07813 687532 (mobile) Email: staustinschoir@blueyonder.co.uk Address: St Austin’,s Choir, 14 Oakleigh Avenue, Wakefield, West Yorkshire. WF2 9DF F or the tenth year in January many cities and towns throughout the Diocese remembered Holocaust Memorial Day. The theme this year was: “,The Legacy of Hope”,. It marked the 65th anniversary of the liberation of the concentration camp at Auschwitz-Birkenau. “,The memories and experiences of those who suffered from the holocaust and subsequent genocides around the world should inform our lives today.”, What follows is an account of one such gathering –, it was replicated in many other places across the diocese. We gathered as representatives of the different religions - Jew, Christian, Muslim, Baha’,i, Sikh, Hindu, Buddhist –, and sat with representatives of Central and Eastern European peoples, Gypsies, Trade Unionists, Disabled People, Lesbians and Gays, and those who had found refuge from modern day Genocides in Africa and elsewhere. Here was the Chief Executive of the Council, the leader of the Council and Councillors representing the different political parties. School children ushered us all to our seats. Pupils, with their teachers from various schools, were there to represent the next and therefore the most important generation. . The Lord Mayor reminded us of the events of the holocaust and of the importance of remembering it today. He lit the first candle, saying: “,We bear witness to the horrors of the Holocaust and will never forget its lessons.”, The audience took up his words: “,We also bear witness.”,An elderly man came forward to speak. He asked us to pardon the fact that he would address us sitting down. He spoke haltingly but with increasing fervour and quiet, controlled emotion of his experience as a survivor of Auschwitz –, the rail journeys in wagons of 100 people, with just one central bucket for water and one for relief, of seeing his mother, sisters and father being led away, never to see them again and, as he found out later, to their immediate deaths, of his time as a slave worker, of the deaths of many around him from starvation, ill treatment and abuse, of his own temptations to suicide, of the unspeakable deprivations and terror. For 50 years he had remained silent, unable to speak of the horrors he had lived through. Then he said he had broken that silence to add his voice to those who realised that the lessons of the holocaust were being ignored. Genocide was being repeated round the world. He had to speak out as part of a “,legacy of hope”, that he could contribute to new generations never drifting towards forgetting the lessons of the Holocaust. After he spoke, the applause, then the silence. One by one members of the Jewish community, survivors, second and third generations, then the representatives of Central and Eastern Europeans, the Gypsies, the Trade Unionists, Disabled People, Lesbian and Gay people came forward, lit and placed their candles and said the words of the refrain: “,We bear witness to the horrors of the Holocaust and will never forget its lessons. And the reply: We also bear witness”,. We stood for a minute’,s silence for all the victims of the Holocaust and subsequent genocides. We left to the words of the Jewish mourning song El Male Rachamim: “,God full of compassion whose presence is over us, grant perfect rest beneath the shelter of your presence to the six million souls whom we mourn today who have gone to their everlasting home from Treblinka, Bergen-Bergen, Dachau and Auschwitz. Master of mercy, cover them in the shelter of your wings forever and bind their souls into the gathering of life. It is the Lord who is their heritage. May they be at peace in their place of rest. Amen. Young people play an increasingly important part in events marking Holocaust Memorial day. Many of them are more alert than previous generations to the dangers of intolerance, the stereotyping and persecution of minority groups and the need for legislation designed to protect human equality. In 1999, to prepare for the Year of Jubilee in the Diocese we held a service of Reconciliation with the Jews, represented by members of the Jewish community in Leeds. We said then: “,Looking to the future we appeal to Catholics to renew the awareness of the Hebrew roots of their faith, that Jesus was a descendant of David and that the Jews are our dearly beloved brothers and sisters –, in one sense our elder brothers and sisters.”, We admitted that “,the Catholic Church desires to express her deep sorrow for the failures of her sons and daughters. As one Church, we are one with all those generations of Catholics who have contributed, directly or indirectly, to that widespread prejudice and contempt for the Jewish people which made it possible for the Nazi horror to take root in Christian Europe. Without that ancient Christian sin, the Holocaust could not have happened. The service ended with prayers and included these words: “,We are one Church and now pray in repentance and shame for the sins of silence over the centuries when evil was done to the Jews and we were silent, for the sin of hatred when we joined in the murder of Jews. We also gave thanks for those Christians who sheltered Jews and for the work of the Holy Spirit at the Second Vatican Council which condemned once for all ‘,all hatreds, persecutions and displays of anti-Semitism levelled at any time, or from any source, against the Jews.’, Our prayer is that in our Catholic schools and wherever our young people come together, they will be able to say with understanding: “,We bear witness to the horrors of the Holocaust and will never forget its lessons”, because “,we also bear witness”,. For information about the work of interreligious relations in the Diocese, please contact David Jackson. Tel: 01274 581094 or email dandt55@btinternet.com ) Feasts and Festivals February 25thFast of Esther. (Jewish) A fast in honour of the fast undertaken by Mordechai and Esther. February 25th Milad un Nabi (Birthday of the Prophet Muhammad) (Muslim) Shia Muslims celebrate this 5 days later (see March 3rd). Some Muslims disapprove of celebrating the birthday and regard it as an innovation. February 28th Purim (Jewish) Marks the time when the Jewish people living in Persia were saved from extermination by the courage of a young woman called Esther. February 28th Holi (Hindu) Marks the start of Spring. March 1st Hola Mohalla (Sikh) A three day festival of military exercises and mock battles, with religious discussions and devotional music at Anandpur Sahib in Indian Punjab. March 2nd Nineteen Day Fast (Bahia) Baha’,is fast from dawn until dusk in the period from now until 20th March. March 3rd Milad un Nabi (Shia Muslim) See February 25th. March 21st Naw-Ruz (Zoroastrian) New Year’,s Day in the Fasli calendar. March 21stShabun-sai- Equinoz Day (Shinto) A day for visiting graves. C AFOD has pledged an initial sum of £,12,500 to assist 2,000 people made homeless by the recent violence in Jos, central Nigeria. Our office in Jos has been working in partnership with a coalition of ten organisations, including the local office of Justice, Development and Peace/Caritas and other faith-based groups including three Muslim agencies. Our country manager in Nigeria, Alex Gray, said “,We’,ve been deeply saddened by the violence that took place in and around Jos last week, and the affect that it has had on the people of Jos. ",We’,re very glad to be able to help supply essential aid for people from both Christian and Muslim communities who’,ve lost their homes.”, Distributing aid Our partners plan to distribute in six camps, 75 bags of food aid for 400 families, 2,000 plastic sachets of water, and nearly 400 mats and blankets. According to Red Cross officials around 25,000 people were displaced by the violence, and forced to live in makeshift camps around Jos. The casualty figures from the violence were reported to be between 300-500 people killed and over a thousand injured. We’,re very glad to be able to help supply essential aid for people from both Christian and Muslim communities who’,ve lost their homes. Jos has repeatedly suffered from sectarian violence over the last decade. In November 2008 at least 700 people were killed in just two days of fighting. Building Peace Our main focus in Nigeria is to strengthen primary health care, but we also work closely with Archbishop Kaigama of Jos to support his efforts to create peace and dialogue. The Archbishop is a close ally of the Emir of Wase, Alhaji Dr Haruna Abudullahi. Together they co-chair the State inter-religious council which works with the Nigerian government to find a more permanent solution to this crisis, and allow people to rebuild their lives.”, Nigeria: Helping people affected by violence in Jos

Read in full

Page 9

Feb 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

CAFOD Leeds extends deep appreciation to everyone in our diocese who has responded so magnificently to Bishop Arthur’,s request to support people suffering because of the earthquake through CAFOD’,s emergency appeal. The donations have been pouring in as parishes, schools and religious communities demonstrate their compassion and their solidarity. So far Leeds Diocese has raised a magnificent £,180,000 and nationally on going to press national total was £,4 million CAFOD is part of the caritas International family and our partners Caritas Haiti and Caritas USA (Catholic Relief Service) had already been working for many years to eradicate the extreme poverty that exists in Haiti. Because they were already on the ground they were able to act immediately, even though Caritas Haiti staff had all lost members of their families and were suffering alongside everyone else. Within three days 50 food and water distribution centres had been set up, demonstrating the strength of being able to work through existing Church networks. CAFOD director Chris Bain said: ",This generosity and compassion to the dire suffering and unimaginable hardship that face the Haitian people hits at the heart of the catholic community, as always you have been overwhelming in your generosity. It has been a wonderful response. The money you have raised will be used to support life-saving humanitarian relief, distributing food, water, tents and medical help, to the most vulnerable.", Our Caritas partners were able to respond within 24 hours of the earthquake hitting the capital Port au Prince, with distributions of food, water, blankets and tents. Several days later they were able to reach the severely damaged city of Leogane and distribute more than 11,000 blankets, water purification tablets, tents and tarpaulins. Aid through parishes From time to time the area continues to feel aftershocks which add to the distress and suffering of those now living out in the open. It is still difficult to verify the numbers killed but the United Nations currently estimate from 100,000 to 200,000. CAFOD’,s sister agencies plan to work directly in 20 camps, but also to distribute aid through their contacts with priests and religious groups working in 32 parishes. In the coming months and years Haiti will not only need the bricks and mortar of reconstruction, but also development of skills and systems which respect the people and value each human life Chris Bain, CAFOD director CAFOD’,s Head of Humanitarian Matthew Carter said: ",We have been talking and listening to staff on the ground who are responding swiftly using their country expertise and church networks to ensure that vital aid gets through to those most in need. This money will support the scale up of humanitarian relief efforts, not just in Port au Prince but in areas out side of the capital like Leogane, where 80 per cent of buildings were damaged by the earthquake.", Despite all the logistical problems aid is reaching people and saving lives. CAFOD`s humanitarian team will also support our partners in developing longer term plans for the reconstruction needs of the Haitian people.", Thanks again to the people of Leeds Diocese for your compassion and generosity. CAFOD PAGE 9 Bishop Arthur initiates Diocesan Haiti Appeal I n 1960 Mrs Jacqueline Stuyt, supported by the then chair of the National Board of Catholic Women, Evelyn White, the treasurer Elspeth Orchard and the secretary Nora Warmington set about organising a Family Fast Day for Ember Friday in Lent, on 12th March 1960. This small group of women produced and printed 600,000 copies of a simple leaflet which asked people to ",go without so that others might have",. They sent copies to all parishes and religious communities in England and Wales. The money raised from this first Family Fast Day was to support a project tackling malnutrition among children in the Dominican Republic, (a country that is now proving vital as a means of getting help through to earthquake-stricken Haiti.) The project h was run by a Belgian nun, Sr. Alicia, a member of the Missionary Sisters of St. Augustine. These four women believed that the deeply spiritual and practical message of Lent –, prayer, fasting and almsgiving - would strike a chord with the Catholic Community and they would want to help mothers and babies in the Dominican Republic. They expected to raise about £,500 to £,1000. In fact they raised £,6,673.9s.7d. The initiative was so successful that they repeated the Family Fast Day in Lent 1961 and raised £,27,000. The success was such that in the following year, the Catholic Bishops of England and Wales created CAFOD to continue the women’,s good work. Their legacy lives on every day with every person who is helped by CAFOD’,s life changing work all over the developing world. Their legacy lives on only because of people like you who continue to support CAFOD and who continue to transform lives. THANK-YOU! Mass of Thanksgiving to mark the 50th Anniversary 12noon, Saturday 27th February Myddelton Grange, Ilkley Celebrant Mgr. Kieran Heskin A soup and bread lunch will be provided Please let the CAFOD office know if you will be joining us leeds@cafod.org.uk tel. 0113 275 9302 Lent 2010 marks fifty years of Family Fast Days! –, celebrating the vision of our ‘,founding mothers. T he Big Swap this Fairtrade Fortnight 2010 gives us the opportunity to build on the hard work last year when 61 parishes decided to become Fairtrade and our diocese achieved Fairtrade status last March. For Fairtrade fortnight 2010 we are being asked to swap everyday shopping basket items such as tea, coffee, chocolate, cotton tee-shirts, pineapples, bananas, cakes, sugar and a host of other products for Fairtrade ones What more can we do? •, It would be marvellous if the remaining 40 parishes would undertake to use Fairtrade tea and coffee routinely. •, It would be wonderful if existing fair-trade parishes could highlight the special fortnight by having a fair-trade stall. •, Even better if each FT parish could agree to add to their use of fairtrade goods eg biscuits, sugar, juice for all parish events and meetings. •, If you need any information or help contact the Leeds office. Fair-trade Fortnight –, remember last year’,s achievement?

Read in full

Page 10

Feb 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 10 FEATURE Awesome Journey Back to the 80’,s F rom 9th–,12th February the scene was set for an 80’,s musical festival at St Wilfrid’,s Catholic High School, Featherstone. The lights were dimmed, the ice machine was cranked up and then with a fanfare of music Back to the 80’,s the musical began. We were promised a totally awesome experience and we weren’,t left disappointed. Think High School Musical meets Grease but set to the biggest hits of the 80’,s and you have it! The story is told through the eyes of 30 something Corey as he looks back at his 17 year old self during his final senior year as a pupil of William Ocean High. He takes us through the fun, the heartbreaks, the loves and the loneliness of growing up - in fact all the highs and lows that he and the students and staff of the school go through during the year. The high energy performance of the students was amazing as they danced and sang their way through the two hour show. The talent of the musicians was phenomenal –, the show would definitely not have been the same without them - and the acting and comedy skills of the cast were superb. For those of us who lived through the 80’,s the memories flooded back. Congratulations to all involved –, simply awesome!

Read in full

Page 11

Feb 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

FEATURE Page 11 WIZ, BANG FOR CORPUS F or this year’,s annual musical production, staff and students at Corpus Christi Catholic College in Leeds chose THE WIZ. A young an enthusiastic cast gave it their all much to the admiration and enjoyment of a full house. Though it has been adapted for school performances , it is still a real challenge to produce and present –, Corpus rose as one to the challenge. The show follows the story of THE WIZARD OF OZ but was re-written in 1975 with a brand new score and it ran on Broadway for 4 years, won 7 Tony Awards and is now regularly performed by schools, colleges and local theatre companies throughout the world. This version was made into a film in 1978 by the people behind the Motown Record label and starred Diana Ross, Michael Jackson and Mabel King. John Atkin (Head of Music) said “,The school production is a big challenge every year which pupils and staff rise to. This year we have 60 pupils involved both on and off stage who are working very hard as a team on what has proved to be a challenging show. We have a new Dance &, Drama Teacher, Amy Thompson, who has set the standard very high and pupils have responded well. This is probably the most visually stunning show we have done with over 120 costumes, pyrotechnics and a new state of the art Sound &, lighting system which was installed last Summer.”,

Read in full

Page 12

Feb 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 12 LEEDS TRINITY UNIVERSITY COLLEGE A life in social work helps Leeds Trinity academic find hope for our children A former social worker, now a senior academic at Leeds Trinity University College, has sounded a note of optimism following recent tragic cases of child abuse and death. Andy Lloyd, Head of the Centre for Children, Young People and Families at Leeds Trinity, delivered the Centre’,s first annual lecture on 28 January, to an audience of students and staff, and children’,s services professionals from across the region. The lecture, entitled From James to Peter: Finding hope in a generation of tragedy explored tragic episodes from the murder of James Bulger to the Baby P case, and considered the policy changes that these events brought about as well as the complex issue of whether there is a crisis in childhood today. Looking with hope to the future, Andy concluded, “,Child and family welfare professionals deserve our admiration and thanks –, they do an immensely challenging job with energy, innovation and real skill. “,Being a child in today’,s world presents many challenges to them. As adults it is our responsibility to help them meet these challenges and overcome them. Simplistic demonisation of children helps no-one. “,But there is hope, we need to restore the proper place of value based social welfare work. Many of the people here tonight are doing just that, they understand the importance of values and the centrality of the child. It is all of our jobs to support and encourage them.”, The audience departed inspired and encouraged by what they had heard. Graham Jarvis, Associate Principal Lecturer in Primary Education at Leeds Trinity, said, “,It was a superb and thought provoking lecture, taking a common sense approach that puts children at the heart of society. Andy found the positive in what could have been a most depressing subject.”, The future generation of social workers were equally impressed with what they had heard. Sadie Corfield, on her first year of a BA in Early Years, said, “,Andy is inspiring to listen to and makes me even more determined to work in the children’,s services environment. Hearing him talk of his experiences as a social worker I think that could well be the career for me.”, Natalie Conte, first year student on the BA Childhood and Youth and Early Years, said, “,It was good to hear the positive side of the situation after all the negative media reporting. I have always wanted to be a social worker and now I’,ve heard Andy speak, I’,m sure that it will be a way to make a real difference.”, All welcome. Events are free unless otherwise indicated. 24 February at 6.30pm An evening with Gervase Phinn Tickets cost £,12 and can be purchased by calling 0113 283 7226 or emailing s.sellars@leedstrinity.ac.uk 24 February at 7.30pm Lecture by Dr Eugenia Russell, University of London “,Hearing worship: Liturgy and music”, For more information on the Eastern Christian Studies Lectures contact Sylvia Simpson on 0113 283 7126 or email s.simpson@leedstrinity.ac.uk 10 March Sixth Annual Writers’, Festival Day Workshops in many aspects of creative writing will be offered by established writers. For more information contact Dr Paul Hardwick on 0113 283 7100 or email p.hardwick@leedstrinity.ac.uk 10 March Postgraduate Open Evening from 5.30pm to 7.30pm For more information and to book please contact Marketing and Communications on 0113 283 7150 or email enquiries@leedstrinity.ac.uk 10 March at 7.30pm Lecture by Dr Mary Cunningham Corran University of Nottingham “,Mary the Mother of God: Receptacle of divinity and human mother”, For more information on the Eastern Christian Studies Lectures contact Sylvia Simpson on 0113 283 7126 or email s.simpson@leedstrinity.ac.uk 18 March at 7.00pm Lecture by Rev Professor Thomas Norris Maynooth College, Dublin “,The theology of the cross in the work of Cardinal John Henry Newman”, For more information contact Dominica Richmond on 0113 283 7100 or email d.richmond@leedstrinity.ac.uk 28 April at 7.00pm Inaugural Trinity Lecture by Dr John McDade SJ, Principal of Heythrop College, London “,The death of God? The Trinity and human suffering”, For more information contact Dominica Richmond on 0113 283 7100 or email d.richmond@leedstrinity.ac.uk Events at Leeds Trinity University College Students who give their time for free enjoy a big bonus A fter a career as a TV Production Manager, taking up the role of Volunteering Coordinator at Leeds Trinity in January 2009 marked a new direction for me and I haven’,t looked back since! At the TV company I worked for I ran a scheme for volunteer Production Assistants, as well as volunteering myself as part of my training to qualify as a Counsellor. Both experiences meant I was soon convinced of the benefits as both a volunteer and a host. So I jumped at the chance of a job dedicated to promoting the benefits of volunteering to students. It’,s very easy to be sucked into the bubble of student life - socialising and studying with your peers. However, volunteering gives you the opportunity to experience real life outside the campus and get a taste of what life might be like after graduation. Recently, I attended the launch of Leeds Year of Volunteering with some student volunteers. It was inspiring to see so many volunteers, organisations and service users all together. The year, together with National Student Volunteering Week starting on 22 February, gives us a great opportunity to celebrate and promote volunteering at Leeds Trinity. The biggest barrier to recruiting volunteers is perception –, while students are well aware of more traditional volunteering roles like working in charity shops or visiting the elderly, they are amazed to see the range of volunteer vacancies on offer. Did you know that you can volunteer to help teach English to asylum seekers, or work with children in after school clubs, or even be a gig reviewer? Volunteering can even count towards a degree now! 30 second year students are currently doing a volunteering module –, instead of a six week professional work placement they devote a few hours a week all year round to volunteering work. All the volunteers are having such rewarding experiences - as well as building their CVs, it demonstrates their commitment to working for the wider community outside the campus, and can also lead to paid work. I would recommend it to anyone! For more information or to discuss the volunteering opportunities you might be able to offer in your organisation please get in touch on 0113 283 7100 ext 675 or email v.leeson@leedstrinity.ac.uk Vics Leeson Volunteering Coordinator Leeds Trinity University College Nominations invited for outstanding contribution to Catholic education D o you know a teacher who you think is top of their class? Each year Leeds Trinity University College recognises teachers who have made an outstanding contribution to Catholic education with a special award. To qualify, teachers must have trained at Leeds Trinity, gained substantial experience in Catholic schools and made a strong contribution to the Catholic school community. In addition the nominee must have been involved in training student teachers from Leeds Trinity University College. Professor Freda Bridge, Leeds Trinity’,s Principal and Chief Executive, said, “,We are proud of our long and successful record of training teachers to be well prepared for their careers in schools. These awards are an excellent way for Leeds Trinity to acknowledge the tremendous contribution made to Catholic education by our alumni who go on to provide invaluable support to trainee teachers.”, Leeds Trinity honoured two teachers in 2009 for their outstanding contribution to Catholic education –, Peter Fusco of Corpus Christi College and Kevin Albrow from St Mary’,s Menston. Nominations for an award must be made by Head Teachers in writing by the end of April. Please send letters of nomination to Professor Freda Bridge, Principal and Chief Executive, Leeds Trinity University College, Brownberrie Lane, Horsforth, Leeds LS18 5HD. Kevin Albrow is pictured receiving his award from Professor Bridge in 2009.

Read in full

Page 13

Feb 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

By Peter M Rinaldi On Sunday 14th February St. Theresa’,s Parish, Leeds held an Exhibition and Talks on The Shroud of Turin by courtesy of Mrs Pam Moon. Pam is an Anglican Vicars wife from Little Aston in Sutton Cold Field. On her 50th birthday Pam received a replica of the Turin Shroud together with life negative prints of the back and front of the Shroud. There are only four exact replicas of the Shroud in the world. While visiting her friend in Tamworth Mary Wilkinson of the Parish saw the display for the second time, the first being at St Anne’,s Cathedral in about 1962 and felt it was something she wanted to share with her own Parish today. These were on display in church from 7am –, 4pm. Over 500 people visited the church with approximately 300 staying for the 2 talks. People of across the Christian community came from far and wide. The Shroud of Turin is a centuries old linen cloth that bears the image of a crucified man –, a man that millions believe to be Jesus of Nazareth. The Shroud of Turin is believed to be the burial cloth of Jesus, revealing what many see as the outline of the face and body of a crucified man. Modern science has completed hundreds of thousands of hours of detailed study and intense research on the Shroud. It is, in fact, the single most studied artefact in human history. During the talks Pam brought alive the images by explaining in detail the markings on the figure in the Shroud. At the start of Lent is a great way for us to contemplate the Passion and Death of Our Lord Jesus Christ. POLISH NEWS 13 Funeral Services “,The effect of some of this legislation designed to achieve this goal (of equality) has been to impose unjust limitations on the freedom of religious communities to act in accordance with their beliefs.”, Things have got to a sorry pitch when the leader of one of the country’,s faith groups has to make a statement about the Government’,s “,equality”, legislation- and the someone is the Pope. Despite reflex protests from predictable groups, the Pope found immediate support from our Chief Rabbi, who said ",using the ideology of human rights to assault religion risks undermining the very foundation of human rights themselves”,. This is not, it is said, a case of the religious belief imposing itself on the state, but the state imposing itself on religious belief. Faiths have a right to employ people who share their ethos, their core beliefs, so as to ensure harmony in the workplace and a common message- never was the old business maxim of “,everyone singing from the same hymn sheet”, more apposite. Already, we have the tragedy of the closure of Catholic adoption agencies because of intrusive legislation, as the Pope complained. Now we have the prospects of faiths being obliged to employ people whose lifestyles- in whatever way- may be contrary to these core beliefs. It is like the person who once insisted “,This organisation will be democratic even if I have to make it so”,. You cannot impose one set of beliefs upon another in the name of equality: that makes the legislators more equal than the legislatees…, which is what Orwell’,s prophetic “,Animal Farm”, parable warned against- then and now. We have an election coming up, and voices need to be heard. The Post Says …, W. Lever Ltd BRADFORD 01274 547137 524 THORNTON ROAD, BRADFORD BD8 9NB FOR OVER 75 YEARS PROVIDING A COMPLETE PERSONAL &, CARING 24 HOUR FUNERAL SERVICE CHAPEL OF REST E.M.D. PARKINSON LTD Funeral Director For a Caring Service We Assure You Of Our Best Attention Any Time Day Or Night. FOR COMPLET PEACE OF MIND THE WHITEHOUSE 37 LOWER YORK STREET, WAKEFIELD WF1 3LH Pre-paid Funeral Plan Telephone: (01924) 373191 H UGHES F UNERAL S ERVICES (Catholic Funeral Directors) 180 YORK ROAD, LEEDS LS9 9NT. Tel 2480953/63 152 GREEN LANE, CROSSGATES. Tel 2326900 3 HOLLIN PARK PARADE, OAKWOOD ROUNDABOUT Tel 2499338 Web: wwww.hughesfuneralservices.co.uk Email: info@hughesfuneralservices.co.uk Family owned and managed. Fully Qualified in all aspects. 24 Hour Service Guaranteed Fixed Price Funeral Plans etc. “,At a time of bereavement we carry out our duties with dignity and respect”, In times of bereavement please contact: B. J. MELIA &, SONS (B. J. Melia Dip F.D.) F UNERAL D IRECTORS AND M ONUMENTAL M ASONS Private Chapel of Rest 64 GIBBET STREET, HALIFAX Telephone: 01422 354453 PRE-PAID FUNERAL SERVICE AVAILABLE DETAILS ON REQUEST Wanted for the Missions Large Statues (Even damaged ones), old vestments, pictures, church fittings, rosaries, prayer books, etc. Please ring Mr. B. Ferris KSC, 102 Moor St, Earlsdon, Coventry CV5 6EY Tel: 02476 676986 For Advertising contact CathCom on 020 7112 6710 A Polish Christmas T his year, Leeds City Council, Community Links,Renaissance Yorkshire and Europe Direct Leeds organised a number of events illustrating a Polish Christmas in consultation with the Polish Catholic Community in Leeds. These were held at the following venues: Leeds Museum Discovery Centre, Central Library, Armley Library and the Leeds City Museum from the 12th till the 20th of December. During all the events, there was an opportunity to look at Polish artifacts including the national costumes of Poland. During the two sessions at the Leeds Museum Discovery Centre, there was an opportunity for those interested to make traditional Polish Christmas tree decorations. These included paper cut outs called wycinanki. The main event held at the Central Library on the 16th of December was well attended. During the evening, the children from the Polish Saturday School and adult members of one of the Polish Parish Choral Groups sang Christmas Carols. There was also an opportunity at both this event and at Armley Library to see the Polish Dance Ensemble directed by Iza de Lehenstein Werendl. The events were a huge success and it is hoped that further workshops/ exhibits will be able to take place in Leeds over the next few years. Polish Service for Christian Unity I n Leeds, on Sunday the 31st of January to mark the end of Christian Unity Week, the Polish Roman Catholic Parishioners’, welcomed the Polish congregation of the Lutheran Church of St. Lukes in Leeds to the Polish Catholic Church for an ecumenical service. This is the third year that the parishes have joined together to celebrate this important part of the liturgical calendar. The service was celebrated by Bishop Emeritus Walter Jagucki and Father Jan Zareba. During the service, nieszpory were sung. Nieszpory are vespers –, evening prayers which in Poland are often used for evening worship on Sundays and holidays. They tend to be archaic, rhymed translations of the Psalms. During the service, Bishop Emeritus Walter Jagucki addressed the congregations. There was also a loaf of bread blessed and shared amongst all participants of the service. After the service, everyone was invited for food at the Parish Hall, which allowed parishioners of the two parishes to mix and discover more about each parish/ religion. A thought provoking experience to start Lent

Read in full

Page 14

Feb 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 14 SCHOOLS NEWS A LITTLE GREEK AT NOTRE DAME December at Notre Dame Catholic SFC saw Theatre studies students mounting a stunning production of Sophocles “,Oedipus”,. The play unfolds the tragedy of a man and a kingdom brought to ruin through the king’,s need to find out the truth about his origins. The production, which ran over three nights, presented all the stark horror of Oedipus’, discoveries, with Tom Lewis as Oedipus giving a mature performance evoking both the statesman and the individual and his final realisation of his crimes bringing a chill to the whole audience. He was ably supported by Ben Morton as the blind prophet Tiresius and Hannah Murray as Jocasta his wife/mother. Alex Noad made a convincing Creon and the traditional chorus were given a contemporary twist with their use of physical theatre and imaginative vocal skills. All the technical elements of the production including costume, sound, lighting and set were designed and operated by the students under the professional eye of production manager Paul Graham. The students are studying Greek theatre as part of their A level courses and this production gave them a chance to put their understanding into practice. Assistant director, Holly Conlon who is going on to study Drama at university, said “,I found the experience exciting, interesting and educational. I learned a lot about Greek tragedy through working with my fellow pupils.”, The next production at Notre Dame is Brecht’,s ‘,A Respectable Wedding’, which is on Tuesday Feb 9th in the Drama studio. For tickets and further information contact the box office at www.notredamecoll.ac.uk/theatre or phone 01132946644 FROM JUST £,299 R.G.R. MEMORIALS COLOUR CATALOGUE QUALITY MEMORIALS AT AFFORDABLE PRICES IN GRANITE, MARBLE &, STONE ALL PRICES INCLUDE DELIVERY &, FIXING Ogee top memorial 2’,6”, high Fully polished Black Granite, Delivered and Fixed for £,399 inc VAT FREE Tel: 0113 282 3888 43 High Ridge Park, Rothwell, Leeds LS26 0NL Mary’,s Meals Send a School Bag An article in a magazine about Mary’,s Meals caught the attention of Mrs Heeley (Head of Music) and inspired her to get the students in Years 7 &, 8 to “,Send A School Bag”, to one particular area, of Liberia, Tubmanburg . Father Garry Jenkins has worked in the mission in Liberia for 36 years and enlisted the help of `Mary`s Meals` at St Dominic`s mission school . Mary’,s Meals is an organisation run by Scottish International Relief that aims to feed every school child in the developing world a hot and nutritious meal every day. Unbelievably it costs only £,8.40 to feed a child for a whole year. The students of All Saints took to the idea straight away and have been filling rucksacks in their forms with everything the children will need to take to school with them each day. The children in Liberia lack the basic equipment needed to attend school and receive the education they so desperately need to escape the poverty stricken life they will face without an education The meals and the equipment have made a great difference to the local community there and hope for a better future. CORPUS CHRISTI CONNECTING CLASSROOMS “, Connecting Classrooms”, is a British Council initiative linking UK Secondary and Primary Schools from UK and Africa. The aims of this initiative are to broaden the international view of young people, to break down perceived stereotypes, to increase students’, knowledge of other cultures and to contribute to the international dimension of the school curriculum in Africa and the UK. Corpus Christi Catholic College is the secondary school participating with Beechwood Primary and schools from South Africa and Ghana. Corpus Christi College and Beechwood Primary have undertaken a joint Art Project which will form part of a final Art Exhibition involving all five schools from the UK , South Africa and Ghana. This week a team of teachers from South Africa and Ghana visited the UK to help contribute to the international dimension of the school curriculum. Corpus Christi College hosted the overseas visitors on Tuesday 2nd February. This involved observation of lessons in English, Geography, Art, Design Technology and Science and interviews with pupils from years 7 to 11. A reception was held at the Civic Hall in Leeds and in the evening the visitors were treated to the Corpus Christi annual school production, “,The Wiz”,. Assistant Head teacher, Marie Coleman, who organised the project said, “,This is a wonderful opportunity to share experiences with schools from overseas with very different educational needs and outlooks. It will enrich the curriculum of our students to help them develop skills to equip them to live in a global economy. It is also an exciting way to meet and make friends from countries across the world. We hope this three year venture will further expand horizons of both our pupils and staff”,

Read in full

Page 15

Feb 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

SCHOOLS NEWS Page 15 Help for Haiti P upils at St John’,s Catholic School for the Deaf in Boston Spa are always keen to raise funds for anyone in need and last week they raised a staggering £,330 for the victims of the earthquake in Haiti. Using their Enterprise and Personal, Social, Citizenship and Health Education lessons, pupils in year 11 organised a non-uniform day, a raffle and baked cakes and biscuits to be sold during break time. Their teacher, Mary McAleer said she was delighted with year 11’,s efforts and with the generous response from staff and pupils. “,I will be sending the funds we have raised to the Daughters of Charity of St Vincent de Paul in Mill Hill, London. The sisters have a long association with our school and have sent a team of helpers out to Haiti. We want the money we have raised to support their work.”, St Joseph’,s raise £,725 to help the people of Haiti T he school held a non-uniform day on Friday 22 January to raise funds for the people of Haiti and what a fantastic response it was by all involved. The staff were moved by the parents’, and children’,s generosity. They even had to open one little girl’,s money box with a tin opener. The final total was £,725. This will be sent to CAFOD to aid relief in Haiti. SELLING WATER FOR HAITI In response to the terrible earthquake in Haiti and the pictures in the media of children being given bottles of water by the aid agencies, the children of St. Nicholas Catholic Primary School, Gipton in Leeds decided to do something about it.- They cut out cardboard bottles and sold them for 50p. - In just 4 days they have raised £,500 to provide bottles of water for the children in Haiti. Headteacher Paul Lawson said: “,This is typical of the children and their families in our school. They see someone who needs help and they respond. They are brilliant”,. The Money Came Rolling In In response to the Bishop’,s appeal for Haiti the people of St Joseph’,s Wetherby did not stop giving over three Sundays they raised £,9,000 –, giving £,1,800 in one Sunday. This was followed by the school that also had their own Fund raising and collected £,1,000. The Bishop has given his personal support to this appeal and has encouraged all the Parishes to take part in raising money.

Read in full

Page 16

Feb 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 16 BATTLE John Battle KCSG P revention is not always cheaper than cure. In particular work on alleviating the effects of cancer and medical and therapeutic treatments to extend the life expectancy of cancer sufferers has a paradoxical knock on cost implication for the National Health Service budgets. Extending the lives of cancer victims naturally leads to more people living into older age, boosting the increasing number of the so called aging society but at the same time results in more demands in older age, for example for hip and knee replacements, heart implants and intensive care support for people with dementia and Alzheimer’,s’, disease in their later decades. In other words medical successes in extending lives by treating cancer generates a knock-on pressure of health service budgets as those who live longer fade in old age and need intensive interventions and carer support. Thus the pressures of an increasing aging population on the health service under supported by fewer younger tax-paying contributors to the common National Health Service kitty grow exponentially. It’,s not just expensive medical technological interventions and costly drug therapies that increase the NHS bills locally and nationally as more and more patients are well treated, it’,s the down the years extra costs of the natural decline of the human body in the later decades. Today over 820,000 people in the UK live with Alzheimer’,s and other dementias at a cost of £,23 billion every year –, twice the cost of cancer, three times the cost of heart disease and four times that of stroke. Recently, Baroness Deech Chair of the Bar Standards Board and influential family lawyers drew stark attention to the future need of grandchildren to support their grandparents in practice by invoking a return to the obligations of the old ‘,poor law’, abolished with the introduction of the welfare state in 1948, which set up state pension provision (in the absence for the vast majority of people of any private work pension) and established our National Health Service. Baroness Deech pointed out the statutory obligation built into the old poor laws for children to look after those who brought them up. The introduction of the Poor Law in 1601 made parishes legally responsible for helping the poor but only if there was no one in their family able to do it. In other words, the infirm and poor were first and foremost to call on their families for help. Children and grandchildren had an obligation to support their parents and grandparents. In 1948 with the introduction of the National Assistance Act this duty was limited to spouses and children. Baroness Deech’,s point was of course not to argue simply for a reintroduction of the Poor Law but to seriously question who will take responsibility for looking after aged relatives. In fact, most of her Gresham College lecture made her point focussed on the facts of the great contributions that grandparents in our society make to bringing up their grandchildren now. Over a quarter of grandparents in Britain already substantially contribute towards the up bringing of their grandchildren. Grandparents do an average of 16 hours baby-minding a week –, saving their children’,s families an estimated £,50 billion a year. In practice grandparents increasingly provide free childcare - and at great personal sacrifice –, giving up their own work and earning chances to help their children’,s families out. As Baroness Deech put it “,grandparents are assuming burdens which deprive them of their own chance to earn a living and for which they are not compensated, and the childcare they give is no doubt at some cost to them.”, Passing a legal obligation to care for elderly relatives will not be an answer, but what about a moral obligation? Of course many children and grandchildren do provide personal contact and care but in an increasingly fragmented society when extended families live far apart –, when sons and daughters move away and cannot keep regular local contact –, the obligation can prove difficult if not guilt inducing impossible. Perhaps then we should begin widening our family ‘,nuclear’, relations to reach out to near friends and immediate neighbours, rebuilding basic caring communities in which all the failing elderly are included. That’,s the new localism in practice. CARE FOR THE ELDERLY Through a Glass Darkly –, Living with partial sight A disability is not always obvious. A wheelchair or guide dog give pretty clear clues, but partial sight or, for example, deafness do not immediately alert others and this can at times lead to confusion! Though registered as blind I think of myself more as being partially-sighted: I did at one time need to use a guide cane and still do occasionally but mostly manage well without it. I spent my working life as a teacher –, having been advised at the outset that I would be unemployable as such (things were different in those days)! You do develop a kind of “,eyes in the back of the head”, sixth sense with regard to what may be going on at the back of a classroom! I am fortunate in that assistive technology has kept pace with deterioration in sight. Computers with screen readers and magnification along with CCTV magnifiers, both desktop and hand-held, are in constant use and I would not have been able to continue teaching as long as I did without them. They also enable the reading of books, though speech output from a computer and audio books are more effective. A small notebook computer enables me to read lessons in church and give talks without having to do it all from memory as was once the case. There are of course still problems. Cash dispensers with touch screens and card readers for example –, would that a standard layout could be agreed on! At least there is now the convention of marking the ‘,5’, key with a raised dot or suchlike. Getting around is easier than it used to be. A PDA with GPS tells me where I am. One can check bus times in real time before leaving home and the bright orange displays at some bus stops are readable with a small monocular (but not so the type with an LCD screen). By the same token the orange destination indicators on many buses are easily seen, especially after dark, whereas the light green ones are difficult to see except at very close range. Then there are drivers who don’,t stop unless you put out a hand –, difficult if you can’,t see the bus until it’,s passing you! Travel by train also has its joys. Leeds station has some monitors at eye level but these are rare. And there are train guards who don’,t announce every station …, Hazards include bollards which blend with the road surface and dustbins left haphazardly on footpaths, not to mention my bê,te noire –, cars parked on pavements! It’,s all much harder in bright conditions: I wear dark glasses outdoors much of the time and a peaked cap to deflect glare from above even at night. To get across roads without formal crossings I rely mainly on listening to traffic noise, a bit dodgy when it’,s windy or there’,s a grass cutter or road works nearby! I could also cite street furniture, quiet cars and rear engine buses, not to mention cycles. Paradoxically it can be a lot easier after dark. As I cannot see to write I am not the person to ask for the loan of a pen! I use a pocket memo for notes, also very useful for recording meetings of which minutes are required. It does mean having to listen to the entire proceedings a second time –, including all the asides and chit-chat (parish council members please note!). And don’,t think I’,m being rude if you greet me on stairs and are ignored –, I’,m counting the steps! Many things are actually achieved without really looking. If you doubt me, try some daily tasks with eyes closed! Eating can be interesting: you often only know what is on the fork once it’,s in your mouth –, and beware the slice of lemon! Wilf O’,Neill The author is happy to discuss problems with anyone living with or caring for someone with a visual handicap and can be contacted on 0845 456 0992 or at w.b.oneill64@members.leeds.ac.uk Knights of St Columba donate to Soup Kitchen On Tuesday December 8th, Colin Spiller, Grand Knight of the Knights of St Columba in Bradford, presented a cheque for £,1,000 to Bro. Felice of the Franciscan Friars of the Renewal. The money was raised at the annual John Kelly Memorial Concert in Bingley Arts Centre recently. The Franciscan Friars of the Renewal provide a soup kitchen in Sedgefield Terrace, Westgate, Bradford at lunchtime on Tuesdays and Thursdays every week. They have been in Bradford since September 2005. Pictured left to right: Sister Felicity, Brother Felice, Brother Seraphim, Colin Spiller, Knights of St Columba, Bradford

Read in full

Page 17

Feb 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

ROME Page 17 FORTHCOMING EVENTS at The Briery Retreat Centre 38 Victoria Avenue, Ilkley LS29 9BW Tel, 01943 607287 Email: srscs@aol.com Website:http://www.briery.org.uk 8th February St Margaret’,s Day The Briery Team 23rd February Lenten Day of Reflection Fr. Richard Atherton 10.00 am-4pm Weekend 5th-7th March Themed Retreat Fr. Jim McManus, CSSr “,Healing Spirit: A Spirituality of True Self-Esteem”, Living by the word God speaks to us about ourselves Is the source of true self-esteem. God assures us that we are made in his own image, that we precious in his sight, that we are the temple of the Holy Spirit. This is the life-giving word of God to each of us. 19th-26th May Preached Retreat Fr. Daniel O’,Leary “,A Way of Being: A Way of Seeing”, Do not let the weed of your fear grow through your dreams of joy. We can all experience the happiness we long for. 2-9th June and 2-9th July 6 Day Individual Guided Retreats: The Briery Team 7th-14th July Preached Retreat Fr. John Fuellenbach, SVD “,The God image of Jesus and our call to follow him today”,. Jesus was sent to reveal to us who God really is and who He wants to be for us. He summarized his message in two words or phrases. The first one contains his God experience expressed in the word Abba (his human expression of his innermost experience of God). The second one is the phrase Kingdom of God, God’,s dream for the whole of creation. He called disciples whom he sent out to carry out his own mission. 20th-24th September Mon-Friday Retreat for Priests Fr. Tom Lane, C.M. “, I will show you the way to Heaven”, The Curé, de’, Ars, John Mary Vianney, is the patron of all priests in pastoral ministry. When he asked a young boy the way to Ars, the boy obliged. To express his gratitude the Curé, spoke the lovely words that are the theme of the retreat. Obituaries Fr. John Henry (Harry) Gilroy (C.S.Sp.) Born and brought up in the Sandal area of St Austin`s, Wakefield , Parish during the 1920`s and 1930`s Fr. Gilroy first realised he had a vocation while serving on the altar. After hearing a missionary speak, he spoke to his father who took him to see the Parish Priest. Not long afterwards he was undergoing an interview at the head-quarters of the Holy Ghost Fathers at Grange-over-Sands, and was accepted to study for the priesthood. He was studying abroad when the war broke out and fled from the seminary in Brittany with his fellow seminarians. Ordained in October 1942, Fr. Gilroy spent much of his time as a missionary abroad. His main area of work was Sierra Leone, where he translated the gospels into several of the local tribal languages. Later, when Westerners were thrown out of the country he returned to Diocesan work at home, serving as Parish priest in several parishes before retiring to London. He was the oldest of his many siblings and survived them all passing away peacefully on 29th December 2009 aged 93. Rev Hubert McNamara RIP Fr Hubert McNamara was a member of a Halifax family well- known in the town by virtue of their undertakers’, business. A native of St Marie’,s parish, Fr McNamara was born on 29th July 1934. He attended St Bede’,s Grammar School, Bradford, and then studied for the priesthood at Ushaw College, Durham. He was ordained priest for the Diocese of Leeds a few days after his twenty- fourth birthday, on 2nd August 1958, in his home parish by Bishop Dwyer. Fr McNamara’,s first appointment was as assistant priest to Fr John Hickey at St Brigid’,s, Huddersfield, where he remained until 1963 when he moved to the Holy Rosary parish, Leeds. In 1968 Bishop Wheeler transferred him to what was then the southern part of the Leeds diocese, and where he was to remain for the rest of his life. In that year he joined the staff of the Sacred Heart church at Hillsborough in Sheffield. In 1975 he became a parish priest for the first time when he was appointed to Our Lady of Mount Carmel in Doncaster. Five years later came the division of the Leeds diocese and thereafter Fr McNamara was a priest of the Diocese of Hallam. In 1982 Bishop Moverley appointed him parish priest of St Paul’,s at Grimethorpe near Barnsley. In 1985 Fr McNamara began a long association with the Carmel Care Centre in Sheffield where he served as Chaplain up until the time of his death. For many years he resided at the centre but in 2002 he also took up appointment as parish priest of St Michael’,s, Hathersage in the Derbyshire Peak District. He retired from there in 2004 and went to live at Thrybergh in Rotherham, while maintaining his connection with the Carmel Centre. Requiem Mass was offered for Fr McNamara at St Marie’,s, Halifax on Saturday 5th December. The following evening his body was received into St Gerard’,s Church at Thrybergh, Rotherham where Evening Prayer was said and a tribute was paid by Fr Tony Burke, from St Michael’,s, Hathersage. The Funeral Mass took place on Monday 7th December at the Church of the Immaculate Conception, Rotherham, led by Bishop Rawsthorne of Hallam, with the panegyric preached by Mgr Peter Moran. Lourdes Youth 2010 Over 400 young people will join Bishop Roche and pilgrims from throughout the diocese for the annual Lourdes pilgrimage (1st –, 9th July 2010). A limited number of places are available on the youth section for young Catholics (Year 10 and Year 12) who do not attend Catholic schools. Anyone interested in this opportunity should register their interest before Friday 26th February 2010. For further details contact: Anna Cowell Diocesan Youth Officer abcleedsdiocese@hotmail.com 0113 2618058 Latin Mass Venues - Extraordinary Form -1962 Missal HALIFAX: St Marie’,s, Gibbett Street. Vigil Mass every Saturday. 6.00pm. CASTLEFORD: St Joseph’,s, Pontefract Road. Every Sunday, 3.00pm. BROUGHTON: Sacred Heart, Broughton Hall near Skipton, every Monday, Wednesday, Friday and Saturday, 9.30am. BATLEY: St Mary of the Angels, Cross Bank Rd. Batley. Every First Friday of the month, preceded by confessions, 7.30pm and every fourth Saturday of the month (Vigil) at 3.00pm and as announced. LEEDS: 1.Our Lady of Lourdes, Cardigan Road, Leeds, every last Sunday of the month, 3.00pm 2. Our Lady of Good Counsel, Kentmere Avenue, Leeds every Friday 9.15am. HECKMONDWIKE: Holy Spirit , Bath Road, Every First Sunday of the month, 2.30pm. and every 2nd, 3rd, 4th and 5th Saturday of the month at 11.30am. BRADFORD: St Peter’,s, Leeds Road, every second Sunday of the month, 3.00pm. lmsleeds.blogspot.com for further details. Ordinary Form –, 1969 Missal First Sunday of the Month Cathedral 11am Second Saturday of Month 4pm (Schola Gregoriana)

Read in full

Page 18

Feb 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 18 PASTORAL LETTER/BE STILL/DIARY/ENGAGEMENTS First Friday of the Month SINGLE CATHOLICS meet at 8.00pm for mass at our Lady of Lourdes, Leeds. We also a have a program of 4-8 events during the month, walks, meals, cinema and theatre trips, etc. Phone David Easterbrook Chairman LDSC on 0113 2289468 evenings between 6 and 7.30pm only. Membership is open to all single Catholics who are free to marry within the church. Crusade Mass The crusade Mass and Rosary of Mary Immaculate is held at St Patrick`s Church, Bradford, on the first Saturday of the Month after 12.15pm Mass Second Sunday of Month 2pm Meeting of Bradford Fraternity of the Secular Franciscan Order at St. Anthony`s Convent, Clayton, Bradford.` `Third Sunday of Month 2.30pm Meeting of Leeds Fraternity of the Secular Franciscan Order at the Cathedral. Ampleforth Renewal Community Ampleforth Abbey, meet 1st Sunday each month, at Ampleforth. 11.30am Praise, Speaker, Sharing Groups, Reconciliation, Exposition, Finishing with Mass and Healing at 4.00pm. All enquiries: Seamus McEneaney 01429 426181 Monthly Vocations Mass Mount St Joseph’,s Chapel 11am First Wednesday of the Month. Calix: An organisation for those recovering from addiction and working the 12 Step Programme of AA so that they can develop and deepen their relationship with Jesus as their Higher Power. Meets on the First Sunday of every month at Corpus Christi Church, Neville Rd. Osmondthorpe. Leeds. Mass at 4.30pm followed by meeting. Contact: Fr. Michael on 01977 510266 Helpers of Gods precious infants, prayer vigils, regular weekly prayer vigils at Marie Stopes Abortuary, 7 Barrack Road.LS7 4AB, next to Nissan car showrooms. Fridays 12.30 to 1.30, and Saturdays 9am-11am. Other times variable. Further details Pat 0113 2582745 Diary Be Still a few moments for thought and prayer God our hope, we entrust to you the victims of the Haiti earthquake. Dismayed by the suffering of the innocent, we ask you to inspire the hearts of those trying to provide aid. We know how deep the faith of Haitian people is. Strengthen the downhearted, console those who are weeping, send your Spirit of compassion on this people who have been so sorely tried. Bishops Engagements - February/March Deadline For receipt of material for next edition: March 5th 2010 Parishes receive their copies: March 21st 2010 Send letters, articles, reports &, pictures: Mr John Grady, Leeds Diocesan Curia, Hinsley Hall, 62 Headingley Lane, Leeds LS6 2BX. If at all possible, send words by e-mail to: john.grady@dioceseofleeds.org.uk, or, failing that, on a floppy disc in Word. Tel: 0113 261 8022. Advertising Deadline Please note All paid-for advertising is dealt with by: CathCom, L4 Blois Meadow Business Centre, Steeple Bumpstead, Haverhill, Suffolk, CB9 7BN. To advertise call 020 7112 6710 or email: ads@cathcom.org Your Catholic Post Sunday 21 February 2.30pm Rite of Election, Leeds Cathedral Monday 22 February 12 noon Episcopal Ordination of Rev Mgr Mark Davies as Coadjutor Bishop of Shrewsbury, St Anthony’,s, Wythenshawe Friday 26 February 1.30pm Visitation, Holy Rosary &, St Anne’,s Primary School, Leeds Sunday 28 February 10.30am Visitation, St Patrick’,s, Earby Monday 1 - Tuesday 2 March Clergy Day of Recollection, The Briery, Ilkley Wednesday 3 March 4.30pm Clergy Conference, Hinsley Hall Thursday 4 March 10am Visitation, St Joseph’,s Primary School, Barnoldswick 7.30pm Lectio Divina, Leeds Cathedral Sunday 7 March 10am Visitation, St Joseph’,s, Barnoldswick Wednesday 10 March 10.30am Meeting with Diocesan Finance Board &, Trustee Directors, Hinsley Hall Thursday 11 March 11am Presbyteral Council Meeting, Little Sisters of the Poor, Leeds, 7.30pm Lectio Divina, Leeds Cathedral Sunday 14 March 10am Visitation, Our Lady of Lourdes, Haworth Wednesday 17-24 March CAFOD Visit to El Salvador Saturday 27 March 12 noon Ordination to the Diaconate, Leeds Cathedral 2pm Diocesan Peru Commission, Hinsley Hall Sunday 28 March 10.45am Blessing of Palms and Mass, Leeds Cathedral Wednesday 31 March 7.30pm Chrism Mass, Leeds Cathedral PASTORAL LETTER SIXTH SUNDAY OF ORDINARY TIME My dear brothers and sisters in Christ, Today’,s readings challenge us about our lifestyles, our values and our priorities. They encourage us to get the balance right between the spiritual and the material, between what is and what is not important in life. Getting the balance right is difficult, but not impossible. It is something that needs constant reassessment and readjustment. The days of Lent give us that opportunity to reflect on our lifestyles, our values and our priorities. The material that CAFOD has produced this year for the fiftieth anniversary of the first Cafod Family Fast Day is thought provoking and will help all of us to reflect upon our living out of the Gospel. Together with that important commitment, there is another aspect of life closer to home that I wish also to reflect upon today. Lent is a time when we hear a lot about sacrifice: the supreme Sacrifice of Christ on the Hill of Calvary and his call to all his disciples to take up their cross daily and to follow him. The history of our diocese and its parishes contains countless stories of sacrificial living and sacrificial giving on the part of large numbers of people. As we know, these people gave generously of their time, talents, energy and wealth. In many cases they were poor but, like the widow in the gospel, their poverty did not prevent them from giving all that they could afford week after week for the love of the Lord and his Church. Today we are indebted to them for our churches, schools, parish halls, presbyteries –, to name but the obvious. It is with gratitude that we remember the sacrificial giving of these past generations while, also acknowledging the generosity of the present generation on which the Church’,s continued work depends. Every parish relies on the willingness of its parishioners to give generously and sacrificially not only in terms of money, but also in terms of time, talent and energy. The greater our giving in all of these areas, the more vibrant our parishes and our diocesan family will be. Today, I want to say something to you specifically about the importance of the offertory collection. It is a worry to me that for quite some time now our expenditure as a diocese has been greater than our income. In the past we have been able to rely on diocesan investments to shore up expenditure in parishes and schools as well as to provide for the central services that are needed in the diocese to support our parishes. The present economic climate, however, makes this fall-back position unreliable and so we need to address more realistic ways in which to operate in the future. During the course of the last eighteen months every reasonable avenue of cutting back on expenditure has and continues to be explored. There is a limit, however, to what can be achieved by this process alone. Our parish income also needs to be increased in order to maintain our parishes and schools and to provide for our clergy and lay employees - not forgetting our retired priests, who have served us well over their long working lives. It is for this reason that I am asking parishes to make a special plea for increased Sunday offertory giving during the course of the next few weeks. I know that you will give serious consideration to what will be presented to you on that occasion and I respectfully ask you to respond generously and sacrificially as in the past. I am sincerely grateful for all that has been achieved in the past and I would like to express my heartfelt gratitude to all who in the present help with financial matters throughout the diocese: the parish clergy and their finance committees, those who help in taking the collections, counting, banking, organizing offertory envelopes, looking after GADs, putting on fund raising events and those who keep the accounts in order. There are many others, too, including yourselves. I wish to thank you all for supporting the work of the Church throughout the Diocese week after week. What you give at the Offertory of the Mass is so clearly associated with the self-giving of the Lord. As His body, the Church, it enables us together, parish, schools and diocese, to provide what is necessary for the building up of the Kingdom of God. Thank you for listening to my concern. I know that you will consider this matter seriously and respond to the needs of the overall family to which we belong at home and abroad. May the Good Lord bless you in this as well as in all the good that you do. Devotedly yours in Christ, Arthur Roche Bishop of Leeds

Read in full

Page 19

Feb 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

NEWS Page 19 Midnight Mass from Leeds Cathedral on BBC Radio 4 I t was a wintry Christmas eve day and the girls and adults choirs of Leeds Cathedral were manically preparing for the Midnight mass broadcast which lay ahead. Unfortunately, getting to the rehearsal posed more problems than expected when Leeds decided to have its first white Christmas for years. To the relief of Mr Saunders, the Cathedral Director of Music, everybody managed to somehow make it in for the rehearsal and the broadcast itself. Throughout the rehearsal, we were constantly being reminded that the key to our success would be to achieve perfect “,BBC diction”, and as far as the music sung in Latin went, we had to sound more Italian than Pavarotti himself! Concentration had to be kept at all times and anyone caught yawning or not looking at the conductor suffered facing the wrath of the Director and potentially not being involved in the broadcast! The point of this was that if you can’,t sing at twelve o’,clock noon, how could you possibly perform at a live broadcast at midnight? For the younger members of the choir, an afternoon nap would definitely be required as they would be up way past their bed times! The evening was certainly a worrying prospect for them, as some expressed their fears about getting home so late after the broadcast that they would miss Father Christmas. However, the selection boxes that they were given by the priests seemed to soothe their anxiety somewhat! With the new organ from Germany having been recently fitted, rehearsals with the organ and choir were vital so as to achieve the right balance of sound for the live recording. This was the first high profile event that the organ was to be used for. Fortunately, the cathedral having highly skilled organists meant that everything was alright on the night! During the broadcast, we knew things were going well because of the “,thumbs-up”, that the head-phoned Mr Saunders gave us from time to time. When I returned home after the recording, the first thing I did was go on BBC I player and have a listen to the mass for myself, in spite of the fact that it was two o’,clock in the morning! All in all, the broadcast went very well and was certainly a most enjoyable experience. Written by choir member Clare Croft (age 17) O n Sunday 15th November, a substantial monetary gift was made to Leeds Cathedral to help secure the long-term future of their choral scholars. A cheque for £,15,000 from the Friends of Cathedral Music (FCM) was presented to Benjamin Saunders, Director of Music at the 11.00am Solemn Mass by a member of FCM`s council, Terry Duffy. Commenting of the gift, Mr Saunders said, ",I am delighted to receive this gift from FCM which will be used as an endowment to start a fund to secure the long-term future of our choral scholars. The Diocese of Leeds has the largest music department in the country, with 10 staff and 45 choirs, including five boys` choirs. A key component of this programme is the reinvigoration of choral music in primary and secondary schools. ",Leeds is one of only three Roman Catholic cathedrals to sing daily services and in total there are ten services of mass and vespers sung each week. The choral scholars are drawn from Leeds and Huddersfield Universities, supplemented by other members that have sung as trebles in the cathedral boys` and girls` choirs when they were younger. We are looking forward to presenting a concert to publicise the work of FCM once our new Klais organ is completed in 2010. It is with deep gratitude that we accept this grant.", FCM`s Terry Duffy, who was until retirement, Director of Music at Liverpool Metropolitan Cathedral, said on presenting the cheque, ",We are delighted to support the excellent work of Leeds Cathedral, which gives so much encouragement to young singers and upholds the choral tradition of Great Britain. FCM is keen to lend all the financial and moral support it can to ensure the continuance of the priceless heritage of cathedral music.", This year alone, FCM is giving a total of £,125,000 to eight cathedrals, large and small, two each in England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland. All subscription income from the members (close on 4,000) is now handed out in grants and since FCM`s formation in 1956 a total of over £,1.7 million has been distributed. Grant to help support long term future of Cathedral Choir A young man, Richard, from Haiti has asked the Taize Community to pray especially for his country on 12th of every month (the earthquake anniversary) and this is a part of their prayer. A brother of the Taize Community is visiting Leeds on Tuesday 16 March- 7:00 pm Prayer and meeting, Catholic Chaplaincy, 5 St. Mark’,s Avenue, and York on Wednesday 17 March,- 12:30 pm Prayer, talk, soup &, bread lunch, More House, Heslington Lane for this meeting, contact Annemarieke de Bruin, adb503@york.ac.uk PRAY FOR TAIZE For Advertising contact CathCom on 020 7112 6710

Read in full

Page 20

Feb 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 20 Designed and produced by CathCom, L4 Blois Meadow Business Centre, Steeple Bumpstead, Haverhill, Suffolk, CB9 7BN. To advertise call 020 7112 6710 or email: ads@cathcom.org Teenage Good Samaritan T he daily walk home from school turned into a real-life 999 emergency call for one Leeds teenager. Fifteen-year-old, Year 11 student, Dannielle Baker was on her way home from Mount St Mary`s High School when she found herself one of the first on the scene of a serious traffic accident. The victim, who had been knocked down by a bus as it pulled away from a stop, turned out to be fellow Mount St Mary`s pupil, eleven- year-old Lesley Opoku who is in Year 7. Dannielle immediately assessed the situation, put Lesley in the recovery position, covered her with her coat and rang the emergency services. Lesley was drifting in and out of consciousness, had a broken arm and was bleeding from her mouth and nose. Dannielle said: “,I used the first-aid training that we learn in school and just got on with it.”, She even stopped a well-meaning passenger from moving Lesley since she was aware that this may have made her injuries worse. Dannielle then rang Lesley’,s mum before sitting with her until an ambulance arrived on the scene. After a short stay in hospital, Lesley returned to school and both girls met up with their parents for an emotional reunion. Lesley thanked Dannielle: “,I don’,t remember much about it but I’,m glad someone like Dannielle was there to look after me.”, Leeds City Credit Union, which provides financial services for the people of Leeds, was so impressed with Dannielle that they presented her with a cheque as a reward for her action. Business Development Manager, Joanne Rogers, congratulated Dannielle: “,I would like to thank you on behalf of the Leeds City Credit Union. I am delighted to be able to reward you for your kind act and for helping a fellow pupil in such extreme circumstances. Your quick- thinking, life-saving actions should be applauded.”, Dannielle, who sits her GCSEs this year and has her eyes on a career in the uniformed services, said: “,I just put into practice everything I had learned in school. You need to think clearly and quickly, consider the circumstances and act decisively. The last thing I expected was a reward. The main thing is that Lesley has made a full recovery and I am proud to have played a part in that.”, Mount St Mary`s honoured as digital revolutionary at the world’,s largest technology and education show B ecta awards Mount St Mary`s the prestigious ICT Mark in recognition of their outstanding use of technology in learning at the 2010 BETT Show Children and staff at Mount St Mary`s in Leeds are celebrating after being awarded the ICT Mark accreditation by Becta, the government agency for technology in learning. Mount St Mary`s was accredited with the ICT Mark in recognition of the school’,s innovative and forward thinking approach in using information and communications technology (ICT) in education. Making it even more special for Mount St Mary`swas the fact that they were awarded the ICT Mark at the 2010 BETT Show on the Naace stand (www.naace.co.uk), the largest education and technology show in the world, where the most cutting edge and innovative technologies in education are showcased. The ICT Mark is only awarded to schools following an external assessment in which the school’,s progress and success in placing technology at the heart of learning, as well as wider school management is rigorously judged. Therefore is it a huge achievement for Mount St Mary`s to be awarded the ICT Mark and highlights their excellence in the field of ICT. ICT has helped to enhance teaching and bring lessons to life at Mount St Mary`s showing clearly how technology makes a difference, not just in the classroom, but at home, within the family and across other school activities. Head teacher Bernadette King commented “,We are delighted to be awarded the ICT Mark. It recognises our positive approach to ICT and the benefits it is bringing to our children. We believe that ICT can be used in every aspect of learning, and that it is an essential tool for ensuring our children are equipped for the modern world. To be awarded the ICT Mark at BETT surrounded by some of the most cutting edge technologies in the industry made it even more special for us as a school. ”, Niel McLean, Executive Director for Schools and Families at Becta said “,Mount St Mary`s thoroughly deserve the accolade of an ICT mark accreditation. They clearly demonstrate how important it is to take a holistic approach to using ICT in schools. Their investment in new technology has contributed to substantial improvements in learning within the school. The BETT Show highlights the importance of technology in education and Mount St Mary’,s is an excellent example of technology in education in practice”, (Picture shows Director of ICT at Mount St Mary`s, Will Jackson (right) receiving the award on behalf of the school)

Read in full

Find your local Catholic Historical Church newspaper. Scroll to find yours.
Contact Us
Current Catholic Papers
Church Advertising
www.CatholicDirectory.org
© CathCom 1997 - 2021