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Catholic South West History

Newspaper for the Dioceses of Plymouth, Clifon and Portsmouth

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May 2019 edition of the Catholic South West - Page

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May 2019 edition of the Catholic South West - Page

Inside Notre Dame Rises from the Ashes Page 10 Domestic Abuse in Church Communities Page 7 Dowry of Mary Tour Page 11 Children’s Section Pages 12 & 13 May 2019

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May 2019 edition of the Catholic South West - Page

O n 25th March 2019, the Feast of the Annunciation of the Lord, Bishop Mark installed three diocesan priests as Canons of the Cathedral Chapter; Fr Mark O’Keeffe, Dean of Plymouth Cathedral, Fr Peter Morgan, Dean of Cornwall and parish priest of St Austell and, as an honorary Canon, Fr Phillip Dyson, parish priest of Pen - zance. The Cathedral was filled to ca - pacity for this joyous celebra - tion. Bishop Mark presided at the installation and was joined by the other Canons of the Chapter as well as priests, dea - cons and lay people from across the Plymouth Diocese. The new Canons professed their faith in unison and then, assisted by the Canon Provost, they were vested with ceremonial crimson capes and the Chapter Statutes were entrusted to them. Finally each Canon was lead to his seat in the Cathedral and took his place amongst the Cathedral Chapter. Following the installation Bishop Mark presided at a Chap - ter Mass. His homily encouraged us to have a renewed en - ergy for both our love of God and our Lenten promises. Many congratulations to Canon Mark, Canon Peter and Canon Philip. We thank you for the service you have given to the diocese and to the people of God and we ask God’s blessing upon you as you begin this new chapter in your ministry. 2 May 2019 Catholic South West CONTACTS & DETAILS Catholic South West is a monthly newspaper for Catholics in the Plymouth, Clifton and Portsmouth Dioceses. It is published by Bellcourt Ltd AIMS To build community in the South West by sharing stories relating to Catholic life around the South West. To encourage readers to get more involved in - or start - projects and initiatives in the local area. To provide thought-provoking arti - cles to help readers deepen their Faith. GET INVOLVED We need your help! Articles: We need your local articles - we can only include what we get. So if you have an article or just a photo with a short desciption - please send it in. Ideas: We need your ideas for the paper and we need your ideas in the paper. If you have any thoughts on what we should in - clude - or if you are thinking about starting a new initiative - get in touch - we’d love to support it! Readers: If you can encourage other readers in your parish please do so. Tell them that the paper has improved Advertising: We rely on advertising - if you know of anyone that would benefit from promoting their busi - ness, event or anything else to parishioners throughout the South West. SUBMITTING EDITORIAL To send in editorial or to get in touch please contact us at:# CSW - Bellcourt Ltd N2 Blois Meadow Business Centre Steeple Bumpstead Haverhil, Suffolk CB9 7BN csw@cathcom.org 01440 730399 ADVERTISING To advertise in Catholic South West please contact: Janet Took janett@cathcom.org 01440 730399 DATES Catholic South West goes to parishes on the last full weekend of the month. It is printed around the middle of the month - so if you would like to advertise or send in editoril please do it as early as pos - sible. FROM CSW H appy Easter to all of our readers! We hope you have had a wonderful Easter so far! This edition of CSW has a slightly dif - ferent feel to it. Dr Jay Kettle-Williams joined us as editor for 3 issues which morphed into 4 issues and for that we are hugely grateful! He has brought to CSW a varied group of contributors and we are delighted that he will stay on as a regular con - tributor. You can read his new section “View from the Pew” on page 9. As well as our other regular contribu - tors we have local news from the Catholic community in and around the South West from all three Dioce - ses - Plymouth, Clifton and Portsmouth. If you have any news, events, articles, or thoughtful/funny stories - please send them in. We really want to repre - sent all parts of the South West but we can only print what we re - ceive! Also, if you have any comments, or if you want to receive more copies for your parish - do let us know. Enjoy the May edition and if you have any comments or feedback please contact us - all the contact details are in the column on the left of this page. CSW TEAM LEGAL INFORMATION Please note that opinions ex - pressed in this paper and on any linked sites or publica - tions are not necessarily those of the Publishers, Edi - tor, any Diocese or the wider Roman Catholic Church Every reasonable effort is made to ensure that due ac - knowledgement, when ap - propriate, is made to the originator of any image sub - mitted for publication. It is understood that those sub - mitting material for publica - tion in CSW either hold the copyright or have arranged for publication with the ap - propriate authority. Downside Inspires Adoration at St Bede’s College, Bristol S t Bede’s Catholic College in Bris - tol will be starting Adoration in its new chapel in the centre of the School, which has just been conse - crated by the Bishop of Clifton, Declan Lang. Dom Leo concelebrated Mass with the Parish Priest, Fr. Cosmos Ikirodah, after which more than 400 pupils adored the Blessed Sacrament dis - played in a new monstrance. For many St Bede pupils, this was the first Ado - ration for them. The Principal, Gary Maher, has ar - ranged for Adoration to place in St Bede’s College chapel every Friday. He believes that Adoration, together with other initiatives, will strengthen School spiritually, and was most grate - ful for Downside’s support. Dom Leo was privileged to be able to present a new monstrance to St Bede’s on be - half of the monastic community at Downside Abbey. Adoration at Downside has been tak - ing place daily in the Crypt Chapel since the Feast of All Saints 2017. The Chapel is open for any - one to adore as a result of the dedica - tion to Adora - tion of regular Ador - ers. New Canons at Plymouth Cathedral Flores de Mayo and Santacruzan Festival `FLORES DE MAYO (Flowers of May) is a festival in honour of the Blessed Virgin Mary celebrated in the Philippines dur - ing the month of May. This is a very popular and traditional festival that is now celebrated in many parts of the world where many Filipinos reside. Here in the Devon & Cornwall and now in Dorset, this festival is now on its 9th year at the Diocese of Plymouth. SANTACRUZAN (Festival of the Holy Cross) - a legend and a festivity depict - ing the searching and finding of the Holy Cross by Queen Helena, ;mother of Constantine the Great, who was a new convert to Christianity. After the Cross was found in Jerusalem and brought back to Rome, it was then welcomed with a joyful celebration of thanksgiving. This celebration is very popular among the young ladies and men as well where they dress up to celebrate this thanksgiving and many ladies representing Biblical personali - ties.` The first celebra - tion in the South - west of England was in 2011 in Callington Corn - wall, 2012-2014, that at the Cathe - dral of Plymouth, 2015 -2016 in Ex - eter, 2017 in Truro and in 2018 in Torquay. EDITORIAL GUIDELINES 1) Think of the readers: If you are writing about an event, think about the readers that don’t know anything about it. Outline what happened, but focus on why people go, why it is im - portant to them, or some teaching that was given. Make sure readers learn something from your article - they don’t just want to know who was there and what snacks were available! 2) Keep it brief : Make sure you make your point - but keep it brief and punchy. 3) Pictures: Send pictures as they are - even if they are very big to email. Don’t reduce them in size or put them inside a Word document. They look fine on the screen but terrible in the paper!

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Malmesbury Youth Group The youth group from St Aldhelm’s Malmesbury is a fantastic example of Youth Ministry in a rural parish in the Clifton Dio - cese. Three years ago, a group of adults who wanted to see young people being part of the parish, met with Dave Wheat, Diocesan Coordinator of Youth Ministry to see what could be done. After around a year of planning meetings, formation and training, the group began with a simple session where young people could relax in an informal environment and en - counter different forms of catechesis and prayer. The group meets once a month with around 15-20 young people attend - ing, with the older young people taking on leadership roles for different games and activities. The volunteers dedication and caring approach to young peo - ple shows what a relatively small parish can achieve in Youth Ministry. Do you think your parish could follow the example of St Ald - helm’s? For more information contact your Diocesan Youth Team: Clifton: youth@cliftondiocese.com Portsmouth: youth@portsmouthdiocese.org.uk Plymouth: jonathan.bielawski@prcdtr.org.uk Catholic South West May 2019 3 Around the South West Diamond Jubilee for St Anthony of Padua, Broad - stone St Anthony of Padua Church in Broadstone, Dorset, will be cele - brating its Diamond Jubilee (60th) on Monday 13th May 2019. Bishop Mark will be here to celebrate Mass with all the parishioners with light refresh - ments to follow. New Stole for Lent Deacon Geoffrey Carey lost his purple stole, so the sewing group at Our Lady Star of the Sea, Wey - mouth, made him a new one in time for Lent. Divine Mercy Service A Divine Mercy ser - vice will be cele - brated at Blessed Sacrament Church on Sunday 28 April at 3.00pm. Fr John Watkins will be the celebrant and it will be preceded by confessions at 2.30pm. Refreshments will be served in the St Richard Reynolds Centre afterwards and all are welcome. Design Technology at Downside Fifth Former Teddy designs and builds a Blue - tooth-activated motorised long - board for his GCSE Design Technology course. Teddy fol - lows in the footsteps of his uncle, Gilo Cardozo, Founder and Executive Chairman of Gilo Industries in Dorset. Gilo was also a pupil at Downside, was taught Design and Technology by exactly the same dedicated staff, and went on to invent and build the Parajet aero engine which powered the famous flying car and took Bear Grylls over the top of Everest. S unday 24th March, a fine sunny morning on the eve of Lady Day, and a good number of parishioners processing with lighted candles gath - ered round the shrine of Our Lady in the new Prayer Garden at Bridport parish church. Leading the congre - gation was Canon Richard, who, accompanied by Fr Cor, Deacon Mark and servers, blessed the new shrine and prayer garden. The garden, had its begin - nings four years ago when clearing and building work for the new church exten - sion began. Canon Richard had wanted to create a prayer garden, he had in mind, the garden at La Trappe Monastery in France. Parishioners Georgette and Mark Wormleighton were commissioned to clear and tend the area which eventu - ally led to the making of the prayer garden which began in autumn 2018. Many local people walk through, lingering for a while on their journey. Canon Richard selected the beautiful statue of Our Lady and the fine wooden arch - way. All the garden furni - ture, ie. chairs, stone benches, paving, safety rails etc were purchased entirely with donations from parish - ioners as were rose bushes and shrubs in memory of their loved ones. In addition, there are plans to have the stations of the cross around the garden. On the Sunday that fell be - fore Mothering Sunday, Georgette and Mark helped the children to plant the flowers which had a yellow and purple theme - prim - roses and pansies. This yel - low and purple theme will be maintained in the garden as it is developed, adding other areas of interest and a reflection bench is planned for the centre of the lawn. It is intended that the gar - den be a place of prayer and peace, for the parish. The Prayer Garden has also gathered interest from peo - ple in the surrounding area. There is a public right of way footpath through the garden so many local peo - ple walk through, lingering for a while on their journey, admiring the beauty and peace of Our Lady’s Shrine and Prayer Garden. Pat McEvoy, Bridport New Prayer Garden in Bridport Georgette Wormleighton, who together with her husband, created the Prayer Garden. And finally... CSW Contributor finds a Pearl Esmee Nichols, a CSW reader and regular contributor, was eating an oyster bought by her husband from local fisher - men at the harbour in Weymouth, when she bit on something hard. She assumed it was a piece of shell, but to her amaze - ment it was a small pearl. Esmee was right to be amazed, only 1 in over 2000 cold water oysters have pearls. Unfortunately, the pearl was less than 2 years old and so noth - ing can be done with it. Mature pearls, which are used for jewelry, usually grow for around 5 years inside an oyster. However, it was a rare and delightful surprise! Send us your local stories - for the And Finally... section to put a smile on people’s faces! Send us your news csw@cathcom.org

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4 May 2019 Catholic South West M any years ago, I had ar - ranged to meet a friend in Leicester Square in London. Having a half an hour to spare, I visited Notre Dame de France Church, just off the Square. I was overwhelmed to find there an art exhibition by Elisabeth Wang. After I met my friend, we returned together to the Church to view the paintings in greater detail. I have been astonished by this modern artist ever since that day. Elizabeth Wang was born in 1942 and received into the Catholic Church in 1968. She was an artist, housewife and mother. She spent much of her life writing and speak - ing about prayer and the Catholic Faith. She was involved in the life of her home parish of Our Lady of Lourdes, Harpenden, particularly as a catechist. Her children are now grown-up, and Stephen, her son, is a priest in Westminster Diocese. She exhibited at the Royal Academy, and at the Royal Institute of Painters in Watercolours. She had solo exhibi - tions of religious work at Westmin - ster Cathedral, the Bar Convent Museum (York), the Conference Rooms at St Pauls Bookshop, and at Notre Dame de France church, Lon - don. Many of her paintings are pub - lished alongside her religious writings. Elizabeth Wang is also the founder of Radiant Light, a movement within the Catholic Church. It seeks to en - courage people to grow in holiness by believing and living the Catholic faith in its fullness. Jesus Christ Himself is `the radiant light of God`s glory` (Heb 1:3). Every aspect of the work of Radiant Light is dedicated to upholding the teaching of the Catholic Church. Visit the webpage of Radiant Light and explore the rich contents. The online Art Gallery contains over 5000 works of art, and most have a Christian theme. All the images can be used for non- commercial purposes. There is a wonderful lesson for pupils which can be downloaded by teachers. I have found Radiant Light generous to a fault in allowing the use of the contents of its Art Gallery. One of my favourite paintings by Elisabeth Wang is that of the Ascen - sion. Have a look at this work of art shown here. I have examined in de - tail several famous paintings of the Ascension, which are inspirational and prayerful in their own way, but in all of them, there is a vast differ - ence between this world and the world to which Jesus ascended. This is often depicted by light and dark - ness, i.e. the darkness of this world and the radiant light of the world of the Ascension. Elisabeth Wang shows this contrast, but with a huge difference. This is not just the Ascension of Jesus; the whole of humanity is ascending too. This is a communal Ascension. The Risen Lord is surrounded with light and with a large crowd of people coming from the face of the Earth- notice the globe. The Father momen - tarily blocks the way into heaven and the narrative of the narrow door is obvious: “Strive to enter in by the narrow door, for many, I tell you, will seek to enter in, and will not be able”. Luke 13:24 Notice the power of the left hand of Jesus. This hand points to the multi - tude. This is the hand of hospitality, of friendship and of love. Notice the wound on it, which is a profound sign of salvation for all. The hand with the wound is the great sign - post as found in St. John: “Greater love has no one than this, that someone lay down his life for his friends”. John 15:13. On the Feast of the Ascension this year, on Thursday 30th April, look at the painting, then read the scrip - tures for the feast, Acts 1:1-11, Eph - esians 1:17-23, Hebrews 9:24-28:19-23 (Alternative Second Reading but enriching to read it) and Luke:46-53. Now meditate on the painting again, placing yourself in the vast crowd approaching the narrow door from the Earth. Allow yourself a moment to be mindful of the hand of hospitality. Elizabeth Wang died in 2016, and she too is in the crowd. Brush Strokes By Fr Tom Grufferty Mindfulness of the Feast of the Ascension

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Buckfast Abbey Trust Registered Charity number 232497 Saturday 6th July 2019 10am 4pm Buckfast Abbey Trust Registered Charity number 232497 S U M M E R FAIR Food & Craft Food & Craft Local food and craft producers Live cookery demonstrations PLUS live entertainment At Buckfast Abbey F R EE EN T R Y THE GRANGE RESTAURANT & TEA ROOM F R EE PAR K I NG Hot & col d drinks tent For up to date information www.buckfast.org.uk / whats-on A great family day out! www.buckfast.org.uk Car Parks and Entry to The Abbey is free. You can always phone us on (01364) 645506 or email on bookshop@buckfast.org.uk Buckfast Abbey Shops Bookshop, Gift Shop, Monastic Shop Come and see the variety of religious books, Christian resources, Cards, Jewellery, CD’s, DVD’s, ideal gifts! Also our interesting range of Monastic produce from across Europe. PLUS - items from local artisans including delicious fudge made by the monks of Buckfast Abbey. Catholic South West May 2019 5 Poetry Corner G o placidly amid the noise and haste, and remember what peace there may be in si - lence. As far as possible without surrender be on good terms with all persons. Speak your truth quietly and clearly; and listen to others, even the dull and the ignorant; they too have their story. Avoid loud and aggressive persons, they are vexations to the spirit. If you compare yourself with others, you may become vain and bitter; for always there will be greater and lesser persons than yourself. Enjoy your achievements as well as your plans. Keep interested in your own career, however hum - ble; it is a real possession in the changing fortunes of time. Exercise caution in your business affairs; for the world is full of trickery. But let this not blind you to what virtue there is; many persons strive for high ideals; and everywhere life is full of heroism. Be yourself. Especially, do not feign affection. Neither be cynical about love; for in the face of all aridity and disenchantment it is as perennial as the grass. Take kindly the counsel of the years, gracefully surrendering the things of youth. Nurture strength of spirit to shield you in sudden misfortune. But do not distress yourself with dark imaginings. Many fears are born of fatigue and loneliness. Beyond a wholesome discipline, be gentle with yourself. You are a child of the universe, no less than the trees and the stars; you have a right to be here. And whether or not it is clear to you, no doubt the universe is unfolding as it should. Therefore be at peace with God, whatever you conceive Him to be, and whatever your labors and aspirations, in the noisy confusion of life keep peace with your soul. With all its sham, drudgery, and broken dreams, it is still a beautiful world. Be cheerful. Strive to be happy. Max Ehrmann, Desiderata, Copyright 1952. DESIDERATA by Max Ehrmann T rapped deep within the limitations of my under - standing of love and for - giveness I cower on the ocean floor. Protected by the hard but porous shell of ignorance and insecurity, pinning me down with memories of the present and the past I exist without meaning or purpose. Piscine bubbles rising to the sur - face are my only link to the things that I strive to feel and understand as my feathery gills filter the mass of experiences and sensations of my earthly life to try and interpret a purposeful meaning. A single word – SAVIOUR – perme - ates the fissures in my shell and my primitive but overpoweringly grateful and receptive mind floods with sensations of belief and self- knowledge. I am free at last, released from my bonds, to ascend through the dark blue of the ocean depths to the lighter expanse of blue sky and the glory of redemption and the joy and promise of eternal love em - bracing me now and forever. Competition Write about this picture by Elizabeth Johnson Devon Next Time Write about this picture. Whatever it means to you. Your thoughts, your rules! Just no more than 200 words. Include your name and where you are from. Please send entries to csw@cathcom.org

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6 May 2019 Catholic South West Scripture Focus On 14th May we celebrate the feast of the apostle, St Matthias. His claim to fame is that he was the replacement for Judas Iscariot, the be - trayer of Jesus. Hardly an appealing role! It was bad enough that the Master had been crucified. The leading apostle Peter had denied him. Other apostles had run away. Only the holy women stayed with Jesus to the end, along with the beloved disciple. Worst of all, one of Jesus’ twelve chosen apostles was the person who be - trayed Jesus. We do not know why Judas Iscariot handed Jesus over to his enemies. Was he disappointed in his expectations of Jesus? Did he want a Messiah who would conquer rather than one who would suffer? Indeed, was he trying to pro - voke Jesus into displaying his power over the Romans? Some have explained his name (Iscariot) as meaning that he belonged to a group called the dagger-men, in Latin: Sicarii. In first-century Judea, these nationalist bandits engaged in violent activity to harass the Romans and their supporters. Whatever his motivation, Judas himself had come to a sad end. Regretting his role in the arrest of Jesus, he handed back the money and killed himself. Jesus’ original group of twelve apostles had lost one of its number, following the worst form of treachery. What would the apostles do now? They could not undo the past. The gospels admit honestly that one of Jesus’ clos - est friends betrayed him to death. Yet Jesus’ resurrection offered a new beginning for the apostles. Hope had tri - umphed over despair. Life had been victorious over death. Under the leadership of St Peter, the group of Jesus’ fol - lowers decided to select a replacement for Judas. And the first chapter of the Acts of the Apostles tells us that Matthias was selected to fill the gap. The group of believers began by considering the qualities needed in an apostle. They were looking for a person of suitable experience—present faithfully since the time of John the Baptist at the outset of Jesus’ ministry. They were also seeking someone to be witness to the Lord’s resurrection. In a miraculous way, God had turned human failure into the means for our redemption. After discussions, they selected two worthy candidates to present before the Lord. Like the Israelites choosing their first king (1 Samuel 10:20-21), the community drew lots, so that God had the final say in the choice. Joseph Barsabbas, widely known as the Just Man (Justus), may have been the favoured candidate. But the lot fell on the less-known Matthias. His job was to build on the failure of all the apostles, but especially his predecessor Judas. Somehow God had used Judas’ betrayal, because on the third day after his death Jesus was seen alive again. God had triumphed over the forces of evil. The psalm gives an appropriate picture: “The stone which the builders rejected has become the corner stone. This is the work of the Lord, a marvel in our eyes.” In a miraculous way, God had turned human failure into the means for our redemption. The appointment of Matthias is a reminder to us that even at the beginning of the church, people had to cope with situations that were far from ideal. Matthias was parachuted in to a disaster area with a mission of rebuild - ing. We are also reminded that we belong within a succession, both within our families and within the church. Some who have gone before us have been great models for our lives, but others may have done harm. It is our job to fulfil our mission in the circumstances where God has put us. St Matthias gives an example for us. Scripture tells us nothing more about him apart from his selection as an apostle to replace Judas. Traditions exist that he preached the gospel in several regions. He was part of that early group who spread the good news of Jesus’ resurrection. Thus he fulfilled St Peter’s plan when proposing the selection of a successor for Judas: “He will become with us a witness to the resurrection.” “Happy are those who have not seen and yet believe.” The earliest witnesses were the twelve apostles, now in - cluding Matthias, along with many other unknown follow - ers of Jesus. They spread the news that death was not the end, because Jesus had overcome mortality. More recent witnesses to Jesus’ resurrection have handed on the faith to us. Nowadays we have not seen the risen Lord, but we believe that he is alive. “Happy are those who have not seen and yet believe.” By Fr Jeremy Corley Young people across the region attend Catholic Youth Event Over 750 young people from Clifton, Plymouth and Portsmouth were among 8,000 who attended Flame 2019 - a Catholic Youth Event held every 2 years at the SSE Arena at Wem - bley. The theme of Flame was Signifi - cance. Significance is defined as “wor - thy of attention,” “with meaning,” “important.” In terms of Scripture, it is a word which resonates deeply with God’s words from heaven at the Bap - tism of Jesus, and the Transfiguration, “You are my Beloved.” One young person from a parish in Wiltshire said ‘this has opened my eyes to my part in the Church and that I’m part of something bigger!’ One of the speakers was Archbishop Eamon Martin, the Primate of All Ire - land, who said: "You are personally called to holiness". On the journey home some of the young people from the Plymouth Dio - cese shared their #significant mo - ments. Veronica recalled the dynamic Robert Madu who highlighted the im - portance of “staying in your own lane and keeping your eye of Jesus”. Santiago, another festival-goer, com - mented on “not comparing myself with other people”. Inspiring and pow - erful lessons for our youngsters to take forward. Paddy’s #significant mo - ment came from the Catenians who shared their experiences of working across the world. He was inspired and is considering getting involved him - self.

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May 2019 edition of the Catholic South West - Page

A t this time of year, young peo - ple face the challenge of exams. Around exam time, one also hears reference to the Prayer to 17th Century St Joseph of Cupertino for success in examinations. In part, it reads: ‘O Great St Joseph of Cuper - tino who while on earth did obtain from God the grace to be asked at your examination only the questions you knew, obtain for me a like favour in the examinations for which I am now preparing.’ While it is indeed a good call – a God call – to place your preparation for, taking of, and results of your exami - nations in the hands of God, I wouldn’t recommend relying on any divine intervention to tweak the al - ready-written exam questions so that they fit in with your study plans. In recent years, exam boards have re - ceived some challenges to the results awarded, from those who believe the marks are wrong. Injustices, of course, need to be corrected; yet, I’ve not heard of any school or candidate appealing when results turn out to be significantly better than expected. The virtue of justice demands that students/exam candidates get what they deserve, no more, no less. In other words, exam results ought to truly reflect student ability and effort, as well as being an accurate measure of the standard of work presented in the exam. Probably, the most common mistake exam candidates make, is not answer - ing the question(s) set. Instead, they provide answers to questions they would like to be on the exam paper but are not actually there, hoping that what they write will somehow do. It won’t! Read the question paper care - fully, think about what it is asking of you, and then get on with it: respond to the actual question(s) asked. The Oxford Dictionary defines the word ‘examine’ as to ‘inspect (some - one or something) thoroughly in order to determine their nature or condition’. In the 16th Century, St Ig - natius of Loyola advocated examining the details of our daily lives to find God’s presence. Indeed, Ignatian Spir - ituality involves ‘finding God in all things’. The basic idea is that we can find God in everything, including the ordinary and mundane – yes, even in the taking of exams. To help achieve this awareness of God’s presence, Ignatius stressed the importance of using the Examen. It involves gratefully reviewing the events of the day with God’s help. Through regular use of the Examen, one becomes more attentive to the presence of God in one’s life, and bet - ter able to discern where God is lead - ing. It becomes a way of living. For reference, see www.ignatianspiritual - ity.com. Plymouth Diocese also has its own Ignatian Spirituality Group (See Diocesan handbook). By the age at which young people take their various examinations, many will have fallen away from the Faith. Part of the reason for this, possibly, is because they have not learnt how to attune themselves to God’s presence in the ordinary events of their up - bringing, schooling, friendships, joys and struggles. When exam results get published this August, at which time schools and colleges parade their academic suc - cesses, one wonders how many stu - dents moving on to the next stage in their life will do so with little or no awareness of God working in their lives. That’s a shame. As 4th Century St Augustine eventually learnt, dis - cerning God’s call and responding to it, is to follow what one’s heart truly desires. ‘Thou hast made us for thy - self, O Lord, and our heart is restless until it finds its rest in thee.’ Learning to find God in the ordinary events of life is, perhaps, the most valuable and life-changing qualifica - tion we can help our youth to achieve. The subject matter of the Examen is ‘your life’. Remember, answer the questions set: Where is God in your life? What is God asking of you? Education - Exams by Paul Dixon World Dishes Koulourakia (Greek butter biscuits) These Greek biscuits taste like shortbread but are not quite as sweet. Especially lovely with coffee. Ingredients Serves: 48 • 225g butter, softened • 150g caster sugar • 1 egg • 1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract • 1/2 teaspoon almond extract • 275g plain flour • 1 egg, beaten Method Prep: 30min › Cook:10min › Ready in:40min 1. Preheat the oven to 200 C / Gas mark 6. Grease baking trays or line with parchment. 2. In a medium bowl, cream together the butter, sugar and egg until smooth. Stir in the vanilla and almond extracts. Blend in the flour to form a dough. you may have to knead by hand at the end. Take about a teaspoon of dough at a time and roll into twists, `S` shapes or wreaths. If the dough is too wet, you may need to add extra flour to make the rolling easier. 3. Place cookies 2 to 5cm apart onto the prepared trays. Brush with beaten egg. 4. Bake for 10 minutes in the preheated oven, or until lightly browned and firm. Catholic South West May 2019 7 The Latin Mass Society www.lms.org.uk 020 7404 7284 Masses in the Extraordinary Form in Plymouth Diocese : St Edward the Confessor, Home Park Ave, Peverell, PLYMOUTH PL3 4PG Sundays 11.30am Sung Mass Blessed Sacrament Church, Fore Street, Heavitree, EXETER EX1 2QJ Third Sundays. 3pm Sung Mass No Mass Easter Sunday St Cyprian’s Chapel, Ugbrooke House, CHUDLEIGH, Devon TQ13 0AD 4th Sundays 3.00pm Sung Mass (1) No Mass in the month of May Lanherne Convent, St Mawgan, NEWQUAY, Cornwall TR8 4ER Sundays at 7.40am Weekdays at 8.00am Sung Mass Our Lady’s, Old Mill Lane, MARNHULL, Dorset DT10 1JX Thursday 13th June 12 noon Low Mass Our Lady of Lourdes & St Cecilia, White Cliff Mill Street, BLANDFORD FORUM DT11 7BN Saturday 4th May 12 noon (Holy English and Welsh Martyrs). Any questions contact Maurice Quinn (LMS Rep, Devon and Dorset) on either : Email : devon@lms.org.uk Mob. 07555536579 Do you want to advertise? If so contact Janet on 01440 730399 janett@cathcom.org

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May 2019 edition of the Catholic South West - Page

8 May 2019 Catholic South West Priests’ Profile F r Cornelis Hooijmaijers sm retired to Bridport from the Solomon Islands in November 2017. He had spent 56 years of his ministry working in the Solomon Islands as a missionary priest. The Solomon Islands are in the South Pacific, nearest neighbour Papua New Guinea. The climate is tropical, hot and humid. Father Cor was born in Rotterdam in 1934, the third of five children. He survived the carpet bombing of Rotterdam at the out - break of WW2 when the Netherlands came under German occupation. When he was 9 years old his father died. To help his mother cope, the parish priest sug - gested that he and his brother be taken into a boys home. Life was very hard and the population of Holland suffered starvation during the ‘hunger winter’ of 1944-45. In 1946, when he was 12 he entered the minor seminary of the Marist Fathers, then progressed to their major seminary. He was ordained in Lievelde, in 1959, by Bishop Mangers sm. In 1962 he went to the Solomons to begin his mission work - first, as assistant priest in Avu Avu on Guadalcanal, then to Wainoni Bay on San Christobal and then to Rohinari on Malaita, as parish priest. In 1974 he became the first Chancellor of the Diocese of Honiara, holding that post until his retirement in 2017. He built up an efficient and well respected Chancery Office staffed entirely by local women, all of whom he trained from scratch. Many of his staff stayed working with him for 30 or 40 years. Fr Cor also undertook essential develop - ment work throughout the Solomons as well as parish and prison ministry. He loved his years working in the Solomon Islands and was delighted when two of his staff came to Bridport for several weeks last year. Fr Cor Hooijmaijers SM By Pat McEvoy Fr Cor with the Governor General and family, Solomon Islands, 2017 Below are various fact and figures. One is not true - see if you can work out which one is Fake News! The answer is at the bottom - just so you know that all the others are true. Big-Bang theory was proposed by a Catholic priest, Monsignor Georges • Lemaitre. Over the past 100 years, the number of Catholics around the world as • tripled from 291 million in 1910 to 1.1 billion in 2010. It was the Catholic Church that added modern-day chapters and num - • bered verses to the Bible. Anyone can baptise in an emergency situation (such as a car crash). • Any person, Catholic or not, can pour the water and say the words. The only requirement is to follow the wishes of the person you are baptis - ing. The Catholic Church has had 235 Popes from Peter to Pope Francis - on • average each Papacy lasts eight and a half years long. The first black person to be documented as a saint in the Roman • Catholic Church was known as Saint Maurice (a.k.a. St. Mauritius or St. Moritz). He was a 3rd-century Roman soldier born in Egypt who was martyred when he refused to massacre Christians for the Roman Em - pire. While there is no definitive “head count,” based on history, the Roman • martyrology, and Orthodox sources, scholars estimate that there are over 10,000 saints and beati (“blesses ones”). The tradition of honouring saints actually came from the Jews who had • a long-standing tradition of honouring prophets and holy people with shrines. The fish, or ICHTHUS, is the symbol used by early Christians to identify • themselves in times of persecution. In Greek, ICHTHUS ( ΙΧΘΥΣ ) is a monogram for the first five letters of the words “Jesus Christ Son of God, Saviour.” Facts, Figures and Fake News Fake News: There have been 266 Popes - making the average Papacy seven and a half years long.

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May 2019 edition of the Catholic South West - Page

Catholic South West May 2019 9 CSW looks at Salvation Background The word Salvation originated in En - glish around 1200AD. It’s original Christian meaning is, "the saving of the soul,". It isfrom Old French sal - vaciun and directly from Late Latin salvationem (nominative salvatio , a Church Latin translation of Greek so - teria, noun of action from past par - ticiple stem of salvare "to save" Church Teaching In the Catholic theological under - standing of salvation, after the Fall, humanity was "wounded by sin", and "stands in need of salvation from God". God invites us to enter into re - lationship with Him, and grace (Di - vine help), which is a gift from God, helps us to respond to this invitation by believing in Christ and the truth of the Catholic Church. Christ died as a satisfaction for human`s offence against God`s hon - our, committed by human sinful be - havior. Baptism is necessary for salvation. It erases original sin, unites the person with Jesus Christ, infuses grace or Divine help, and gives him justification. When one is baptised, one is saved. Christ can work apart and before the Sacra - ment of Baptism, as desire for even - tual baptism is grace enough to be saved, since God is not tied to the salvation of persons by means only of his instituted sacraments. To maintain salvation and grace, one has to perform good works and par - ticipate in the sacraments. “Total salvation of the body and of the soul is the final destiny to which God calls all of humanity...Founded in faith, sustained by hope, and working in charity, with the example of Mary, Mother of the Savior and first among the saved, we are certain that ‘our citizenship is in heaven, and from it we also await a savior, the Lord Jesus Christ.’” Placuit Deo (It Has Pleased God) Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith, March 2018 Putting the cart before the horse E xistentialism, like most long words, is easier to understand than to spell. The basic idea of is that our nature is shaped by our actions as we progressively become the ever-evolving sum of our acts. We make of ourselves what we are. Existentialism per se denies that we inherit any features or traits. We start life as a blank sheet of paper, nothing inherited, nothing innate. That obviously puts Chomsky and Saussure in op - posing corners of the ring: one in the blue corner, one in the red. In the same way that any parent recognises family traits in their offspring – what with wee Johnny having Aunt Maud’s eyes and bad temper - Catholic existentialism maintains that we can and that we do inherit, that we are born in an image but that we are still the ar - chitects of what we become: free will within firmly dictated parame - ters. I go along with that. The idea of inheriting yet indepen - dently evolving must surely apply also to society, composed as it is of its constituent members. Soci - ety then will also develop over time as it runs its trans-genera - tional relay race, the baton of in - heritance being passed down through the ages. ‘Approximately one in ten of the UK’s population is Catholic’ The term ‘society’, a short um - brella word, which therefore has wide breadth and profound depth of application covering a host of meanings, can refer to a basic family unit – such as a husband and wife – or a larger family unit or group, association, team, club, tribe, sect, nation, union or what - ever congeries, each with its re - spective terms of association, its code of behaviour, its rules of membership, its allegiance, its protocol, its ‘understanding’ among members. And all the while any such form of society act and behave, so will its nature and character evolve. Nothing can be made to stand still. Problems arise when the member of any social group rejects the col - lective rules to which they have subscribed yet they may still want or even demand the freedoms – fa - cilities, opportunities, benefits, en - titlements and protection – offered by membership. They forget that with entitlement comes responsi - bility. The freedoms we traditionally enjoy, inherent in British society, inherited over time, have been largely fought for and won on Christian principles. People forget that point. The irony these days is that, under the protection of the inherited Christian principles of tolerance, there are vociferous mi - nority voices within society bent on destroying the safeguards which the majority of us support in protecting the wellbeing of each and every one of us. ‘A politician’s focus can readily go off target’ Approximately one in ten of the UK’s population is Catholic, slightly more than the Asian popu - lation, yet the Catholic lobby – putting aside other Christian com - munities – is largely ignored, often criticised, readily mocked and even condemned or attacked – in what can otherwise be a minority- sensitive or even minority-ob - sessed society. A politician’s focus can readily go off target with disproportionate favour in our entitlement-heavy, responsibil - ity-light world towards numeri - cally smaller, noisier and often destructive interests. It`s not for me to delve deep into a philosophical treatise. God forbid! But we don’t need one. To my mind it’s better that the horse keeps pulling the cart … and cer - tainly before the one, by its very actions, evolves existentially into the other. View from the Pew By Dr Jay Kettle-Williams

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May 2019 edition of the Catholic South West - Page

10 May 2019 Catholic South West T R A V E L I N S U R A N C E arranged for readers of Catholic South West A N N U A L T R A V E L I N S U R A N C E AVAILABLE TO ANYONE UP TO 85 YEARS OF AGE. MOST PRE-EXISTING MEDICAL CONDITIONS ACCEPTED T O P Q U A L I T Y C O V E R With a 24 hour helpline and an air ambulance get-you-home service. Mention this advert to get a Special Catholic South West discount. Don’t forget we also offer SINGLE-TRIP COVER, with no maximum age limit and up to £20,000 cancellation cover per couple. CALL FOR DETAILS AND PRICES 0116 272 0500 Real people - not nachines! 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BOOK ONLINE & SAVE £10 ­ Funding Bids ­ Cost Planning ­ Condion Surveys ­ Project Management ­ Principal Designer Services ­ Advice on Internal Remodelling Hookway Surveyors ­ proud to support Diocesan Schools and Academies I n August 2017, the Rector of the Shrine of Our Lady at Walsingham offered an idea to the leadership team at the Shrine. To rededicate England as the Dowry of Mary. In order to prepare the nation for this rededication a preparation period of two years was proposed. In this period the statue of Our Lady of Walsingham would be taken to every Cathedral in England and Wales. This idea was subsequently proposed by the Rector, Mgr John Ar - mitage, to the Catholic Bishops of England and Wales. They ac - cepted it, but it was to be confined to England which is the Dowry of Mary. The idea was then taken to the Guild of Our Lady of Ransom which has a principle mission as ‘The Conversion of England and Wales’. The Guild has been instrumental in spreading devotion to Our Lady of Walsingham and in helping rebuild the shrine. As a result they became the principle sponsors of the Tour. In January 2018 the Rector wrote to every Catholic Bishop in England and subsequently to every Cathedral Dean confirming the Tour and asking for dates to hold a triduum of prayer in every Cathedral. The triduum would begin on a Thursday around 5pm and conclude with a midday Mass on Saturday. This would enable the statue of Our Lady to be back in the Slipper chapel for Sunday when we always attract large numbers of pilgrims. In spring 2018 the Dowry Tour team at Walsingham were very busy working out how the tour would look. After some deliberation it was agreed that we would take an exhibition detailing the history of the Dowry and the Shrine. However, there was a very crucial ele - ment missing. As we studied both the history of the Dowry and the history of the shrine it became very clear that the Walsingham message was really about a house. Our Lady led Richeldis in spirit to Nazareth and showed her the house where the angel had greeted her: “Look, daughter,” said Our Lady, “take the measurements of this house and erect another like it in Walsingham, dedicated to praising and honouring me. All who come there shall find help in their need. It shall be a perpetual memorial to the great joy of the Annuncia - tion, ground and origin of all of my joys, and the root of humanity’s gracious redemption. This came about through Gabriel’s message that I would be a mother through my humility, and conceive God’s Son in virginity.” We had no idea what the original house looked like, but we used our imagination. So when we head out to each Cathedral we take the Slipper Chapel statue of Our Lady of Walsingham, a Holy House which houses the statue, an exhibition, and a shop. Backstage The idea behind the Dowry Tour by Derek Williams Notre Dame Rises Again Rebuilding out of the Ashes As the flames rose high above Notre Dame and the 850 year old spire colapsed creating what looked like an explosion, it seemed impossi - ble for anything inside to sur - vive. At that point the world was wondering whether the walls would hold or would everything collapse. It seems unbelievable that the cross, the altar and even the stained glass could survive the fire. Whilst so much history, art - work and holy objects were lost - so much survived. As pictures emerged of charred beams and rubble lying in front of the altar, the cross and the stained glass which looked earily empty but un - touched, the front pages of the secular UK papers de - scribed it as a miracle. Added to this was the hero - ism of a Catholic priest - Fr Jean-Marc Fournier - who risked his life to run in and out of the Cathedral while it was on fire to rescue some of the most important artefacts. The most precious items in - cluded the Crown of Thorns worn by Jesus and the tunic of St Louis who brought the Crown of Thorns to Paris and was canonised in 1297. Frag - ments of the Cross and a nail also survived the fire. After the fire, in the debris left be - hind, a copper rooster was found which contains the relics for the protection of Paris. President Macron said Notre Dame will be rebuilt even more beautifully than it was before. A sign that our tradi - tion, our history and our faith is alive and continues to grow despite the problems we face. Please Support Our Advertisers They Support Us!

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Catholic South West May 2019 11 Portsmouth Cathedral From Thursday 4th to Sunday7th April 2019, the statue of Our Lady of Wals - ingham from the Slipper Chapel at the Catholic National Shrine of Our Lady in Walsingham visited St John`s Cathe - dral as part of the Dowry of Mary Tour around all the Catholic Cathedrals in England in preparation for the Re-ded - ication of England as Mary`s Dowry in 2020. We give thanks for the many graces received from the visit during which a packed programme of talks on the Dowry of Mary, Marian devotions and, of course, celebrations of the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass took place. The image arrived on Thursday when Fr Smith, Cathedral Dean, celebrated Mass and crowned the image. On Fri - day, Fr John Maunder from St Agatha`s Landport, just down the road from the Cathedral celebrated the lunchtime Mass in the Cathedral which was of - fered in the distinctive Ordinariate Use of the Roman Rite; the first time this form has been offered in the Cathedral. Then in the evening, I cele - brated a Votive Mass of Our Lady of Walsingham which concluded with the Act of Consecration to Our Lady. On Saturday, we welcomed Dom Cuthbert Brogan OSB, Abbot of Farnborough to celebrate the lunchtime Mass. Dowry of Mary Tour Plymouth Cathedral The statue of Our Lady of Walsing - ham will be at the Cathedral in Ply - mouth this month, from 16-18 May. Thursday 5.00 pm - Opening Rosary of inter - cession 6.00 pm - Solemn Holy Mass & pro - cession, Main celebrant: Bishop Mark O’Toole 7.15 pm - 8.00 pm Talk: Dowry of Mary, Mgr John Armitage Friday 9.00 am - Rosary & Litany of Saints 11.00 am - Schools’ Holy Mass Main celebrant: Mgr John Armitage 12.00 pm - Angelus 2.00 pm - Rosary for vocations 2.50 pm - Adoration & Divine Mercy Chaplet Sacrament of Reconciliation available 4.00 pm - Holy Mass i(Ordinariate Rite) 5.00 pm - Talk: Dowry of Mary by Mgr John Armitage 6.00 pm - Angelus and Holy Mass Main celebrant: Canon Mark O’Keeffe 6.45 pm - 8,00 pm Eucharistic heal - ing service and Benediction Saturday 9.10 am - Rosary & Litany of Saints 10.00 am - Adoration Sacrament of Reconciliation available 11.10 am Talk Dowry of Mary by Mgr John Armitage 12.00pm Mass of Our Lady of Walsingham Clifton Cathedral For those in the Clifton Diocese you will have to wait until 20th - 22nd February 2020 until the Dowry Tour comes to Clifton Cathedral. For more info see www.dowrytour.org.uk New contemporary and traditional stained glass designed, made and fitted. Professional repairs and restoration. Website: customstainedglass.co.uk Email: wayne.ricketts@btconnect.com Tel: 0117 955 5390 Wayne Ricketts Stained Glass A Prayer to the Virgin Mary This is a prayer that is never known to fail, a prayer for a very special intention, in your most needed time, so this is not your everyday prayer. Oh most beautiful flower of Mount Carmel, fruitful vine, splendour of heaven. Blessed Mother of the Son of God, Immaculate Virgin, assist me in my necessity. Oh star of the sea, help me show herein, you are my Mother. Oh Holy Mary, Mother of God, Queen of heaven and earth! I humbly beseech you from the bottom of my heart to succour me in this necessity (say your intention) . There are none that can withstand your power, oh show me herein that you are my Mother. Oh Mary, conceived without sin, pray for us who have recourse to Thee. Holy Mother, I place this course in your hands. (Say this portion of the prayer three times). Holy Spirit, you who solve all problems, light all roads so that I can attain my goal. You who gave me the divine gift to forgive and forget all evil against me, in all instances of my life you are with me. I want, in this short prayer, to thank you for all things, as you confirm once again that I never want to be separated from you in eternal glory. Thank you for your mercy towards me and mine. After the prayer, recite nine Hail Mary’s and also you can include the “Queen of the most Holy Rosary, Pray for us.” Recite this prayer for three consecutive days and on the last day after you pray, publish it and your intention will be guaranteed. Do you want to advertise to Church-goers across the South West? If so contact Janet on 01440 730399 janett@cathcom.org

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May 2019 edition of the Catholic South West - Page

12 May 2019 Catholic South West Advertise in this space for as little as £70 Contact Janet on 01440 730399 janett@cathcom.org

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May 2019 edition of the Catholic South West - Page

Catholic South West May 2019 13

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May 2019 edition of the Catholic South West - Page

14 May 2019 Catholic South West Prayer L oving Lord, resurrection scared me stiff. Facing you, fresh and risen, broken and given, is no easy matter. I can understand why your first friends were bolted behind locked doors and were frightened out of their wits by the talk of you as really risen. After all, it’s much easier to cope with a dead body than to follow you marked for life. Living, yes, living in a resurrection world means always a fuller-frontal facing of you, Lord. You look me straight in the eye and say ‘Do you love me?’ You look me straight in the eye and say ‘Peace be with you’. You look me straight in the eye and say ‘Follow me’. You look me straight in the eye and say ‘You’ll do greater things than I.’ You look me straight in the eye and say ‘I forgive you’. Loving Lord, your resurrection, livingness and lovingness is so overpowering, too much for me to take on board. Heart-busting. Mind-boggling. I can only take a little at a time. Loving Lord, and when I hear you saying to me ‘I am sending you’ it’s all too much. Why pick on me? Why not pass me by and let the next person be your messenger? Yes, you make demands that are demanding. It’s no pretence, this resurrection world, it colours all I am and can. it centres me on you, Lord. Loving Lord, and the same Good News is true for each man, woman and child. Yet how slow each one of us is to really listen to this astonishing Good News – that your rising makes all the dif - ference to how I see the world around me, and in particular how I see the indi - viduals around me. Resurrection rings new bells. It means each of us is called to greatness. It means each of us meant to be an encourager. It means a re-awakening of our very selfhood as gift to be ever more fully re - ceived and as task to be worked at more eagerly. It means the end of complacency, the end of compromise. It means a new start, a new vision, a new hope, a new horizon, a new world. Risen, Loving Lord, let me see again. Amen. by Fr Denis Blackledge QUOTES The best time to plant a tree was 20 years ago. The sec - ond best time is now. Chinese Proverb  For beautiful eyes, look for the good in others, for beautiful lips, speak only words of kindness, and for poise, walk with the knowledge that you are never alone. Audrey Hepburn  Good, better, best. Never let it rest, ‘Until your good is better and your better is best.’ St Jerome  Happiness radiates like the fragrance from a flower and draws good things towards you. Marharishi Mahesh Yogi  A little nonsense now and then, is relished by the wisest men. Roald Dahl  A tree is known by its fruit; a man by his deeds. A good deed is never lost; those who sow courtesy reap friendship, and those who plant kindness gather love. St Basil  RISEN AND RISKY Funeral Services To Adver - tise in the Funeral Sec - tion contact Janet Took 01440 730399 janett@cathcom.org

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DOMESTIC ABUSE IN CHURCH COMMUNITIES A safe pastoral response Nikki Dillon Keane Redemptorist Publications, 82 pages, pbk, 2018, £4.99 The author is a counsellor with exten - sive experience in the field of domes - tic abuse. She has written a superb, sensitive and sensible book on this life-and-death issue. In ten brief chap - ters she begins by explaining what do - mestic abuse is, who is affected by it, how it happens, and how to under - stand spiritual abuse. Areas covered include feeling scared by a partner, how to help someone else, how to cre - ate a safe helping environment, and how to give appropriate spiritual sup - port. She moves into the delicate area of working with perpetrators, as well as self-care and safety for helpers. She ends by providing organisations, re - sources, and further reading material. Domestic abuse is potentially fatal. Domestic violence, intimate partner vi - olence, domestic violence and abuse are defined in law, and there is vic - tim/survivor and perpetrator. In 2013 the UK government defined domestic abuse as follows: “Any incident or pat - tern of incidents of controlling, coer - cive, threatening behaviour, violence or abuse between those aged sixteen or over who are, or who have been, in - timate partners or family members, re - gardless of gender or sexuality.” There is a variety of kinds of violence: psy - chological, emotional, isolation, physi - cal, sexual, economic, neglect, stalking, harassment, digital, spiritual. All are based on power and control as the central focus of any abusive rela - tionship. The shocking figures are often not known. In the UK every six seconds a woman is assaulted in her home; one in four women will experience domes - tic abuse at some point; one in four of all rapes are connected to domestic abuse; and on average two women a week are murdered by their partner or ex-partner, and up to ten women a week commit suicide as a result of such abuse. Domestic abuse can affect men and women of any age group; it happens across every culture and socio-economic group and level of ed - ucation; and is often unrecognised. People living with chronic illness or disability are twice as likely to be vic - tims. Dating abuse is increasingly common among young people. Children and the elderly are often at risk, as are people far from their country of origin, and LGBT+ communities. And one in six men ex - perience domestic abuse at some point in their life. There is a regular cycle of how such abuse develops. Perpetrators are sub - tle: they do not behave abusively at the start of a relationship. There is al - most always a period of “grooming”, before chipping away at the victim’s confidence, and disrupting relation - ships with family and friends. After a so-called honeymoon period, tension builds; then an abusive incident oc - curs, followed by reconciliation. The victim may not realise that abuse is oc - curring, but there may be threats, fear of death, combined with a sense of duty and having nowhere to go, as well as sheer exhaustion. Various myths need to be debunked concerning perpetrators. Here is a list: they do it because they have a mental health problem; they do it because they have an alcohol or drug problem; they do it because they have anger is - sues or problems controlling their temper; they do it because of their cul - ture or religion; they do it because they were a victim of abuse in the past. There are three main forms of spiritual abuse: preventing someone from prac - tising their religion or spirituality against their will; forcing someone to practise a religion or spirituality like - wise against their will; or using a twisted form of religious or spiritual teaching to gain or maintain control over another person, or to coerce them to stay in an abusive relation - ship. There are various crass ways of colluding with spiritual abuse. The au - thor quotes eleven such pieces of so- called “advice” on page 39, which are actual quotes from actual “advice” given. They are phenomenally stupid and dangerous. In Catholic Canon Law Canon 1153 says clearly: “A spouse who occasions grave danger of soul or body to the other or to the children, or otherwise makes the common life unduly diffi - cult, provides the other spouse with a reason to leave, either by a decree of the local bishop or, if there is danger in delay, even on his or her own au - thority.” In other words, psychological, spiritual or physical abuse is sufficient reason to leave a spouse. For a spouse who is scared of his or her partner, the author lists seven things it might help to know: you are not alone; it’s not your fault; God does not want you to suffer; nothing is wrong with you; people can help; safety comes first; and you are impor - tant. When it comes to offering help, if there is immediate danger to spouse or children, call 999 straight away. If safeguarding measures are needed, follow the procedure laid down by local church or place of worship, but tell the victim/survivor of this notifica - tion. If the case is non-urgent, there is need to be aware of safety considera - tions: any intervention has the capac - ity to increase risk, so make sure what is the safest method of contact. Perpe - trators, for example, often check mo - bile phones, or hack into email accounts. It often takes a team of pro - fessionals with different areas of ex - pertise to deal with abuse situations, but there is also an important role for non-professionals too. Certain kinds of support are not helpful: do not sug - gest anger management training for perpetrators. And do not suggest rela - tionship, couple therapy, family ther - apy or marriage enrichment programmes. Recognising the signs of domestic abuse is key. The perpetrator will ex - hibit jealousy and possessiveness, control, or imbalance of power in rela - tionship. The victim/survivor will shows signs of isolation, self-neglect, change of appearance or behaviour, fear of spouse, or physical injuries. Though perpetrators are clever, and cause injuries that cannot be seen. Reacting and responding to disclosure may be helpful or unhelpful. Unhelpful reactions include disbelief or minimi - sation; victim-blaming; feeling over - whelmed, or excessively angry; believing that the perpetrator is not that dangerous; or even trying to heal the relationship or save the marriage. By recognising these instinctive natu - ral reactions they can be overcome. Safe and helpful responding needs to be clear from the start of the kind of help you can and cannot offer: be clear about your limitations, about confidentiality, and about safeguard - ing. Give time, understanding, reassur - ance, and encourage the creation of a safety plan as you help the person ac - cess support safely. And, with permis - sion, jot down the key points shared by the victim. Check up on them, work alongside professional services, and enable the person to feel valued and believed. Helpful stories of individual victim/ survivors are dotted throughout the book. When it comes to spiritual abuse there is a distressing story of how a woman who used to go to a prayer group was abandoned by the members of the group when she left her partner who was abusing her. It is important to be familiar with the teachings of your faith about gender equality, healthy relationships and abuse, and to understand how to challenge inter - nalised spiritual abuse, and to create abuse-free communities. Sensible advice is provided about never approaching a perpetrator, as this may put the victim/survivor at risk. And what to do should a perpe - trator approach you to ask for help, plus rules for staying safe around per - petrators. Finally, a dozen self-care tips are proposed for helpers. All in all, this is a superb practical manual, written from the heart by a counsellor with extensive experience in this delicate and difficult field. Lay a foundation of faith Share your faith and hope with future generations by leaving a gift in your Will to a Catholic cause. “On this rock I will build my church, and the powers of death shall not prevail against it.” Matthew 16:18 Your legacy gift means the things you care about in life continue into the future. Provide the building blocks for tomorrow’s churches and schools Plant the seed of faith in children Share God’s love and care with those most in need Your Catholic Legacy is a group of 27 organisations. You can choose the causes you feel most passionate about and make a difference to many people’s lives. To find out more, visit yourcatholiclegacy.org.uk or call 020 7095 5370 ● ● ● Catholic South West May 2019 15 © Denis Blackledge SJ

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Page 16

May 2019 edition of the Catholic South West - Page

16 May 2019 Catholic South West T h e A n n u a l N o v e n a i n h o n o u r o f S t R i t a o f C a s c i a p a t r o n o f t h e h e l p l e s s begins at St. Rita’s Centre, Honiton, Devon on 14 th May and finishes with Mass at 12 noon on 22 nd May. Following Mass roses will be blessed for distribuon to the sick. A e r t h e f e a s t d a y b l e s s e d r o s e p e t a l s w i l l b e s e n t o u t t o t h o s e w h o r e q u e s t t h e m . To join in the novena please write to: St Rita’s Promoons, St Rita’s Retreat & Conference Centre, Oery Moor Lane, Honiton, Devon EX14 1AP For more informaon: 01404 42635. Email: stritas@bnternet.com Web site: stritascentre.org You can use both sets of clues to solve the puzzle: the solutions are the same. So, if you want to try the CRYPTIC puzzle, for instance, but are unsure, use the QUICK clues to help you work out the solution. Similarly, if you try the QUICK clues, use the CRYPTIC clues to help you prove the solution CRYPTIC Across 5 Recipient of Paul`s letter that destabilized rich nation (10) 8 Philosopher`s utter pretentiousness (4) 9 Aaron`s wife is with the priest, the scoundrel son of 4? (8) 10 Principal faction of the IRA, given time (7) 11 Trifle with this 3 character, for instance (4) 13 Church composer means little in Wales (4) 15 A royal seal about to be given to a body of water (4,3) 18 Forebear little boy getting to popular jelly first (8) 19 Celtic language after humankind multiplied (4) 20 Hot stews among diverse spread in period before the fast (10) CRYPTIC Down 1 Don`s place eats up mucho euros, tovarich! (6) 2 Thiamin`s oily, but there`s no resistance in New Orleans (3,4) 3 Elevated inner area of Athens? (5) 4 Descendant of 18`s church is held in one taken- over bar (6) 6 Petra they made eat bananas mushed up (10) 7 Where Paul landed in Crete markets line the har - bour (4,6) 12 One idiot`s introduced in attempt to make a trio (7) 14 Jeremiah is sick, without yours truly, on return flight from Mecca (6) 16 3 character`s father`s contracted to follow the Lord (6) 17 I love in old Italy being on Venice`s banks, being awake (5) QUICK Across 5 Order of architecture: amateur sportsman (10) 8 Influential German idealist philosopher (1724- 1804) (4) 9 Wife of Aaron (8) 10 Dignitary presiding over a cathedral or college church (7) 11 Ninth letter of the Greek alphabet (4) 13 Family of German (Protestant) church composers (4) 15 Lake of Central Asia now only a quarter of the area it was in 1960 (4,3) 18 Youngest son of Jacob (8) 19 British language officially extinct in 1974 (4) 20 Season immediately preceding Lent (10) QUICK Down 1 ------ -on-Don: Russian city, centre for the resur - gence of Cossack nationalism (6) 2 Nickname for New Orleans (3,4) 3 Of or concerning the Greek region which encom - passes Athens (5) 4 Father of Sheba who rebelled against David (6) 6 Biblical people whose capital was Petra in mod - ern Jordan (10) 7 Port in Crete where Paul docked on his way to Rome (4,6) 12 In Christianity the union which makes up one Godhead (7) 14 Flight of Muhammad from Mecca to Medina in 622, beginning the Muslim era (variant spelling) (6) 16 Eleventh letter of the Greek alphabet (6) 17 Stir up, affect (archaic); remove (legal) (5) Across: 5 Corinthian, 8 Kant, 9 Elisheba, 10 Provost, 11 Iota, 13 Bach, 15 Aral Sea, 18 Benjamin, 19 Manx, 20 Shrovetide. Down: 1 Rostov, 2 Big Easy, 3 Attic, 4 Bichri, 6 Nabataeans, 7 Fair Havens, 12 Trinity, 14 Hejira, 16 Lambda, 17 Amove. SOLUTION

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