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Catholic South West History

Newspaper for the Dioceses of Plymouth, Clifon and Portsmouth

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Jun 2019 edition of the Catholic South West - Page

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Jun 2019 edition of the Catholic South West - Page

Inside Antiques Roadshow at Buckfast Page 2 Renew the Face of the Earth Page 6 Using the Internet to pray Pentecost Page 8 Children`s Section pages 12-13 June 2019 Celebrating First Holy Communion and Confirmation Page 10

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2 June 2019 Catholic South West CONTACTS & DETAILS Catholic South West is a monthly newspaper for Catholics in the Plymouth, Clifton and Portsmouth Dioceses. It is published by Bellcourt Ltd AIMS To build community in the South West by sharing stories relating to Catholic life around the South West. To encourage readers to get more involved in - or start - projects and initiatives in the local area. To provide thought-provoking articles to help readers deepen their Faith. GET INVOLVED We need your help! Articles: We need your local articles - we can only include what we get. So if you have an article or just a photo with a short desciption - please send it in. Ideas: We need your ideas for the paper and we need your ideas in the paper. If you have any thoughts on what we should include - or if you are thinking about starting a new initiative - get in touch - we’d love to support it! Readers: If you can encourage other readers in your parish please do so. Advertising: We rely on advertising - if you know of anyone that would benefit from promoting their business, event or anything else to parishioners throu - ghout the South West. SUBMITTING EDITORIAL To send in editorial or to get in touch please contact us at: CSW - Bellcourt Ltd N2 Blois Meadow Business Centre Steeple Bumpstead Haverhil, Suffolk CB9 7BN csw@cathcom.org 01440 730399 ADVERTISING To advertise in Catholic South West please contact: Janet Took janett@cathcom.org 01440 730399 DATES Catholic South West goes to parishes on the last full weekend of the month. It is printed around the middle of the month - so if you would like to adver - tise or send in editorial please do it as early as possible. FROM CSW W e hope you are enjoying the new look and editorial of CSW. Our apologies that last month we had a problem with the print quality. We hope it didn`t spoil your enjoyment of the paper! We have a variety of editorial in CSW this month - but as ever there is so much going on in the South West - so do send in your stories, write-ups, thoughts, letters and ideas. We`d love to hear them. The more we have, the more we can repre - sent the whole of the South West. We are starting our focus on Holy Com - munions and Confirmations. If you want to send in some photos we`ll fit them in and you could order copies as a souvenir for your young people - see page 10 for more information. CSW TEAM LEGAL INFORMATION Please note that opinions expressed in this paper and on any linked sites or publications are not necessarily those of the Publishers, Editor, any Diocese or the wider Roman Catholic Church Every reasonable effort is made to ensure that due acknowledgement, when appropriate, is made to the originator of any image submitted for publication. It is understood that those submitting material for publication in CSW either hold the copyright or have arranged for publication with the appropriate authority. EDITORIAL GUIDELINES 1) Think of the readers: If you are writing about an event, think about the rea - ders that don’t know anything about it. Outline what happe - ned, but focus on why people go, why it is important to them, or some teaching that was given. Make sure readers learn something from your article - they don’t just want to know who was there and what snacks were available! 2) Keep it brief : Make sure you make your point - but keep it brief and punchy. 3) Pictures: Send pictures as they are - even if they are very big to email. Don’t re - duce them in size or put them inside a Word document. They look fine on the screen but terrible in the paper! Antiques Roadshow at Buckfast Abbey On Easter Sunday a second episode of BBC One’s Antiques Roadshow was broadcasted from Buckfast Abbey. The BBC crew spent two days on location last September. The visit was one of several landmark events held to celebrate Buckfast Abbey’s Millennium (1018-2018). Presenter Fiona Bruce discovered the long tradition of beekeeping and trie d some of the famous Buckfast Abbey honey. Items under appraisal included a diamond tiara and a collection of First World War medals. There was also a selection of children’s illustrations, an 18th century apple corer and some exquisitely-made miniature furniture. Jonathan Deacon, the General Manager of Buckfast Abbey said: “We have been looking forward to the broadcast of the second episode of the Antiques Roadshow. It is especially apt that the programme was transmitted on Easter Sunday, the holiest day in the Christian calendar.“ He added: “The weather was glorious when the filming took place last September and the gardens were shown at the height of their perfection. Antiques Roadshow has provided the perfect showcase both for the Abbey and for the county of Devon.” About Buckfast Buckfast Abbey is a working Benedictine monastery situated on the edge of Dar - tmoor National Park. Founded in 1018, it fell into ruins when King Henry VIII dissol - ved the monasteries in the 16th century. The Abbey Church was restored in the 19th century. Buckfast Abbey and its gardens are open every day of the year and welco - mes visitors to learn about its rich history. Entry is free and there is ample free par - king on site. The shops and restaurants are open every day except Christmas Day.

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Jun 2019 edition of the Catholic South West - Page

Catholic South West June 2019 3 Around the South West Send us your news csw@cathcom.org Oldest Marian Shrine Opens its Doors Our Lady of the Park as depicted on a civic mural in the town centre of Liskeard in Cornwall. It recognises that she is an essential part of the town’s heritage. Last year Catholic South West featured a book, "A Phoenix Rises: Our Lady of Cornwall Returns" by Claire Riche, who grew up in Truro, Cornwall. The book tells the story of Our Lady of the Park, a pre- Reformation shrine of the Virgin Mary in Liskeard in Cornwall which is in the process of being restored. This could be one of the oldest Marian shrines in England Up until now it has only been possible to visit the actual shrine site once a year on arranged visits as it is in private hands. Now, however, the owner is letting out the beautiful house on the historical spot for holiday lets. It would be ideal for small prayer, or other church groups looking to arrange a pilgrimage/holiday with a difference perhaps to celebrate the rededication of England as the Dowry of Mary in 2020. It sleeps 12 in eight bedrooms and can be viewed online by searching, "Ladye Park Liskeard Cornwall" on the internet. Another book telling the story of the shrine is "The Lost Shrine of Liskeard" by Claire Riche. Icon painted in honour of Our Lady of the Park and now hanging in St Neot’s room in Liskeard Catholic Church From its origins in medieval times as a site of Christian Pilgrimage "Our Lady at The Park" has evolved to the fine residence known today as Ladye Park. This beautiful country house is as steeped in history as it is in architectural beauty and is set in extensive grounds of lawns, woodland, stream, lake and includes a Grade 2 listed grotto with waterfall and crystal-clear pool known locally as the fountain of youth. Up until now it has only been possible to visit the actual shrine site once a year on arranged visits as it is in private hands. Now, however, the owner is letting out the beautiful house on the historical spot for holiday lets. It would be ideal for small prayer, or other church groups looking to arrange a pilgrimage/holiday with a difference perhaps to celebrate the rededication of England as the Dowry of Mary in 2020. 2018 VISIT ENGLAND 5 STAR GOLD AWARD FOR EXCELLENCE Ladye Park Gorgeous holiday home in spectacular secluded grounds, with beaches nearby For further information Telephone number: 01503 262736, email: enquiries@cornishcollection.co.uk www.cornishcollection.co.uk Welcome to the Diocese We welcome into the Diocese, the Ursuline Sisters of the Immaculate Heart of Mary. The community arrived in the Diocese just after Easter and two of the sisters are living in the Presbytery at Our Lady of Fatima, Brixey Road in Poole. The sisters are already feeling at home and have their Provincial, Sr Kusum, with them for these next couple of weeks to help them settle. The sisters will be working across St Joseph’s parish with Parish Priest, Fr Chris Findlay-Wilson. Parishioners helped prepare the house for their arrival and are looking forward to working with the sisters. It’s a great joy to welcome them into our Diocesan family and we hope that they will have many years with us. Pictured left Sr. Kusum (Provincial), Sr Juliana and Sr Vincey. Pilgrimage for St Boniface Crediton Pilgrimage to honour St Boniface In celebration of St Boniface on Sunday 9 June led by the Bishop Mark O`Toole and the Anglican Bishop of Crediton, The Right Reverend Jackie Searle. Begins at 3.00pm with sung Evensong at the Anglican Parish Church of Holy Cross, Church Lane followed by a procession to the statue of St Boniface in Newcombes Meadow and then to the National Shrine of St Boniface. The pilgrimage concludes with Solemn Benediction at St Boniface church at approximately 4.30pm followed by light refreshments. Exeter Street Pastors The Exeter Street Pastors provide pastoral support for those who are out late at night in Exeter City Centre. For the last ten years they have supported people, compelled by the Gospel imperative to ‘love thy neighbour’. To celebrate their Tenth Anniversary you are invited to a service of thanksgiving at Exeter Cathedral on Saturday 15 June from 7.00 till 8.15pm. The Gift How can we encounter the Holy Spirit & share our faith? This course from CaFE carries the Apostolic Blessing of Pope Francis. See www.thegiftofthespirit.org for a clip. There will be prayer, DVD, talks & discussion (plus lovely refreshments). The last four - in the series of six Tuesday evenings at 7.30 pm will be on the following dates: 4, 11 and 18 June. They will be held at Cardinal Newman House, Wonford Road, Exeter EX2 4PF. There is no charge for this event, but please book your place in advance. Contact: Chris & Sue on 01392 432929 or email smyl_lee@hotmail.com

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Jun 2019 edition of the Catholic South West - Page

4 June 2019 Catholic South West St Anthony of Padua meets the neighbours! St Anthony of Padua Church is tucked away in a quiet cul-de-sac in Melksham. Our parishioners recently decided that it would be a good idea to invite our neighbours to tea. Invitations went out to all the neighbours and the parishioners began to bake. It was decided that a cream tea with cakes was to be the menu; some of St Anthony’s congregation are cake makers extraordinaire! Our elderly neighbours and those who are carers of family members were unable to come so cakes were delivered to them. We realised we had a celebrity among our neighbours when Melksham’s Carnival Queen Naomi turned up! Perhaps next time she will wear her regalia! It was a fun afternoon, with lots of chatter and laughter. Neighbours were sent home with cakes for their neighbours who were unable to come, and we will definitely be inviting our neighbours again. Journey of the Lampedusa Cross A replica Lampedusa cross is making it’s way around every school of the Diocese of Clifton as part of a pilgrimage in the Dio - cese`s year of prayer. The cross was cre - ated by St Edward’s School, Sherfield English and aims to help us all focus on the plight of refugees and encourage us to spread compassion and hope, not concern and suspicion. The cross has been to St Gregory`s School, Bath and St Bede`s Catholic College in the past month. Chap - laincy students from St Gregory`s worked hard putting together an emotive and pow - erful art installation to house the cross, based around the idea of refugees being an inconvenience. It was placed in the hall right in the middle of the assembly set up, in the middle of lessons and in the middle of the dining area – to create an inconven - ience, to become the focus. We called it ‘In - convenience: A comparison between treatment of refugees: Barricades vs Hope’ At St Bede`s they began their morning with a short, reflec - tive service that was led by the Year 7 Chaplaincy Team and then pupils were in - vited to visit the cross in the Chapel at break and lunchtime. Francesco Tuccio is a carpenter from the small Italian island of Lampedusa who came up with the original concept of the Lampedusa crosses. Seeing hundreds of refugees in haphazard boats crashing on the rocks that surround the Island, Tuccio was moved to gather the driftwood from the wrecked boats and turn them into crosses, which he offered to survivors as a small but powerful symbol of hope. For a time, when the refugee crisis topped the news head - lines, you couldn’t get away from stories of capsized boats in the Mediterranean, mi - grants – both alive and dead washing up on the shores of holiday Islands and so on. The sad part came when people started to see the arrival of these innocent victims as an inconvenience, as a problem to sort out, as a crisis that needed to be passed on to someone else. Brexit has stolen the attention of the media these days but the persecution of thou - sands around the world hasn’t stopped. For the arrival of the cross we chose to focus our installation upon the contrasting re - sponses that refugees face when arriving on foreign shores. We also placed around the hall an exhibition based around the 34,361 refugees who lost their lives in the 25 years up until the last World Refugee Day. Their names, their stories, the cir - cumstances surrounding their untimely deaths were documented by United for In - tercultural Action, a European Network of 550 anti-racist organisations in 48 coun - tries. In reality there are so many more, these are just the reported deaths. We used this data and the stories documented to share the harsh reality of this humanitar - ian crisis, but more importantly highlight the hope we can offer. This is why, at St Gregory`s, the centrepiece of the installation held the cross aloft – the symbol of hope given to refugees is high above the barricade. The plinth holding the cross was designed to represent a flame with the story of Tuccio written onto it. Fi - nally, the display had colourful sheets of paper, just like the wood used to construct the crosses, for students and staff at St Gregory`s to write a message or prayer of hope upon. These could be for those who have died or still journeying towards a bet - ter life, before being placed into a box built into the artwork. Here are a few of those messages left in the artwork: “ Jesus loves you no matter what you’ve been through. ‘Perfect love casts out fear.’ (1 John 4:18)” “If you stay strong, you can get through any - thing. Always remember that there is a light at the end of the tunnel. Your suffer - ing will come to an end.” “Never give up, you’re welcome here.” “You are hope, you are love, you are brave and you are the future. Keep on.” “Dear God, please help refugees when they try to find a new life, and protect them from all the danger that they go through. Also, please help others to help them in any way they can. Guide them through tough times and be with them when they are struggling, let them always know you are with them. Amen.” “To all the parents and carers taking their children away from the conflict in your home country, you are doing the right thing. You are giving them the future they deserve to have and they will thank you for that.” “Dear God, please pray for all those people who risk their lives crossing borders or try - ing to get to safety. We are all equal. It doesn’t matter if we’re white, black, believe in a God or not. This is one world, and we need to change the way we act. Refugees running away from their homes, floods, dis - asters, conflict – we must make the world different for all our family and friends. Amen .” The cross at St Bede`s, Bristol Students from St Gregory`s, Bath The Installation at St Gregory`s Explanation of the Cross

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Jun 2019 edition of the Catholic South West - Page

Buckfast Abbey Trust Registered Charity number 232497 Saturday 6th July 2019 10am 4pm Buckfast Abbey Trust Registered Charity number 232497 S U M M E R FAIR Food & Craft Food & Craft Local food and craft producers Live cookery demonstrations PLUS live entertainment At Buckfast Abbey F R EE EN T R Y THE GRANGE RESTAURANT & TEA ROOM F R EE PAR K I NG Hot & col d drinks tent For up to date information www.buckfast.org.uk / whats-on A great family day out! www.buckfast.org.uk Car Parks and Entry to The Abbey is free. You can always phone us on (01364) 645506 or email on bookshop@buckfast.org.uk Buckfast Abbey Shops Bookshop, Gift Shop, Monastic Shop Come and see the variety of religious books, Christian resources, Cards, Jewellery, CD’s, DVD’s, ideal gifts! Also our interesting range of Monastic produce from across Europe. PLUS - items from local artisans including delicious fudge made by the monks of Buckfast Abbey. H alf price Christmas card sa le whilst stocks last H alf price Christmas card sa le Catholic South West June 2019 5 Poetry Corner DON`T QUIT By Edgar Guest W hen things go wrong, as they sometimes will, When the road you`re trudging seems all uphill, When the funds are low but the debts are high, And you want to smile but you have to sigh, When care is pressing you down a bit... Rest if you must, but don`t you quit! Life is queer with its twists and turns, As every one of us sometimes learns, And many failures turn about When we might have won had we stuck it out. Don`t give up though the pace seems slow... You may succeed with another blow. Often the struggler has given up When he might have captured the victor’s cup; And he learned too late when the night came down, How close he was to the golden crown. Success is failure turned inside out... And you can never tell how close you are It may be near when it seems so far. So stick to the fight when you’re hardest hit It’s when things seem worst that you must not quit. Fact s , Figures and Fake News Fake News: At birth, a baby panda is actually smaller than a mouse! Below are various fact s and figures. One is not true - see if you can work out which one is Fake News! The answer is at the bottom - just so you know that all the others are true. n The Earth is the only planet in our solar system not to be named after a Greek or Roman deity n The Earth’s rotation is gradually slowing down by approximately 17 milliseconds per hundred years, although the rate at which it occurs is not perfectly uniform. This is lengthening our days, but it could be as much as 140 million years before the length of a day will have increased to 25 hours n The only letters that don’t appear on the periodic table are J & Q n If a Polar Bear and a Grizzly Bear mate, their offspring is called a “Pizzy Bear” n A single strand of Spaghetti is called a “Spaghetto” n Sunflowers can help clean radioactive soil. Japan is using this to rehabilitate Fukashima. Almost 10,000 packets of sunflower seeds have been sold to the people of the city n At birth, a baby panda is the size of a rabbit n Iceland does not have a railway system n In order to keep Nazis away, a Polish doctor faked a typhus out break. This strategy saved 8,000 people n The Roman – Persian wars are the longest in history, lasting over 680 years. They began in 54 BC and ended in 628 AD n If you translate “Jesus” from Hebrew to English, the correct translation is “Joshua”. The name “Jesus” comes from translating the name from Hebrew, to Greek, to Latin, to English

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6 June 2019 Catholic South West Scripture Focus By Fr Jeremy Corley RENEW THE FACE OF THE EARTH Scripture Notes by Father Jeremy Corley At Pentecost we express our longing for God’s Spirit to renew all things—not just humanity, but the whole earth. In the words of the Psalm: “Send forth your Spi - rit, O Lord, and renew the face of the earth!” The first chapter of Genesis describes God’s Spirit ho - vering over the face of the deep. God’s creative breath brought the whole world into existence. The second chapter of Genesis tells how God breathed on a lump of clay and created the first man. Our life comes from God, and we are going to God. Without God’s life breath, we would not be alive. With - out this breath of life, no creatures would live on earth. As the Psalm says: “If you take away their breath, they perish and return to the dust. When you send forth your spirit, they are created, and you renew the face of the earth.” In a special way at Pentecost, God’s Spirit came upon the first apostles. The mighty wind blew over them, and tongues of fire symbolized the Spirit’s coming. The Spirit’s presence transformed them from fearful friends of Jesus into courageous people. They became powerful witnesses to what they had seen and heard. They became bearers of Good News to the people aro - und them. But when we look around us at the world today, many people lack hope, often worying about the future of our planet. Rising levels of carbon dioxide have produced global warming. Rivers of discarded plastics pollute areas of the sea. Clean air and clean water have run short in some places. Is there any hope for humanity to avoid destroying the beautiful planet on which we live? Pope Francis’ document on caring for our common home (Laudato Si’) offers us hope. The Pope reminds us: “The Spirit of God has filled the universe with pos - sibilities and therefore, from the very heart of things, something new can always emerge” (#80). The Pope adds: “The Spirit, infinite bond of love, is intimately present at the very heart of the universe, inspiring and bringing new pathways” (#238). However, Pentecost was not magic. The disciples had to play their full part, even to suffering for the sake of the Lord. Similarly, the Spirit’s call today is not a magic solution to environmental problems. We also need to respond. Today we are aware of the value of biodiversity. Each created species of animal and plant plays its particu - lar role in the cosmos. We could see a similar diversity at work on Pentecost day. The miracle of Pentecost meant that each of the listeners heard the apostles speaking in their own diverse tongues. The one Crea - tor had a particular message, expressed in the diffe - rent tongues of the earth. Pope Francis’ document reminds us how closely God’s Spirit is linked with the earth: “Nature as a whole not only manifests God but is also a locus of his presence. The Spirit of life dwells in every living creature and calls us to enter into relationship with him. Discove - ring this presence leads us to cultivate the ecological virtues.” (#88). Such virtues are based on an ecological spirituality grounded in the convictions of our faith. We need a spirituality capable of inspiring us, an “interior im - pulse which encourages, motivates, nourishes and gives meaning to our individual and communal acti - vity” (#216). Pope Francis acknowledges the change of perspective needed: “Admittedly, Christians have not always ap - propriated and developed the spiritual treasures be - stowed by God upon the Church, where the life of the spirit is not dissociated from the body or from nature or from worldly realities, but lived in and with them, in communion with all that surrounds us” (#216). What is the Spirit saying to the Church around Pente - cost in 2019? We are called to renew our faith in Jesus Christ, risen from the dead, and we are called to share The Spirit of God has filled the universe with possibilities and therefore, from the very heart of things, something new can always emerge this faith with others. But we cannot ignore our planet, which is the common home of every human being. Our call is to bring Good News to our planet by treasuring it and preserving it and enhancing it. May the Holy Spi - rit give us strength to bring the Good News to a needy world today. The document of Pope Francis ends with a thanksgi - ving that we can use around the feast of Pentecost: “Holy Spirit, by your light, you guide this world towards the Father’s love, and accompany creation as it groans in travail. You also dwell in our hearts and you inspire us to do what is good. Praise be to you!” Each created species of animal and plant plays its particular role in the cosmos L aunch of Caritas Plymouth Caritas Plymouth was launched on May 18th 2019. An event to celebrate the Launch of Caritas Plymouth took place in May at St Nicholas RC Primary School, Exeter. Speakers included Dr Phil McCarthy, Chief Executive of Caritas Social Action Network, Sean Ryan MBE, National Caritas Community Sponsorship Co- ordinator and Canon John Deeny, Vicar General. Outlined at the event are the future plans for Caritas Plymouth including its priorties, charitable partners and aims for its first 2 years. These aims are... To express Christian love for all people through the practical service of those in need, of all faiths and none, by: n Increasing support to those in need n Increasing volunteering and befriending n Making a greater contribution to the common good of society n Enhancing education and formation within the Christian community, helping people appreciate the importance of sharing, respect and love in the spirit of the Gospel. The presentation was followed by a Holy Mass for the Launch of Caritas Plymouth which will be celebrated by the Right Reverend Mark O’Toole, ninth Bishop of Plymouth.

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Charity Profile Catholic South West June 2019 7 Catholic Children’s Society Plymouth (CCSP) needs your help Our 50:50 club – Helping Hands is expanding! We have around 100 supporters of our Helping Hands 50:50 club, but we’re looking to double this number by the end of 2019. This means that every month, we would be looking to give away £100 in prize money whilst raising £100 each month for CCSP too ! Please support CCSP and be in with a chance of winning one of three prizes in each monthly draw - contact Lydia at ccs@prcdtr.org.uk or 01364 645420 to receive an application form. It costs just £12 a year for one entry into all 12 monthly draws, or you can increase your subscription to £24 for 2 entries or £36 for three and so on. Do you donate and declutter with an orange box ? If you do not have one in your parish or school, but would like to help support CCSP by recycling your unwanted stamps, coins, jewellery, watches, keys and locks etc., please email vicki.dunstone@prcdtr.org.uk or call 01364 645420 and we will send one to you. ******************************************************* 2019 is proving to be an exciting year for the Catholic Children’s Society (Plymouth) The Board of the Catholic Children’s Society (Plymouth), which has 10 volunteer trustees from across the diocese, is pleased to welcome two new members of staff to our small team based at St Boniface House in Ashburton. Vicki Dunstone is our new Fundraiser and Communications Officer replacing Claire Warren, who for the last 8 years did a wonderful job raising funds and increasing the charity’s profile across the diocese. Having worked in a local CAST school for the last 6 years and with a wealth of marketing and fundraising experience, Vicki is looking forward to continuing the great work undertaken by her predecessor, and to finding innovative and fun ways such as linking with our schools in the diocese to help raise much needed funds for the charity. We also welcome Lydia Keogh, our new administrator who is responsible for our grant funding scheme assisting children and their families at a time of great financial need. Last year, CCSP raised £50,000 and was able to provide over £33,000 in grant funding and we hope to be able to support even more families over the next couple of years. One in five children living in the south west are living in poverty and in some areas of the region, poverty is even more severe ! Many parents and carers, despite working, find their income does not meet their basic needs such as providing a working cooker, warm clothes in the winter or a proper bed to sleep in. And then when circumstances change suddenly, life can become even harder as they have no cushion of savings to fall back on. Our Grant Essentials programme aims to relieve the urgent material needs of children, young people and families through the provision of financial assistance to those in dire need. We deliberate long and hard over each application we receive and for every grant we are able to approve, we do have to turn away about the same number too. We would love to be able to do more fundraising every year and increase the financial support and generosity we already receive so that we can assist more families in time of great financial need. “We can not thank you enough !” is a common theme of feedback we receive from those parents and carers we have been able to support. Vicki and Lydia will be working alongside Caroline Hambly, who has been providing our Patchwork Parenting programme throughout the diocese for the last 5 years, supporting over 60 families in 2018. Pictured left to right: Caroline, Vicki and Lydia Summary of Grants provided in 2018 21 washing machines 22 cookers 20 fridge freezers 25 beds and mattresses 25 grants for essential furniture such as tables and chairs 59 grants for school uniform/shoes 13 grants for new baby equipment 8 grants for educational purposes (residentials, courses and books) 3 grants for pilgrims going to Lourdes Nicole and Emelia from Weymouth held a cake sale last month after Sunday Masses. They were raising money for a wheelchair, desparately needed for their cousin Maria. The wheelchair has to be specially adapted for her needs - and the two girls raised an amazing £558 to help. The parish sewing group also donated a child`s duvet to be raffled. The winner of the duvet donated it to Maria. Well done Nicole and Emelia! Their work doesn`t just help Maria, but it inspires us all! Seventy Years Young! In 1949 Bishop Grimshaw had the idea of forming a Catholic Choral Society to assist with the singing at Diocesan events. Now Seventy years on, apart from a change of name to the Plymouth Catholic Choir, we are still going strong, kinda! We may be small in numbers but big in our commitment and our love of singing. Under the baton of our musical director Shaun Brady we practice every Wednesday evening at Our Lady of Lourdes Church in Plympton between 7:30 and 9:00 pm. We would welcome new members warmly; your only talent needed is a love of singing! This year to mark our 70th anniversary, we will be organising three services in June. These are:- 2nd June. 3pm at Nazareth House Plymouth. 5th June. 7pm at Our Lady of Lourdes, Plympton. 12th June 7pm at St. Austin’s Priory Ivybridge. Please come along and support us in our efforts to bring music and cheer to all. You will not be disappointed Rita Joesbury. Publicity Officer Plymouth Catholic Choir. Nicole and Emelia Raise Money

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8 June 2019 Catholic South West Brush Strokes By Fr Tom Grufferty B rush Strokes has taken the liberty to paint on a broader canvas this month with the great feast of Pentecost in mind. I have spent some time scouring the Internet for useful prayer sites that enriched my prayer life for the third greatest feast, Pentecost, 9th June. What follows is a summary of what I found. I would encourage you, dear reader, to explore the Internet for yourself as searching is often a powerful prayer on its very own. My favourite is “Universalis” which was founded by Martin Kockanski in 1995. Martin went to Downside School. This site is widely used and there is a once in a life time joining fee. It contains the Readings for every day as well as the Divine Office. It can be used on all devices including WAP phones. It sets out to provide what it says on the tin, “to harness computer technology to enrich the spiritual lives of Christians” and provide the liturgy and devotions of Catholics in this electronic age. You get a great deal on this site. I know lay people who use this site at Mass and privately at home. www.universalis.com My second site is a new discovery for me. “Pentecost-Novena of the Seven Gifts-EWTN” Many Catholics, especially those who are no longer able to attend Church use EWTN. This section gives the background to the idea of Novena and then it takes you through nine days of Prayer. The prayers can be printed off so that you don’t have to login each time. There is a beautiful prayer of consecration which is recommended for each day of the Novena. There is a prayerful challenge as you pray through the gifts and the challenge is to make these gifts your own. For the nine days pick the best time suitable to you each day. Sit and take ten deep breaths before you start. Take the Scripture Readings in the order of three, for example Acts:1- 11 on the first day of the Novena, Romans 8:8-17 on the second day and John 14:15-16, 23-26 on the third day. Repeat the same sequence for the nine days. Having read the scriptures, say the prayer of consecration and then the prayer for each day. www.ewtn.com/devotionals/pente - cost/seven.htm “Sacred Space” is run by the Irish Jesuits and has been my favourite for many years. The Pentecost prayer outline is called “Dance with the Holy Spirit”. Will there be dancing in your Parish this Pentecost? There are numerous ways in which the Holy Spirit is at work in our lives, when you have an urge to love for no apparent reason that is the Holy Spirit. When you have a feeling of joy without any apparent reason that is the Holy Spirit at work in you. I just love the profound thought that “we belong to the best company. We are VIPs who truly share God’s DNA”. Check out the excellent “Pray as you go”. You cannot get better brush stokes than that. www.sacredspace.ie Using the Internet to Pray the Feast of Pentecost 2019

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Catholic South West June 2019 9 The terms ecumenism and ecumenical come from the Greek οἰκουμένη ( oikoumene ), which means "the whole inhabited world", and was historically used with specific reference to the Roman Empire. The ecumenical vision comprises both the search for the visible unity of the Church (Ephesians 4:3) and the "whole inhabited earth" (Matthew 24:14) as the concern of all Christians. The adjective ecumenical has been applied to any interdenominational initiative that encourages greater cooperation among Christians and their churches, whether or not the specific aim of that effort is full, visible unity. In Christian Chur c hes the qualification ecumenical is originally (and still) used in terms such as "ecumenical council" and "Ecumenical Patriarch" in the meaning of pertaining to the totality of the larger Church (such as the Catholic Church or the Orthodox Church) rather than being restricted to one of its constituent local churches or dioceses. Used in this original sense, the term carries no connotation of re-uniting the historically separated Christian denominations, but presumes a unity of local congregations in a worldwide communion. Historically, the word was originally used in the context of large ecumenical councils that were organized under the auspices of Roman Emperors to clarify matters of Christian theology and doctrine. These "Ecumenical Councils" brought together bishops from around the inhabited world (that is, οἰκουμένη ) as they knew it at the time. There were a total of seven ecumenical councils accepted by both Eastern Orthodoxy and Roman Catholicism held before the Great Schism. Thus, the modern meaning of the words ecumenical and ecumenism derives from this pre- modern sense of Christian unity, and the impulse to recreate this unity again. There are a variety of different expectations of what Christian unity looks like, how it is brought about, what ecumenical methods ought to be engaged, and what both short- and long-term objectives of the ecumenical movement should be. Ecumenism and nondenominational or post denominational movements are not necessarily the same thing. View from the Pew By Dr Jay Kettle-Williams Silence is the ultimate weapon of power W hen it comes to cooking, I consider myself a ‘Good Luck Chef’. Any meal I might prepare is brought to table, then unceremoniously put before those banging their cutlery in wild anticipation as I say, ‘Good luck!’. No, I’m not a good cook. I stand up and admit any accusation condemning me for my culinary skills. But false or unsubstantiated accusation is a different kettle of fish. And we seem to have a lot of it nowadays, be that by way of slander or libel. Yes, if there is one thing that really gets my goat, it’s false accusation, defamation of character particularly when it’s cowardly, behind someone’s back ... especially from anyone wielding an ounce of power. That’s when things can get abusive, dangerously so. I suppose we have all been victims of calumny at some point in our lives when, defenceless, we are subjected to slander or libel by those wishing to besmirch our character, damage our reputation. Those launching the attack often do so in their own self-interest, perhaps self-defence. Being too mindful of their own shortcomings or misdemeanours, they try to avoid what otherwise might be unwelcome focus of attention on themselves. But we take our example from the innocence and good will exemplified by the Christ child, so sorely defamed once grown into a man among us before sacrificed. When people learn you’re Christian, you could well be attacked, especially if you’re lay. Admittedly the priest’s collar, nuns’ habits etc. highlight the individual and so the group, but such markers can defend - a shield which the lay do not carry – or act simply as a magnet for unwelcome attention. There’s little or no defence for attacks against our theocracy. We might well be condemned as mealy-mouthed dinosaurs, naïve do-gooders, and then ostracised by our peer groups in an increasingly secular society which is often over mindful of other minorities but too unmindful of being born of and borne by Christian ideals. Perhaps ‘Silence is the ultimate weapon of power’, as Charles de Gaulle once voiced. Or is it? © jlkw Victims of calumny Condemned as mealy-mouthed dinosaurs, naïve do-gooder Ostracised in an increasingly secular society CSW looks at the word “Ecumenical”

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On Saturday 11th May families and friends came together in the Chapel at St Mary’s for the Confirmation and First Holy Communion sacraments. Administered by The Right Reverend Declan Lang, Bishop of Clifton, 18 girls were confirmed along with 10 children receiving their First Holy Communion. It was particularly nice to welcome pupils from Leweston and Port Regis, who also spent the last few months preparing for the day. People travelled from Switzerland, France, Germany and Spain to celebrate with their families. The Mass was a wonderful celebration in which around 200 guests sang their hearts out, led by the St Mary’s Chapel Choir. After the service, the congregation enjoyed a buffet lunch on the Head’s Lawn. The sun shone and families and friends celebrated together on this joyous occasion. Thanks must go to all those who helped make it such a special day, particularly Mrs Bowe for the overall organisation, Miss Coffin for administration, Miss Connolly and Mr Forrester for catechesis, Mrs Roberts for the flowers and Mrs For - rester for the cakes. 10 June 2019 Catholic South West T R A V E L I N S U R A N C E arranged for readers of Catholic South West A N N U A L T R A V E L I N S U R A N C E AVAILABLE TO ANYONE UP TO 85 YEARS OF AGE. MOST PRE-EXISTING MEDICAL CONDITIONS ACCEPTED T O P Q U A L I T Y C O V E R With a 24 hour helpline and an air ambulance get-you-home service. Mention this advert to get a Special Catholic South West discount. Don’t forget we also offer SINGLE-TRIP COVER, with no maximum age limit and up to £20,000 cancellation cover per couple. CALL FOR DETAILS AND PRICES 0116 272 0500 Real people - not nachines! Authorised and regulated by the FCA FT Travel Insurance UK based Confirmations and First Holy Communions We will be celebrating First Holy Communions and Confirmation in the next 2 issues. Please send us your pictures, stories, reasons for confirmation or whatever you like! We would love to share your celebration! csw@cathcom.org Confirmation Group from Exeter with Bishop Mark on their Confirmation Day on May 12th Shaftesbury

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Please Support Our Advertisers They Support Us! Catholic South West June 2019 11 New contemporary and traditional stained glass designed, made and fitted. Professional repairs and restoration. Website: customstainedglass.co.uk Email: wayne.ricketts@btconnect.com Tel: 0117 955 5390 Wayne Ricketts Stained Glass Seafarers find a welcome in Falmouth There are few more dangerous jobs in the world than being a seafarer. You take to the ocean in a metal box and face not just treacherous storms, but accidents and fires on board, explosions, collisions, and sometimes even attacks by pirates. And there is always the risk your ship could sink. Yet without seafarers, we would not have many of the things we rely on. Cars, com - puters, phones, fuel, various types of food, all of this is brought to the UK by ship. When John Pinhay, the AoS chaplain to Falmouth, went on board the cargo ship Heba M, he discovered the crew had endu - red a terrifying experience in the North Sea of the Dutch coast. Atrocious weather had dislodged the ves - sel’s cargo of timber and much of it had tumbled over board, leaving a long trail of floating timber in an area of about six miles long and three miles wide. As a re - sult, the ship had become dangerously un - balanced. Alarmed by the situation, the captain, who was sailing from Latvia to Italy, headed for the safety of Falmouth, where the vessel remained in the shipyard for three weeks while work was carried out on it. During this time, the crew – nine Syrians, an Indian and a Turk - had to remain on board the ship and were not allowed ou - tside the port area due to immigration re - strictions. At one time, being a seafarer might have meant that you got to travel the world and see exotic locations. Nowadays, due to the fast turnaround of ships, seafarers get few opportunities for shore leave. John and volunteer ship visitor Simon Bro - mage visited the men to see if they could help them in any way during their enforced stay. “During our visits the men spoke about their work, lives and families. We could imagine the loneliness and frustration the crew were experiencing. The Syrian crew members expressed sadness and anxiety about the war in their homeland,” said John. John and Simon also brought the seafa - rers woolly hats, maritime newspapers, and chocolates, all of which were grate - fully received. World Dishes Khorovats from Armenia As the barbecue season (hopefully) approaches, why not try this recipe from Armenia for grilled meat eaten with flatbreads and vegetables. There is some preparation so make sure you get started at least a day before you plan to eat! 1. The best meat to use is Pork – either loin, ribs or tenderloin. Cut it up into large chunks so that it is ready to be marinated overnight. 2. For the marinade you need white onion, black pepper and dried basil. Cut the onions into thin half rings and then rub the pepper and basil into the chunks of meat with your hands . 3. Using a deep, wide bowl, place a layer of the onions at the bottom and then a layer of meat. Then more onion and more meat until you’ve used it all up. 4. Cover the bowl and put it in the fridge for 24 hours. 5. Take the meat out an hour or so before you need it so that it can come up to room temperature. 6. Skewer the meat and sprinkle course salt all over, patting the meat to make sure it gets attached. 7. Traditionally khorovats are cooked over charcoal – start cooking as soon as there is white ash on the charcoal. The key is to keep turning the skewers – the more you turn them, the tastier they will be! 8. Serve with vegetables cooked on skewers in the same way (no need to marinate) and flatbread. Canon Mattie Hayes RIP Please keep in your prayers Canon Mattie Hayes who died in his sleep on Saturday morning 27 April at St Joseph’s Care Home, Bristol. Canon Mattie’s body was received into the Chapel of St Joseph’s Home, Cotham Hill on Tuesday 14 May. Monsignor Gabriel Leyden celebrated Mass later that evening with St Joseph’s community, residents and Canon Mattie’s family and friends. The fol - lowing day the Funeral Mass took place in St John the Evangelist, Bath and he was laid to rest at Perrymead Cemetery. In July 2018, Fr Mattie had celebrated his Platinum Jubilee with family and friends who gathered from Ireland, Canada and different parts of the UK for a joyful Mass in Bristol.

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12 June 2019 Catholic South West Advertise in this space for as little as £70 Contact Janet on 01440 730399 janett@cathcom.org

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Catholic South West June 2019 13

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14 June 2019 Catholic South West Prayer L oving Lord, just as you hovered over creation at the start, so now you hover over your new creation. Just as you breathed life into our first parents, so now you literally inspire each one of us with that gentle breeze that enlivens and enriches. Loving, Lord, Pentecost is a constant reminder that your Spirit continues to hover over the chaos of your one church and one world. Your Spirit is the very one who reminds us that we share only one good earth, that a good planet is hard to find, and that we are called to treasure it. Your Spirit inspires and inflames, and is the very source of that different sort of global warming which we are all invited to work at. Your Spirit points us in new directions, opens our eyes and minds and hearts in wonder and welcome, in caring and sharing, in cherishing and developing, in co-operating and peacemaking, in mutual understanding and trust. Loving Lord, as we celebrate Pentecost we`re ever so much more aware of the fragile earth on which we tread. We`ve all been walking around recently with carrier bags bearing the message of our modern- day Pentecost: `A good planet is hard to find. Treasure this one`. `Global warming. . . the heat`s really on the Third World`s poor`. Loving Lord, let the heat of your inspiring and enfiring Spirit be upon each one of us so that we may truly understand the treasure of your creation within and without, so that we may handle with care all those whose lives we`re privileged to touch both near and far, so that our hands and our hearts and our minds may be open to receive the gifts you so desperately want to give us. Loving Lord, don`t just trickle, but pour upon us your wisdom, your understanding, your prudence, your reverence, your awe, your - Self! Then Pentecost will not just be a word we utter but an experience we daily plunge into and live. Amen. by Fr Denis Blackledge QUOTES      GLOBAL WARMING Funeral Services To Advertise in the Funeral Section contact Janet Took 01440 730399 janett@cathcom.org  Be yourself, everyone else is already taken (Oscar Wilde) The future rewards those who press on. I don`t have time to feel sorry for myself. I don`t have time to complain. I`m going to press on. (Barack Obama) Real knowledge is to know the extent of one’s ignorance (Confucius) Strange women lying in ponds, distributing swords, is no basis for a system of government! (Monty Python) Success consists of going from failure to failure without loss of enthusiasm (Winston Churchill) Are we happy that our grandchildren may never seen an elephant except in a picture book? (David Attenborough)

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SAINT OSCAR ROMERO Pastor, Prophet, Martyr Kerry Walters Franciscan Media, Cincinnati, pbk, 165 pages, 2018, £13.99/$15.99 Talk about “a prophet not being welcome in his own country”! Oscar Romero lived out to the end those words of Jesus, and ended up with an assassin’s single bullet shot through his heart whilst offering the sacrifice of the Eucharist. But there were many wounding words, not least from his other brother bishops, who, all bar one, sided to the end with the powerful politi - cians and wealthy land owners, and even delated him to Rome. And even his Salva - doran brother bishops, al bar one, did not even attend his requiem. The author, a professor emeritus of philo - sophy and peace and justice studies, pro - vides the reader with all that is necessary to glimpse the greatness of Romero, who, from being a timid, introverted and very traditional Salvadoran priest, reputed to be himself at one stage a lackey of power - ful right wingers, became the hero of libe - ration theology, and sacrificed all for the sake of the love of his people. This is a deeply moving and sympathetic biography of a man of God who began life in the simplest of circumstances, who never forgot his roots, and who slowly but surely saw through the radical injustices meted on his people by the few who held all the purse-strings and the political power. From being a man who did not seem to have it in him to rock the boat, and who early on was set against libera - tion theology, and against Jesuits who were promoting it, he slowly but surely began to imbibe Vatican II, Pope Paul VI, and especially the latter’s 1975 challen - ging encyclical Evangelii Nuntiandi, which stated that the Gospel and justice went to - gether. Circumstances in El Salvador also began to deteriorate in the 1970s, and individuals disappeared or were tortured and murde - red: it was mainly the simple folk, the campesinos, who were on the receiving end of such atrocities. Amazingly, Romero had one close friend who was a Jesuit, Rutilio Grande, who lived very simply with the poorest folk after he had been turned down when it was suggested he become Rector of a seminary. In 1977, whilst on his way to a village for mass, Rutilio and two men in the car with him were riddled with bullets: the two children with them escaped. This murderous moment was the ultimate turning point for Romero, when he truly began to dare all, risk all, and sacrifice all for the sake of love of his Salvadoran peo - ple. Against the wishes of the Papal Nun - cio he decided that on the Sunday following the Rutilio murder there would be only one mass in the whole country. An amazingly brave gesture, given the fact that his own brother bishops, bar one, di - sowned him! Romero was good with his words, and used media extremely well. His Sunday homilies were broadcast throughout the land, and even when the government de - stroyed the radio station means were found of carrying on broadcasting. Inci - dentally, those Sunday homilies – which lasted an hour! – are now in six massive volumes titled A Prophetic Bishop Speaks to His People. Meanwhile, in the late 1970s, things were going from bad to worse in the country, which was becoming the opposite of its name. Romero was the only bishop, by then of course, as Archbishop, who week by week face full-on the tragedies that were piling up against his people, with tor - ture, murder and disappearance ever on the increase. Consequently Romero fell foul of Church authorities, not just local via the Papal Nuncio, but was reported to Rome, and had to go to face the newly elected John Paul II after the death of Paul VI, and the sudden death of John Paul I. Walters tells the story with limpidity and vigour, giving the reader a deeper grasp and understanding of what enabled Ro - mero to grow from a quiet, conservative priest into a modern-day martyr. The book coincided with the canonisation of Saint Oscar Romero on 14 October 2018 in Rome, the very same day when Pope Paul VI, his kind and encouraging mentor, was canonised. This is a story for our time, to help us to grow in our willingness to stand up as prophets who put into action the words and work of Jesus. Catholic South West June 2019 15 © Denis Blackledge SJ DRUG AND ALCOHOL DEPENDENCY Dr Derek Indoe Redemptorist Publications, 63 pages, pbk, 2018, £4.99 Written from a Christian perspective, this book from the Pastoral Outreach Series is intended to support parish counsellors, parents, friends and therapists who want to help someone overcome drug or alcohol dependency. It provides clear, concise, accessible information, as well as pointers and a framework for recovery from addiction. And it will be of use to anyone who wants to know more about their own dependency, and find options for a way out. Dotted throughout the book are vignettes of individuals in drug or alcohol dependency, some deeply painful and touching. Four chapters cover a general introduction to drugs, including a list of those most commonly available; some of the different kinds of treatment available; hints for help for anyone who experiences dependency in their family; and a look at the Christian perspective. At the end of the book the author gives a list of references, resources and help. He starts by giving a simple definition of a drug, which is a chemical we take into our body by swallowing, injecting or inhaling. He reminds that medicines are drugs, and may be used not to heal, but to get a “high” and to get away from reality, rather than ground reality in healing. Solvent abuse happens when an individual sniffs petrol, paraffin or glue: prolonged use of such leads to brain damage. Solvents are favoured by those with little money, or those who cannot get their hands on the plethora of other drugs. Then there are the Class A, B and C drugs. He begins with Lysergic acid [LSD], which breeds hallucination, may damage the brain, and lead to self-harm or even death. Heroin, an opiate used to treat pain, gives a feeling of well-being, relaxation or sleepiness. It is highly addictive, as is cocaine, which can be sniffed, “snorted” or injected. Magic mushrooms and ecstasy complete his list of Class A drugs. Amphetamines begin his Class B, stimulants which can make a person overactive, agitated or psychotic. Mephedrone, a newly manufactured drug, has a similar effect as amphetamines. Cannabis is the most frequently used drug in the UK, and may lead to mental health problems affecting motivation, memory, concentration and learning. Barbiturates, like alcohol, act as sedatives on the central nervous system. Cannabinoids bring his Class B drugs to a close. In Class C he has tranquilisers, khat, GHB (gammahydroxybutrate) and ketamine. All are dangerous: GHB is the “rape” drug, for example. There are also new psychoactive substances – “legal” highs – which fall into four categories: stimulants; sedatives; hallucinogens and synthetic cannabinoids. Methylphenidates, promoted as cocaine alternatives, have a dozen names by which they are known. If on prescription, they are stimulants used medically to treat ADHD. The author, a consultant clinical and forensic psychologist who has worked with adults, families and adolescents in a variety of settings, moves into a phased approach to treatment. He adduces the Wheel of Change, and the first decision to be made is where the individual is on the Wheel, which helps to understand the process of addiction, and where an individual is within the process of recovery. He goes through the five parts or stages on the Wheel: pre-contemplation; contemplation; preparation; action; and maintaining the action. He stresses that all effective psychological treatments for addictions involve treating the client as a co-worker in a healing partnership; and negotiating arrangements rather than imposing views. Plenty of hope and patience will be needed, staying in the present and reminding oneself that managing addiction takes a lifetime. Clinical signs of alcohol withdrawal are covered, as are current approaches to inpatient treatment for alcohol detoxification. Behavioural interventions are needed when individuals do not engage in treatment. Reinforcing or rewarding positive behaviour is often the easiest way to help someone change their behaviour. A twelve-point individual programme is proposed, recording data accurately, and the author gives a summary of implementing the programme, with sample contracts. He sets out behavioural terms to know when talking to professionals about behaviour. These include goal-setting, self- monitoring, rate-controlled training and self-reinforcement analysis. Family then becomes the centre of the author’s attention, and he goes through a variety of approaches to parenting, and the “tough love” approach needed at times. He suggests a relapse prevention plan, complete with a questionnaire. He wraps up the book with a Christian perspective, with a series of questions for individuals and communities to take the reader out of his or her comfort zone. The whole is based on Vatican II, Evangelii Gaudium, and other quotes from Pope Francis. As Francis stated: “I prefer a Church which is bruised, hurting and dirty because it has been out on the streets, rather than a Church which is unhealthy from being confined and from clinging to its own security.” An appendix provides references, resour - ces and help. And in his listing of the vari - ous Classes of drugs he lists a fascinating vocabulary by which drugs are known. Al - together this is a most helpful guide for anyone involved in this area of pastoral need, and I highly recommend it. The Latin Mass Society www.lms.org.uk 020 7404 7284 Masses in the Extraordinary Form in Plymouth Diocese : St Edward the Confessor, Home Park Ave, Peverell, PLYMOUTH PL3 4PG Sundays 11.30am Sung Mass Blessed Sacrament Church, Fore Street, Heavitree, EXETER EX1 2QJ Third Sundays. 3pm Sung Mass St Cyprian’s Chapel, Ugbrooke House, CHUDLEIGH, Devon TQ13 0AD 4th Sundays 3.00pm Sung Mass Lanherne Convent, St Mawgan, NEWQUAY, Cornwall TR8 4ER Sundays at 7.40am Weekdays at 8.00am Sung Mass Our Lady’s, Old Mill Lane, MARNHULL, Dorset DT10 1JX Thursday 13th June 12 noon Low Mass Our Lady of Lourdes & St Cecilia, White Cliff Mill Street, BLANDFORD FORUM DT11 7BN Low Mass 12 noon Friday 19th July Any questions contact Maurice Quinn (LMS Rep, Devon and Dorset) on either : Email : devon@lms.org.uk Mob. 07555536579

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CRYPTIC Across 1 Lovely lass from the outset left key within to visit (4,2) 4 `Fake place`? That`s low even for a disgusting rag to get involved (6) 9 Biblical site to trumpet about? (7) 10 It`s up to peacekeepers to prepare the ground, mostly (5) 11 State of 22 that`s randomly taken on board (7) 12 Circumference defined using retro heavy trigonometry (5) 13 Tom and Jerry: no act amused better! (3,3,5) 18 Philistine`s suit tailor only partially fits (5) 20 Sailor, an Irishman, is announced as David`s third mate (7) 22 Some stars like Lugosi lost heart with support in the end (5) 23 Mary`s boy is in your school (3,4) 24 With London band regularly coming back, golf around Home Counties fits in, it`s true (6) 25 Idiot`s admitted to changing due to being married (6) CRYPTIC Down 1 Dupe a king to entrap a knave (6) 2 Saul`s daughter married bachelor, about to retire (5) 3 Tic Arab gets, uncommon where the camels come from (7) 5 Fleeced, stomach`s upset with number taken in (5) 6 One that works to make Greek god the brightest star in the firmament (7) 7 Oracle ushered back Greek character (6) 8 Couple in the Bible fiddle a good man out of three grand (3,3,5) 14 Riviera resort`s against elite contracting (7) 15 Greek`s letter to explore parts of volcano, Micronesian section (7) 16 Place Amalekites burned in Zion, including killing Levites and Gideon`s leaders (6) 17 Ran around, sure getting whipped (6) 19 Fancy motorway trip`s a long time coming (5) 21 One huge hold on ship, they say (5) QUICK Across 1 Obtain: pop in (4,2) 4 Heavenly dwelling of the Norse gods (6) 9 Strategic oasis town near the Dead Sea taken by Joshua (7) 10 As far as time allows (5) 11 Africa`s oldest republic (1847) (7) 12 Belt put around a horse to secure a saddle (5) 13 Game of battle or other contests where first one side, then the other, has the upper hand (3,3,5) 18 Philistine who stood by David against Absalom... (5) 20 ...and David`s third wife (7) 22 Seventh sign of the zodiac (5) 23 Another designation for the Blessed Virgin Mary (3,4) 24 One of several narratives of the life of Christ, and the principles laid down therein (6) 25 ------ Reformed Church: merger of the Congregationalists and English Presbyterian Churches in 1972 (6) QUICK Down 1 Coax, persuade (6) 2 Saul`s elder daughter who married Adriel (5) 3 Ancient Central Asian land which gave its name to the two-humped camel (7) 5 Conned: shocked (5) 6 Important star in Scorpius (7) 7 Oracle site in Asia Minor (6) 8 In Revelation two nations under the dominion of Satan (3,3,5) 14 French Riviera resort, originally a Greek port (7) 15 15th letter of the Greek alphabet (7) 16 Place Achish of Gath gave to David to live (6) 17 Scourged; excoriated (6) 19 Persona: idol (5) 21 Hold, stop (nautical/archaic) (5) 2-in-1 Crossword by Axe You can use both sets of clues to solve the puzzle: the solutions are the same. So, if you want to try the CRYPTIC puzzle, for instance, but are unsure, use the QUICK clues to help you work out the solution. Similarly, if you try the QUICK clues, use the CRYPTIC clues to help you prove the solution SOLUTION Across: 1 Come by, 4 Asgard, 9 Jericho, 10 Until, 11 Libe - ria, 12 Girth, 13 Cat And Mouse, 18 Ittai, 20 Abigail, 22 Libra, 23 Our Lady, 24 Gospel, 25 United. Down: 1 Cajole, 2 Merab, 3 Bactria, 5 Stung, 6 Antares, 7 Delphi, 8 Gog and Magog, 14 Antib es, 15 Omicron, 16 Ziklag, 17 Flayed, 19 Image, 21 Avast. 16 June 2019 Catholic South West Clifton Diocesan Day 6th July 2019 - Bristol T he Clifton Diocese have announced the speakers and Workshops for their Diocesan Day which will take place on Saturday 6th July at St Brendan`s College, Broomhill Road, Brislington, BS4 5RQ. The keynote speaker is Fr Denis McBride, a priest, theologian and director of Redemptorist Publications. Workshops cover many aspects of prayer, meditation, scripture and spirituality for all ages. There are also activities for children and young people. The Diocese have said: "It is good for us to be together as we gather to reflect, to celebrate and consider once more what it means for us to be Church. In our diocesan Year of Prayer, we come together to deepen our relationship with God and with one another. We are blessed to have Fr. Denis McBride to lead us in reflecting upon our re - sponse to the invitation to engage in a relationship with God and the Church. Fr. Denis is a Redemptorist priest and author who has written extensively on the Gospels. His warm and engaging approach will give us new insights into how different personalities within the scripture respond to the voice of God. He will help us to reflect on what this means for us. How do we respond to God’s invitation in our own life? Personal and communal prayer are in trinsically linked. They are enriched when we allow ourselves to enter more fully into the sounds and silence of prayer and allow God to speak to us. We hope that there will be something for everyone, including our young people and children." Lunch will be provided, and people from all over the Clifton Dioecse are welcome. If you want to attend you will need to let the Diocese know you are coming either by email: adult.education@cliftondiocese.com or tel: 0117 902 5595. Timetable Refreshments: 9.15am Opening Liturgy: 9.45am Keynote: 10.15am - 11.15am Workshop One: 11.30am - 12.15pm Workshop Two: 12.30pm - 1.15pm Lunch: 1.15pm - 2.15pm Workshop Three: 2.15pm - 3.00pm Workshop Four: 3.15pm - 4.00pm Mass: 4.15pm

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