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Catholic South West History

Newspaper for the Dioceses of Plymouth, Clifon and Portsmouth

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Mar 2020 edition of the Catholic South West

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Mar 2020 edition of the Catholic South West

March 2020 Inside School News – Pages 3 & 16 Fairtrade Fortnight – page 4 Lenten Desolation & Easter Consolation – page 6 Parish of the High Seas – page 13

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Mar 2020 edition of the Catholic South West

2 March 2020 Catholic South West CONTACTS & DETAILS Catholic South West is a monthly newspaper for Catholics in the Plymouth, Clifton and Portsmouth Dioceses. It is published by Bellcourt Ltd AIMS To build community in the South West by sharing stories relating to Catholic life around the South West. To encourage readers to get more involved in - or start - projects and initiatives in the local area. To provide thought-provoking articles to help readers deepen their Faith. GET INVOLVED We need your help! Articles: We need your local articles - we can only include what we get. So if you have an article or just a photo with a short desc r iption - please send it in. Ideas: We need your ideas for the paper and we need your ideas in the paper. If you have any thoughts on what we should include - or if you are thinking about starting a new initiative - get in touch - we’d love to support it! Readers: If you can encourage other readers in your parish please do so. Advertising: We rely on advertising - if you know of anyone that would benefit from promoting their business, event or anything else to parishioners throughout the South West, do let us know. SUBMITTING EDITORIAL To send in editorial or to get in touch please contact us at: CSW - Bellcourt Ltd N2 Blois Meadow Business Centre Steeple Bumpstead Haverhil l , Suffolk CB9 7BN csw@cathcom.org 01440 730399 ADVERTISING To advertise in Catholic South West please contact: Janet Took janett@cathcom.org 01440 730399 DATES Catholic South West goes to parishes on the last full weekend of the month. It is printed around the middle of the month - so if you would like to adver - tise or send in editorial please do it as early as possible. LEGAL INFORMATION Please note that opinions expressed in this paper and on any linked sites or publications are not necessarily those of the Publishers, Editor, any Diocese or the wider Roman Catholic Church Every reasonable effort is made to ensure that due acknowledgement, when appropriate, is made to the originator of any image submitted for publication. It is understood that those submitting material for publication in CSW either hold the copyright or have arranged for publication with the appropriate authority. EDITORIAL GUIDELINES 1) Think of the readers: If you are writing about an event, think about the rea - ders that don’t know anything about it. Outline what happe - ned, but focus on why people go, why it is important to them, or some teaching that was given. Make sure readers learn something from your article - they don’t just want to know who was there and what snacks were available! 2) Keep it brief : Make sure you make your point - but keep it brief and punchy. 3) Pictures: Send pictures as they are - even if they are very big to email. Don’t re - duce them in size or put them inside a Word document. They look fine on the screen but terrible in the paper! FROM CSW The first Community Sponsorship application in the Plymouth Diocese has been submitted to the Home Office to resettle a refugee family in Sidmouth. It is hoped that the family will arrive around Easter. Exeter and Poole have formed their own Community Sponsorship Groups to start working on their applications. Exeter brings together the churches of the Sa - cred Heart and the Blessed Sacrament and Poole brings together St Mary’s and St Anthony of Padua. Poole are considering repurposing their presbytery as accommo - dation for the resettled family. If any parishes are interested in Commu - nity Sponsorship there is a lot of support available from Caritas Plymouth. Tem - plates for most of the documents required by the Home Office are available and the diocese can act as the Lead Sponsor tak - ing forward the financial and legal respon - sibilities for the parish. Sidmouth have found it very worthwhile, attracting a lot of volunteers to the Church and taking for - ward the Mission of the Church. Please contact Zoe at caritas@prcdtr.org.uk or 01364 645421 for more information. Community Sponsorship in Sidmouth “Every human being is a free person destined to live for the good of others in equality and fraternity. Every person, and all people, are equal and must be accorded the same freedom and the same dignity.” – Pope Francis (Declaration on International Day for the Abolition of Slavery) Caritas Plymouth will be holding their fourth event looking at Modern Slavery and Trafficking on Satur - day 7 March 2020. The event will be led by Bishop Mark O’Toole and include speakers from Border Force, the Medaille Trust and Apostleship of the Sea. The event will be held on Saturday 7 March 2020 from 10.30 a.m. – 3.15 p.m.at St Boniface College, Plymouth. It is free and includes a buffet lunch. Booking is essential at: caritas@prcdtr.org.uk Modern Slavery Event As we begin Lent, we focus on what we can change before we celebrate Easter. Inevitably, we think of what could give up. Hopefully, we can also find time to think about what we can take on during Lent. Perhaps there is a project nearby to help those in need. Or a prayer group or weekday Masses that would help us deepen our Faith. If not perhaps Lent could be a time to think about starting something like this. Perhaps it is something more personal – helping those around us, paying more or reading Scripture. Whatever it is, our focus should be our preparation for Easter. Preparing our lives, preparing our faith, and preparing ourselves to walk with Christ through His suffering and death. So we can share in the cele - bration of His Resurrection. This is time to immerse ourselves more deeply in our Faith and our relationship with Jesus. CSW TEAM

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Mar 2020 edition of the Catholic South West

Catholic South West March 2020 3 Around the South West Send us your news csw@cathcom.org Pupils from Plymouth’s Catholic schools have joined forces to praise the quality of their education and the family atmo - sphere of their schools. The students, from Catholic schools across the city, were quick to applaud the learning, inclu - sivity, social life, strong values, and edu - cational support – not to mention the globe-trotting school trips. Indeed, some even thought their school offered an inti - mate family environment where students feel safe, welcomed and loved — and form friendships that last a lifetime. Read the entire article at www.Plymouth - Live.co.uk What it’s like going to a Catholic school in Plymouth in 2020 St Edward’s school at Melchet Court have been awarded the Participator Level of the Oscar Romero Award. They are the first school in the Diocese of Clifton to be given this award and are now working across the Diocese to work with other schools to help them achieve the same. The Oscar Romero Award supports schools in realising and living the unique calling of a Catholic school to become an evangelising centre by empowering young people and staff to become true agents of the change they want to see in the world by putting their faith into action. This is along with many other great things they are doing at the school such as: - Re-foresting an entire meadow onsite with over 400 trees this Autumn with another 450 in the Easter term - Creating our own oak tree nursery to teach boys the rudiments of agro- forestry - Helping finance a tree planting programme in our partner school in Uganda - Just finished a 3 well project in Uganda, spending just over £3,000 to give fresh water to a district near the partner school. Canon Mark welcomed CAST pupils from all over the Diocese of Plymouth as he led a special service in the Cathedral fol - lowing a day of activities at the Cathedral School for the 80 newly commissioned pupil chaplains to celebrate their new roles as members of the Chaplaincy Team for their schools and the parish community. 80 New Pupil Chaplains Commissioned by Bishop Mark 80 New Pupil Chaplains with Canon Mark O’Keefe and Sr Judith Russi (Educare UK) in Plymouth Cathedral St Edward’s School, Melchet Court awarded an Oscar Romero Award Weymouth Celebrates Altar Servers Altar servers from Our Lady Star of the Sea, Weymouth, having received St Stephen’s Medals in recognition for their commitment and dedication. Congratulations! Changes in Plymouth Diocese The Diocese of Ply - mouth has created the new post of Chief Operating Of - ficer and appointed Anthony Akinpelu to the new role. Fr Kieran Kirby, who was in charge of property and finance has been appointed as our new Moderator of the Curia. In a letter from Bishop Mark to parishioners throughout the Dio - cese, he said: “These changes are effective from the 1st February, and I ask your prayer for all con - cerned and for our continued mis - sion to proclaim the Gospel.” Catenian Bursary Fund This fund is designed to offer financial support to young Catholics aged 16 to 24, particu - larly those who are more disadvan - taged and would not normally be able to undertake voluntary work, and who engage in projects of at least 15 working days to help oth - ers less fortunate than themselves. Please visit www.thecatenians.com for more information Solemn Profession at Buckfast The Solemn Profession of Dom Andrew Prickett took place at Buckfast Abbey on Sunday 5th January 2020 – the Solemnity of the Epiphany of The Lord.

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Mar 2020 edition of the Catholic South West

Shining the spotlight on cocoa farmers in West Africa Calling all chocolate fans and fighters for fairness. Fair - trade is continuing their mission to ensure that all farm - ers are paid fairly for their work and are able to earn a living income, starting with cocoa farmers in West Africa. 4 million tonnes of cocoa are produced each year and yet Fairtrade cocoa represents just a fraction of this. In West Africa, it is just 10 percent. It may be hard to swallow but many of the people behind our most-loved food still live in extreme poverty. It is a scandal that behind the sweet delight of chocolate lies the bitter taste of exploitation. When we buy chocolate or cocoa bearing the Fairtrade logo we are choosing fairness not exploitation So, why not take a leap this year and join Fairtrade in the fight for fair prices and a living income. This year Fair - trade is celebrating the power of stories to engage the na - tion and get more people choosing Fairtrade chocolate. From Cote d’lvoire come the stories of women such as Edith, who has been empowered by Fairtrade to make de - cisions and develop as a leader of her community. Edith’s Story – How Can Hope Be Forged from Heartache? Edith’s fiercely independent. She has unstoppable drive and a generous spirit. It’s a powerful combination. Edith and her friend grabbed the chance to train as business women with Fairtrade. On their cocoa farms they dreamed and planned. When her friend died suddenly, Edith fought through her sorrow to keep their dream alive. “We want to keep her memory with us”. Leading a group of strong women, she set up a commu - nity farm. Here they sow, grow and laugh together. Work - ing as a team brings more money to make ends meet today... and plant seeds of hope for the future. Stories like Edith’s provide a glimmer of hope in the dark tale of the chocolate industry. Fairtrade has brought posi - tive change to the lives of farmers like Edith but the story remains unfinished. There is still more to be done. Only by choosing Fairtrade are we doing the right thing by both people and planet. That is why Fairtrade is asking people across the UK to show their support for farmers who grow the cocoa in our chocolate. You can be part of the story by choosing Fair - trade each time you shop. ONLY FAIRTRADE PROTECTS FARMERS FROM ROCK BOTTOM PRICES. We look forward to a time when all trade is fair. You can support in other ways too. With thousands of local campaigning groups across the UK, there are lots of ways to get involved in your community. Falmouth Town Fair - trade group is organising a Fairtrade Coffee Morning for the local community on Saturday 29th February, 11am- 2pm. Refreshments are free. There will be a chocolate promotion, Fairtrade goods to buy, information about the work of Fairtrade and more stories about cocoa farmers in West Africa and much more. So, look out for news about Fairtrade events in your community and meet the campaigners who are sharing the good news about the ongoing work of the Fairtrade Foundation. You can keep up to date with Fairtrade campaigns online: fairtrade.org. Pat Fitzpatrick St Mary Immaculate RC F almouth (A Fairtrade Church) 4 March 2020 Catholic South West FAIRTRADE FORTNIGHT 2020 24th February – 8th March

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Mar 2020 edition of the Catholic South West

Catholic South West March 2020 5 Dear Catholic South West reader, Life with cataracts has not been easy for three-year-old Leah, living in East Africa. Unable to see, every morning she sits on an old car tyre, hearing the sounds of her brother and cousins going to school. She feels left out and alone. Leah’s mother is heartbroken that her daughter is needlessly blind. She told us, “Sometimes she cries because of the discomfort. It is as if she sees stones instead of light in her eyes.” Cataract surgery to restore sight can take just 45 minutes, but many families in low- income countries cannot afford the £95 for surgery. You can change that with a gift to CBM today. £95 could fund cataract surgery for not one but two children like Leah. That’s because every pound you give will have double the impact - you could fund twice as much equipment and medical supplies, medication and a skilled surgeon’s time, as well as any follow-up care, including eye drops and glasses. Give before 12th May 2020 and every £1 you donate to our See the Way appeal will be doubled by the UK government. God bless you, Louise Shute CBM Programme Manager Registered in England and Wales under 1058162 and Scotland under SC041101 Please return this form to: Freepost Plus RSKK-HXAX-CYGZ, CBM, Oakington Business Park, Dry Drayton Road, Oakington, Cambridge CB24 3DQ Yes, I want to donate to help twice as many blind children like Leah. I will give: £95 My choice amount of: ___________ Title: First Name: Surname: Address: Postcode: If you are a UK taxpayer and if you tick the Gift Aid box when you make a donation, HMRC will add an extra 25p for every pound you donate. I want to Gift Aid my donation and any donations I make in the future or have made in the past 4 years to Christian Blind Mission. I am a UK taxpayer and understand that if I pay less Income Tax or Capitals Gains Tax than the amount of Gift Aid claimed on all my donations in that tax year it is my responsibility to pay any difference. We will need your name and address to claim the additional 25% of your donation from Gift Aid. Increase the value of your gift by 25% I enclose a cheque/postal order/CAF voucher made out to CBM or Please debit my Visa/Mastercard/Maestro Card/CAF Card Card holder’s name: Card number: Expiry date: M M / Y Y security number: signature: Date: / / 3-digit Cardholder’s You can also call 0800 567 7000 to make your donation today, or visit our website seetheway.org. Until 12th May 2020, the UK government will double all public donations to our See the Way appeal up to £2 million. We will send you an update on Leah’s surgery. We’d love to keep you informed about our life-changing work and how you can support it by making a donation. By giving your email address or phone number below you give CBM UK consent to contact you using these methods: Phone: Email: We like to contact our supporters with postal fundraising messages and updates from the projects we support. If you do NOT want to receive such messages from CBM UK in the future please contact us on 01223 484700 or email info@cbmuk.org.uk. You can update your contact preferences or unsubscribe at any time. You can view our privacy policy at www.cbmuk.org.uk/privacy. How it works Help people in the world’s poorest places See the Way to a brighter future - give before 12th May 2020 and every £1 you donate to our See the Way appeal will be doubled by the UK government. Help people in the world’s poorest places See the Way to a brighter future – give before 12th May 2020 and every £1 you donate to our See the Way appeal will be doubled by the UK government. UKAM20-0220PR15 Public donations will support CBM’s work preventing blindness and transforming lives wherever the need is greatest. Match funding from the UK government will improve access to sight saving eye- health services in Malawi.

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Mar 2020 edition of the Catholic South West

6 March 2020 Catholic South West By Fr Jeremy Corley Scripture Focus Our lives can be full of ups and downs, high points and low points. Speaking of the spiritual life, St Ignatius of Loyola refers to times of consolation, when God seems close, and times of desola - tion, when God seems far away. The gospel for the First Sunday of Lent (1st March) describes Jesus’ forty days in the desert. These are days of desola - tion and testing, when he is all alone in the wilderness. We can imagine what it is like. Vast expanses of sand and rock. Blazing sun by day and cool clear skies at night. Often utter silence. No one to talk to and nothing to eat. This solitude in the desert could easily lead a human being to feel lonely and vulnerable. In the desert there is nowhere to hide, even from ourselves. There is no entertainment and no dis - tractions. Temptations can rear their heads. After his days without any food, Jesus hears the devil’s voice: “If you are really God’s Son, you can just turn these stones into bread.” How easy that would be! But Jesus recalls the experience of the Israelites in the desert. They survived on the manna that God provided for them. They did not need the familiar food they had eaten in Egypt—the fish and onions and garlic. What God would provide would be enough. His word would supply the necessary nourish - ment. Then the devil encourages Jesus to make a display of himself, by throwing himself down from the top of the tem - ple. Surely, he could just jump from the parapet, because the angels would catch him and protect him from getting hurt. But Jesus will not put God to the test in this way. Finally the devil offers him all the king - doms of the world, if he will just bow down to him. But Jesus will not take any shortcut to enter into his glory. In - stead, he insists that he will serve God alone, even in the desolation of the wilderness. The temptations in the desert prepare Jesus for the great test in the Garden of Gethsemane: will he drink the cup of suffering and make the great sacrifice of his life on the cross? The desolation of the wilderness, where God has seemed so far away, has prepared Jesus for the terrible experience of the crucifixion: “My God, my God, why have you forsaken me?” The gospel for the Second Sunday of Lent (8th March) moves our attention from the low point of the desert temp - tations to the high point of Jesus’ trans - figuration on the mountain. In the wilderness, he was all alone, with only the devil for company. But on the holy mountain he is with his three chosen disciples, Peter and James and John. Then two biblical heroes appear to him: the great lawgiver Moses and the pow - erful prophet Elijah. Moreover, he is now bathed in the light of God’s glory. His face shines like the sun and his clothes become bright white. Here is an experience of being close to God the Father in his magnificence. This is a moment of blessing and hope, when toil and pain are left aside. Here there is nothing but the radiant splen - dour of God’s presence—a foretaste of heavenly glory. Jesus is comforted by a voice from the cloud, offering him affirmation and support. The voice acknowledges him in front of his disciples: “This is my beloved Son. He is the one to listen to.” The disciples are being told: just as you have previously listened to Moses and Elijah, now listen to Jesus. The consolation of the transfiguration looks ahead to the glory of Easter, when God will acknowledge Jesus as his beloved Son by raising him from death. The brilliant glory of the trans - figuration is a foretaste of the radiant splendour of the risen Christ, con - queror of sin and mortality. We are invited to journey with Christ through Lenten suffering to Easter joy and peace. We are called to join our Lord in the movement from desolation to consolation. Let us pray for the grace to make this Lenten journey with Christ during the coming forty days, so that we may ultimately experience the joy of the resurrection. For longer notes on the Sunday scrip - tural readings, see: www.tarsus.ie LENTEN DESOLATION AND EASTER CONSOLATION 2020 marks the 13th anniversary of the Pride of Somerset Youth Awards. The awards are organised by BBC Somerset and the Rotary Club of Taunton with spon - sorship by Bridgwater & Taunton College, Carly Press Ltd, Avon and Somerset Constabulary with the support of Somer - set Day and Tone News. They celebrate young people across Som - erset who have done something in the last 12 months to make their family, friends or community proud. From achievements in the arts, sport, music or academically to caring for others and the environment, to overcoming per - sonal adversity and hardship and making a difference to their community through vol - unteering: the awards recognise ANY young people in the county who display tremendous generosity, courage, talent and passion. There are no specific cate - gories for the awards. Lead organiser Rotarian Peter Renshaw said, ‘There have been some amazing young people over the last 12 years and The Rotary Club of Taunton is proud to be able to celebrate the achievements of young people in Somerset and we are pleased that they are being recognised as part of the Somerset Day celebrations.’ This year`s ceremony will take place at the Conference Centre at Bridgwater & Taunton College in Taunton on Wednesday 6th May and will be hosted by BBC Somer - set presenters Claire Carter and Simon Parkin. Claire says: “I am always blown away by the stories we unearth with these awards. I believe now – more than ever – we not only need to encourage future generations to be passionate about what they love and achieve as much as they can, but also shine a light on what they do and make a fuss of them!! It’s a privilege to host the event and be in the room with such inspir - ing youngsters.” Young Somerset and the President of Taunton Rotary Club, the Rev’d Tony Cox, spoke of his own enthusiasm for the scheme, ‘The Pride of Somerset Youth Awards evening is a highlight in the Rotary Club’s calendar. Every year we attract an amazing selection of very special young people from across the County. Each nominee is a hero in their own right and it is a privilege to be able to shine a light on their out - standing achievement. The triumph over adversity shown by some of the winners is humbling and it means so much to them and their families to be acknowledged in this way. I`m so excited about being part of it all this year!’ Applications open on Saturday 1st Febru - ary 2020 and all entries must be submitted by 12th April. Nominees must live in Som - erset and be under the age of 20 on 31st March 2020. To nominate a young person please send their full name, age, school/college (where appropriate), postal address, and contact phone number(s), along with a maximum of 200 words detailing their accomplish - ments to explain why they deserve a Pride of Somerset Youth Award. Please include your own name and contact details. Appli - cations can be sent to somerset@bbc.co.uk BBC Somerset will be broadcasting inter - views with some of the winners live from the awards evening. The Rotary Club of Taunton Recognising Somerset’s outstanding young people

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Mar 2020 edition of the Catholic South West

Catholic South West March 2020 7 God calls to us constantly, longing to guide those who yearn for life and desire to see good days into the way of peace. The Rule of Saint Benedict helps us to hear God’s voice, in the Holy Scriptures, in the sacred liturgy and in our brothers in community. If you are a single man longing to live your Catholic faith in a way which brings great joy as it demands the best of you, consider whether God is calling you to be a Benedictine monk at Buckfast Abbey. Please reach out to us, and we will do all we can to help you. ‘Listen, my son’ Rule of St Benedict Buckfast Abbey Trust Registered Charity number 232497 www.buckfast.org.uk/vocation vocations@buckfast.org.uk ‘ L i s t e n , Rule of St Benedict m y s o n ’ Fr Augusto Zampini Davies is an Argentine priest from the Diocese of San Isidro, Buenos Aires. He is currently working as Director of Development and Faith at the Dicastery for Integral Human Develop - ment of the Vatican. On Monday morning he spent time with students of St Bede’s Catholic College, Bristol sharing his work with Pope Francis and the Papal Encyclical, Laudato Si. Fr Augusto gave a passionate presentation to the students, sharing the theory behind Laudato Si, and the partnerships the Church has created with leading scientists and world leaders so that we have a voice to share the Gospel message of love and stewardship. Some of the students who met Fr Augusto are currently taking part in the CAFOD Young Leaders programme and the Faith in Action Young Volunteers programme who will take Fr Augusto’s message into their social action work. You can listen to Fr Augusto’s presentation and some of the challenging questions the students asked him at www.cliftondio - cese.com/news. Fr Augusto gave a passionate presentation to the students

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Mar 2020 edition of the Catholic South West

8 March 2020 Catholic South West By Fr Tom Grufferty Brush Strokes Several years ago, the Evangelization Strategy Team of the Immaculate Con - ception and St. Joseph’s Church, Christchurch opted to distribute Blessed Ashes to the general public on the High Street on Ash Wednesday morning. We spent 3 weeks preparing for the event. We debated at length on whether we should move around the High Street but wisely decided to stay in one place. We decided on a two hour slot from 11am. On the actual day 12 of us gathered at where most people walk. We were armed with notice boards advertising what the event was about. We also had some very attractive leaflets with an explanation of Ash Wednesday, the 40 days of Lent and why we begin Lent as we do. Everyone was invited to receive the Ashes in the traditional way, prac - tising Catholics, lapsed, fellow Chris - tians, people of other faiths and even agnostics and atheists. The Priest and the Deacon were dressed in clerical dress and they distributed the Blessed Ashes while the other ten people en - gaged the passers bye with an invita - tion to partake. It was immediately obvious that the general public were interested even those who did not re - ceive the Ashes. The response was overwhelming with about 80% of those invited receiving the ashes. Equally important was the dialogue between us and the public. Several young people received the Ashes with enthusiasm. Other people spoke about their personal pain as re - gards grief. Many people commented in a favourable way on the initiative. One man with a broad smile said, “I thought we lost The Ashes to Australia last year,” while a woman refused to have the Ashes, saying, “I have my husband’s Ashes at home.” Most people on receiving the Ashes closed their eyes in deep reverence, some reacted physically on being touched by the cold Ashes and several expressed shock at the words, “Re - member that you are dust and into dust you will return.” We had at least three people from eth - nic backgrounds ask where the Catholic Church was. This we found fascinating. Blessed Ashes on the High Street

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Mar 2020 edition of the Catholic South West

Catholic South West March 2020 9 By Dr Jay Kettle-Williams View from the Pew Two men stand and look between bars ... My working day might start late of a morning, but then I might see it going on well into the evening. So I might from time to time be drawn to watching a bit of morning TV. Having now seen those FFing ads (Funeral Financing, I hasten to add) so often and so regu - larly repeated, I think I could quote you and even recite them faithfully word for word. There comes a point, with them for ever hammering their point home, that I shout and scream at the wretched box. Perhaps you too react in the same way to having messages rammed down your throat? Someone I was talking to recently certainly agreed with me on the point: `Yes!` they mused, `If you keep condemning soci - ety for one thing or another, being racist maybe, then that’s precisely what you’ll turn it into. It’s a type of brainwashing.` It saddened me that, amid the exten - sive virtue signalling and calls for cel - ebration from within the LGBTQIA+ community, Phillip Scofield came out, having seen himself throughout his 27- year married life and before as gay. I know, I know, I know there’s the argu - ment about gay men taking to hiding out of sight in a marriage. But in the case of Phillip Scofield my thoughts turned, apart from whatever suffering he has had to bear, to the suffering borne and yet to be borne by his wife and family. The LGBTQIA+ community - being com - posed of those covered by the terms Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Trans, Queer, Intersex and Asexual plus all other sexualities, sexes and genders not cov - ered in the initialisation – is often seen to receive disproportionate media at - tention. In fact, it has been recently concluded that there are 3.6 million gay people in Britain i.e. around 6% of the total population of 67.6 million or 1 in 16.66 people. In a survey of around 1,000 Britons using a self- completed questionnaire, 2% of the total sample see themselves as bisexual, 4% as ho - mosexual, 92% as heterosexual. While touching on ‘demographic pro - portionality’, let`s not forget that 56.3% of the UK`s population see themselves as Christian with one in every 12 (over 5.6 million) as Catholic, ‘dinosaurs’ as some see us and as we’re often de - picted. That’s one helluva lot of di - nosaurs! Proportionality of attention from within the media leads me to the number of children living in poverty in the UK (re - portedly some 4 million). That number continues to grow and already exceeds that of the LGBTQIA+ community. The poverty line in the UK is defined as a household income below 60% of the average. This threshold is currently around £195 a week for a lone parent with two children. Shockingly as it seems, almost half of these 4m chil - dren live in families with a household income far below this – an average of £124 per week for one adult and two children. The Bible, its contents dating back 2,000 and more years, to long before the Social Metrics Commission, quite correctly forecast: `You have the poor with you always` (Matthew 26:11). My concern is whether children need al - ways to be among that number. I’ll pick up on an expression often used by my father in saying that it`s the children who won`t be `old enough, fat enough and ugly enough` to fend for them - selves. So, 2020 – perfect vision? 2020 IN SIGHT QUOTES Â Â Â Â Â My neighbour asked if he could use my lawnmower and I told him of course he could, so long as he didn’t take it out of my garden Eric Morecambe I think it’s wrong that only one company makes the game Monopoly Steven Alexander Wright Two things are infinite: the universe and human stupidity; and I’m not sure about the universe Albert Einstein But first, the news: The House of Commons was sealed off today after police chased an escaped lunatic through the front door during Prime Minister’s question time. A spokesman at Scotland Yard said it was like looking for a needle in a haystack Ronnie Barker A jump lead walks into a bar. The barman says, ‘I’ll serve you, but don’t start anything.’ Peter Kay Just some unashamedly light hearted quips this month. To help us see out the end of the winter.

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Mar 2020 edition of the Catholic South West

10 March 2020 Catholic South West Charity Profile News from the Catholic Children’s Society (Plymouth) The Board of the Catholic Children’s Society (Plymouth), which has 10 volunteer trustees from across the Diocese and 3 members of staff would like to take this opportunity to thank all our loyal supporters in our local parishes and schools as well as our generous individual donors for all the support you have shown us in 2019. We have been overwhelmed once again by the support we received last summer for our Annual Appeal ‘Working Together – Putting All Children First’ campaign, and then towards the end of the year when so many parishes supported us by generously donating their Crib Appeal monies and purchasing packs of our Christmas cards, which were designed by children in some of our Catholic schools and were on sale for the first time ever. A warm welcome to a new member of staff The Catholic Children’s Society (Plymouth) is also pleased to welcome a new member of staff to our small team based at St Boniface House in Ashburton. Pictured left to right: Vicki, Karen and Caroline New administrator Karen Grute joins the team and will be responsible for our Essential Grants funding scheme assisting children and their families at a time of great financial need. One in five children living in the south west are living in poverty and in some areas of the region, poverty is even more severe ! Many parents and carers, despite working, find their income does not meet their basic needs such as providing a working cooker, warm clothes in the winter or a proper bed to sleep in. And when families are struggling to put food on the table, warmth in their homes and clothes on their children, they are not prepared for when something goes wrong. A broken washing machine is an unwanted expense for anyone, but for those struggling with circumstances such as sudden illness, bereavement, redundancy or eviction, it may mean the need for an expensive loan and the risk of spiralling debt. The CCSP Essential Grants programme aims to prevent am immediate crisis from threatening the stability of family life, by providing essential items that parents and carers could otherwise not afford for their children. A typical grant could be – • £50 for school shoes for two children • £100 for a single bed and mattress • £160 for a new washing machine or an electric cooker • £250 for a gas cooker and its fitting Looking for new trustees to join our Board We would welcome new trustees to the Board of Directors who meet quarterly at St Boniface House in Ashburton. For more information, please contact Karen on 01364 645420 or email ccs@prcdtr.org.uk Catholic Children’s Society Plymouth (CCSP) needs your help Do you enjoy taking part in quiz nights ? CCSP are looking for parishes to join our Great Big Diocesan Quiz on Friday, 24 April 2020 to compete for ultimate Diocesan Championship status All materials to be provided by CCSP – you just need to find a venue and teams to compete. If you are interested, please contact: Vicki Dunstone on 07388 185374 or email vicki.dunstone@prcdtr.org.uk Also, why not join our 50:50 club – Helping Hands We have around 100 supporters of our Helping Hands 50:50 club but we’d love to double this number ! So every month we would give away £100 in prize money whilst raising £100 for CCSP too. If you would like to be in with a chance of winning one of three prizes in each monthly draw, please contact Karen on 01364 645420 and we can send you an application form. It costs just £12 a year for one entry into all 12 monthly draws and of course you can increase your subscription to £24 for 2 entries or £36 for three and so on. ***************************************************** 2020 sees the 10th anniversary of Verbum Domini, the Apostolic Exhortation of Pope Benedict XVI on the Word of the Lord. It is also the 1600th anniversary of the death of St Jerome who said: “Ignorance of the Scriptures is ignorance of Christ”. We pray that during this special year we will all be enriched and renewed by the living Word of God and that we shall all be moved to share the love of Christ to the ends of the earth. In the coming year, at 10 venues across the across the Plymouth Diocese, including Blessed Sacrament, a talk will be given by Fr Guy De Gaynesford and Fr Robbie Low on “Principles of Scriptural interpretation and the link between the Old and New Testaments”. There is also a website, www.whatgoodnews.org with some excellent talks on the Scriptures, created and overseen by Fr Adrian Graffy, a priest of the Diocese of Brentwood, who is also a member of the Pontifical Biblical Commission.

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Mar 2020 edition of the Catholic South West

Catholic South West March 2020 11 Ernestine Northover Poetry Corner Fact s , Figures and Fake News Fake Fact: It is 10% of adults who have never done paid work, not 5%. The Storm Blue hills, along the horizon hugging, Like a mountain range in mist, Lightning flashing, thunder crashing, Part of God`s almighty fist. Clouds descending, bowing deeper, Within their centre, shadows form, And, as if this world`s a sleeper, It lays waiting for the storm. After the onslaught of the raindrops, Silence all around is heard, Then within this peaceful stillness, Awakes the sweet notes of a bird. Around about now, the 13 and 14 year olds amongst us are choos - ing their options – i.e. what to study for their GCSEs. With that in mind, this months’ facts and figures are all about the job market There are 7.6 billion people in the world of whom 5.7 billion are over 15 and therefore considered to be part of the labour pool. However, 3.5 billion is the number of people who are employed or looking for a job – the rest are in education, unpaid care work or they have retired. 5% of adults (3.6 million) in the UK have never done paid work. 62% are students, 15% are looking after young children, 12% are sick, 1% are retired and everyone else is either unemployed, feel they don’t need a job or not yet looking for work. Earning over £23,600 per year in the UK puts you in the top 50% of the country, earning over £80,000 puts you in the top 5%. About 78% of Companies pay men more than women. The jobs most likely to be automated in the future are Waiters and Shelf Fillers. The jobs least likely to be automated are Medical Practioners. Fake Fact: It is 10% of adults who have never done paid work, not 5%.

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Mar 2020 edition of the Catholic South West

12 March 2020 Catholic South West Advertise in this space for as little as £70 Contact Janet on 01440 730399 janett@cathcom.org Syon Abbey closes, while other Bridgettines flourish With the kind assistance of Sister Anne Smyth OSsS last Abbess of Syon Abbey Final years and Feast of The Transfiguration 2011 Over the last years of New Syon, the Sisters dropped to three, and Mother Anna Maria made ar - rangements for her and Sr Mary Julie to move to Nazareth House in Plymouth. Sr M. Bridget needed more care so she was to move to St Peter’s nursing home in Plympton. I visited her there several times before the home closed and she moved to Waypoints in St Budeaux. Before this, a special Mass was celebrated in the chapel at New Syon on the Feast of The Transfiguration, August 6th, 2011. Rt Rev Christopher Budd of Plymouth con-celebrated with Abbot David Charlesworth OSB and Fr Sebastian Woolf and Fr Christopher. They gave thanks for the continuation of Syon Abbey through the Refor - mation to return to England in 1861, a hundred and fifty years before, and for their time since at Marley House. Buckfast provided a buffet, and we felt so sad that this was to be the last time we would see our Bridgettine sisters together in full habit. Srs Julie and Bridget died in 2015 and are buried at Buckfast Abbey. (“By the waters of Bidwell Brook , I sat down and wept, for I remember thee Syon“ were the last words I wrote in Syon’s Visitors’ book) Syon 600 Celebrations in Isleworth Syon Abbey was founded in 1415 by King Henry V. In July 2015 a great ecumeni - cal celebration of 600 years was held. Sister Anne Smyth OSsS was guest of honour, with her chauffeur Adrian Wardle who edited the Syon Breviary , now in English,and published just in time for the event. Along with many local people were the Sisters of the three commu - nities of the active Bridgettine foundation. Shortly after, a conference was held in Dartington Hall where researchers spoke on the theme “ Continuity and Change “ . Active Bridgettine Foundations Maria Hesselblad was a young Swedish nurse who had gone to New York in the1890s and later converted from Lutheran to become a Roman Catholic. When she visited Rome with friends, she saw a vision of herself becoming a Brid - gettine Nun within the Carmelite Order in the very house of St Bridget, Casa Brigida. In 1910 she journeyed to Syon Abbey in Chudleigh, where she lived inside the cloister to learn their ways, returning later with a full habit. Eventually with Papal permission for her new Foundation, M. Maria and her small flock procured Via del Isole in Rome as their first guesthouse, then Casa Brigida, and now the Founda - tion has 50 guesthouses all over the world. There are other types of Bridgettine communities in Spain and Mexico who are enclosed and some Missionary Sisters. Over in Amity, Oregon are a small community of Bridgettine Brothers, who were founded in 1976, as - sisted by Syon Abbey. They make the most delicious gourmet chocolates as well as praying the Daily Hours. St Bridget’s Friends Group While walking in Italy on pilgrimage in 2005, I felt a very strong call to start a secular group to support our Sisters in prayer. It was not until 2017, that this came into effect, with the assistance of Adrian Wardle. With Sister Anne as patron, we set up a Facebook group with some on e-mail, and held some events to learn the prayers and music of The Syon Breviary. Now the group has spread to 25 countries and has about 300 members. “Of Syon I shall not keep silent,all nations shall see of her glory “ Isaiah 62.

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Mar 2020 edition of the Catholic South West

Catholic South West March 2020 13 LONDON: 0203 468 0617 | CARDIFF: 0292 000 3865 www.joewalshtours.co.uk | info@joewalshtours.co.uk Licenced by the Commission for Aviation Regulation, TO 052 and TA 0689 in compliance with the Package Travel and Linked Travel Arrangement Package Regulation 2018. JOE WALSH TOURS PILGRIMAGES 2020 MEDJUGORJE 12 & 19 MAY & 2 JUNE | 7 NIGHTS From Manchester » Direct return 昀ights to Croatia » Breakfast & evening meal served daily » Staying near St. James’s church » Full religious programme » Tour the Shrine, Hill of Apparitions & climb to Mt. Krizevac HOLY LAND 28 OCTOBER | 7 NIGHTS From London Luton » Return 昀ights to Tel Aviv » 4 nights Bethlehem | 3 nights Tiberias » Breakfast & dinner served daily at hotels » Private air-conditioned coach transfers throughout » Professional English speaking guide throughout £ £ 1345 pps £ £ 645 pps T R A V E L I N S U R A N C E arranged for readers of Catholic South West A N N U A L T R A V E L I N S U R A N C E AVAILABLE TO ANYONE UP TO 85 YEARS OF AGE. MOST PRE-EXISTING MEDICAL CONDITIONS ACCEPTED T O P Q U A L I T Y C O V E R With a 24 hour helpline and an air ambulance get-you-home service. Mention this advert to get a Special Catholic South West discount. Don’t forget we also offer SINGLE-TRIP COVER, with no maximum age limit and up to £20,000 cancellation cover per couple. CALL FOR DETAILS AND PRICES 0116 272 0500 Real people - not nachines! Authorised and regulated by the FCA FT Travel Insurance UK based Free Sample Pack of Foam & fabrics sent by first class mail. When phoning please quote CSW101 New contemporary and traditional stained glass designed, made and fitted. Professional repairs and restoration. Website: customstainedglass.co.uk Email: wayne.ricketts@btconnect.com Tel: 0117 955 5390 Wayne Ricketts Stained Glass Father Tom Grufferty is a Stella Maris (Apostleship of the Sea) cruise ship chap - lain. Over Christmas and the New Year, he served on P & O’s the Ventura on its voy - age from Southampton to the Mediter - ranean. He tells Greg Watts about his unusual ministry at sea. “Having been a priest in Portsmouth dio - cese for 46 years, and with Southampton being a cruise ship port, the idea of chap - laincy has been very prominent during those years of my ministry. Three years ago, the Bishop asked me to be his chap - lain to the 76 head teachers and principals of all the Catholic Schools in the diocese. This meant that I was free for chaplaincy work during the school holidays. Stella Maris give guidance on how to con - tact the entertainment manager on board ship well in advance of the actual cruise. That person is the gateway to the chaplain getting in contact with the passengers as he or she advertises the fact that there is a Catholic chaplain on board. Before the contact is made it is wise to have a pastoral plan as a proposal on what you wish to be engaged in. That plan then gets advertised in the daily pro - gramme for the passengers. Getting in contact with the crew is a more difficult proposition. Even though the crew has a welfare office, which is well-staffed and by the crew mess, it is not always pos - sible to establish contact before arrival on board ship. This is usually the first place I go on the ship, since the crew are the utmost prior - ity of the chaplain. The second task is walk around the crew mess at meal times on the first day of the cruise. Immediately the crew know that a priest is on board. It is also useful to discover who the Catholic leaders are among the different ethnic groups on board. If you have per - sonal details available, such as your contact details while on board, that is useful to distribute. But not your cabin number. I always eat all my meals in the self-ser - vice restaurant, as here you meet mem - bers of the crew in a casual, informal way. I walk around the ship covering most parts each day. I offer Mass for the passengers each day, depending whether the ship is at sea or in port. I offer Mass for the crew as often as they wish. This is usually at 11.30 pm when they have finished their work sched - ule. I also offer time for the Sacrament of Reconciliation in the prayer room, which is used by all denominations. Many of the 1,200 crew on the Ventura came from the Philippines, Goa, or Kerala. Having a priest on board is profoundly im - portant for them. They love to receive in - stant blessings as they hold the priest’s hands and bow their heads. Stella Maris provides the chaplain with rosaries, miraculous medals, and prayer cards, and some of them find their way to family members miles from the ship. As soon as these items appear, they are scooped up and treasured like gold dust. The crew can be away from their loved ones and family for anything up to nine months. Modern technology is a great help, as you see them in contact with their loved ones back home usually on port days when WIFI is free at the terminal. We often forget that 95% of those who work on ships are from poor countries. They send all their wages home to provide for their loved ones. Speaking with the crew, education has a high priority for it enables people to break free of the poverty trap. The parish of the high seas is very differ - ent from the parish of ‘terra firma’ and the maritime family is constantly in motion. When you leave the cruise ship, you leave with the impression that the entire experi - ence is somehow unreal, and yet for thou - sands of people this is their world and their lives. Those who work at sea are modern day heroes upon whom the prosperity of most of us depend. Without them, world trade would cease, and the shelves of our su - permarkets would be empty.” The parish of the high seas Ventuta Fr Tom Grufferty Please support our advertisers

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Mar 2020 edition of the Catholic South West

14 March 2020 Catholic South West by Fr Denis Blackledge Prayer Funeral Services The Latin Mass Society www.lms.org.uk 020 7404 7284 Masses in the Extraordinary Form in Plymouth Diocese : St Edward the Confessor, Home Park Ave, Peverell, PLYMOUTH PL3 4PG Sundays 11.30am Sung Mass. Blessed Sacrament Church, Fore Street, Heavitree, EXETER EX1 2QJ 2nd Sundays of the month 3.00pm Sung Mass (refreshments afterwards). (except April when Mass date has been moved from the 2nd Sunday to the 1st Sunday.) St Cyprian’s Chapel, Ugbrooke House, CHUDLEIGH, Devon TQ13 0AD 4th Sundays 3.00pm Sung Mass. Lanherne Convent, St Mawgan, NEWQUAY, Cornwall TR8 4ER Sundays & Days of Obligation 8am Sung Mass [1] Mon – Sat inclusive 7.30am Low Mass. Our Lady’s, Old Mill Lane, MARNHULL, Dorset DT10 1JX Thursday 23rd April 12 noon Low Mass Our Lady of Lourdes & St Cecilia, White Cliff Mill Street, BLANDFORD FORUM DT11 7BN Every Saturday Low Mass 8am. Thursday 19th March 12 noon Low Mass. [1] Preceded by Rosary and at 7.30am Any questions contact Maurice Quinn(LMS Rep, Devon and Dorset) on either : Email : devon@lms.org.ukMob. 07555536579 To Advertise in the Funeral Section contact Janet Took 01440 730399 janett@cathcom.org Lord, grant us simplicity of faith and a generosity of service that gives without counting cost. A life overflowing with Grace poured out from the One who gave everything, that we might show the power of love to a broken world, and share the truth from a living Word. Lord, grant us simplicity of faith, and a yearning to share it. Amen Please support our advertisers

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Mar 2020 edition of the Catholic South West

WOUNDED SHEPHERD Pope Francis and his Struggle to Convert the Catholic Church Austen Ivereigh Henry Holt and Company New York, hardback 401 pages 2019 $30.00 US ISBN: 9781250119384 This is perhaps the most thor - oughly researched book covering the first six years of the pontificate of Pope Francis. The author has drawn heavily on the homilies, ad - dresses and flight conferences of Francis himself, and has personally in - terviewed about forty key individuals in Europe, Latin America and the United States, including Francis him - self. He has also delved into a variety of books covering various aspects of the papacy and life of Francis. Ten fascinating chapters, and thirty pages of notes, cover all the key as - pects of how Francis is trying to put into practice the core teaching of Vati - can II, alongside the Aparecida Synod Document of 2007, inaugurated by the South American bishops. His Jesuit roots and way of proceeding are de - scribed with great clarity, and the whole book shows how Francis is soaked in the Spiritual Exercises of Saint Ignatius of Loyola, and how he goes about the process of discern - ment. No stone is left unturned by Ivereigh, and he faces head-on the radical chal - lenges Francis continues to face in his struggle to convert the Church into a more hands-on practically compas - sionate community, reverencing the holy ground that each human individ - ual is, and re-learning the art of true accompaniment. The author shows how Francis does not ask of others what he is not prepared to do himself: from the start Francis understands himself as a sinner, yet called by Jesus to be his close companion and lover. Wonder and wounds, from Evangelii Gaudium to the abuse crisis, are cov - ered with great honesty and delicacy. Mercy is at the heart of Francis, and nowhere more so than in Amoris Laeti - tia, and the waves created by that inti - mately compassionate document. Care for our one and only common home is key in Laudato Si, addressed to the whole of humanity. How to involve young people more as missionaries is cited in Christus Vivit, the fruit of the Synod which centred on young folk in the Church. And the universal call to holiness is a constant in the life and teaching of Francis. The author shows how Francis longs for a Church of service, of closeness, of down-to-earth humility, of vulnera - bility, of profound compassion, of truly facing each individual as a uniquely beautiful gift of a loving cre - ative Lord, of bringing a kingdom of justice and peace to all in our one world. And for the members of the Catholic Church he has constantly been urging a synodal way of growing in discernment, deeper understanding of the Faith, and working together as a team of friends and followers of Jesus. This book is a “must” for anyone who wants to enter deeply into the mind and heart of Pope Francis, and the au - thor has done a great service not just for Catholics, but for anyone of good will who would know more about what makes Pope Francis “tick”. The answer to that is very simple: in a word, it is Jesus! © Denis Blackledge SJ World Dishes Catholic South West March 2020 15 The word “Lent” comes from the old English, “lencten," which means “spring." In Middle English is derived the words, lenten, lente, lent; related to the Dutch, lente, the German, Lenz, also rendered “spring.” In the Christian Church, Lent refers to the period of abstinence preparatory to the Feast of Easter. As this fast falls in the early part of the year, it became confused with the season, and gradually the word Lent, which originally meant spring, was confined to this liturgical use. The Latin name for the fast is Quadragesima derived from the Sunday which was the fortieth day before Easter. In England a Lenten fast was first ordered to be observed by Earconberht, king of Kent (A.D. 640- 664). In the middle ages, meat, eggs and milk were forbidden in Lent not only by ecclesiastical but by statute law; and this rule was enforced until the reign of King William III. The chief Lenten food from the earliest days was fish. CSW looks at the word “Lent” EASTER PASSION PLAY ‘’NO NAME IN THE STREET’’ AT THE CHURCH OF THE ASSUMPTION OF OUR LADY TORQUAY 1ST, 2ND, 3RD APRIL AT 7.00PM TICKETS ADULT £5 UNDER 12’S £3 FAMILY TICKET £12 (2 ADULTS & 2 OR MORE CHILDREN) TICKETS AVAILABLE FROM: THE PARISH OFFICE – torquay-abbeyroad@prcdtr.org.uk JULIA BEACROFT – Julia.beacroft@gmail.com SUSANNE KOWAL – Susanne.kowal@gmail.com MARY HAWKE & JULIA PARTENHEIMER – After Masses OR ON THE DOOR ON THE NIGHT Ingredients 240g Plain Flour 100g Golden Granulated Sugar 11/2 teaspoons baking powder 1/4 teaspoon salt 110g unsalted butter, cut into small pieces 1 large egg 4-5 tablespoons milk 6 tablespoons sesame seeds Method Preheat the oven to 190 degrees. Line two baking trays with baking parchment. Add the flour, sugar, baking powder, and salt and mix well. Add the pieces of butter and gently rub them into the flour. In a small bowl, beat the egg lightly and add in the milk. Gradually add the milk and egg mixture to the flour and mix with a spoon until it is all combined. Place the sesame seeds in a shallow bowl. Break the dough into slightly larger than golf ball sized balls and roll each between the palms of your hands to form a short, stubby tube about 4cms long and 2cms wide. Squash them slightly and then cover them in the sesame seeds. Put them on the tray leaving a gap between each one as they will spread in the oven. Bake for 15 minutes, or until they are light brown in colour. Remove to wire racks to cool. If they don’t all get eaten within the first ten minutes, Biscotti de Regina can be kept in an airtight container for three or four days, or frozen for up to four weeks. Biscotti di Regina From Sicily

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Mar 2020 edition of the Catholic South West

16 March 2020 Catholic South West CRYPTIC Across 1 Annals from one or two books (10) 8 Travel to an old city having found someone with taste (7) 9 Director introduced learners to string instrument – but not violin (5) 10 Pick up a sailor the French wanted first (5) 11 Vile embrocation no team applied with robustness (3,4) 12 Raise the profile of a line manager (6) 14 Polish detective to the fore in tripping up receiver (6) 17 A result of the sun one gets in California and a spot in Sicily (7) 19 Judge a bishop`s academic following (5) 21 Fabrication of Lully`s overture and the coda in this key (5) 22 Characters that make the Epistles? (7) 23 He reformed after salvo Aaron blasted (10) CRYPTIC Down 2 Nigerian with Cuban capital, but without any transport, reaches America (5) 3 Family group of agents adopted 007`s change of leadership to `M` (7) 4 During performance it`s tense, all in one piece (6) 5 Aristo that`s disappeared is concerning one of the Gospels (5) 6 Deal`s naval connection brings nothing to Allies landing here (7) 7 Seen in craters close to Aleppo is a type of plant, in general, found in Babylon (10) 8 Geldof clan`s upset seeing an idol shattered? (6,4) 13 Bar within limits, on the fringes, is just about the place to be when camping (7) 15 Hymn book each sailor keeps (7) 16 Cardigan`s arm of leadership in the Crimean War? (6) 18 Strict veggie turned up replacing an A with an E supplement to fill the void (5) 20 Expertly introduce Schubert piece live (5) QUICK Across 1 Two OT books which record the early history of Israel and Judah (10) 8 Epicurean; connoisseur (7) 9 Four-stringed bass instrument of the violin family (5) 10 Assimilate: detect (5) 11 With vigour (music) (3,4) 12 Mould to raise against low relief (6) 14 Smart cellular handset (6) 17 Port on the eastern coast of Sicily, at the foot of Mt Etna (7) 19 Judge of Israel for eight years, son of Hillel the Pirathonite (5) 21 Mendacious; double-dealing (5) 22 Colossians or Ephesians, for instance (7) 23 Italian priest and reformer (1452-98), who fought against immorality and corruption (10) QUICK Down 2 Predominantly Muslim people, and their language, living chiefly in northern Nigeria (5) 3 1970s American band (7) 4 Complete; whole (6) 5 Relating to St Luke (5) 6 Landing beach site for the Invasion of Italy (1943) (7) 7 His beheading is portrayed by Donatelli, among others (10) 8 Image made by Aaron which has come to mean an un worthy or inappropriate object of worship (6,4) 13 British holiday institution since 1936 (7) 15 Book of hymns or poems associated with the OT (7) 16 Kind of sweater sleeve design: Welsh castle (6) 18 Desert area north of Sinai (5) 20 Reside; inhabit (5) 2-in-1 Crossword by Axe You can use both sets of clues to solve the puzzle: the solutions are the same. So, if you want to try the CRYPTIC puzzle, for instance, but are unsure, use the QUICK clues to help you work out the solution. Similarly, if you try the QUICK clues, use the CRYPTIC clues to help you prove the solution SOLUTION Across: 1 Chronicles, 8 Gourmet, 9 Cello, 10 Learn, 11 Con brio, 12 Emboss, 14 IPhone, 17 Catania, 19 Abdon, 21 Lying, 22 Letters, 23 Savonarola. Down: 2 Hausa, 3 Os - monds, 4 Intact, 5 Lucan, 6 Salerno, 7 Holofernes, 8 Golden calf, 13 Butlins, 15 Psalter, 16 Raglan, 18 Negev, 20 Dwell. On Wednesday 5th February, the Clifton Diocesan Schools that make up the New - man Partnership, gathered in Clifton Cathedral, together with Bishop Declan and some of our Priests and Deacons, to celebrate the Canonisation of St John Henry Newman. Children, staff and par - ents came together to give thanks for our new Saint and the contribution he made to Catholic Education. One of the pupils from St Francis’ School in Nailsea wrote: “John Henry Newman was a Christian who tried to be like Jesus by serving and help - ing others. He wanted to follow God so he became a Priest then a Canon. He taught Theology in a Catholic School and showed the pupils how to carry out Jesus’ mis - sion. He liked to travel around the world and when he did he saw poor people living in poverty and he found ways of helping them. John Henry Newman built a Church in Birmingham because he wanted to teach people about God and Jesus”. At the special Mass, Bishop Declan told those present that John Henry’s motto was “Heart speaks to Heart”. He re - minded us that God loves us and speaks to us in our hearts and we must listen to his call and respond to what he is asking us to do. Canonisation of St John Henry Newman celebrated by School partnership at Clifton Cathedral

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