Church Papers Archive
Feb 2013 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Feb 2013 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Jan 2013 U edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Jan 2013 U edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Dec 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Dec 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Nov 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Nov 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Oct 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Oct 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Sept 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Sept 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Jul/Aug 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Jul/Aug 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Jun 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Jun 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
May 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
May 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Apr 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Apr 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Mar 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Mar 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Feb 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Feb 2012 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Jan 2012 U edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Jan 2012 U edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Dec 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Dec 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Nov 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Nov 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Oct 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Oct 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Sept 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Sept 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Jul/Aug 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Jul/Aug 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Jun 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Jun 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
May 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
May 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Apr 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Apr 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Mar 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Mar 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Feb 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Feb 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Dec 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Dec 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Nov 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Nov 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Oct 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Oct 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Jun 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Jun 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
May 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
May 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Apr 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Apr 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Mar 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Mar 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Feb 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Feb 2010 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Dec 2009 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Dec 2009 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Nov 2009 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Nov 2009 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Oct 2009 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Oct 2009 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Sep 2009 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post
Sep 2009 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Leeds Catholic Post History

Newspaper for the Diocese of Leeds

.

May 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 1

May 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

CATHOLIC POST THE NEWSPAPER FOR THE DIOCESE OF LEEDS MAY 2011 www.dioceseofleeds.org.uk www.catholicpost.org.uk Whats inside I have come that you may have life and have it to the full! Pastoral Letter Page 16 Blessed JohnPaul Page 14 Big Society Page 3 Rediscovering Pentecost Page 2 As usual the Leeds Parish Church and clergy were there along with their choir and congregation also present was the Lord Mayor of Leeds and the Lady Mayoress, Councillor James McKenna and Councillor Andrea McKenna. Once the procession reached Leeds Cathedral the two congregations went to their respective places of worship for the rest of the liturgy. Bishop Roche in his homily in the Cathedral pointed out how in the service that had taken place we had listened to two Gospels and how different they had been. The first a story of triumph, the entry into Jerusalem, the second one of betrayal. ‘,The first,’, he said ‘,recalls the triumphant entry of Jesus into the Holy City where he receives a rapturous welcome. The second records how that joy gave way to something very ugly, the cries of delight turn to cries for a public lynching - let us get rid of the man! we hear said. The mood has changed, the atmosphere is charged with contradiction, conflict and deceit.’, …,…,. ‘,The presence of Jesus brings to light the darker side of human life: sin and dysfunctionalism. Jesus is confronted by jealousy and intrigue, fear and sheer hatred.’,…, ‘,The journey to the City is the journey the Lord wishes to make into our lives to being light to what is dark and hidden, and forgiveness and healing to what is so wounded within us. I have come he says that you may have life and have it to the full’, A fter a week when the Christian community in Leeds has found itself under attack from an ill chosen poster on full public display at the West Yorkshire Play House there was a larger gathering than usual for the now traditional joint blessing of the palms and procession through Leeds City Centre to remember the first Palm Sunday.

Read in full

Page 2

May 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 2 Leeds Catholic Post There will always be controversy over the death of Osama bin Laden. Some would say that a man who lived a life of violence- even if always seemingly vicarious- would inevitably die in that way: that those declaring a war of terror must expect violence in return: that in the thick of battle, preservation demands a first strike: war is of its nature total, not partial, at least for the victor. The Archbishop of Canterbury sounded a more troubled note: “,The killing of an unarmed man is always going to leave a very uncomfortable feeling because it does not look as if justice is seen to be done”, he said referring also to the altered accounts coming from the White House. A good balance was found by the Vatican. Father Federico Lombardi, the Vatican spokesman, said: ",Osama bin Laden, as we all know, bore the most serious responsibility for spreading divisions and hatred among populations, causing the deaths of innumerable people, and manipulating religions to this end,", ",In the face of a man`s death, a Christian never rejoices, but reflects on the serious responsibilities of each person before God and before men, and hopes and works so that every event may be the occasion for the further growth of peace and not of hatred,", Osama bin Laden has to face God like everyone else, and account for what he has done- not only himself, but through other young men who have killed innocent people, most being people who shared his God, and many who shared his faith. What can we do to promote peace, to support those who work for peace and harmony in our own Yorkshire cities, and who strive to prevent such evil influences affecting young people living in the cities of our diocese? That is the responsibility not of a SEAL squad, but of each and every one of us here in the Diocese of Leeds. The Post Says REDISCOVERING PENTECOST THE FORGOTTEN FEAST P entecost is often the forgotten feast. I sometimes wonder if the reason that it is not celebrated at the same depth as Christmas and Easter is because we haven’,t really understood its importance and that Jesus came not just to save us from our sins but also to empower us with His Holy Spirit. The book of Acts too often is seen as past history, rather than something that is still being written by us today. The apostles were no superheroes, as was made evident by their behaviour in the gospels, yet after Pentecost, the same men who ran away at the crucifixion, through the action of the Holy Spirit do amazing things –, performing signs and miracles and taking the gospel to the ends of the earth. There is no reason why we should not be doing the same. We are supposed to experience our own empowering at Confirmation, when we make our adult commitment to Christ. But instead for many this has become an empty ritual –, an exit sacrament rather than the source of a new strength and commitment. Recent popes, aware of this, have called for a new Pentecost in the Church. How in practice might we co- operate with this? Firstly I would suggest raising the bar of expectation of what it means to be a Catholic –, ie seeing ourselves as contemporary disciples of Christ rather than simply Mass goers or nice people. We need to begin read the Acts of the Apostles as a living book aware that the same Holy Spirit is operating today as operated then, and able to do the same things. We also need to concretely and actively prepare for the feast of Pentecost during the Easter-tide period. Easter tide should be a time of study and expectation for the gifts of the Holy Spirit. The Catholic Charismatic Renewal, one of the movements in the Catholic Church, have a wonderful course called The Life in the Spirit seminars, which is particularly suitable to be run at this time of the year. This has brought people new fervour in faith and motivation to evangelize. A version of this, called “,This Promise is for You”, is available on DVD from Goodnews Books (01582 571011). A list of Pentecost events and retreats can be found on www.ccr.org.uk/pentecost or www.pentecostnovena.org or by contacting the Catholic Charismatic Renewal office 020 7352 5298 or email ccruk@onetel.com The Catholic Truth Society have produced with the Catholic Charismatic Renewal a helpful prayer guide for Easter-tide called “,Road to Pentecost”, and a Pentecost novena leaflet. Pentecost vigils –, all night if possible - with adoration of the Blessed Sacrament, are also an excellent way to help us to tap into the expectation of the early apostles waiting in the Upper Room for the coming of the Spirit. Pentecost is the feast of unity so a good opportunity to join in with something ecumenical or with other nationalities, sharing music and food to mark Pentecost as the birthday of the universal Church. The more we prepare and the more we focus, the more we receive! MORE PICS FROM PAGE 1

Read in full

Page 3

May 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Leeds Catholic Post Page 3 ACT ON POVERTY A fter last year’,s general election, CAFOD supporters called on the new UK government to “,Act on Poverty”,, demanding action on aid, climate change and making business work for the poor. The target set was 10,000 action cards to No.10 Downing Street by 10.10.10. Over 26,000 CAFOD supporters called on the government to act, and among that number were messages from young people who had visited Myddelton Grange. The Prime Minister’,s response was a favourable one but the staff at Myddelton Grange decided that the Act on Poverty campaign was too important to drop after the tenth of the tenth of the tenth and that more messages from more young people would help keep the attention of our government focused on the three key issues. Here at Myddelton Grange we believe that we should help our young people feel something of the nearness of God and that we should encourage them to explore the treasures of the Faith. We are also keen that there should also be a social, outward-looking aspect to their retreat (so that it doesn’,t become a self-indulgent spiritual ‘,trip’,). And so, every school group from Year 6 upwards which comes here has had the ‘,Act on Poverty’, campaign points explained: we want our government to make sure that any climate change deal is fair towards the poorer countries since, in many cases, they are the most likely to be affected by disasters brought on by the changing climate and have the fewest resources to respond to such crises, we want our government to sustain its pledge to commit 0.7% of our national income to the poorest communities in the world from 2013, we want our government to ensure that businesses operating in developing countries provide good conditions and fair wages for the workers and show respect for the environment. Each student has then been invited to sign a letter to the Prime Minister asking him and his government to keep these vital issues in the forefront of their work. Just in case the PM doesn’,t “,hear”, what they are saying, each school group has shouted a little louder by making a video saying that they don’,t want any more broken pledges and want action on poverty. The format for this was based on the video which was filmed at Hyde Park on the evening of the vigil with the Holy Father back in September 2010. These too will be sent to Downing Street. Our young people have a much deeper sense of justice and mercy than we might be prepared to give them credit for. Exercises like this at Myddelton Grange, and elsewhere, encourage this charism for its own sake and in the hope that they will create a better, safer, fairer world for all God’,s children, including themselves. by Frank McCrickard and Fr Simon Lodge Award for Brian Brian Hazell of SS Peter and Paul Parish, Wakefield was awarded the MBE for 35 years devoted work to The Suzy Fund, which he founded and has won the support of every Parish Priest at SS Peter and Paul Wakefield since. Brian is still as active as ever - he was awarded Bene Merenti 15 years ago, he gets satisfaction he says from helping other people. Catholic Care Disappointed C atholic Care, has spent more than two years arguing it will have to give up its work finding homes for children if it has to comply with recent equality regulations which prohibit discrimination against same-sex couples wanting to adopt. The complex legal debate ended up in the High Court last year before it was referred back to the Charity Commission which again refused to back Catholic Care`s stance. Today a tribunal dismissed the charity`s appeal, supporting the Charity Commission`s ruling. In its decision published today, the tribunal acknowledged there would be ",a loss to society if the charity`s skilled staff were no longer engaged in the task of preparing potential adopters to offer families to children awaiting an adoption placement.", But the panel said it had to balance the risk of closure of the charity`s adoption service - which it said was ",by no means certain", - against the ",detriment to same-sex couples and the detriment to society generally of permitting the discrimination proposed",. Today`s ruling dismissed an appeal by Catholic Care against the decision of the Charity Commission to refuse its consent to a ",change of charitable objects",. The charity argued that its stance attracted potential adopters who did not approach other agencies. It told the tribunal that same-sex couples could get adoption services from local authorities and other voluntary agencies and said failure to secure the exemption would hit the voluntary donations which keep it afloat. Bishop of Leeds Arthur Roche told the tribunal last month that he believed the law should respect the Catholic Church`s views on this issue in the same way that it allows churches not to have to bless civil partnerships. But the tribunal found that adoption is a public service, funded in part by local authorities, so does not have the same exemptions under the Equality Act 2010 as those which cover private religious worship. The tribunal also said there was no evidence, except for the bishop`s opinion, that donated income would be hit. It said it had heard expert evidence which contradicted the charity`s case that, if it were to close, children would be left unadopted. It said other Catholic charities have found alternative means of operating since the law changed. In response Bishop Roche, said: ",Catholic Care is very disappointed with this ruling. The Trustees are considering their position and whether or not to appeal. It is unfortunate that those who will suffer as a consequence of this ruling will be the most vulnerable children for whom Catholic Care has provided an excellent service for many years. It is an important point of principle that the Charity should be able to prepare potential adoptive parents, a service recognised for its excellence by the local authorities who are responsible for placing children, according to the tenets of the Catholic faith.", BIG SOCIETY HERE ALREADY E ver since David Cameron first introduced us to his notion of the ‘,Big Society’, many people have wondered quite what this means and, especially, what it would look like in practice. Indeed, a few weeks ago the Catholic Bishops of England and Wales, no less, held a conference in London which tried to get to grips with this issue. In all the deliberations to date one thing seems clear: the ‘,Big Society’, envisages a big role for the volunteer and voluntary service, for the common good of the local community and the wider society. As Catholics we are members of diocesan and parish communities which have always depended on volunteers to make them work. A good example are the recent Holy Week and Easter ceremonies across the diocese that were made possible thanks to the efforts of countless volunteers who place their time, energy and talents at the disposal of their parishes and enable the liturgies to be celebrated in a way that befits the most important time of the Church’,s year. Simply think of the part played by the likes of volunteer cleaners, flower arrangers, musicians, singers, readers and Eucharistic Ministers in making this happen, and of what they also do week in and week out. In the Year of Catholic Education there is another group of volunteers in the diocese who merit recognition: the Foundation Governors in our schools. In all we have something like 700 Foundation Governors in our diocesan primary and secondary schools and without them these schools couldn’,t function, either legally or practically. What is more, in Catholic Voluntary Aided schools the role of Foundation Governor not only encompasses the responsibilities common to all governors, but a good deal more besides. Above all we rely on Foundation Governors to sustain and develop the Catholic ethos and distinctive Catholic nature of the school in which they serve. This in turn requires them to pay particular regard to the way in which school leaders and managers develop the Catholic life of the school through, for example, pastoral care, chaplaincy and the positive behaviour of pupils. In addition they must have concern for the quality of collective worship and religious education in the school. An effective governing body will have good systems for evaluating the implementation of school policies in these areas and acting upon the findings. They will support the work of the headteacher and staff but at the same time they will provide high levels of professional challenge to hold the school to account. Doing these things is not always easy and as volunteers our governors have usually to fit their duties around other commitments and responsibilities, both at home and at work that compete for their attention. As a diocesan community we owe them all a debt of gratitude for what they do on our behalf, mostly ‘,behind the scenes’,, in promoting Catholic education and the common good. As a mark of his own appreciation Bishop Roche is holding a Mass and Reception for Foundation Governors at Leeds Cathedral in July. Further information about this event will be sent to schools in due course but in the meantime let’,s acknowledge and celebrate the contribution of all those in the local Church who already exemplify the ‘,Big Society’, in action

Read in full

Page 4

May 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 4 Leeds Catholic Post ‘, Congratulations! All five learners went through this morning’, Eight simple words in a routine email last week that relieved months of hard work and not a little anxiety for all five learners and the team of trainers who had worked with them to get them to this point. The learners are Ana Hodkinson and Anne Pennock of St Joseph’,s parish Wetherby, Ruth McLaughlin and Daria Fella of St Augustine’,s parish Harehills, and Bernadette Longbottom of St Patrick’,s Primary School Leeds. They have each succeeded in completing the practical and theoretical components, including filling two large portfolios each with their work, for the OCN accredited Level 3 Certificate in Parenting: Leading With Confidence course delivered at Hinsley Hall last year. All five are now accredited and equipped to deliver the excellent Family Caring Trust Programmes programmes in their parishes, schools and community. Each student has already successfully run at least one parenting course. What some parents who have taken FCT parenting courses have said: ‘,my attitude towards permissive and authoritarian parenting has changed’, My husband and I were both able to attend...it has led to positive effects on a personal and spiritual level on our relationship... and of course on the children and family unit as a whole ‘,The course is fantastic!’, Congratulations! Church Reopens Tom Foley, Parishioner T he Feast of the Annunciation, 25th March 2011, was celebrated in a very special way in the parish of the Holy Redeemer, Huddersfield. Bishop Arthur concelebrated Mass with six other priests, supported by three deacons, to mark the reopening of Our Lady of Lourdes Church and dedication of the altar following complete refurbishment of the Church. Music for the Mass was provided by the Huddersfield Boys Choir, Huddersfield Girls Choir and Choral Scholars from Leeds Cathedral. All three choirs sung motets by themselves, including the ‘,Panis Angelicus’, by Cé,sar Franck sung by the Girls Choir, and cantors from the Boys Choir led Psalm 39. The Bishop in his homily referred to the faith of Our Lady in responding to the call from God to bear His Son as an example for all to try to follow. He spoke about the ceremony of the dedication of an altar evoking the sacraments by which we are initiated into the faith. A packed Church of parishioners, many of them members since the parish of Our Lady of Lourdes was formed in 1938, remembered how Mass was celebrated originally in a temporary building until 1961 when the former Rialto cinema was adapted into the current Church. Last year, under the guidance of parish priest, Fr. Ian Smith, the Church was refurbished with structural changes including underdrawing the original ceiling, a new heating system, new toilets and provision of a meeting room with kitchen facilities. The Church was redecorated inside and out with new signage facing the main road through Sheepridge. Invaluable support had been given by Deighton and Brackenhall Initiative contributing to the demolition of the five derelict shops adjacent to the Church. The Deputy Mayor of Kirklees, Councillor Eric Firth, attended with two Ward Councillors Jean Calvert and Cath Harris. Also present was the local Anglican vicar David Carpenter and his wife Susan. Following the Mass a buffet was held in the new Meeting Room formed in the space arising from reduction of the seating capacity in the original Church. All present agreed it was a wonderful and spiritual occasion and a firm foundation for growth of the Church in the years to come. 30 years of FAMILIARIS CONSORTIO Pope (Blessed) John Paul II’,s document on the family Quote of the month - May “,God is love and in Himself He lives a mystery of personal loving communion. Creating the human race in His own image and continually keeping it in being, God inscribed in the humanity of man and woman the vocation, and thus the capacity and responsibility, of love and communion. Love is therefore the fundamental and innate vocation of every human being.”,(FC 11) For May’,s reflection Laura, Theology Student at LTUC, chose this quote from Familiaris Consortio. It is a perfect summary of God, love, the meaning of life and our human and Christian vocation. Familiaris Consortio is a short and beautiful document ‘,on the Christian family in the modern world’,. It is a valuable summation of many strands of church teaching and this quote, chosen to celebrate National Family Week (30th May –, 5th June), locates family right at the heart of the Christian vocation. For most people family is the primary school of love and those who are aware of it’,s sacramental reality also recognise family as a primary place evangelisation. Familiaris Consortio also contains an enticing invitation to families to ‘,become what you are’,. I was reminded that this when the Bishop of London quoted St Catherine of Sienna (1347- 1380) “,Be who God meant you to be and you will set the world on fire”, at the royal wedding. A wedding day is a perfect celebration of family life in all its beauty anticipating as it does the joys and pains of real married life. It anticipates the cares and difficulties and the couple trust each other, God and their families and wider community to help them keep their faith hope and love alive. Family is where we begin the process of becoming who we are meant to be. Blessed John Paul II wrote Familairis Consortio in 1981following the Synod on the Family in 1980. It is still a rewarding read. For the thirtieth anniversary of publication why not have a look yourself at www.vatican.va or available to buy from St Paul’,s Bookshop Hinsley Hall (10am –, 4pm Mon –, Sat. Tel: 0113 275 4043) Harehills parenting course Home is a holy place …, …, because relationshps in the family reflect God’,s relationship with us

Read in full

Page 5

May 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Leeds Catholic Post Page 5 “,If you’,re in a hole, stop digging”, is a sound bit of advice. It’,s a shame no-one told the West Yorkshire Playhouse who decided that giving the play “,Tis Pity She’,s a Whore”, its full title was not enough in these shock- numbed days and they had better think of something else to make you run into the back of a bus, mesmerised, at the bottom of The Headrow. So they came up with the idea of putting the title on a poster next to a picture of a plaster pieta- Mary with Jesus taken down from the cross. Between the words and the pieta is a row of lit votive lights and a smaller picture, said to be the characters in the play. The connection between all these is hard to fathom. This, unfortunately, is where the Playhouse decided to keep digging. The poster, they said, was ",intended to represent a sacristy",. ",The focus of the image, and therefore at the centre of the poster is the picture of the children holding hands, the suggestion being that candles are being lit and prayers given in the sacristy for these children.”, Does anyone have any idea what this means? A sacristy, we know, is what the Playhouse would call a dressing room. Methodists call it a sac- risty, too, but Anglicans more usually a vestry. Why there should be this huge statue there, or a photo on the wall, or a row of votive lights? Why, indeed, would we pray in there for these characters in this desolate play whose purpose seems only to be to explore a great taboo. Sacristies are often dusty rooms, smelling of candles and old charcoal, with forgotten brassware in cupboards and wardrobes with modern vest- ments and old copes (ceremonial “,cloaks”,) of monumental weight. There is a safe for the gas candle lighter and other valuables and drawers for long forgotten cloths and hangings. All this may be presided over by a photo of our Bishop, so that visiting clergy can remember whose territory they are in, but a full size pieta- no. How do you “,give”, prayers, as the Playhouse has it? Said, spoken, offered, prayed- but “,given”,? This is a what we would call a paradigm, if any of us understood what the word means. It is a typical example, a pattern for the way Christianity is being treated: we must not feel persecuted, but we should object- as the Bishop and Communications Officer did here- to a lack of respect for the beliefs of fellow-citizens, for the things they hold precious: because it be- trays a lack of tolerance. Funny, isn’,t it, coming from an outfit which you would expect to be both liberal and tolerant? The old advice used to be “,If you’,ve messed up, don’,t be stubborn: say so: apologise and move on”, Or- if you’,re in that hole, stop digging! Benchmark Sidelines It is not too late to book for the Society of St Gregory`s Summer School, 1st - 5th August at Belsey Bridge Conference Centre, Ditchingham, Norfolk, and on past form, it will be truly inspirational. Check their website below. I understand that football clubs make money by selling `replica kit`. When sales start to drop off, as the fans who are going to buy the kit have done so, then they change the design, so everyone can buy the new one (or ones –, obviously, a true fan needs both the home and away kit...) Even I do not think that the new translation of the liturgy is primarily motivated by finance, though –, the revenue from all those new missals and hymn books is just a bonus! Actually, I don`t get the impression the publishers are yet poised for a flurry of activity- my search for, say, `xxx hymnal, new edition` was less than fruitful. However, I have learned something of Laudate`s plans (can a hymn book plan?). There will be a new version, but not straight away. First there will be a Supplement, with the “,Mass Settings”, section entirely revised, though some favourites will still be there in revised or approved versions: - Coventry Acclamations, Mass of Creation, Farrell acclamations, Celtic Liturgy and others”,(see below *). There will be three more complete masses: New Celtic Liturgy (Walker), Pershore Mass (Alan Smith), Storrington Mass (Haugen) (Jane Shields says this is GOOD –, and even though her name often appears at the top of this column despite the fact that I`ve written the words, her opinion remains sound!) There will be ten settings of the Gloria- Peter Jones` Coventry Gloria, Francis Duffy`s Gloria and Stephen Dean`s Mass of Hope Gloria are all revised and retained: three from the new Masses are included and four others: Dean, Ward, Walker (Jeanne Jugan) and Inwood (Plymouth.) Two paraphrase Glorias, by Berthier and Salazar are moved to general praise. (That means the ‘,General Praise section` not a spontaneous praise outbreak –, though some people do react strongly to the Salazar setting –, like Marmite?) Decani are also publishing a collection of Mass settings edited by Alan Smith and Peter Jones, a successor to ‘,Music for the Mass’, - called `Glory to God`, and that flyer (see *) gives an intriguing variety of Mass settings –, I look forward to “,Misa del Pueblo Inmigrante/Mass of the Immigrants”, by Bob Hurd –, when we get to heaven, we`ll all be immigrants: I wonder if St Peter will let us in if we`re wearing the wrong kit? Tim Devereux tim.devereux@ssg.org.uk Useful links: * Decani New Mass Settings –, see link on West Yorkshire Pastoral Music Network: http://www.westyorkshirechurchmusic.org.uk/ Society of St Gregory (`Liturgy and Music alive in the Church today`): http://www.ssg.org.uk/ National Network of Pastoral Musicians: http://nnpm.org/ Musical Notes by Tim Devereux A Problem Before Mass - Fr Colum Kelly T hey said it was to be the biggest ship, capable of carrying 7500 cars, ever to visit Immingham. There was great excitement in the port and the local press ran an article describing this as a great coup for Immingham. It was also to be the maiden voyage of the ship bringing cargo from Singapore, have a turn around of one day and make the return voyage. - The full crew, including The Captain were Filipino On the morning of the planned sailing, I received a call from the berthing company asking for my help. Half the crew had walked off the ship and the remainder had locked themselves in the engine room. It is extremely rare for a crew to take matters into their own hands like this. I met with the crew in an office compound and the full horror of their plight unfolded. Conditions for the crew were so bad that they wrote a letter of complaint to the company whose representative visited the ship on arrival at Immingham. His response was to threaten them with the police and assured them they would all end up in prison. Obviously an idle threat, but the crew were at the end of their tether and refused to work. Their letter of complaint highlighted the following issues. , No pay in the two and a half months they had worked for the company , No receipt of danger money they were promised for double watch shifts while sailing through the gulf of Aden , Lack of food on board, they had survived on a diet of boiled rice, twice a day, all the way from Singapore , No bottled drinking water or fruit juices on board , No access to shore leave in Immingham. The Captain told them it wouldn’,t be possible. (He didn’,t want them to have the chance to complain) , No communication with families. The staff at the berthing agency was wonderful and provided the crew with sandwiches and bottled water. They were very sympathetic to the plight of the crew but really needed to get the ship away to allow for new arrivals that were booked on the jetty. I went on the ship and met the owner’,s representative and told him that I was happy to negotiate with the crew but there could be no more idle threats and the concerns of the crew had to be addressed - they refused to come back on board while the captain was still there. By this time we were joined by the ship agents who travelled up from Essex and calls were made to company offices in Japan. The realisation had begun to set in that there was a serious problem with this captain and that he had neither represented the crew nor the company. A long day of negotiation ended with the promise the that captain would be replaced and would spend a night in a local hotel before flying home. The crew were taken to the centre where they were able to make contact with their families and there was a mixture of relief and yet some fear that their complaints would come back to haunt them. Next day I arranged for the ITF representative to come on board and he was able to deal with the wages issue. A fleet manager arrived from Japan and I was invited to join in the discussions he had with the crew. A new captain would arrive at midnight, the ship was to receive a full quota of provisions, as listed by the chief cook, wages would be paid on time and various technical issues with the ship would be properly addressed. All that remained was that Mass be celebrated and the ship blessed. That was a very joyful occasion. Prayers were said for their families and the joy with which they received Holy Communion made me realise what “,hunger for Eucharist”, really means. Again this highlights the plight of some modern seafarers, unable to have their voice heard, even when the nature of their complaint is so apparent. So maybe find a moment in your prayers to remember the work of seafarers who inhabit an invisible world and whose rights can mean so little in this cruel world of the sea. ‘,O Mary we Crown Thee with Blossoms Today’, O n a lovely warm sunny day the parishioners of St Joseph’,s, Castleford gathered for their May Day Mass on Sunday 1st May. As the altar servers and Canon Durcan processed to the statute of Mary a slight breeze fluttered through the open door gently moving the Easter flowers creating a heavenly fragrance throughout the Church reminding everyone of the Easter celebrations held just a week earlier and Mary’,s role in the life of Christ. One of the altar servers, Karis McDonald proudly carried the crown and as the congregation sang she carefully placed it on Mary’,s head. Canon Durcan spoke briefly at the beginning of Mass about Mary, her role in the Church and how we can emulate her in our own lives. Throughout the Mass ‘,Marian’, hymns were sung in praise of Mary and in her honour. A beautiful Mass on a beautiful day –, enjoyed by all present.

Read in full

Page 6

May 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 6 Leeds Catholic Post The National Liturgy Office has published a summary of those changes to the Missal which involve Deacons. They rather spoil the helpful effect of this little publication by listing it under “,Material for Lay Liturgical Ministries”,, on their website, an apparent lack of ministerial understanding enough to make any deacon despair. The following are worthy of note: , The deacon may also introduce the Mass for the Day , Similarly the deacon does have a role in the invocations of the Penitential Rite. , When the deacon asks for a blessing before the Gospel, the Presider says “,May the Lord be in your heart and on your lips that you may proclaim his Gospel worthily and well.”, , At the end of the Gospel, the Deacon now merely says “,The Gospel of the Lord”, , The Deacon should of course continue to announce the intentions of the Intercessions (Bidding Prayers) and the usual invitations during the Liturgy of the Eucharist. , The four dismissals at the end of Mass are new: Go forth, the Mass is ended.: Go and announce the Gospel of the Lord. Go in peace, glorifying the Lord by your life. Go in peace. An extended singing role seems a possibility, too, in view of the more central position of music in this liturgy. The Exsultet- the Easter Proclamation- will be renewed: this is of course a major part of the Easter liturgy, which is allocated firstly to the Deacon. But then, the opposite: silence. The instruction on the new missal tells us “,The Liturgy of the Word is to be celebrated in such a way as to promote meditation, and so any sort of haste that hinders recollection must clearly be avoided. During the Liturgy of the Word, it is also appropriate to include brief periods of silence, accommodated to the gathered assembly, in which, at the prompting of the Holy Spirit, the word of God may be grasped by the heart and a response through prayer may be prepared. It may be appropriate to observe such periods of silence, for example, before the Liturgy of the Word itself begins, after the First and Second Reading, and lastly at the conclusion of the Homily.”, This is very much the opposite of the headlong dash which may characterise the Liturgy of the Word- “,the Readings”,- in parishes other than your own. In those other parishes, the deacon is not usually the presider, and, like the Queen, can only advise (carefully, mind) . When presiding, he himself can take care not to be of those who believes that liturgy, like nature, abhors a vacuum or that, like radio transmissions, liturgies will shut down completely if there are no words for more than a minute. Silence in liturgy can, after all, soon become addictive in our over noised, over-worded world. Careful! Deacons Diary The Bishops’, teaching document on Interreligious Relations (2010) A DATE FOR YOUR DIARY: “,THE CALL TO DIALOGUE”,. An opportunity to explore this Bishops’, statement on Saturday June 25th 2011 at Wheeler Hall, from 9.30 to 1.30 pm ending with lunch. With: Bishop Arthur Roche, Archbishop Kevin McDonald (Chair of the Bishops’, Committee for Other Religions), Bishop Tony Robinson (Anglican Bishop of Pontefract), Fakhara Rehman (Community Faiths Coordinator Kirklees Faiths Forum) There is no charge but since we need to know numbers please contact David Jackson to book a place: Tel 01274 581094 or email: dandt55@btinternet.com See the advert in this issue of the Catholic Post for details. I n Britain today many people marry partners with different religious beliefs from their own. In this chapter the Bishops look at the Catholic understanding of marriage and how Catholics thinking about marrying someone of a different religion should be prepared and supported. Support for Catholics marrying someone of another religion is based on Catholic teaching about marriage in general and on sacramental marriage between two Catholics. All marriages –, involving a life-long and exclusive union of two spouses in love and an openness towards the birth of children - are intended and blessed by God. Marriage between two baptised Christians has been raised to the dignity of a sacrament. Couples are given graces to live their marriage as a sign of Christ’,s love for the Church. Such marriages are referred to as being ‘,the domestic church’, –, because they symbolise the Church as the family of God. The Church recognises the commitment to marriage and the family shown by other religions and how they place them at the heart of their cultures –, subject as Christian marriages are to exactly the same threats we all face from a permissive ethos today. The importance they give to marriage and the family is another sign of the unity of the human family. We all share the desire to live a harmonious and supportive family life. Whilst admitting all this, interreligious marriages face serious problems due to the great differences between religions. It is not easy to move from one culture to another when expectations of the roles of men and women differ so much. When an interreligious couple do decide to marry they should expect every support –, based for the Catholic partner on Church teaching about marriage but also about relations with members of other religions. The beliefs of others should be respected as much as Catholic beliefs allow. Partners must remember that all marriages are blessed by God as a means to salvation. Such marriages can be fine examples of a deepening of faith, cultural and personal enrichment and a real example of the ‘,dialogue of life’,. Family and friends and the wider religious communities have an essential role in encouraging partners to develop the values they share and values particular to their own tradition. Different religious belonging should not be seen as rivalry or sources of conflict but as mutual sources of enrichment. Technically the law of the Church describes the situation of a Catholic wishing to marry someone of another religion as ‘,disparity of cult’,. This requires a dispensation granted by the local Bishop. The Catholic must declare that she/he is prepared to remove any danger of defecting from the faith, and must promise to do all they can to ensure children are baptised and brought up in the faith, the other partner must be informed of these promises, both must be instructed about the teaching of the Church about marriage as monogamous, life-long and faithful, and open to children, the non-Catholic partner must accept that this understanding of marriage must not be excluded by either partner or the marriage will be invalid. Clearly all involved need to ponder its implications very seriously. The wedding ceremony must be carefully prepared but more so how the couple will live their life afterwards. Preparation must include recognition of the challenges ahead and agreement on: the upbringing and religious education of children, how to cope with pressures to convert to another religion or to restrict its practice, how to live out a full explanation of Catholic teaching on marriage and the obligations of the Catholic partner, but also how to live out a full explanation of the teaching on marriage of the other religion, then the Bishop must be asked to grant a dispensation and reasons given –, usually the parish priest will be the first port of call for this –, though there are also diocesan marriage guidance counsellors and partners of other interreligious marriages who can provide support. Priests and Deacons should be well informed about other religions and about the Catholic Church’,s teaching on interreligious dialogue. They should bear in mind: the need for genuine respect for the other partner’,s religion, the need to affirm and support the religious identity of the Catholic partner, the need to provide room for each partner to discuss their understanding of their own beliefs, the need to protect couples from opposition they can face so that they do not rush in to ill-advised or immature decisions but have room to be honest and open with one another and open to prayer. Often couples will face the actual wedding ceremony with trepidation. The priest, within canonical and liturgical limits can adapt the ceremony to respect the sensibilities of both families. In very exceptional circumstances the Bishop can dispense from some or all of the canonical form (the need for the wedding to take place in a Catholic Church, with priest or deacon and two witnesses). After the wedding all those who have pastoral care of the couple must be willing to make themselves available and support the newly-married couple. They must feel welcomed by the Catholic community –, in parish and then school. The other community must not feel they are losing one of their members. Partners in interreligious marriages often need special care. You have experience of an interreligious marriage? Let the Interreligious Relations Commission know about it –, in all confidence –, so they can support or advise others who may be thinking of entering into one and who seek help. FEASTS AND FESTIVALS 23 May: Anniversary of the declaration of the Bab: Baha’,i. The Bab announced the arrival of Baha’,ullah and co-founded the Baha’,I faith –, in Persia in 1844. He inaugurated the Baha’,I calendar from that date. 29 May: Anniversary of the Ascension of Baha’,ullah: Baha’,i. Commerorates the death of Baha’,ullah at Bahji near Acre in 1892. His shrine there is the place towards which all Baha’,is face when praying. 6 June: Tuan Yang Chieh (Dragon Boat Festival): Chinese. Most notable now for the great dragon boat races between slim rowing boats shaped like dragons. Originally the feast celebrates the death by suicide by drowning of the poet and statesman Ch’,u Yuan in 279 BCE. 8-9 June: Shavuot: Jewish. The Feast of Weeks or Pentecost. Seven weeks after Pesach, it celebrates the revelation of the Torah on Mount Sinai and the early harvest season in Israel. Synagogues are decorated with flowers and dairy foods are eaten. 16 June: Martyrdom of Guru Arjan: Sikh. The Fifth Guru was executed on the orders of the Indian Mogul Emperor, Jehangir, for refusing to pay a fine exacted from a charge of treason. He made the first compilation of the Sikh Scriptures –, the Adi Granth and completed the building of the Golden Temple in Amritsar. Sikhs attend the Gurdwara to hear extended readings and hymns from the Adi Granth. MEETING GOD IN FRIEND AND STRANGER CHAPTER 5: Interreligious Marriage (Paras 153 - 166)

Read in full

Page 7

May 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Leeds Catholic Post Page 7 A young person’,s perspective Earlier this month, Jade Broadley took up the challenge to be a “,Vocations Voice.”, Here she reflects on the experience: “,Talking about vocation can often seem a little daunting, especially to young people, which is why I found the ‘,Vocation Voices’, training day held by Abbott Christopher Jameson a great help. As a small group of 18-30 year olds we were able to talk openly with one another about our personal faith journeys, where we were up to in terms of discerning vocation and how important priests and religious and single and married lay people have been in forming us as young Catholics. “,After a day of training I was then assigned to St Martin de Porres’, Parish, Wakefield where I talked at the end of Mass about vocation and gave part of my personal testimony, focusing particularly on the words that Pope Benedict XVI spoke to young people during his visit to the UK last September, ‘,Only Jesus knows what definite service he has in mind for you. Be open to his voice resounding in the depths of your heart.’,”, Mount St Mary’,s Catholic High School, Ellerby Road, Leeds LS9 8LA LAY CHAPLAIN Required from September 2011 Salary Scale B3 - £,17,161-£,19,126 pro rata (This scale is currently under review and may be upgraded) 37 hours per week term time only Mount St Mary`s is a successful, over subscribed inner city comprehen- sive school located very close to the city centre of Leeds. Following re- cent, successful Inspections - in Section 48 we were judged to be Outstanding - the Governors are seeking to appoint a Full Time Lay Chap- lain to further develop and lead the spiritual work of the school. The main focus of the role will be: , To provide spiritual and pastoral support to the pupils and staff of the school and members of the wider school community, bearing witness to the mission statement and maintaining and enhancing the distinc- tive Catholic nature of the school. , To develop and enhance the spiritual, liturgical and prayer life of the school. , To organise a full programme of school liturgies and retreats. , To develop links between the school, the Diocese, parishes and the wider community. Application forms and further information can be downloaded from our website –, www.mountstmarys.org Alternatively please contact Mrs Amanda Stubbs, Head’,s PA, on 0113 2005110 or email stubbsa02@leedslearning.net Our school is committed to safeguarding and promoting the welfare of children and expects all staff and volunteers to share this commitment. The successful candidate will be subject to an enhanced Criminal Records Bureau (CRB) disclosure. Invitation to vocations festival Young adults from the diocese will be heading to Birmingham next month for Invocation 2011, a national Catholic festival with a difference. The event, which will be held between 17th and 19th June in the grounds of St Mary’,s College, Oscott, is for young men and women aged 16-35 who are looking to deepen their relationship with Christ and to discern God’,s will for their lives. It is the second such festival. Six young people from the diocese attended last year’,s event which proved very successful. It is hoped that more will be interested in going this summer. Invocation 2011 will provide opportunities for fellowship, catechesis, confession and Adoration. Keynote speakers include Mgr John Armitage and Fr John Hemer and there will be a wide variety of workshops. The new Papal Nuncio Archbishop Antonio Mennini and Bishop Mark Davies, the Bishop of Shrewsbury, will be among the bishops attending. Young people can book a place at the festival through the dedicated website: http://www.invocation.org.uk/home.html . The minibus will leave Wheeler Hall, Leeds Cathedral at 2.30pm on Friday 17th and return to Leeds for 1pm on Sunday 19th June, in time for our diocesan Corpus Christi procession, beginning at 2pm. The cost is £,40 per person. If a young person is unable to pay this, they are invited to get in touch with Celia at the diocesan vocations office: celia.blackden@dioceseofleeds.org.uk . Young people long for “,fullness of life”, Young people in the diocese are yearning for “,fullness of life”,, Bishop Roche noted in his Pastoral Letter to mark Vocations Sunday this month. “,Whenever Blessed John Paul met with the young he quickened within them a desire to make a wholehearted, life-changing and permanent commitment to Christ, because he knew that only in Christ is fullness of life to be found,”, he wrote. He added: “,As young Catholics in this generation strive for that holiness for which God created them, some of the young men will perceive within their souls the first stirrings of a vocation to the priesthood. They may be surprised by this and they may initially wish that things were otherwise. We know, for example, that as student Blessed John Paul had ambitions to be an actor and a poet and a playwright. Only slowly, and not without pain, did he recognise that God was calling him to the priesthood. It was a process of ‘,interior illumination,’, he later said.”, Missionary sisters speak of their work in Africa Two Comboni Sisters who have spent years working in Africa have been touring highs schools and primary schools with vocations director Fr Paul Grogan in the last fortnight. Sister Graç,a Almeida worked for the national communications office of the bishops’, conference of Ethiopia and oversaw the launch of a Catholic radio network in southern Sudan. Sister Natalia Gomes served as a nurse in Sudan and Uganda and looked after patients suffering from leprosy. The sisters, who are currently based in London, are pictured with students from St John Fisher Catholic High School, Harrogate (Sister Graç,a is on the left). Canon Nunan fosters culture of vocation in Wetherby Among this year’,s jubiliarians is Canon John Nunan who is celebrating his 40th anniversary of priesthood. He has decided to give thanks for these years by holding a month-long series of events in St Joseph’,s Parish designed to foster a sense of vocation among all the parishioners. An exhibition prepared by the diocesan vocations office is on display in the church’,s narthex, Deacon Charlie Conner, who ministers in the parish and who is helping to organise the month with fellow parishioner Lady Mia O’,Donnell, will give a special presentation to young people, vocations director Fr Grogan is to preach on the vocation to the priesthood next month, and a novena is being said for more men and women in the diocese to embrace the challenge of priesthood and the religious life. Preparing for World Youth Day Backbreaking physical activity was the order of the day during the recent retreat for the eighty or so young people from the diocese who will be going to the World Youth Day in Madrid in August. In the midst of the prayer experiences and the talks at Myddelton Grange they planted potatoes in the garden. Vocations Director Fr Paul Grogan was there to lend a hand. The world youth days have proved to be key moments in many of our diocesan seminarians’, discernment. Four seminarians will be accompanying the young people to Madrid. The call to young black men in Yorkshire Blessed Anuarite Nengapeta, a young Holy Family Sister, who was killed in 1964 by rebel troops in what is now the Democratic Republic of Congo, is a model of virtue who can inspire all Christians, vocations director Fr Paul Grogan said during a homily at the quarterly Mass for the Afro-Carribean Chaplaincy at Leeds Cathedral recently. Fr Grogan noted that Blessed Anuarite had been able to face her death with such equanimity because of the intensity of her friendship with Christ, nourished in the Eucharist. To have the Eucharist we first need priests, he said, quoting Pope Benedict. He added: ",I have no doubt that the Lord is calling some young men from an Afro-Caribbean background in our diocese to the priesthood. I am also conscious that young men in western Europe are finding it difficult to discern such a call at the moment for all sorts of reasons. Young black men, I imagine, may find it even more difficult given that there are so few black clergy ministering on our sanctuaries to act as role models. Nevertheless, there is no need to be downhearted: the risen Jesus is more powerful than we can comprehend.", The picture shows Fr Solomon Bulus msp (on the left), a Missionary of St Paul who is at St Joseph`s, Pontefract, Fr Fr Ghebreysus Woldekidan (standing), who is the Chaplain to the Eritrean community in the diocese, and some members of that community. Forthcoming events Friday 20th May 7pm: Discernment Group, Leeds Trinity University College Chaplaincy. There will be a holy hour with the opportunity for confession and Evening Prayer. Then Fr Stephen Brown will speak on “,Our Lady”, after which the group will go for a simple meal. Lifts home afterwards will be available. The group is for men aged 17 or over who are interested in exploring the possibility of the priesthood. Saturday 16th July 10am: The Quo Vadis Group for High School Students. Visit to the Shrine of Our Lady of Mount Grace, Osmotherley. Six-mile walk, packed lunch, rosary procession, Vigil Mass of Sunday and fish and chip supper en route home.

Read in full

Page 8

May 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 8 Leeds Catholic Post S t. Benedict’,s, Garforth are connecting to Puentecitos in El Salvador and the parishioners made Lent a special time to journey together. It started on Ash Wednesday when we all received a bean seed to plant. During Lent as we watered and nurtured it, we were mindful of the ways in which each of us needs to grow in faith and in compassion. We were conscious also that the tiny farming community of Puentecitos is trying to save for a seed bank so that they can grow a variety of nutritious crops on their tiny plots high on the mountainside. (Previously they had to take loans to buy genetically modified ’,terminator’, seeds from one of El Salvador’,s transnational companies that now own 70% of the country’,s agribusiness.) We thought we could fast, pray and fundraise throughout Lent to support them. Each Sunday an insert in the bulletin shared news from one of the villagers and on Lent Fast day we organised a ‘,Solidarity Supper’, and watched a slide show about Puentecitos. A highlight for me was the Good Friday Ecumenical ‘,Walk of Witness’, through Garforth carrying the cross. St Benedict’,s was responsible for prayer at the last station and we read the story from Puentecitos about how they celebrate Holy Week: ‘,During Holy week, all the Catholic groups from the surrounding villages including Puentecitos, come together in the nearby town of Guaymango. On Good Friday, the streets are decorated with carpets made of coloured salt and woodchips and with flowers and fruit. People make images from the salt and woodchips, including the face of Jesus. There is a procession through the town. Fourteen men dressed in purple carry the figure of Jesus. There is singing at each station of the cross. At three o´,clock in the afternoon, there is a time for the adoration of the Holy Cross. At eight o´,clock in the evening, there is another procession in silence, in which only the men take part. Again they carry the figure of Jesus. The older men make a sound with a wooden instrument like matracas which is an ancient tradition. Afterwards, people gather in the church to share food –, “,tamales”, made from corn and beans, wrapped in banana leaves. About 300 people attend, coming from the surrounding villages. The person or group who does the best carpet wins a religious picture as a prize.’, We then decorated our cross with lilac blossom and spring flowers before continuing to the parish centre for a shred soup and bread lunch. Parishioners brought back their collection boxes during the Holy Thursday liturgy and at the Easter Vigil there were special intercessions for Puentecitos. The way parishioners identified and journeyed with the community during Lent was witnessed by their tremendous generosity, for which CAFOD was very grateful. Margaret Siberry Sacred Heart Parish, Ilkley, CAFOD Group Fundraising For Connect2 Rwanda The Group is keen to emphasis the FUN is fundraising, and the three principal events this year for Connect 2 will do just that. Spring Fever over the weekend of 07/08 May involved the Group and its friends in a massive cake and bun making exercise, the results which were on sale after each of the weekend Masses, with refreshments....and the inevitable ‘,Grand Raffle’,! July sees a modestly priced Supper and Quiz evening, generously hosted by the Briery Retreat Centre, where again the culinary skills of the Group are displayed and some 60 or so guests eat and drink well and then pit their wits in a wide ranging Quiz: there is, of course, a raffle. September brings the CAFOD walk, a not too energetic Sunday ramble to Addingham and back, with a picnic in the Churchyard of English Martyrs Church: walkers find sponsors or pay an entry fee. There is no raffle...but instead a Treasure Hunt for our younger walkers: it’,s normally a great family occasion. If your parish or group would like to explore the idea of Connecting2: one of CAFOD’,s partners and the communities they work with, please contact Margaret or Joanne , leeds@cafod.org.uk 0113 275 9302 and we will be in touch. SNAPSHOTS FROM OUR DIOCESE C AFOD is offering the opportunity for your parish community to enter into a relationship with one of our overseas partners to learn more about the impact your generosity is making in the lives of people in specific communities in El Salvador, Cambodia, Rwanda, Brazil, Ethiopia and Bangladesh. We asked a number of our key partners in these countries if they would be willing to enter into a more in depth relationship with parishes around England and Wales. Their response was one of great enthusiasm. Cambodia Our Cambodia partner is Salvation Centre working with the Samrong Mean Chey community a very poor displaced community living in temporary shelter near the capital of the Cambodia capital, the work is around promoting the need for permanent homes and providing counselling on HIV &, AIDS. El Salvador In El Salvador our partner is the Jesuit Development Service working together with a rural community Puentecitos (Little Bridges) providing training in farming and growing nutritious crops to support them making a living on the outskirts of San Salvador. Brazil Our Brazilian partner is APOIO working in Sao Paolo with families and young people, contributing to reducing violence, promoting respect for human rights and working to secure safe housing. Ethiopia The Adigrat Diocese Catholic Services in Ethiopia is our partner working with the Bera community in North East Tigray with a very poor community living in a drought affected area, developing local agriculture and managing crops and developing new ways to make a living. Bangladesh Caritas Bangladesh is our partner working with the people of Kainmari who are trying to adapt to the their changing environment to create a secure and prosperous future. This involves setting up early warning systems, building cyclone shelters and learning which crops will grow well in soil that has been affected by sea water. Rwanda How do people overcome the trauma of genocide, heal memories and rebuild lives? Our partner, Avega East, is working with the people of Musha in Rwanda to help them build houses, offer trauma counselling and provide legal and medical care. Each of these communities wants you to know more about them but they also want to hear about you and life in your community. So it’,s a real opportunity to go on a journey together. Let’,s read how some of our parishes are doing just that. WALKING FOR PERU SPONSORED WALK FOR SISTERS OF MERCY PERU MISSION SUNDAY JUNE 26TH START 3PM FROM 59 ALWOODLEY LANE 6 Miles round Eccup Reservoir Connect2: Getting closer to CAFOD’,s work, getting closer to partner communities

Read in full

Page 9

May 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Leeds Catholic Post Page 9 I n any diocese one of the highlights of Holy Week is the annual Chrism Mass, during which the priests, deacons, religious and representatives of the entire diocesan community gather around their Bishop, who blesses the Holy Oils for use in the coming year. It is a key moment in the life of the local Church and a visible expression of its unity, for whenever the Holy Oils are used in the diocese, the ministry of the Bishop who consecrated them is symbolically present. As ever there was standing room only at Leeds Cathedral by the time the Chrism Mass began on the evening of Wednesday 20th April. It was an occasion which reminded everyone present of our oneness in Christ through Baptism and its holy anointing, which is in turn made possible by the ministry of the Bishop and his priests. During the liturgy Bishop Roche and the assembled clergy together renewed their personal commitment to serve God’,s people. At the Offertory the Holy Oils were carried up to the sanctuary in readiness for the blessing by Bishop Roche. The Oil of the Sick will be used in the year ahead whenever the Sacrament of the Sick is administered to bring the strengthening and healing power of Christ. The Oil of Catechumens is used at every Baptism to strengthen and purify candidates before they are baptised with water. The Oil of Chrism has three main uses: at Baptism for the anointing of the newly-baptised person, at Confirmation when the Bishop anoints the forehead of the candidate saying, ‘,Be sealed with the Holy Spirit’,, and when a man is ordained to the priesthood, or a priest is being consecrated as a Bishop –, in both cases his head is anointed with Chrism by the consecrating bishop. It is also used in the dedication ceremony of a new altar or church. At the start of Mass the Bishop welcomed the congregation to the Cathedral and said that their presence was a real expression of their support for the priests of the diocese and he asked everyone to pray for vocations so that the ministry and service which they exemplify can continue into the future. In his homily he struck a personal note referring his own priestly journey from the time he first said ‘,Yes’, to God’,s call to the priesthood. His emphasis was on priesthood as life of service and the centrality of the Eucharist in the life of the priest, pointing to the words in Eucharistic Prayer II in which the celebrant gives thanks to God for being counted worthy to ‘,stand in your presence and serve you’,. Tonight was an occasion, said the Bishop, for priests to renew that ‘,Yes’, and their connection to the priesthood of Christ for ‘,all the days of our life’,. After the Final Blessing the Holy Oils were taken in procession from the sanctuary to a side chapel where they were distributed to the Deans of the Diocese and thence to the parishes for use in the weeks and months ahead. GATHERED IN UNITY AROUND THEIR BISHOP

Read in full

Page 10

May 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 10 Leeds Catholic Post I n contrast to the Mass the night before, for the blessing of the Holy Oils, the Cathedral on this the first night of the Triduum while it was full and people were standing there was in fact room for everyone to sit had they so chosen. The Bishop in His opening remarks reminded everyone about how this was the start of a very special time and the gift of the Eucharist to all. He said how all were privileged to be there on such an occasion. The institution of the Eucharist was the theme he started out from in his homily as he pointed out that this was the night that Christ gave us the priestly ministry and the Eucharist –, his Body and Blood –, the gateway to eternal life. He pointed out the meaning of the Passover and how his time in the garden after the supper is commemorated at the end of the celebration in the procession to the altar of repose. It is the confrontation of darkness and his over coming of it. We, as Christians, in our own way continue this work as we confront darkness and take the light of Christ to the world. After the homily the Bishop, acting out, the Gospel washed the feet of 12 people from those who regularly worship at the Cathedral. The choir meanwhile provided an excellent rendition of ‘,Domine tu mihi lavas pedes’,. At the Preparation of gifts everyone was invited to bring forward their Lenten Alms boxes as their offerings for the poor. The procession to the Altar of Repose was accompanied by the singing of the Pange Lingua. Bishop Washes The Feet Of His People To advertise in the next issue of Leeds Catholic Post contact Louise on 0113 261 8028

Read in full

Page 11

May 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Leeds Catholic Post Page 11 T he Bishop accompanied by his ministers made his entry into a silent Cathedral full, to standing room only, for the Solemn Liturgy of The Lord’,s Passion. As is now customary The Priests, Brothers and Sisters of Renewal were part of the accompanying group. As is also now the custom the congregation that had gathered in such vast numbers reflected the multi ethic nature of the people who now worship at the Cathedral –, this is a world church in action reflecting its common Faith and Belief. The homily, as befitted, such a gathering was preached by Fr Thomas Cacciola CFR an American and a member of the Franciscan Friars of Renewal. He started by recounting how they had spent the morning praying the stations of the cross around the City of Bradford and how they had met with acceptance, indifference and hostility this he pointed out was only minor to the reactions Jesus had received. He had simply become so close to us as to sacrifice His life and be crushed for our sins –, the challenge he said was for us to understand that. Jesus actually did do it –, he died for us! Bishop Leads His People In Prostrate Prayer Specialists in wedding photography 01977 556088 07716728109 Your wedding is a unique day which involves considerable thought, planning, time and effort. Once your special day is over you will be left with many lovely memories some of which will inevitably fade over time. Investing in good photography can ensure that the mood and emotion of your day is captured to form a permanent reminder to enable you to relive your memories for years to come.

Read in full

Page 12

May 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

A s the City of Leeds swung into action for its night life, as clubs and pubs filled up and emergency sirens wailed, Leeds Cathedral was plunged into darkness as people gathered for the celebration of the Vigil to Easter. With only the flickering ‘,New Fire` of Easter giving any light Bishop Roche started the ceremonies with the blessing of the fire and the Paschal Candle. There followed the progression of light as the Candle was processed down the Cathedral and then the splendid rendition of the Exultet by Mgr Moger setting the seal on the first part of the ceremony. The readings were listened to in candle light only before the singing of the Gloria brought the splendor of the Cathedral back as all the lights came on. In his homily the Bishop pointed out how we had just acted out and listened to the great acts of drama that had made up our history and our salvation. The two women in the Gospel reading he pointed out were told not to be afraid - For He Is Risen - He is not in the past but in the present - he is creating something new - just as we were about to witness in the ceremonies that were to follow as people were baptised and received into the church. This journey of Faith makes us all walk in a newness of life. This is the night when the whole church rejoices as we receive new members and renew our own Faith. In all 16 people were baptised or received into full communion on a night that saw the Cathedral full once again and, at the Bishop`s suggestion, the new members were received with get applause at the end of the celebrations. Page 12 Leeds Catholic Post FROM JUST £,299 R.G.R. MEMORIALS COLOUR CATALOGUE QUALITY MEMORIALS AT AFFORDABLE PRICES IN GRANITE, MARBLE &, STONE ALL PRICES INCLUDE DELIVERY &, FIXING Ogee top memorial 2’,6”, high Fully polished Black Granite, Delivered and Fixed for £,399 inc VAT FREE Tel: 0113 282 3888 43 High Ridge Park, Rothwell, Leeds LS26 0NL Light Dispels the Darkness

Read in full

Page 13

May 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

NEWS FROM LEEDS TRINITY UNIVERSITY COLLEGE Leeds Catholic Post Page 13 Leeds Trinity celebrates life and work of Leeds artist Atkinson Grimshaw J ohn Atkinson Grimshaw is a Victorian artist whose name you probably know and whose paintings are certainly familiar to you. Historians at Leeds Trinity University College are working hard to bring the artist behind the atmospheric depictions of Victorian cities and their inhabitants to greater prominence. A one day conference in May held by Leeds Trinity’,s Centre for Victorian Studies gave art enthusiasts and experts a welcome opportunity to discuss Atkinson Grimshaw’,s work, life and themes. Speakers included artists, curators and poets as well as academics, demonstrating the continuing relevance of his work today. The event was timed to coincide with a rare exhibition of Atkinson Grimshaw’,s work. As Nathan Uglow of the Centre for Victorian Studies explains, this is the first major exhibition for a generation and includes personal accounts which help to bring the artist to life. Nathan said, “,Atkinson Grimshaw was a local man, living in East Leeds and painting the Yorkshire area. His moonlit scenes of Leeds town centre or the docks of Hull, Liverpool, and Glasgow are as spontaneously familiar to us as fairytales.”, “,But, beyond a few sketchy outlines, the dates of his birth, marriage, and death, we know little about what he was like or what he thought. His emotional life has been a closed book to us, he is as enigmatic and as shadowy as the scenes he painted.”, “,An unpublished biography written by his descendents has been unearthed, revealing a sharp sense of humour, a love of art and a fierce dedication to his family. There are photographs and sketchbooks, letters and personal effects, creating stories that turn the paintings from fairytales into history.”, The exhibition “,Atkinson Grimshaw: Painter of Moonlight”, is at the Mercer Art Gallery in Harrogate until 4 September, displaying over 50 works from throughout Atkinson Grimshaw’,s career. Established in 1994, the Leeds Centre for Victorian Studies is a hub for scholarly work into all aspects of Victorian society, hosting many distinguished guest speakers and publishing the Journal of Victorian Culture. Taught and research postgraduate courses cover literary, cultural, social and art history. Events at Leeds Trinity University College Please visit our website at www.leedstrinity.ac.uk for more details and a full events listing. Four decades of learning and teaching Thursday 23 June at 6.00pm Talk by Leeds Trinity lecturer Graham Jarvis. The lecture will reflect on Graham’,s 40 years teaching in schools and in teacher education, on what he has learned and what he believes we, in education, can learn from experience and history. Contact Diane Ainsley to book, by email on d.ainsley@leedstrinity.ac.uk or call 0113 283 7100 ext 379. Yorkshire Women`s History Network inaugural conference Saturday 25 June from 9.15am to 4.30pm “,Women on others/Women as others”,, with keynote speaker Professor Alison Oram, Leeds Metropolitan University. For more information contact Julie Wadsworth by email on j.wadsworth@leedstrinity.ac.uk or call 0113 283 7100 ext 348. Open day for prospective students Wednesday 29 June from 11.00am to 3.00pm Find out about studying at Leeds Trinity as an undergraduate, postgraduate or foundation degree student. Call 0113 283 7150 or visit www.leedstrinity.ac.uk for information and to book. A n entrepreneurial postgraduate at Leeds Trinity University College has received a boost for his business after braving the dragons in their den. Chris Hale, who is studying for the Masters in Business Management, came out on top in a recent business competition at Leeds Trinity, winning a valuable cash injection for his “,Justbreathe”, enterprise. Modelled on the “,Dragons’, Den”, format popularised by BBC TV, the competition was the culmination of Leeds Trinity’,s annual business startup masterclass, which aims to provide aspiring entrepreneurs with the skills and knowledge they need to go it alone in business. Chris said, “,The masterclass was a very useful way of networking with other professionals, but most importantly listening to experts within their fields and learning from not only their skills and expertise, but also the mistakes they have made in business.”, “,My current business ‘,Justbreathe’, can simulate altitude in the comfort of a gym to improve aerobic capacity. It provides ideal training for anyone travelling to altitude such as skiers and climbers or professional athletes looking for a competitive edge, and aids general health and wellbeing.”, “,My business plan takes this a step further, proposing to introduce Justbreathe to the corporate market. There are a wide range of benefits, particularly with improving people`s health and reducing stress levels, thereby increasing productivity and energy levels throughout the day, which can only be beneficial for companies and their employees.”, Phil Williams, Enterprise Officer, said, ",The judges were impressed equally with the number of entrants and the range and quality of the business ideas. Although the judging was very close, Justbreathe Corporate won the competition due to the potential for the business and the fact that Chris showed how he would develop the product to market.”, The Business Start up MasterClass was organised with the support of the Graduate Entrepreneurship programme which is part funded by the European Regional Development Fund. Leeds Trinity “,dragons”, breathe new life into altitude simulation business Papal Audience is a special moment for Chaplaincy pilgrims in Rome A group of twenty-four students and four members of staff representing the Chaplaincy at Leeds Trinity spent a four day pilgrimage in Rome before Holy Week. Central to their visit was the Papal Audience, at which pilgrims and visitors gather in St Peter’,s Square to listen to the Pope and receive the Papal Blessing. Pope Benedict XVI holds a Papal Audience every Wednesday that he is in Rome, at which he delivers teachings and readings in many languages and prays with those in attendance. The group also toured St Peter’,s Basilica and visited the Vatican Museum, which includes the Sistine Chapel. They were given a tour of the Venerable English College by Leeds diocesan seminarian Marc Homsey, where they then participated in the Community Mass. They were also privileged to have a conducted tour of the garden of the Passionist Fathers on the Caelian Hill and the Church of St John and Paul which is located there. Leeds Trinity was co-founded by the Cross and Passion Sisters who are connected to this congregation. In addition the group visited the Colosseum and the Roman Forum, as well as the Pantheon, the Trevi Fountain and the Spanish Steps. The pilgrimage was led by Leeds Trinity’,s Chaplains Fr Paul Grogan and Sr Anne Hammersley. Fr Grogan said, “,I was delighted by the students’, response. This is the first time, at least in quite a while, that we have planned something on this scale. Our group comprised many Catholic students who wanted to discover more about their faith and meet the successor of St Peter. It also included some students who are still searching for meaning in their lives. It was great to be alongside such a good-humoured and supportive bunch of young people.”,

Read in full

Page 14

May 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 14 Leeds Catholic Post WYD Palm Sunday Retreat 2011: Planted and Built Up in Jesus Christ, Firm in the Faith On Sunday 17th April, to celebrate Palm Sunday, many of the World Youth Day pilgrims travelling to Madrid this summer gathered at Myddleton Grange to prepare for the pilgrimage. It was a great afternoon full of practical information about the pilgrimage and also a great opportunity to spend time with each other in prayer. The afternoon kicked off with a chance for the pilgrims to discover the group they will be in during our time in Spain and to discuss their expectations, excitement and anxieties about the pilgrimage. Anna Cowell then spent some time updating the group on the plans for the pilgrimage so far. Focusing on the WYD theme ‘,firm in the faith’, the rest of the afternoon was spent doing an ‘,apologetics carousel’,, looking at five different aspects of the Catholic Faith, Bible and Tradition, Mary, the Eucharist, the Pope and the Cross. We were blessed to have Fr John Wilson with us who took the lead in teaching us about the Bible and Tradition. The group then walked together up to Calvary to pray the Stations of the Cross together in preparation for Holy Week. As the group gathered, there were some passers by who were intrigued and impressed by the amount of young people bearing witness to their faith. The Pilgrims then enjoyed a Lenten themed snack of hot cross buns before being creative in the garden, planting sunflower seeds to take home and some potatoes to then come back after the pilgrimage to eat together! The group also spent some time making Rosary beads which will be on sale at the Diocesan Corpus Christi Procession. The day ended with a time of Adoration of the Blessed Sacrament in the chapel where many pilgrims took the opportunity to celebrate the Sacrament of Reconciliation. Rachel Webster led us in some reflections of the five aspects of our faith we had looked at earlier in the day. There was a really peaceful and prayerful atmosphere as each pilgrim was asked to pray for the person either side of them. Thank you to all involved and please keep all World Youth Day pilgrims in your prayers! Leeds Diocesan Youth Service ‘,All who are thirsty, come!’, (Rev 22:17) For more information about how to register for Leeds Diocesan Youth Service events, check out: www.leedsyouth.org.uk, contact Anna at the Youth Office: 0113 261 8058 / abcleedsdiocese@hotmail.com or join the “,Leeds Diocesan Youth Service”, Facebook group. Wednesday 18th May REVELATION 7-9pm Cathedral Hall, Leeds Thursday 19th May Youth Ministry Holy Hour Praying for young people in the Diocese of Leeds 2.30-3.30pm Hinsley Hall Chapel Saturday 21st May St. Pio Friary Open Day 1-6pm, St. Pio Friary, Bradford Saturday 21st May “,Handmaids”, Evening of prayer for young women aged 18-30ish There will be a BBQ from 4.30pm. Prayer will begin at 7pm. 4.30-7pm 7-9pm St. Joseph’,s Convent, Hunslet Thursday 26th May Ecumenical Youth Worker Breakfast 9.15-10.30am TBC Leeds Diocesan Youth Service Calendar Blessed John Paul the Great! I t was in the Jubilee Year of 2000 that I first encountered Pope John Paul II. Having just finished my A Levels, I had an exciting summer of travelling ahead of me. The last stop on my travels before heading to university was Rome, where I joined 2 million other young Catholics to celebrate my faith and meet with the Holy Father. I could never have known what a profound effect the following days were to have on me. Having been brought up in a faithful Catholic family and surrounded by Catholic friends, I knew of Pope John Paul II, but I did not know that this man wanted to speak to me personally we went to meet with him in the grand piazzas and vast fields of Rome. I will never forget hearing his famous and much repeated words “,Do not be afraid!”, and his call to us young people to be “,saints of the new millennium”,. As I listened to this old man, I knew in my heart that I had to take seriously his message. His radical words challenged me and encouraged me as I began university life. I knew with renewed faith that I need not be afraid because Jesus was with me. I tried, with renewed faith and clumsy attempts, to respond to the universal call to holiness. I knew I wanted to be a saint of the new millennium! During my university years I began to study with greater enthusiasm the teachings of the Church and in particular the teachings given to the Church through Pope John Paul II. I was amazed as I read his reflections on marriage and family, human sexuality and relationships. The things that I had been told in my teenage years suddenly gained greater credibility and profoundly impacted me and the way I desired to live out my life as a young Catholic. As Pope John Paul II came to the end of his life, the media of the world paid acute attention to the way in which he grew old gracefully and with great dignity. At this time, my own father (who was diagnosed with MS in his early 20s) was also going through a period of decline in his illness. The witness of Pope John Paul II to the beauty and frailty of human life was a source of encouragement to me (and I’,m sure to my family too). On the evening before Pope John Paul II died, I was asked on a radio interview why JPII was so important to young people. The answer was simple. Though most of us who class ourselves as part of the “,JPII Generation”, never had the privilege of meeting one-to-one with him, we some how knew he loved us. We knew he prayed for us. We knew he desired the best for us. We knew that the best was a life in relationship with Jesus. Young people loved Pope John Paul II because he showed us how to pray and he taught us the truths of the Church with conviction and he helped so many of us live out our faith in the world. Like many others, I never met Pope John Paul II face to face but through his words, written and spoken, I began my friendship with him. I remember watching his funeral at Myddelton Grange and finding it strange that I was mourning for a man that I had never met and yet, he had had so much of an influence in my life. Since his death, he has continued to be a companion on my journey of faith. I have a particular intention that I frequently bring to his attention and it was with this intention held in my heart that I made the pilgrimage to Rome for his beatification. After the Easter celebrations at St. Peter’,s the atmosphere and focus turned to one of rejoicing in the life of JPII and anticipation for the upcoming beatification. Pilgrims and tourists stood side by side in St. Peter’,s Square watching footage of JPII on large screens. Banners, flags and images of Pope John Paul appeared in every area of the city. I found it particularly interesting to speak to pilgrims during that week, to find out why they were keen to attend the beatification. I was touched by the story of some older friends that we met with, who told us that as they were heading in the direction of old age, they wanted to make a pilgrimage to Rome for the beatification to ask JPII to pray that they would grow old with prayerful dignity as he did. Some pilgrims came praying for healings and miracles through his intercession, while others wanted to hold their futures before him and pray for their spouses and families. Finally, I met pilgrims who were simply keen to soak up the Catholic atmosphere at this particular point in the Church’,s history. I noticed that some of them, while incredibly enthusiastic, knew very little of JPII and perhaps were just a few years too young to have encountered him in the “,JPII Generation”, way. The melting pot of pilgrims gathered in their hundreds of thousands, perhaps even millions on the morning of Sunday 1st May 2011. On this morning, I travelled to St. Peter’,s with a small, privileged group who had been given special tickets for the beatification. What an amazing morning! I couldn’,t quite believe my eyes as we made our way to our seats through the Apostolic Palace. The anticipation increased as the climax of our pilgrimage had arrived. As the sun was blazing down onto St. Peter’,s, before the ceremony began, I gave two interviews for BBC Radio Leeds and York. I couldn’,t quite believe that this moment had arrived and that we had such a wonderful view of the proceedings …, I’,m sure this excitement came across in the interviews! At the end of his homily, it was beautiful to hear Pope Benedict speak personally of his relationship with Pope John Paul II. After Mass, before the doors opened to the crowds of pilgrims, a few of us managed to slip into the Basilica to pray by the coffin and relics of Blessed John Paul II. I wept as I thanked him for helping me and guiding me to this point in my Christian life and I asked him to continue to pray for me and my intentions. What more could I say? Blessed John Paul II, pray for us! Anthony Hayward and Anna Cowell.

Read in full

Page 15

May 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Leeds Catholic Post Page 15 Classified Advertising LEEDS CATHOLIC MARRIAGE CARE Marriage isn’,t always easy —, Counselling can help For an appointment in confidence, with an understanding and experienced listener, please telephone: LEEDS 0113 261 8045 HUDDERSFIELD 01484 422523 A Relationship Counselling Service W. Lever Ltd BRADFORD 01274 547137 524 THORNTON ROAD, BRADFORD BD8 9NB FOR OVER 75 YEARS PROVIDING A COMPLETE PERSONAL &, CARING 24 HOUR FUNERAL SERVICE CHAPEL OF REST H UGHES F UNERAL S ERVICES (Catholic Funeral Directors) 180 YORK ROAD, LEEDS LS9 9NT. Tel 2480953/63 152 GREEN LANE, CROSSGATES. Tel 2326900 3 HOLLIN PARK PARADE, OAKWOOD ROUNDABOUT Tel 2499338 Web: wwww.hughesfuneralservices.co.uk Email: info@hughesfuneralservices.co.uk Family owned and managed. Fully Qualified in all aspects. 24 Hour Service Guaranteed Fixed Price Funeral Plans etc. “,At a time of bereavement we carry out our duties with dignity and respect”, In times of bereavement please contact: B. J. MELIA &, SONS (B. J. Melia Dip F.D.) F UNERAL D IRECTORS AND M ONUMENTAL M ASONS Private Chapel of Rest 64 GIBBET STREET, HALIFAX Telephone: 01422 354453 PRE-PAID FUNERAL SERVICE AVAILABLE DETAILS ON REQUEST Jennings Funeral Services (Catholic Funeral Directors) 13 Racca Green, Knottingley WF11 8AT Telephone: 01977 677715 •, Highest standards of care •, Family owned and managed •, Pre payment plans •, 24 hour service •, Personal attention of Barry and Elizabeth Jennings A Personal and Dignified Family Business that Cares S J F T he Holy Family School has a partner school in Japan so when they heard about the tsunami on the world news both staff and students rallied to provide contributions for the central appeal One of the staff, Suzannah Gardner, a member at the Vine Church in Laisterdyke, brought information about an appeal masterminded by other members of The Vine to provide underwear and socks to those displaced from their homes. Mrs Gardner explained, “,We have personal contact with a shelter in Tokyo where people can live for a while without changing their top clothes, when they have lost everything. But what they really want is to have a change of underwear, and we thought this was something people might want to help with.”, She continued, “,As a packet of socks is relatively cheap, even within pocket money range, this has been an appeal that everyone has been able to support in some way.”, The students in school also collected loose change to help defray postal costs. The bundle of clothes collected in Keighley was despatched to the Vine Church as the school closed for Easter Nicks ‘,n’, socks for Japan A truly memorable celebration took place at The Church of the Good Shepherd, Mytholmroyd on Passion Sunday Throughout Lent and across a wide age range of young people special art work and meditations were prepared for a moving liturgy. During the main Sunday Mass they gave their unique version of the Stations of the Cross. Everyone present was connected to the theme by a single, continuous thread of Red wool spread throughout the church. Prayers and reflections were read at each location, given from both a young persons and an adult perspective. The depth of feeling, personal experiences and emotions expressed touched everyone. During the readings the congregation was asked to break the thread making a knot for anything that touched them personally. The blood Red threads were then draped over a specially created rough cross, at the Eucharist, forming a powerful symbol of forgiveness and Resurrection for the Holy Week Stations with a Difference African &, Caribbean Chaplaincy Leeds Diocese Annual National Caribbean &, African Pilgrimage to Walsingham Sunday 26 June 2011 7.00am Coach depart from St Anne’,s Cathedral Leeds 12 noon Coach Arrival &, Lunch Break at the Shrine 1 :00pm Coach take everyone down to the village 1 :45pm Assemble for Procession, Friday Market in the village 2:00pm Procession along the Holy Mile from the Village to the Shrine of Our Lady of Walsingham (pilgrims unable to walk the mile may be dropped off at the Church) 3:15pm Sung Mass: 5:00pm Coach depart Walsingham to return Please bring a Packed Lunch. All are welcome including children &, families Coach Price of £,12 per person should be paid in advance Please Contact Immediately Rev Michael on 0113 2959718 or mob. 07884197261 First Come First Served. Available seats and time limited!!! …,.. Booking Form I /We wish to go on a pilgrimage to Walsingham on Sunday 27 June 2010 Name(s)…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…, Address &, phone number…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…, …,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…,…, I enclose the sum £,12 per person. (Please make Cheques payable to LEEDS DIOCESE and send them together with the completed form to the chaplain: Rev Michael Mkpadi No. 1 Deanswood Gardens Leeds LS17 5JF)

Read in full

Page 16

May 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 16 Leeds Catholic Post Cities Of Sanctuary? Last week a Tunisian refugee applied for asylum in Leeds and a few Libyans arrived in West Yorkshire. There is always a bit of a time lag between a major national or international conflict and the arrival of refugees and asylum seekers. Usually about a month after the war accounts appear on our news bulletins refugees start to turn up in Britain. After the first Kosovans arrived during the Balkans disintegration at least there was an agreement to get refugees out and bring them here. Conflicts in African countries, Congo, Rwanda, Sierra Leone and Zimbabwe produced refugees as did the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq more recently. Then as the conflict settles down so does the flow of refugees. But the recent conflicts in North African countries, particularly in Tunisia, and now Libya are producing a new stream of refugees, ordinary people and their families driven from their homes by war and desperate to survive. When the western countries militarily engage in conflicts, as the UK, France and Italy have done along with America, there should be no surprise that there will be a inevitable stream of refugees desperate to leave and to get to countries they deem to be friendly. Apart from the distance and cost, American immigration rules are among the most restrictive in the world, so getting to and in there is extremely hard. Europe is therefore the common destination. In the last decade it has been Spain (with refugees from western African countries), UK, Italy and Germany that have taken in the most refugees in recent times,( each allowed in 100,000 in 2008). Nor is fleeing a country an easy or cheap option. In recent years it has been developed into a quasi piracy business as agents have hired fishing boats and crammed them with refugees overcharged and convinced that a short trip over the sea to the Spanish Canary Islands off the African coast will get them into Spanish territory and then onto mainland Europe. Tragically the boats were inadequate, overcrammed and underestimated the real hazards of the journey. Thousands have died at sea or been washed up dead on the beaches. The conflicts in North Africa have led to people offering refugees boats across the Mediterranean to Italy targeting the tiny Italian island of Lampedusa situated half way between the north African coast and the island of Sicily. Again if refugees make it to Lampedusa and ask for asylum they are transferred to detention centres in Oria and Taranto in southern Italy. The problem again is that the dangers of storms in the Mediterranean are massively underestimated and the boats carrying refugees are often inadequate small open fishing boats, overcrammed with people and little supplies of food, water and fuel. The result is that thousands have died attempting the crossing and occasionally bodies are washed up on the shores. Recently a boat carrying 72 people including women and children left Tripoli for Lampedusa and got into difficulties. All but 11 of the 72 passengers died of hunger and thirst after days at sea. The survivors were washed back up on the Libyan shore close to Misrata where the conflict was still blazing. It is estimated that since February over 30, 000 refugees have attempted to cross the Mediterranean to reach Europe mainly from Tunisia and Libya. According to the UN refugee agency, UNHCR, more than 800 are known to have died trying to cross the Mediterannean in the last few months. Of course when they land they are treated as illegal immigrants and have to formally apply for asylum. The result is that Lampdusa itself is now being overwhelmed without proper reception facilities and far from arriving at a safe haven refugees are left hungry surviving on the streets sleeping out in the open. The local authorities can no longer cope with the numbers arriving. Most are rounded up and transported to the detention centre in mainland Puglia where they are kept in tented camps surrounded by barbed wire and armed guards until their status is resolved and either they illegally escape and try to make it to Rome or Milan or to France or Britain, or they are moved on or deported back to north Africa. The agency Medicin Sans Frontieres has described conditions in the Italian refugees camps as “,intolerable”, much worse than others in the world. In other words the asylum seekers are not given a warm reception despite the traumas of their journey. The main aim is containment and if any are to think of escaping and trying to get into France at the French borders extra French police have been deployed to keep out Tunisians and trains suspected of carrying refugees are now simply turned back to Italy. Those that do get through are arrested on the streets of Paris for sleeping out. On 13th February the Italian government declared a state of immigration emergency as a result of the numbers of Tunisians arriving. In recent weeks Italy and France have petitioned the European Union hard to change the immigration rules to allow “,Shengen”, agreement countries to suspend their free movement between borders (with only rudimentary checks ) and reintroduce strict border controls to “,keep illegals out”, thus restricting asylum applicants who can only apply once they get in. Since Britain was never in the “,Shengen Agreement”, along with Ireland they remain the two countries (yes with strict border controls) who have not been given permission to restrict migrant entry. Meanwhile speaking in Venice on 8th May Pope Benedict intervened with a direct appeal to all Christians “,not to fear immigrants but rather to show solidarity towards them”,. He spoke of the “,fear of others, of foreigners who reach our land and appear to threaten what we are”, and stressed that “,in the light of new geopolitical circumstances underway we should favour solidarity and strengthen its ancient spirit of unity”,. For once his words got some international news coverage. It should however hardly be surprising to governments who actively intervene in conflicts even with the best humanitarian intentions to anticipate that those cinflicts will generate numbers of refugees. They may only stay short term until the conflict is resolved and it is safe to return home as did most of the Kosovans who came to Britain during that conflict but not to prepare in any way to support refugee and asylum seekers would seem to reflect the twentieth century trend of treating conflicts and war as technological capacity reduction events in which human beings are not casualties but unavoidable “,collateral damage”,. Sending in drones still results in people dying, getting hurt and fleeing. But if governments, particularly those involved in the intervening action refuse to take a proactive approach to refugees then citizens of the countries to which people flee in desperation should mobilise to welcome and assist those who make it to our shores. On the day of the Pope’,s plea, a boat from Libya crashed onto the rocky coast of Lampedusa and the rescue services had to get 400 shipwrecked people out of the sea. When the desperate arrive its time to step up our commitment to the new “,City Of Sanctuary’, movement (launched last year in Leeds) and as churches and parishes make positive practical efforts to join with others in making them feel at home. John Battle KSG PASTORAL LETTER FOURTH SUNDAY OF EASTER 2011 My dear brothers and sisters in Christ, Two weeks ago I had the great privilege of attending the Mass at St Peter’,s in Rome for the beatification of Pope John Paul II. In his first encyclical letter, Redemptor Hominis, and throughout his long pontificate, Blessed John Paul proclaimed that it is only in a personal encounter with Christ that one can discover the purpose of one’,s life. It was in this context that he wrote about the priesthood. The priest, he wrote, is one who prolongs the presence of Christ in history. The first reading today helps us to understand this further. On the day of Pentecost, buoyed up by the Holy Spirit, the Apostles stand together and St Peter addresses the crowd. He speaks with great authority. Indeed, it becomes clear that Christ is speaking through him. So much so, that people wished to remain close to him as they had formerly sought to be with Jesus. The Apostles cannot have known personally all those whom they were baptising. However, St Luke tells us that they quickly set about building up relationships through the celebration of the Eucharist, their teaching, through prayer and the time spent together. Soon the first believers “,knew the voices”, of their shepherds. Their shepherds called them “,one by one,”, knowing each of them personally. So it was that Christ’,s love for each member of his flock was expressed through the pastoral care exercised by those whom he had chosen as his first priests. God gave to each of them all that they needed for this special mission and, little by little, they were transformed through the grace they had received. Their new-found boldness at Pentecost did not desert them. They spent themselves in the service of the gospel and through that service they made present the self- sacrificial love of Christ. So tirelessly committed were they to this service that they made the Lord’,s Gospel all the more credible because of their own radical response to it. Indeed, the tradition of the Church suggests that all, except St John, were eventually martyred because of their witness to Christ. They exemplified that “,fullness of life”, which, as we heard in the gospel, is the Lord’,s gift to his Church. As I have the joy of meeting more and more of our young people in the diocese, I am increasingly aware how much they yearn for this “,fullness of life.”, Whenever Blessed John Paul met with the young he quickened within them a desire to make a wholehearted, life-changing and permanent commitment to Christ, because he knew that only in Christ was this fullness of life to be found. He knew that the young hunger for truth and, in response, he gave them the Catechism, the summary of the apostolic teachings of the Church. He knew, too, that they longed to live their sexuality well, and not cheaply, and so he wrote his famous “,theology of the body”, for them in which married love and celibate love are seen to complement each other harmoniously. As young Catholics in this generation strive for that holiness for which God created them, some of the young men will perceive within their souls the first stirrings of a vocation to the priesthood. They may be surprised by this and they may initially wish that things were otherwise. We know, for example, that as a student Blessed John Paul had ambitions to be an actor and a poet and a playwright. Only slowly, and not without pain, did he recognise that God was calling him to the priesthood. It was a process of “,interior illumination,”, he later said. He was helped to respond positively to God’,s invitation by those around him. He recalled that his own father’,s life of prayer and self-sacrifice was “,a kind of domestic seminary.”, A particular priest who taught him as a boy had a great influence on him. So did a layman in Krakow who organised a prayer and spirituality group in which he participated as a young man. A number of teachers and friends, women as well as men, suggested to him that he would make a good priest. In recalling how so many people from different walks of life had such an encouraging and positive influence on Blessed John Paul’,s vocation to the priesthood, we become aware that each of us in the Catholic community has a responsibility to encourage young people in their spiritual development. Pope Benedict, in his Message to mark today’,s World Day of Prayer for Vocations, notes that young people who feel called to the priesthood or consecrated life need to “,feel the warmth of the whole community as they respond by saying ‘,yes’, to God and the Church.”, I gently urge all of you in our parishes, parents and grandparents, teachers, catechists and indeed all parishioners, together with our priests, to seek ways of encouraging our young men to consider the priesthood and also to pray each day for this intention. The spiritual vitality of our diocese depends upon it. We need young priests who, inspired by Blessed John Paul’,s example and sustained by his prayers, will make Christ present in the next generation through selfless service to their brothers and sisters. Devotedly, with my blessing, and the assurance of my own prayers for all of you, + Arthur Roche Bishop of Leeds Dementia - Responding to Need I n the April edition of the Catholic Post, you may recall seeing a very short article about “,Dementia –, Meeting the Challenge”,. The short article proposed a meeting date on 5th May 2011 for anyone who was interested in this subject area and for those who may be Carers, etc. On the 5th May, a small group of people met at Hinsley Hall to discuss Dementia and talk about their own experience. Though the numbers were small who attended the meeting, each person had a direct interest and knowledge in the subject matter of Dementia and personal experience brought the meeting alive. As you can well imagine, these personal issues relating to Dementia and caring for those who have Dementia, revealed both experiences which were very “,raw”, but at the same time very profound and the commitment, care and love shown by those caring for family members with Dementia was truly inspirational. While everybody shared their personal experience, some common issues emerged from the meeting. These included:- , Information and education in relation to Dementia and the needs of Carers. , Resources to support Carers. , The need for periodic expert talks on Dementia in order to highlight the initial signs of Dementia and what family members need to do. The meeting on the 5th May was organised by Catholic Care working very closely with the Growing Old Grace-fully Project. We will now attempt to take up some of the issues identified by the meeting, particularly in relation to a presentation from an “,appropriate expert”, who could outline for people what the first signs of Dementia are and what family members need to look for. Equally important according to those who shared their own personal stories, is help and support in taking the next steps when some form of Dementia has been diagnosed. Planning will now go in to taking forward this meeting and you are invited to watch the Catholic Post for details of future meetings. If anybody has any queries or questions in the meantime, please telephone Catholic Care 0113 3885400.

Read in full

Page 17

May 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Leeds Catholic Post Page 17 Amidst recent celebrations for Easter, the beatification of Pope John Paul II and the sixth anniversary of Pope Benedict’,s pontificate, the Vatican newspaper, L’,Osservatore Romano, also started its own anniversary celebrations with the launch of a new website. Later this summer, staff at the daily and weekly publications will be marking the 150th anniversary of the paper’,s first edition, which appeared on July 1st 1861. The new website in Italian, English and Spanish, is simply the latest transformation of a paper that began life as a form of protest against the unification of Italy, with Rome as its new capital and the subsequent loss of power and property belonging to the Papal States. With the proclamation of the new Kingdom of Italy at the end of March 1861, Pope Pius IX and his closest advisors realised they needed a new means of mass communication to drum up support for their plight from political or diplomatic friends across Europe and beyond. They entrusted the bold venture to a couple of political exiles who had fled to Rome - a journalist from Bologna and a lawyer from nearby Forlì, - who oversaw the setting up of the new publication. The Pope himself wanted to call the paper ‘,L’,amico della verità,’,, or ‘,the friend of truth’,, (a title with an undoubted appeal for many modern day readers) but the two editors persuaded him to settle for the less polemical name of ‘,the Roman Observer’,. From the start, L’,Osservatore Romano set out to provide independent ideas and food for thought, rather than just a daily chronicle of papal events. Originally describing itself as ‘,A political and moral newspaper’,, the editors soon adopted the two Latin mottos which still adorn its front page today alongside the papal tiara and keys: ‘,Unicuique suum’, or ‘,Each to his own’,, a basic principle of Roman law, and ‘,Non praevalebunt’, or ‘,they will not prevail’,, echoing Jesus’, words to Peter in Matthew 16:18 “,the gates of hell will not prevail (against my Church)”,. With the capture of Rome in September 1870 though, the Pope became a virtual prisoner within the Vatican walls –, a crisis that would not be fully resolved until the Lateran Pacts were signed by Mussolini, for the King of Italy, and by Cardinal Pietro Gasparri, for Pope Pius XI, in February 1929. Throughout those decades, the newspaper continued to protest and demand legal rights for the Holy See, while at the same time reporting on the much broader concerns of international conflicts, injustice and poverty that were reflected in papal encyclicals of the period, such as Rerum Novarum or Quadragesimo Anno. A century and a half later, a glance at the web page confirms that those same priorities, of highlighting moral and ethical issues behind the international news headlines, have remained largely the same. Reflecting the universal mission of the Church, the paper regularly reports on conflicts or crises in forgotten corners of the globe that rarely receive coverage in other media outlets. Alongside accounts of papal audiences and documents from the pontifical councils or congregations, you can find analysis of the political, cultural and increasingly economic trends that are shaping the lives of people across the different continents. While its main aim is therefore to inform and inspire, rather than to increase sales, in the post second world war period the editors realised the potential of reaching far larger audiences by publishing in other languages. A weekly French edition was started in 1949, followed two decades later by publications in English, Spanish, Portuguese, German and –, after the election of Cardinal Karol Wojtyla –, in Polish. The most recent addition, in 2009, is a paper which is translated into Malayalam and printed in India for the six million or so Catholics who live in the state of Kerala. Under the long pontificate of Pope John Paul II, L’,Osservatore Romano saw a progressive opening up to the views of other Christian churches and other religions as well. The paper now regularly features several well known Jewish writers, as well as thoughtful contributions from columnists of other faiths or none. There has also been a deliberate effort to include more women’,s views and the editor, history professor Giovanni Maria Vian, has recently appointed the first woman, Austrian Astrid Haas, to head the weekly German edition. Unlike the newsroom of the Italian paper, the English edition also has a distinctly feminine feel to it, with two English, two American and one Australian woman currently making up the entire staff. While a lot of their work involves translating documents, speeches or articles from the Italian edition, there is also increasingly space for original English arts and cultural features. At the same time as launching the new site on April 19th, the paper also came out with an all colour, 100 page magazine in seven languages, marking the beatification of Pope John Paul II on May 1st. Copies flew off the shelves, especially in the Spanish speaking world, and sales topped 400.000 copies worldwide. The website www.osservatoreromano.va is currently free, though charges will be introduced from September 1st and you can subscribe online for a modest fee of €, 25 a year. For priests in poorer ‘,mission’, countries who cannot afford the fee, it is still possible to fill out a form and pay for a subscription with prayer intentions, “,to begin with the arrival of the first copy of the newspaper and to extend throughout the whole one year period.”, Philippa M Hitchen Our Rome Correspondent Two new Junior Choirs L eeds Cathedral has two new choirs! Lucy Haigh, a new Choral Director for the Diocese of Leeds has recently set up Junior Boys’, and Girls’, Choirs for children aged 7-11 at the Cathedral. These choirs began rehearsals in January this year and are now firmly established. Each choir consists of around 24 children, the maximum number we can comfortably fit into our smaller, second practice room! Most of the children attend one of the eleven Catholic primary schools which Lucy visits each week as part of the Diocesan Schools Singing Programme. New potential Junior Choir members are selected by means of informal assessment during their class lessons. An ideal Junior Choir member would have a clear, tuneful voice, the ability to sing back tunes accurately, and an alert, sparky personality. The main purpose of the Junior Choirs is to prepare the children for membership of the main Cathedral Girls’, and Boys’, Choirs. The Junior Choir children attend the Cathedral once per week, unlike the main choirs who attend three times each week, so the Juniors are able to find out if they enjoy it before they need to make a greater commitment. Junior girls may be ‘,promoted’, towards the end of Year Six, while boys will typically transfer at a much younger age, as the life of a boy treble has a biologically imposed limit. The children are trained to sing to a high standard and the aim to foster a life-long enjoyment of choral singing. Each rehearsal lasts an hour and a half: this includes a number of fun vocal exercises to train the children’,s voices, tuition in sight singing, rounds to develop their aural skills, repertoire learning, and a short break in the middle which enables the children to bond as a group. The choirs’, repertoires consist of masses, motets and plainchant (often in Latin, but with an explanation of the text) and some secular songs for variety. The Junior Choirs have now reached the stage where they are singing Masses at the Cathedral, and they will also perform their first concerts this term. The Cathedral Junior Choir children work very hard and thoroughly enjoyed the Easter eggs they recently received from the Cathedral Dean! Second season of organ concerts! The Summer of 2011 sees the second season of organ concerts on two of the most stunning organs in West Yorkshire. This series brings together some of the coun- try’,s most celebrated organists to delight and entertain au- diences. Adding a European dimension, international prize-winner Adriano Falcioni of Perugia Cathedral makes a welcome first appearance - not to be missed! The organ at St Patrick’,s Huddersfield was built in 2009 by Š,krabl of Slovenia and combines the technical bril- liance of a modern Classical organ with the warm tones of Central Europe. Leeds Cathedral’,s new organ is a full bodied Romantic instrument, built on the Edwardian gravi- tas of the original 1904 instrument with a touch of magic provided in the reconstruction of 2010 by Klais of Bonn. , Leeds Cathedral: Mondays at 1.15pm Free admission , St Patrick’,s Huddersfield: Thursdays at 7.30pm £,5, £,3 concessions Monday 23rd May –, Thomas Leech Thursday 26th May –, Gordon Stewart Monday 6th June –, Ian Tracey Thursday 9th June - Adriano Falcioni Monday 13th June –, Adriano Falcioni Monday 20th June –, Christopher McElroy Thursday 23rd June –, Thomas Leech with Huddersfield Boys’, Choir Monday 27th June –, Benjamin Saunders Passion In Dewsbury On Good Friday once again Sixth form students from St. John Catholic High School, Dewsbury, gathered outside in the heart of Dewsbury town centre to perform their traditional annual re- enactment of the Crucifixion of Jesus. Adam Mowbray took the role of Christ, Stara Cowban the role of Mary, with Jack and Joseph Maguire as centurion guards. Five Stations of the Cross were re-enacted and narrated by Katie Shires, Leanne Nash and Emily Quinn. Musical accompaniment was provided by the school choir: ‘,The Melodies’, and the orchestra led by Eileen Butterworth and Kathryn Lea. Both the minister at the United Reformed Church, Reverend John Jenkinson and the Headteacher of St. John Fisher, Mr. Kevin Higgins thanked the large crowd for their participation and support. They commended the students for displaying this public witness which serves to re-enforce the value of a Faith school to the wider community. Afterwards refreshments were generously provided by the members of the URC.

Read in full

Page 18

May 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 18 Leeds Catholic Post First Friday of the Month SINGLE CATHOLICS meet at 8.00pm for mass at our Lady of Lourdes, Leeds. We also a have a program of 4-8 events during the month, walks, meals, cinema and theatre trips, etc. Phone David Easterbrook Chairman LDSC on 0113 2289468 evenings between 6 and 7.30pm only. Membership is open to all single Catholics who are free to marry within the church. Leeds Cathedral 20-35 Group Young people (20-35 years old) who attend St. Anne`s Cathedral in Leeds meet regularly every Thursday for spiritual, social and charitable activities. For further details search Facebook for “,Leeds Cathedral 20-35 Group”,, phone 07816 891872 or 07759 591233 or email leedscathedral20-35@hotmail.co.uk Crusade Mass The crusade Mass and Rosary of Mary Immaculate is held at St Patrick`s Church, Bradford, on the first Saturday of the Month after 12.15pm Mass , Second Sunday of Month 2pm Meeting of Bradford Fraternity of the Secular Franciscan Order at St. Anthony`s Convent, Clayton, Bradford.` `Third Sunday of Month 2.30pm Meeting of Leeds Fraternity of the Secular Franciscan Order at the Cathedral. Ampleforth Renewal Community Ampleforth Abbey, meet 1st Sunday each month, at Ampleforth. 11 .30am Praise, Speaker, Sharing Groups, Reconciliation, Exposition, Finishing with Mass and Healing at 4.00pm. All enquiries: Seamus McEneaney 01429 426181 Monthly Vocations Mass Mount St Joseph’,s Chapel 11am First Wednesday of Month. Calix: An organisation for those recovering from addiction and working the 12 Step Programme of AA so that they can develop and deepen their relationship with Jesus as their Higher Power. Meets on the First Sunday of every month at Corpus Christi Church, Neville Rd. Osmondthorpe. Leeds. Mass at 4.30pm followed by meeting. Contact: Fr. Michael on 01977 510266 Helpers of Gods precious infants, prayer vigils, regular weekly prayer vigils at Marie Stopes Abortuary, 7 Barrack Road.LS7 4AB, next to Jaguar car showrooms. Fridays 12-30 to 1-30, and Saturdays 9am-l1am. Monthly all night vigil of reparation in St Marys Horsforth 12th of every month, 9-30pm to 6am . Other times variable. Further details Pat 0113 2582745 Rosary rally Sat Oct 9th 2010 12-30pm Leeds cenotaph, outside art gallery, Headrow. Contact 07747698553/ or 0113 2582745 Leeds Schola Gregoriana The Schola meets on the 2nd Saturday of each month (except August), at 2.00 p.m., for rehearsal, followed by sung Latin (Vigil) Mass in the Ordinary Form, fulfilling the Sunday Obligation. An opportunity to learn and sing Gregorian Chant on a regular basis. Contact Michael Murphy (Director) on 07810 808 530, or Peter Lawley (01423 884274), or Rev. G.M. Parfitt (01756 793794). Diary A few moments for thought and prayer Where can I go from your Spirit? Or where can I flee from your presence? If I ascend to heaven, you are there, if I make my bed in Sheol, you are there. If I take the wings of the morning and settle at the farthest limits of the sea, even there your hand shall lead me, and your right hand shall hold me fast. Psalm 139 (138) Be Still Deadline: For receipt of material for next edition: June 10th 2011 Parishes receive their copies: June 26th 2011 Send articles, reports &, pictures: Mr John Grady, Hinsley Hall, 62 Headingley Lane, Leeds LS6 2BX. Send text as word doc, pictures as jpeg, e-mail to: john.grady@dioceseofleeds.org.uk Tel: 0113 261 8022. Advertising Deadline June 20th Please note All paid-for advertising is dealt with by: Louise Ward Leeds Diocesan Curia, Hinsley Hall, 62 Headingley Lane, Leeds LS6 2BX Telephone: 0113 261 8028 Email: louise.ward@dioceseofleeds.org.uk Your Cath Post Wednesday 1 June 6.30pm Confirmation, St Paul’,s, Cleckheaton Thursday 2 June 10.30am VGs’, Meeting, Bishop’,s House 6pm Confirmation, St John’,s, Normanton, 7.30pm Confirmation, St Austin’,s, Wakefield Friday 3 June 10.30am Meeting with Clergy, Mount St Joseph’,s, Leeds 6.30pm Confirmation, St Bernard’,s, Halifax Saturday 4 June 12 noon Mass celebrating the 75th Anniversary of the APF and the Mill Hill Missionaries, Leeds Cathedral Monday 6 - Friday 10 June Diocesan Clergy Retreat, Myddelton Grange, Ilkley Friday 10 June 6pm Confirmation, St Patrick’,s, Huddersfield, 7.30pm Confirmation, St Joseph’,s, Brighouse Saturday 11 June 9.30am Interview Candidates for the Priesthood, Hinsley Hall, 12 noon Candidacy Mass, Leeds Cathedral 6pm Mass for those received into the Catholic Church at Easter, Leeds Cathedral Tuesday 14 June 10.30am Catholic Care Trustees’, Meeting, Hinsley Hall, 6.30pm Confirmation, St Nicholas, Leeds Wednesday 15 June 11am St Bede’,s Trustees’, Meeting, Bishop’,s House, 1pm VGs’, Meeting, Bishop’,s House, 7pm Silver Jubilee Mass for Rev Ian Smith, St Patrick’,s, Huddersfield Thursday 16 June 6pm Confirmation, St William’,s, Bradford, 7.30pm Confirmation, St William’,s, Bradford Friday 17 June 10am 100th Anniversary of Good Shepherd Service, Leeds Cathedral, 10.30am Northern Bishops’, Meeting, Bishop’,s House Sunday 19 June 2pm Corpus Christi Procession, Mount St Joseph’,s, Leeds Monday 20 June 12 noon Installation of Most Rev George Stack as the Archbishop of Cardiff, St David’,s Metropolitan Cathedral, Cardiff Tuesday 21 June 11am Mass, Ushaw College, Durham 6.30pm Confirmation, St Joseph’,s, Keighley Wednesday 22 June 6.30pm Confirmation, SS Peter &, Paul, Yeadon Thursday 23 June 6pm Confirmation, St Robert’,s, Harrogate, 7.30pm Confirmation, St Joseph’,s, Wetherby Friday 24 June 11am Celebration of Priesthood, Leeds Cathedral Saturday 25 June 12 noon Meeting with WYD Pilgrims, St Mary’,s School, Menston Monday 27-Tuesday 28 June CBCEW Standing Committee Meeting, London Thursday 30 June 10.30am VGs’, Meeting, Bishop’,s House Bishops Engagements –, June The Sidhe Do Exist S elected extracts from Bernard McGrath’,s debut novel ‘,Operation Leprechaun’, are to feature on the Cork based web site Europeanirish in the near future, together with a chance to win a signed copy. Catering for the Irish community across Europe, the site provides news, views, opinions, practical advice and social networking. Established in 2003, the site had 10 million hits in its first four years and there were 960,000 visitors to the site in 2007. Bernard teaches at St John Fisher Catholic High in Harrogate and both he and his family are parishioners of Christ the King in Leeds. The novel is a contemporary Irish political satire, but you don’,t have to be Irish to either enjoy it or understand it. Operation Leprechaun focuses on a Taoiseach / Prime Minister who attempts to firm up his shaky political base by tackling the best kept secret in Ireland, that the Sí,dhe (Irish fairies) have always had a say in Irish government policy. It is his attempts to take on the Sí,dhe that see his real problems beginning! In his attempts to become his own boss Taoiseach Donal Brady is dogged by the literary shadow of Adolph Hitler, a priest with a hot line to St Patrick, a journalist determined to uncover the truth and a diplomatic donkey disaster in Galway The novel has featured as lead article in the Arts and Entertainment section of the Irish newspaper ‘,The Anglo Cavan Celt’, of April 7th. The Celt referred to the ‘,rave reviews’, it had received on line. Out of a possible maximum 5 star rating on Amazon, Operation Leprechaun has scored between 4 –, 5 stars in reviews to date The national Irish community press in Britain, ’,The Irish World’, being one example, praised Operation Leprechaun as ‘,an entertaining, contemporary Irish political satire that houses a lot of home truths about the political situation in Ireland. ’, The Irish World further commented ‘,if you fancy a read about the lighter side of Irish politics, then this is the one for you’, ‘,Operation Leprechaun’, is available both in hard copy and kindle formats. The novel was published by Fisher King publishing of Pool in Wharfdale Book Review A Walk Of Witness by Norman Hazell The Good Friday Procession has become an Annual event in the City of Wakefield, handled by Deacon Nick Shields who is a genius of organisation. A fully Ecumenical event, with members of all Churches marching together, used to be from Market - now demolished, - so recently sets off from The Salvation Army H.Q. The Walk is in silence behind a Cross around the City, before pausing in the Bull Ring to sing a Hymn, and then continue into the Cathedral, packing it, leaving standing room only for a service, a play and this year a brilliant address by Mgr Kieran Heskin, V.G. Afterwards out onto The Cathedral Precinct for singing led by The Cathedral Girls Choir, and finally into Treacey Hall for Hot Cross buns and coffee.

Read in full

Page 19

May 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Leeds Catholic Post Page 19 THE RED BOX: CELEBRATING 75 YEARS OF GENEROSITY AND FAITH! 2 011 celebrates the 75th anniversary of the Red Box and the support given by the Catholics of England and Wales to countless missionaries, missions and people in countries where the Church is young and poor. Today the iconic Red Box, unique to England and Wales, is present in more than 200,000 homes. Thanks to the generosity of so many people, in 2010 the Catholics of England and Wales contributed more than £,3 million to 39 dioceses in 5 countries and to Mill Hill’,s work with the poor in 27 countries. The Association for the Propagation of the Faith (APF) and the Mill Hill Missionaries agreed to work together in 1936 and so the APF-Mill Hill Red Box was born. The sides of the first Red Box declared that ‘,The APF supports the work of spreading the Gospel throughout the world’, and that Mill Hill Missionaries are ‘,Britain’,s own Missionary Society of Priests, Brothers and Associates’,. The familiar circle encompassing the black and white APF-Mill Hill insignia was replaced by a picture of the world with the Cross both at its centre and in its foreground. Yet just as life is not static, neither was the Red Box! The next version bore a more colourful label, but retained, both, ‘,To be a Christian is to be a missionary’, and the reminder to pray for the Missions. Today’,s Red Box looks very different from its predecessors, but its function and message are the same: to be a Christian is to be a missionary. In order to mark the 75th anniversary, a special Mass of Thanksgiving will be concelebrated in each diocese in England and Wales between 28 May and 23 October. So what does the Red Box do? The money given to the APF through the Red Box goes directly to the bishops of the dioceses where it will be used. So how do your Red Box contributions bring faith and new life communities around the world? , Catechists and Prayer Leaders are trained, bringing people together when the priest can only visit a village a couple of times each year. Thus, even in the most remote places, villagers are prepared for the Sacraments, babies are baptised and funerals are conducted. Often the catechists’, wives teach women to read and write. , Newly-weds begin their life together within a supportive faith community that helps mothers find medicines for sick children, fathers learn job skills and children to live beyond infancy. All this happens because the Red Box builds churches, schools and hospitals. , Families have dignity and hope because development and health education become a reality, avoiding and reducing disease. , Sisters continue to equip and run schools, clinics and hospitals in towns and in rural areas, offering dignity and hope to the poor, love to orphans, food and education to hungry children, medicine to the sick and skills-training to young people. , The Red Box support for the local Church wherever it is young or poor means that dioceses have priests and new priests can be assigned to a parish community, making the Sacraments available even in remote areas. , The guarantee of support through the Red Box enables the continued existence of dioceses and parishes and the opening-up of new dioceses and parishes, spreading faith, hope and life in a world that urgently needs to know and experience the love of God. We hope you will join us in giving thanks for this great initiative which builds communities of faith here and throughout the world. 75 years of generosity and faith are worth celebrating! A right royal fashion parade H oly Family Catholic Primary, Armley, on the eve of the Royal Wedding celebrated with a fun packed old-fashioned street party. And it was a right royal fashion parade …, pupils donned their finest party outfits, staff and visitors wore fascinators and hats for the bash. Peter McQuillen Strong, head teacher, said that everyone had risen to the occasion and children, staff and guests looked top class. The children enjoyed a feast fit for royalty including crisps, buns, jelly and ice-cream out in the playground in glorious sunshine, after singing the National Anthem. Union Flag Hats made by the children added to the sense of occasion. It wasn’,t just the pupils having fun …,staff, parents, grandparents and local residents also joined in and enjoyed themselves at the event, which also involved traditional British Party Games. The Lord Mayor of Leeds Jim McKenna joined the celebration with the Lady Mayoress, particularly enjoying a game of Croquet. The day had been organised as part of family week by Bev Crosthwaite and Mandy Kennedy, our school Family Support Workers. Our visitors said they had a wonderful time, some of the older generation said it took them back to the parties they had to celebrate previous Royal weddings. For some it was a reminder of parties they had had in the school grounds to celebrate the end of the Second World War. Growing Old Grace-fully –, ‘,Spirituality and Personhood in Dementia’, Monday 20 June 2011, 2.30 –, 4.30 pm at Hinsley Hall, Leeds Albert Jewell, an active retired Methodist Minister, will talk about his latest book which brings together perspectives from theologians, researchers and practitioners on the positive role that spirituality can play for people with dementia. All who care for or minister to people with dementia are welcome. There will be time for questions and discussion. For more information contact Growing Old Grace-fully, 0113 388 5400 or 07739975019 To advertise in the next issue of Leeds Catholic Post contact Louise on 0113 261 8028

Read in full

Page 20

May 2011 edition of the Leeds Catholic Post

Page 20 Leeds Catholic Post Alleluia He Is Risen! W ith Easter already dawn it might have been expected that the numbers attending the 11am Eucharist at the Cathedral would be slightly less –, this was not the case this year! The cathedral was soon full and people stood down both isle as well as three deep at the back. Easter Day is, of course, a triumphant celebration –, gold vestments and much singing of the Alleluia. The choir were in attendance to bring to a fitting conclusion their singing over the Holy Week celebrations –, a fact that had not gone un-noticed by the Bishop, who thanked them for all their hard work. In his homily, concentrating on the Gospel, he picked up the theme that Jesus was alive and bringing new life –, that new life that had come to those who the night before had been received into full communion with the church. He thanked everyone for being present at the Cathedral today and keeping alive the Faith that Jesus came to give. Welcome to Alexandra Court! We are a small private family orientated residential home for the elderly, where standards of care and cleanliness are our priority. Together with my three children, a dedicated and conscientious manager and our wonderful team of staff members, some of which have been with us since we opened in 1992, we have ensured Alexandra Court continues to exceed expectations. We have home cooked meals and desserts, tailored care plans to meet each resident’,s individual needs and activities galore including entertainers, fitness instructors, beauty and cinema afternoons and two little dogs visit regularly who bring a lot of happiness to our residents. Most rooms are en-suite complete with television and telephone points, nurse call systems and they are decorated regularly to ensure the Alexandra Court stays fresh, clean and always smells nice! In order to experience life at Alexandra Court please feel free to contact my daughter Marilouise, to arrange a viewing or alternatively have a look at our website for more information. We look forward to welcoming you soon. 333 Spen Lane, Leeds LS16 5BB Tel: 0113 274 3661 Email: court_alexandra@yahoo.co.uk www.alexandracourtcarehome.co.uk Family orientated residential home for the elderly

Read in full

Find your local Catholic Historical Church newspaper. Scroll to find yours.
Contact Us
Current Catholic Papers
Church Advertising
www.CatholicDirectory.org
© CathCom 1997 - 2021